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Tidbits of Casper - For Advertising call 307-473-8661 • 161 South Fenway, Casper, WY

June 3 - 9, 2010

TO YOUR GOOD HEALTH By Paul G. Donohue, M.D.

Metabolic Syndrome Simplified What is Metabolic Syndrome? The Metabolic Syndrome is best defined as a clustering of closely related medical conditions which increase the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.The following features comprise metabolic syndrome that increases risk of future adult diabetes and future heart disease: • Increase blood triglyceride ( a form of fat) levels • Decreased “good” cholesterol levels (HDL cholesterol) • Overweight particularly around the abdomen • Increased blood pressure

• Increased blood glucose level If a person has been diagnosed with three of the above features they have a metabolic syndrome. This is called clustering of closely related medical conditions, by the medical field. Why is Metabolic Syndrome potentially harmful to your health? Metabolic Syndrome increases the risk of diabetes five (5) fold and heart disease by approximately three (3) fold. The metabolic syndrome is present in approximately 20% of adult populations in developed countries and in approximately 80% of people with type 2 diabetes. The level of obesity is increasing in population across the world. The occurrence of metabolic syndrome is likely to increase with the rising levels of obesity and will contribute to the epidemic of

diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is likely to have a marked impact on the prevalence of heart disease and type 2 diabetes worldwide in the next two decades. Other medical conditions such as fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, gallstones, sleep apnea and certain cancers will also increase worldwide with the increased level of obesity. The biggest impact the metabolic syndrome has on health is the increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. Obesity has been on the increase of the last few decades during which time most people have been exposed to an energy dense food supply and decreasing levels of physical activity. The metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with obesity particularly if fat is stored around the abdomen. High triglyceride levels have been found to be contributing factor of the metabolic syndrome (calories that are consumed and not burnt are converted into triglycerides and transported by the blood to the fat cells for storage). The influence of obesity on the incidence of the metabolic syndrome has also been observed in children over recent years and obesity is now an important cause of type 2 diabetes occurring in children. Some ethnic groups have a higher predisposition of central obesity than others, for example, the amount of central obesity is greater among South Asians than Europeans and is greater among Europeans than AfricanCaribbeans. Low birth weight may also increase the risk of metabolic syndrome when it is linked with obesity in adulthood.

Unlimited Potential Wellness Center Nadia Mansour-Fries RN Karen McVay RRT

Tidbits of Casper, 06/03/10  

Weekly Entertainment Publication featuring messages from local businesses.

Tidbits of Casper, 06/03/10  

Weekly Entertainment Publication featuring messages from local businesses.

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