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ALINE MAGAZI NE

Editor-in-Chief Chloe Gersten

Managing Editor Benjamin Fang

News Editor Lillian Kim On Campus Editor Yvonne Lee Entertainment Editor Cypress Yang Bai Fashion Editor Kim E. Powell Food Editor Tracy Yeung Writers Ruo Piao Chen, Eva Choi, Shirley Don, Jenifer La, Harris Leung, Sharon Lee, Lydia Kim, Ji Seo Art Director Vania Myers Photo Directors Jeffrey Ho & Michelle Yan Illustration Director Taolun Guo Illustrators Fenna Engelke, Rebecca Ko, Robert Sack Photographers Allen Chiu & Rachel Thalia Fisher Graphic Designers Heather Chang, Stanley Huang, Rika Inouye, Sarah Kim, Birani Nyanat Social Media Manager Jane Hong

Asian Eye began in 1990 as a publication dedicated to promoting awareness of cultural, social, economic, and political issues that affect Asians and Asian Americans. The magazine gradually evolved into ALINE, as the expressive voice for Asian students on the Syracuse University/SUNY-ESF campus. Contributors of all ethnicities are welcome to submit their work as well. Our main goal is to bring the Asian and Asian American experience closer to campus, and to educate the SU and larger Syracuse community on issues pertaining to race and diversity, while working to help SU accomplish its goal of a diverse and inclusive campus. This publication is an outlet for Asian and Asian American students at SU to share their perspectives on culture and society with creative freedom and editorial integrity. It provides an opportunity for students to understand the issues that affect Asian communities in the United States and beyond. ALINE is an affiliate of the campus organization, Asian Students in America (ASIA). The opinions expressed within the content of this magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of ALINE or ASIA. A-Line is published once a semester by the Syracuse Unviersity Office of Publications. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior permission from the publisher. For editorial, design, or advertising inquiries, please contact us at alinesyr@gmail.com.

ASIA E-BOARD President Sharon Lee Vice President Tracy Yeung Secretary Nancy Dong Treasurer Benita Mach Events Coordinator Samantha Chung Co-Cultural Chairs Julia Chen & Shirley Don Political Educator Chair Benjamin Fang Community Service Chair Jenifer La Public Relations Chair Claudia Chen Creative Director Vania Myers Fundraiser Shao Mei Zhang Historian Diana Chin

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EDITOR’S NOTE

CHLOE GERSTEN A wise lady told me at the beginning of the semester that being editor-in-chief is something like herding cats. My response now: it’s a good thing I like cats. When I got to Syracuse University, a new opportunity arose. For the first time in my life, I had the option to surround myself with a group of people who look like me—an option many take for granted. Contrary to popular belief, there is no Koreatown in Cincinnati, Ohio. ALINE was the first “Asian interest” organization I got involved with on campus. Asian interest refers to the issues Asians and Asian Americans face, the discussions we have, and the struggles we share. Asian interest does not mean you have to be Asian to join, read, or connect. I’ve read several honest and reflective narratives about identity. We sort through a combination of letters, hoping to string something together that fits—Asian, Asian American, Korean American, American. I struggled finding the voice of ALINE. I thought about this for almost two years and still nothing. But then I realized. ALINE does not have one side, one identity, one voice. ALINE has the voices of our editorial team, our art team, our readers, our community. How can I brand ALINE into something so restrictive, so generic? That learned sage with the cat simile was right but perhaps in a way she didn’t intend. This semester was like herding cats. Cats are independent animals with mannerisms that are as distinctive as their markings. A combination of personalities and backgrounds breathe life into this magazine. The ALINE family is made up of unique and independent people who cannot and will not be tied down, told to be one way, not the other. So, let them be cats, I say. Let them wander and explore. Let them find their independence and their individualism. Let them learn and let them discover. But every once in awhile, let them remember to turn in drafts. I invite our readers to journey through our experiences and into our minds. I hope you will see how deep our personalities flow and how wide our identities run. If I did this thing right, you’ll gain the same appreciation for ALINE that I have.

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2013 FALL 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS

LEAVING A LEGACY: A LOOK BACK AT THE ASIAN/ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM DESTINATION: ABROAD

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DESTINATION: POSTPONED

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CHINA SURPASSES U.S. IN ADULT DIABETES DIAGNOSES

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ALINE ASKED READERS FOR THE BEST EATS ACROSS THE COUNTRY AND WHERE TO FIND THEM

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SAVING FACE

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THE STATE OF ASIAN AMERICA

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VOTER DISCRIMINACY IN A POST-JIM CROW ERA

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STOP-AND-FRISK AND THE FUTURE OF NYC

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SELF-EXPRESSION VS. SELF-DENIAL

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STREET STYLE

MONEY, POWER, INFLUENCE

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’BOXERS AND SAINTS’

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YOU DON’T EVEN GO HERE: EATING LIKE A LOCAL

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BEHIND THE SCENES

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Cover illustration: Robert Sack

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Leaving a Legacy: A Look Back at the Asian/Asian American Studies Program Now that the original student-advocates for the AAA minor have graduated, it’s up to current students to guide the program to its full potential Text by Chloe Gersten

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Manan Desai, the first faculty hire specifically for the AAA program, starts first semester at SU; Prema Kurien serves as interim director while search continues

SPRING 2010

University Senate officially approves the AAA program; students are able to declare the minor the following semester

SPRING 2013

Kurien steps down as interim director; negotiations with two “serious” candidates for director position fall through at last minute

FALL 2013

Dean Greenberg forms Executive Planning Committee to oversee AAA operations

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SPRING 2014

Committee’s new program requirements goes into effect; two new AAA courses to be offered

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97 07 08 APRIL 11, 1997

A group of Asian and Asian American students are denied service and attacked at a Syracuse Denny’s restaurant

NOVEMBER 2007

Students Carina Lui, Angie Cho, and Ellee Kim propose the Transnational Asian Studies Program (TASP) at a private meeting with Chancellor Nancy Cantor and vice chancellor/provost Eric Spina

SPRING 2008

A faculty request is submitted to change TASP into Asian/Asian American Studies (AAA) and becomes the program’s official name

After another unsuccessful search, the Asian/Asian American Studies (AAA) minor remains without a director. The University has yet to hire an official, full-time program director in the five semesters AAA has been an official program. Gerry Greenberg, senior associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, formed the Executive Planning Committee to temporarily lead the program. The Committee consists of Dean Greenberg, Gina Lee-Glauser (Vice President for Research), Prof. Tej Bhatia (linguistics), Prof. Manan Desai (English), Prof. Susan Edmunds (English), Prof. Gareth Fisher (religion) and Prof. Meera Lee (linguistics). Per student requests, the Committee drafted a new curriculum for the AAA minor and will offer two new courses in Spring 2014. The Committee hopes these changes will make the minor more accessible for students and will satisfy requests for more courses specifically on Asian American studies.

Student efforts have traditionally been the driving force behind the AAA minor. Since the original proposal in 2007, students have petitioned to the University for some sort of recognition of Asian Americans through academia. In 1997, a group of Asian and Asian American students were denied service, then attacked at a local Denny’s. Syracuse District Attorney William Fitzpatrick said there was no indication the incident occurred because of the students’ race and dismissed the case. This sparked outrage among students and revealed a lack of educational opportunities at SU when it comes to Asian and Asian American issues. Carina Lui, a graduate ofthe class of 2008, was part of the original AAA proposal. “The value of the AAA program is the potential education and progress that could be achieved at SU if the program is given a real chance,” Lui said.

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DESTINATION: ABROAD

SU students are more interested in Hong Kong’s modern hustle tha Text by Sharon Lee

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1. Hong Kong | Jinny Cheung, alumnus class of 2013 2. Hong Kong | Brian Cheung, junior broadcast digital journalism & finance 3. technology 4. Beijing | Danley Hu, masters in accounting 5. Beijing | Grace Sakurada, Santa Clara University senior 6. Beijing | Fun Karei Law, former HK program assistant

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an Beijing’s deep history

. Hong Kong | Sharon Lee, senior information ng Tat Li, alumnus class of 2013 7. Hong Kong |

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or young, daring college students, the study abroad experience draws an adventure and a challenge. SU students can choose unique locations around the world but those interested in Asia choose between two cities: Beijing and Hong Kong. The SU Beijing program is located at Tsinghua University, a globally recognized and ranked university. The program is arranged so SU students are immersed with the Tsinghua students and campus. SU students are surrounded by China’s culture and history while earning a prestigious education. The SU Hong Kong program is affiliated with City University of Hong Kong (CityU), a small, local university. Though not as highly ranked as Tsinghua, CityU and SU offer students two options. The students who stay in the SU Hong Kong Center must complete an additional internship or independent study. Students can also participate in a direct enrollment at CityU and learn with local students. Hong Kong is rich with Chinese culture but has noticeable western influences. Beijing is a historical capital and Hong Kong is a fast-paced metropolis. Both are thriving Chinese cities but offer different experiences. Operating under communist rule, Beijing is notorious for its traditional living styles and government operations. Hong Kong is a densely populated community that has adopted many western traditions after more than 150 years of British occupancy that ended in 1997. While both Beijing and Hong Kong have a lot to offer, a noticeable disparity in program enrollment has developed in recent years. Mary Fedorko, the SU counselor for the Beijing and Hong Kong programs, has seen the Beijing program shrink from around 20 students per semester to the current eight-person program. The Hong Kong program has a consistent size of 45-60 students.

Fedorko mentioned Tsinghua’s recent policy change to not accept Chinese citizens as a possible explanation for the deviation. She has talked to Chinese students who chose SU because of the Beijing program at Tsinghua University. It comes down to a matter of personal preference. Hong Kong is more appealing to Jason Quiles, a junior studying finance and information management and technology, because it fits his academic schedule and he can take all his required courses. Quiles also thinks Hong Kong will be a little easier for him to adjust to. Wendy Chung, a sophomore studying international relations, believes students should be openminded and eager to learn more. “Hong Kong is really appealing to people our age because it’s super modern and has a lot of western influences,” said Chung. “You can still explore and be in your comfort zone. Beijing is a step [beyond].” Chung wants to explore the traditional Chinese culture that is not remotely similar to the West. Danley Hu, a graduate student completing his Certified Public Accountant degree, chose to study in Beijing in Spring 2012 because of Tsinghua University’s prestige. Hu wanted to leave his comfort zone but he thought Hong Kong would have been too similar to his home in New York City. He says his experience in Beijing made him more independent. Despite low enrollment numbers for Beijing, Fedorko says both programs will continue to run in coming years. The SU Abroad office has been doing more on-campus recruitment—giving presentations in various Chinese Studies and Asian/Asian American Studies classes and tabling in different academic buildings. Past SU Beijing alumni are spreading awareness of Beijing’s opportunities in areas like business and arts. The SU Abroad office has already seen more Beijing applications for next semester.

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DESTINATION: POSTPONED

For Pasang Lhamo, studying abroad comes with unexpected challenges Text by Yvonne Lee Photos by Michelle Yan

My trip was not supposed to be political. It was about getting a world experience and learning about a different culture to gain a deeper understanding.

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Pasang Lhamo waited outside the Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China in New York City for hours, hoping to get her student visa. Lhamo’s plans were set—she was accepted into the SU Beijing program, classes were selected, housing was arranged and flights were booked. All Lhamo needed was her visa. But as her departure date drew closer, she grew increasingly nervous. Lhamo’s Tibetan background had apparently prompted additional security checks because of the complex relations between Tibet and China. The relationship can only be described as highly contentious—China states that Tibet is part of its territory while Tibet considers itself an autonomous region. There have been many violent conflicts between Tibetan protestors and the Chinese government. Lhamo was disappointed by the additional scrutiny but understood the Chinese government’s concerns of possible Tibetan activism affiliation. SU Beijing counselor Mary Fedorko describes the Chinese student visa application process as relatively simple. However, Lhamo’s file was assigned to a specific caseworker. She later learned that her caseworker was on vacation

and wouldn’t return until after the program started. Though Lhamo anticipated roadblocks, she was still disappointed when she didn’t get her student visa. “I was expecting problems and I knew it wasn’t going to be easy,” Lhamo said. “I assumed after my background check, they would realize there’s nothing wrong with me or my family that wouldn’t let me go in to study.” Lhamo and Fedorko reached out to other Chinese embassies in the US but because Boston, Lhamo’s hometown, fell under the New York City consulate’s jurisdiction, no other embassy could help her. Lhamo’s caseworker was the only person who could approve her application. As a public relations and policy studies major, Lhamo wanted to learn more Chinese in hopes to someday work on international development in Tibet. “My trip was not supposed to be political. It was about getting a world experience and learning about a different culture to gain a deeper understanding,” Lhamo said. Despite her experience, Lhamo remains optimistic and is reapplying to the Spring 2014 Beijing program.

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China Surpasses US in Adult Diabetes Diagnoses The Journal of the American Medical Association released in September 2013 that 11.6% of China’s adults suffer from diabetes Text by Jenifer La Infographic by Chloe Gersten

5.1%

30% WORLDWIDE CHINA ACCOUNTS FOR

OF ALL DIABETIC PATIENTS

of the Asian American population is diabetic.

According to Dr. William Hsu, Co-Director of the Asian American Diabetes Initiative at the Joslin Diabetes Center, "Asian descents need to carefully guard their weight because their risk of developing diabetes rises sharply even with a small amount of weight gain above the target appropriate for their ethnicity."

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ALINE asked readers for the best eats across the country and where to find them

Sichuan Kabob @ Peter Chang’s Tasty China II in Atlanta, GA; photo by Nan Ding

Cronut @ Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York, NY; photo by JJ He

Rainbow Roll @ Wonderful Sushi in San Diego, CA; photo by Heather Chang

Nitro Ice Cream @ The Bazaar in LA, CA; photo by Tim Huynh

Lobster Roll @ Lobster Joint in Manhattan, NY; photo by Rebecca Ng

Pork Bibimbop @ Urban Seoul in Irvin, CA; photo by Tim Huynh

BBQ Ribs @ Phil’s BBQ in San Diego, CA; photo by Heather Chang

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Ramen Burger @ Smorgasburg in Brooklyn, NY; photo by Alice Zhu

California Greek Salad @ Daphne’s California Greek in San Diego, CA; photo by Heather Chang

Hamburger and Fries @ In N Out in San Diego, CA; photo by Heather Chang

Pork Belly Tacos @ Urban Seoul in Irvine, CA; photo by Tim Huynh

Cheesecake Tarts @ Eileen’s Cheesecake in New York, NY; photo by Benita Mach

Cupcakes @ Georgetown Cupcake in New York, NY; photo by Nan Ding

Wagyu Yakiniku w/ Egg @ Pepper Lunch USA in Milpitas, CA; photo by Jane Hong

Wontons w/ Hot Sauce @ White Bear in Flushing, NY; photo by Tony Lau

Pork Ramen @ Minca in New York, NY; photo by Alan Cheng

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saving face Strong reactions follow Julie Chen’s daytime TV confession but mask the underlying problem Text by Ji Seo Illustration by Fenna Engelke

On September 11, 2013, the Chinese American journalist and well-known television anchor Julie Chen took a segment on her show, ‘The Talk,’ to reveal a long-held secret. Chen admitted to her co-hosts that she had undergone cosmetic surgery almost 20 years ago to make her “Asian eyes” appear larger. She chose to have the procedure done so she could advance a career in doing what she loved without looking, as many agencies claimed, “dull” and “uninterested” on-screen. Some Asian American audiences empathized with Chen and applauded her courage in starting a conversation about the ways Asian Americans must give up or alter their identities to be accepted or advance their careers in America. Others were outraged, calling her weak, bitten by the “self-hate and white-worship bug,” and accusing Chen of being “ashamed of her Chinese heritage.” According to Hub Brown, Newhouse associate dean for research, creativity, international initiatives and diversity, “The problem is us.” Brown pointed out the industry’s inherent flaw by emphasizing that this is quite an “unfortunate event” and that she only “acted accordingly” to what news directors, who are big influences in the field, strongly suggested to her. Brown continued to bring attention to the “Eurocentric look” of people

on television, especially women. He said that this problem is not “uniquely American,” but is, “distinctively American.” Brown doesn’t think enough has changed in the past 20 years to be able to say that this occurs any less frequently now. Lydia Kim, an undergraduate television, radio, film student, empathizes with Chen’s decisions. “[Chen] valued her career and future in the industry to make a sacrifice in order to gain a greater chance at success,” Kim said. Though Kim would have opted for a different resolution and wouldn’t have altered her physical appearance, she believes Chen’s “sacrifice is arguably acceptable.” As an Asian American student in a similar industry, Kim understands that striving for “equal opportunity in America” is a challenge that Asian Americans face. Regardless of birthplace, nationality, or citizenship, Asian Americans are often “otherized” or seen as perpetual foreigners. Whether the root of Chen’s decision is her self-esteem or the gravity of the television industry framing the public mind on physical appearance, Chen chose to do what she felt was necessary in her situation. What is clear is that the fixation on a “normal” or white American appearance remains overwhelmingly dominant in the American media industry.


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THE STATE OF AMERICA On the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, Asian Americans find MLK’s speech a dream deferred Text by Lydia Kim Photos by Michelle Yan

< Inspiried by the UN Women ad series that went viral, ALINE did its own Google search on what “Asians are,” and this is what we found.

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F

ifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. declared his dream of equal civil rights for Americans of all colors. Did he imagine that the United States would progress so far as to elect an African American president for not one, but two terms? We’ll never know. Certainly, America has transformed in ways that many would never have imagined half a century ago. As of November 2013, 16 states have legalized same-sex marriage. For the first time in history, a woman is anticipated to run for and win the next presidential election. Cory Booker, who was sworn into office on October 31 as the senator of New Jersey, is the sixth African American male to serve in the Senate. The fifth African American male to serve in the Senate was President Barack Obama. The ‘Los Angeles Times’ documented the findings from a recent survey authored by the Pew Research Center on the way different racial groups in America perceive the progress the nation has made over the course of half a century towards racial equality. According to this survey, 44 percent of white respondents believe the U.S. has yet to fully achieve racial equality, while 48 percent of Latinos and 79 percent of black respondents felt the same way. The difference in opinions is clear. But the survey only asked a portion of America. Neither Asian Americans nor First Nations peoples were invited to the conversation. Despite the milestones America has achieved, it is safe to say that we have not yet fully achieved the dream Dr. King envisioned for our nation, especially in the eyes of Asian Americans, whose voices are still widely unheard. The absence of Asian American consideration in America is indicative of the serious misconceptions when it comes to the academic and economic success of the Asian American population—the long-held the model minority myth. The effects of this stereotype—the constant omitting of Asian American voices from society—is silencing a minority that is, according to the most recent U.S. Census, 18.9 million people strong. Most harmful about the model minority stereotype is its perpetuation of the assumption that all Asian Americans are one and the same. While Asian Americans are considered economically and academically successful, many are not. Southeast Asians, for example, have the highest high school drop out rate in the nation. Almost one-in-four Koreans in America are undocumented immigrants. Only five percent of Laotian and Cambodian Americans hold college degrees. Jin Young Park, a freshman majoring in communication and rhetorical studies, attests to the effects of the model minority stereotype. “I think living in America as an Asian American is difficult because we don’t necessarily receive the same amount of care or consideration other people seem to receive when it comes down to things like financial aid, just because everyone

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thinks we’re all smart enough to get scholarships from colleges when that’s not always true,” Park said. For some, it may seem like there’s no end in sight. That Asian Americans will never be able to escape the image of the model minority. Professor Arleen de Vera, who teaches Asian American Studies courses here at SU, thinks it’s possible.

DESPITE THE MILESTONES AMERICA HAS ACHIEVED, IT IS SAFE TO SAY THAT WE HAVE NOT YET FULLY ACHIEVED THE DREAM DR. KING ENVISIONED FOR OUR NATION, ESPECIALLY IN THE EYES OF ASIAN AMERICANS, WHOSE VOICES ARE STILL WIDELY UNHEARD. “Back in the 1910s and the 1920s, when Asian Americans were viewed as some kind of threat—the yellow peril propaganda—we were definitely not considered this model minority at all,” de Vera said. “Given that many of these stereotypes are out of our hands and given the perceptions imposed on us from dominant society, to a certain extent, we can’t escape it. At the same time, I also see the possibility that we could, seeing how stereotypes have changed over the years.” Without a doubt, America has a great deal of progress to make in giving Asian Americans the same equal treatment that white Americans receive. The first step that America can take in order to achieve this is simply to begin including and listening to Asian Americans.

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Voter Discrimination in a Post-Jim Crow Era

Before, states needed to prove voter laws were necessary. Now, citizens must prove the laws are unfair. Text by Harris Leung Illustration by Vania Myers

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he Voting Rights Act of 1965 is considered to be one of the greatest tangible accomplishments of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. It’s a landmark piece of national legislation that sought to end racial discrimination in voting. This past summer, the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act in a 5-to-4 vote. Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act defined which states and localities require preclearance before passing voter laws. These areas were singled out due to histories of racial discrimination. Section 5 requires those specified states/localities to first obtain preclearance from the federal government before passing voting laws. Without Section 4, Section 5 holds no bearing because there is no longer a definition of states or localities with a history of racial discrimination that require preclearance. Some states made immediate motions to change voter laws following the decision. Texas placed previously illegal voter identification laws into effect. South Dakota is denying early votes specifically for American Indians living on reservations. Many think this is a blatant assault on American civil rights. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg publicly dissented and said the nation’s commitment to civil rights was deeply “disserved” by this decision and that the court “errs egregiously” in this ruling. Al Sharpton voiced

his dismay on MSNBC and deemed the decision a cancellation of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “dream.”

Many Asian Pacific Americans do not have the necessary documents or the capacity to obtain these documents [to vote].

Dr. John Hanley, a constitutional law professor at SU, agreed that the majority decision was erroneous. “Sometimes when bad outcomes disappear, it means you’ve solved the problem forever, and sometimes it only means that you’ve kept the problem from doing damage in the short term,” he said. Hanley cautioned that politicians

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4 MAIN VOTING LAWS Voter ID: Some states require voters to present a photo identification, which voters may not have due to financial and transportation limitations. Many states allow voters to use mail, bills, or paychecks, which are easier to provide, as identification. Early voting: Some states allow voters to cast their ballot before Election Day—either in-person or by absentee ballot. The purpose is to making voting as convenient as possible. Same day voter registration: Some states allow residents to register to vote on Election Day, provided the proper identification material, to allow as many residents as possible to vote. Purged voter rolls: Some states are requesting data from the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) database to compare with voter registration lists, despite the Department of Justice noting SAVE is not meant to be a list of citizens.

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^ Before June 25, 2013, the above nine states had to get approval from the federal government before passing any voter laws. Specific areas in California, New York, Florida, North Carolina, South Dakota and Michigan also fell under the preclearance requirement. Of the 15 states that were affected by Section 4, nine states have since changed voter laws following the Supreme Court's decision.

could be more likely resort to manipulating the voting process if the right to vote is not actively protected. Sharon M. Wong, National President of the Organization of Chinese Americans, Washington, D.C., noted that the court ruling also significantly obstructs Asian American voters. “Many Asian Pacific Americans do not have the necessary documents or the capacity to obtain these documents [to vote],” Wong said. The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, a national civil rights organization, published an Access to Democracy Report for the 2012 elections and affirmed that prejudice frequently occurred at polls, even while the 1965 Voting Rights Act was still in effect. Korean American voters in Annandale, Virginia, were told to stand in a separate line from voters of all other ethnicities and asked to say their names and home addresses out loud in English, despite the fact that those voters had identification cards on hand. New Orleans and Philadelphia were among a number of cities that did not have translators for all languages at the polls. However, the Supreme Court’s

majority ruling argued that the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was sufficiently effective in the past at protecting minority voters and that such enforcements are no longer needed or relevant today. Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the majority opinion and noted the Act was outdated as it was based on data from the 1960s. He said that Congress has the ability to create an updated Act. But as past records have shown, the current Congress is deeply divided and highly unlikely to agree on any measures. “Removing Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act could lead to even more oppressive voting rights efforts in states with a history of racial discrimination beyond voter purges and voter identification laws,” Wong said. “This decision is a great loss for our community.”

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Stop-and-Frisk and the Future of NYC Text by Benjamin Fang

ALINE’s Benjamin Fang gives a New Yorker’s perspective on recent events surrounding the controversial policy and what Bill de Blasio can bring to his city Stop-and-frisk, a crime-fighting tool used by the New York Police Department, has been a policy in practice for decades. It was championed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly as a necessary instrument to keep New York the safest big city in the country. The policy has come under fire in recent years for its disproportionate application, unfairly targeting black and Latino communities. Since 2004, the NYPD has stopped over 4.4 million people, over 83 percent of whom were black or Hispanic, even though they make up 52 percent of the city’s population. Of those 4.4 million stops, just 1.5 percent of stops revealed weapons. In June, the New York City Council, the legislative body, passed police reform legislation that established an enforceable ban on racial profiling and created independent oversight of the NYPD. Despite Mayor Bloomberg’s opposition, the City Council mustered enough votes to override the mayor’s veto. In August, District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled stop-and-frisk unconstitutional, as it violated the Fourth and 14th Amendments. “Those who are routinely subjected to stops are overwhelmingly people of color, and they are justifiably troubled to be singled out when many of them have done nothing to attract the unwanted attention,” Scheindlin said in her 195-page opinion. She ordered a set of reforms to stop-and-frisk, including a monitor to oversee changes in the policy and training programs and a one-year body camera pilot program for at least one precinct in each borough.

But the city pushed back, filing an appeal to the judge’s decision. In late October, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit put a stay on the reforms ordered by Scheindlin, effectively halting the changes. And in a move that the New York Times Editorial Board called an “overreach,” the appeals panel removed Scheindlin from the case, criticizing her for creating the “appearance of impartiality” by steering the lawsuit to her courtroom and granting media interviews while the case was still pending. The case, formally named Floyd v. City of New York, has been randomly reassigned to a new judge, John Koeltl, who was instructed to “put off all proceedings and otherwise await further action from the panel.” But none of this may matter. On November 5, Democrat Bill de Blasio won the mayoral election with 73 percent of the vote. His progressive campaign heavily focused on “ending the stop-and-frisk era.” This is a major rebuke to Bloomberg’s policies and 12 years in City Hall. Stop-and-frisk is expected to change under a de Blasio administration. The mayor-elect, set to take office on January 1, 2014, has promised to withdraw the city’s appeal, which will allow Scheindlin’s reforms to take effect. This is the right decision. For far too long, people of color in New York City, particularly young black and Latino men, have suffered the wrath of discriminatory policing. Mayor Bloomberg has even gone as far as declaring that minorities are not stopped enough. He has waged a campaign of fear mongering that is politically dangerous. Under the leadership of Bill de Blasio, New York City will continue being the safest big city in America and protect the constitutional rights of minorities. These are not mutually exclusive. The mayor-elect has already said he will not keep NYPD Commissioner Kelly, a strong advocate of stop-andfrisk. This is a good step for communities that want to feel safe around police officers again. Stop-and-frisk can be an effective policing tool, but only if applied constitutionally. With the necessary reforms, New York City can once again be a city of opportunity for everyone.

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Self-Expression VS. Self-Denial How a Japanese subculture teeters on the edge of fantasy and delusion Text by Ruo Piao Chen

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The idea of style: dressing a certain way or wearing certain brands to produce a recognizable visual niche to satisfy the scrutinizing eyes around you. For some, fashion is the physical manifestation of individualism. Even those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put a conscious effort into getting dressed in the morning canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t escape the inciting looks from the fashionconscious. The fashion industry itself has evolved into a medium of objectification, welcoming criticism from its audience. Whether intentional or not, your sense of style sends

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a message to those around you, including those consumed by the industry. B-Style, short for Black Lifestyle, is one of the trending subcultures in Japanese fashion. Since it’s conception around 2010, B-Style transforms teenage girls and young women into their black idols. B-Stylers draw inspiration from American media outlets such as hip-hop music videos or magazines like ‘Vibe’ and ‘Complex.’ Hina, a prominent B-Style fashioner, works at the store, Baby Shoop, which promotes the theme “Black for life.” According to Hina, Baby Shoop is, “A tribute to black culture’s music, fashion and dance.” The development of B-Style follows the thread of a collective fashion sense that defies cultural norms. B-Style is a derivative of an earlier fashion subculture called Ganguro. Ganguro girls don artificial tans and dyed hair. This specific look was adopted as an act of rebellion against traditional Japanese beauty standards—pale skin and dark hair. As the Ganguro trend lost popularity in the late ‘90s to early 2000s, sub-trends like B-Style gained traction. “Part of B-Style is that you do not look Japanese,” Hina said in an interview posted on several fashion blogs. In addition to clothing and hairstyles that deviate from the traditional Japanese fashion scene, B-Stylers desire darker skin and frequent tanning salons, opting for lengthy ten-minute sessions. Hina and other B-Stylers pick up this look without a complete understanding of the implications these images have on those who are born black. On the other side of the world, it’s not uncommon for African American youth (especially young girls) to want to bleach their skin or perm their hair for a less “natural” look. Black celebrities like Beyoncé are shown on the covers of ‘Seventeen’ and ‘Cosmopolitan’ with dyed, straightened hair and lighter skin. These images create the beauty standard for African American women: light skin and straight hair is the only desirable look. This message is only amplified with thoughtless actions like that of ‘Time’ magazine, which digitally altered a photograph of OJ Simpson to make his skin appear darker and the image more menacing. While light skin is adjacent to beautiful, dark skin is next to criminal. Trends like B-Style are dangerous because it trivializes a specific part of a culture. Miley Cyrus’s MTV Awards performance helped bring the term ‘cultural appropriation’ to the front of online discussions. As ‘appropriation’ refers to the taking of something without the proper authority or permission, ‘cultural appropriation’ is essentially the dominant culture taking something from a marginalized community. In the case of B-Style, fashioners like Hina are attempting to take hip-hop from the African American culture and turn it into something of their own. Similar to how B-Stylers are unaware of the implications their adopted look has on the black community, they also lack a proper knowledge of the hip-hop culture and its

origins. Developed in New York City, hip-hop was formed as a creative outlet for black and Latino youth living in low-income parts of the city. As it gained popularity, hiphop became integrated into the mainstream entertainment industry. Hip-hop is no longer something that exists exclusively within a marginalized community, it’s now seen as the “cool” thing to do. Hina uses the same language when she describes B-Style’s appeal. “When I looked at black artists, I found them very cool,” Hina said in that same interview. “Black people look so great and stylish.” Though some may not see Hina’s admiration for American hip-hop artists as negative or harmful, the lengths to which B-Stylers will go to achieve this desired look can be highly controversial. Some argue B-Style fashioners reject their Japanese heritage by rejecting their Japanese appearance, thus contesting the redundant image of beauty within Japanese popular culture. However, while rejecting one dominant stereotypical image as presented by Japanese media, they latch on to another—America’s popular media and its sentiments on blackness.

In addition to clothing and hairstyles that deviate from the traditional Japanese fashion scene, B-Stylers desire darker skin and frequent tanning salons, opting for lengthy tenminute sessions. By changing their look so much, B-Stylers tread a dangerous line of self-rejection. Cosplayers gather in droves to dress up as fictional characters from games, comic books, or movies but have the ability to shed the unique look at the end of the day. B-Stylers desire more permanent physical alterations. They want something that won’t go away with a change of outfits. Girls like Hina desire a look that is as unJapanese as possible. B-Stylers blur the distinction between style and lifestyle—the difference between something you choose and something that becomes you.

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Street style Photos by Rachel Thalia Fisher

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Rachel Thalia Fisher is a senior art photography student whose work has been featured in the street style section of Teen Vogue 5

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LEFT PAGE Joy, 20, information technology THIS PAGE 1) Alexandra Tults, 18, painting 2) Ola Candide Johnson, 20, acting 3) Keaton Fox, 21, video art 4) Ivy Maurice, 19, economics 5) Sophia, 18, computer science & graphic design 6) Evette Yedid, 19, television, radio and film

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Money, Money, Power, Power, Influence Influence ALINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kim E. Powell reflects on the need for and sources of justification in the legitimacy of fashion industry Text by Kim E. Powell Photos by Allen Chui

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Models Maricelis Galanes, Natalia Forsey and Julie Sabo wearing Tiffany Wu and Jasmine Kimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring/Summer 2014 collection, Folie ĂĄ Duex

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I

have always seen fashion as an industry that has to prove its significance, relevance, or legitimacy. Whenever I express my interest in pursuing a career in fashion, I am assumed to be an aspiring clothing designer. “I’m actually not interested in being a fashion designer,” I’ll respond, leaving my inquirer even more puzzled than before. On the one hand, many respond quite traditionally, seeming to internally mourn your assumed future financial woes (i.e. parents). On the other, some respond with an enthusiastic, “So cool!” or, “Wow!” because I decided to actually pursue my “hobby” as a career (i.e. friends). Though opposite in nature, both responses work in the same way. They leave me thinking: I have a lot to prove. The concept of “legitimacy” is understood on two levels throughout this piece. The first equates legitimacy directly to financially stability. The second equates legitimacy to the influence and power within the fashion industry. While I’m motivated by the legitimacy described in the latter, people often make assumptions about fashion based on the former. This is not to say influence and power are not separate from financial freedom, as there exists a cause and effect relationship. However, when I address legitimacy in the context of my motivations, money is unrelated. I often explain my pursuit in fashion with my aspiration to write and create video documentary. For some reason, an answer mentioning only fashion never feels like enough. Despite my current lack of agency in the industry, I’m confident in the amount of career mobility in my future. I’ve found that one of the biggest misconceptions about fashion is the notion everyone wants to be a designer or work for Vogue. Fashion is constantly changing, expanding and creating more job options. I can be an aspiring fashion photographer, street-style photographer, fashion writer, online blogger, style director, art director, brand consultant, or my position of choice, videographer.

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Though it’s an industry that very much believes in earning your stripes, there are opportunities. If you reach a standstill, create your own online platform as Leandra Medine, Tamu McPherson, or Susie Lau did. Bloggers, one of the most ambiguous positions you can hold in fashion, are now given free clothing to review and have reserved, front-row seats at the most exclusive fashion shows. So, my woes weren’t ever in coming to terms with the reality of working in fashion; my dilemma was discerning exactly what I wanted to do in the industry. I chose not to enter university as a fashion major for these reasons. Ironically enough, the fashion department here at Syracuse University only has one program—fashion design. I asked Tiffany Wu and Jasmine Kim, two third-year fashion design students in the College of Visual and Performing Arts, how they felt about the question of legitimacy that surrounds the industry. As actual fashion design majors they don’t share my struggle of false career assumptions, yet they were familiar with the reactions aspiring fashioneers, or engineers of fashion, often get. Both Wu and Kim receive the same concerns from parents and praise from friends that I experience. Wu initially applied to the Whitman School of Management due to some parental pressure. “What are you planning on doing with that?” her parents asked. In the end, Wu decided she felt most passionate about fashion and switched her major before her first day at SU. Designers like Vera Wang, Jason Wu, Alexander Wang essentially weren’t deemed legitimate until they became prominent figureheads in the world of fashion design and beyond. But does the fact that a designer now makes millions equate to legitimacy? With an estimated net-worth of $115 million, Vera Wang is among the many designers in the industry putting her pockets where her mouth is. The undeniable combination of influence, recognition and revenues combat those who deem fashion as an illegitimate career.

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‘Boxers and

Saints’ text by Shirley Don

Illustration by Rebecca Ko

Gene Luen Yang’s most recent graphic novel deviates from the typical textbook standard of historical events

Between 1899 and 1901, a war waged on in China between the Boxers and the Qing Dynasty, catalyzed by the presence of foreign imperialism. The Boxers were a secret society of lower class Chinese men who wanted to oust foreign powers that were slowly taking over their homeland. The foreigners were mostly white Christian missionaries traveling around China to spread Christianity.

Gene Luen Yang compacts this deeply complicated strife, involving religion, nationalism, and foreign imperialism, into a two-part companion graphic novel set, Boxers and Saints. Yang is an American-born Chinese graphic novelist and comic book artist with an arsenal of experience to back his outstanding resume. Yang told the ‘Austin Chronicle’ the books took him six years to complete.

Two characters lead the plot of Boxers and Saints—Little Bao, a boy from Shan-tung who eventually becomes a leader of the Boxer Rebellion, and Four-Girl, a girl from the same village who later becomes a Christian and adopts the name Vibiana. Yang shows the deaths of those involved with the Boxer movement and the foreign imperialists and Christian missionaries. His creative narrative sympathizes with both sides indicating that there are no winners in war, only survivors.

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YOU DON’T EVEN GO HERE: eating like a local If you don’t know what you’re doing, sitting down for a meal can be the eastiest way to oust yourself as a tourist

Text by Eva Choi Illustrations by Rebecca Ko

F

ood has a universal purpose; we eat to socialize, we eat to experience and we eat to live. Whether it’s using chopsticks or forks, worldwide differences in food etiquette are strongly based on societal culture. Culture plays a significant factor in shaping societal values. The ways, means and reasons we eat are influenced by religion, traditional values and societal behaviors. The norm in one country could be considered taboo in another. Take the cultural differences in food etiquette between East Asia and America. In East Asia, eating loudly when consuming a bowl of noodles or chewing with one’s mouth

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open is highly encouraged. In America, this practice is considered taboo. Belching and slurping while consuming a meal in China indicates a patron’s compliments to the chef. Similar behavior comes off as rude, uncivilized and gluttonous in American dining. Food etiquette in East Asia is built on tradition and rituals. Regions like China are collectivistic societies that value respect and filial piety. These values shape the culture and act as a direct catalyst to the cultural differences and taboos in East Asian dining. When it comes to proper East Asian food etiquettes, the use of chopsticks evokes strong symbolic meanings. Placing

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chopsticks vertically in a bowl of rice can be negatively associated with death—this symbolizes the burning of incense during funeral and ancestral rituals. Exchanging food between two sets of chopsticks is considered taboo, as this symbolizes the transfer of bones during funeral rituals. The process of when to eat is also strenuously practiced as well. Eating before elders is regarded as highly disrespectful and should be avoided at all times—people eat in order of eldest to youngest. Understanding the cultural differences and taboos in food etiquettes is best experienced when traveling or studying abroad. For many students, learning and understanding a culture through food is another anticipated part of the experience. Brian Steinberg, a senior majoring in political science and policy studies, enjoyed his dining experience in Hong Kong but was surprised how “there was no cold water” served at restaurants. Similarly, all the cold water served in American restaurants shocked Bernice Chan, a senior, advertising major from Hong Kong. Some students studying abroad were introduced to food preparations that they had never seen before. Morgan Leigh, a senior majoring in retail, marketing and supply chain management, was first introduced to hot pot when she studied abroad in Hong Kong. “It’s amazing because [it is] such a simple concept,” said Leigh. This simple concept acts as another symbol in East Asian culture. Hot pot represents family unity and is commonly served during major celebrations like Lunar New Year. On the other hand, some students experienced culture shock when it came to trying new foods. Xiaonan Jia, a senior marketing major, commented on the “huge portions served” in American dining, a custom that is nonexistent back home in Jilin, China. Having an open mind to cultural differences makes an experience abroad more enjoyable and rewarding. Deanna O’Keefe, a senior majoring in marketing and finance, had never been to Asia before going abroad to Hong Kong. She was able to embrace and appreciate cultural differences she previously knew nothing about. “I ended up loving the food because I was not afraid to try new options,” O’Keefe said. With an accepting and unbiased attitude, one can learn to appreciate another society’s culture and values. When it comes to food, Eastern and Western cultures have different expectations and taboos. There is no universal method in proper food etiquette; no one is right or wrong, weird or normal. By encountering cultural differences with enthusiasm and without predispositions, one can overcome stereotypes, bridge cultural gaps and embrace diversity. Learning about food etiquettes is just another part in understanding a society’s culture. So, when embarking on an adventurous trip to a new restaurant or country, don’t jump to conclusions about things that seem strange or unfamiliar. Instead, take the time to understand the centuries of traditions, rituals and cultural manifestations behind it.

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BEHIND THE SCENES ALINE sits down with producer Brian Yang to talk Jeremy Lin and the ‘Linsanity’ documentary Interviewed by Cypress Yang Bai Photo courtesy of Brian Yang

This interview has been edited for length and clarity

When did you decide to start filming Jeremy Lin and why? When did you realize he had a story worth telling? The truth is we didn’t know. He started playing major division-one college teams and performing really well. That’s when people thought maybe he could make it to the NBA. We (the filmmaking team) thought, “Wouldn’t it be interesting if we put a camera on him and documented his process of getting there?” We had no idea he would go to New York—Linsanity was not even a word at that time. It was just going to be a story about an Asian American kid who went to Harvard University and made the NBA. That, in and of itself, is a very unlikely story. Once the Linsanity phenomenon was born, the Linsanity film soon followed and we realized we had a much bigger project on our hands.

Who’s your target audience? What can this movie bring to people who aren’t Jeremy Lin fans or aren’t into basketball? How can different groups relate to his story? There are a lot of folks who can see a little bit of Jeremy in themselves and can identify with his story. It was an interesting thing to see many Asian people who didn’t even like basketball, suddenly want to watch everything Jeremy’s doing because he became the pride of Asian American. There were Christians who identify with him because he’s a very devout Christian and speaks openly about his faith. There were other Ivy League students who identify with him because there’s more to them than good grades, they’re also talented athletes. I think many people just enjoy the underdog story. Any human being can relate to the things he went through, so it’s really for everybody. You don’t need to

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be an American, you don’t have to be Asian, you don’t have to be a sports fan, or any of those things to appreciate the story of Jeremy Lin.

What's your relationship like with Jeremy? There are a lot of Jeremy fans here at SU, could you share anything interesting that happened during the filmmaking process? Jeremy is the same person today that he was three to four years ago when we started this whole thing. He just seems like someone you would know—someone who you have class with, someone in your bible study or club. When people look at NBA superstars, they will feel like they can never be like that. I think he inspires a generation of people who are now growing up thinking, “Wow, Jeremy Lin can do it, so can I.” He kind of becomes a beacon of hope. Hopefully, that’s going to advance the Asian American community because, with every successful story about an Asian American, it helps the mainstream look at Asian Americans in a different way—whether that’s in sports or even a corporate setting. When we talk about the bamboo ceiling or discrimination, people think of Asians in a certain way that’s not always positive. We have the model minority myth then along comes a person like Jeremy Lin who shatters all these stereotypes. It forces people to look at the Asian American experience in a different way. I think that’s great. I think it’s important we have these stories to tell and share. Hopefully, it’s just the start of more. I wish I had an amazing story to tell but he’s really just an ordinary guy. Jeremy’s created this phenomenon that the world has clung on to yet remained the same throughout the entire process.

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ASIAN STUDENTS IN AMERICA The first pan-ethnic, non-Asian exclusive Asian American student organization on campus

Connect with us on all social media to learn about upcoming events facebook.com/syracuseASIA flickr.com/syracuseasia @syrasia Fall 2013

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