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ALI KARLEN

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

M.ARCH APPLICANT 2017 // UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE


CONTENTS arch 380 // gathering at the edge arch 381 // the movie house arch 480 // imagining the urban future of titanyen kounkuey design initiative // ksps06 scott/edwards architecture // 4th dimension recovery center scott/edwards architecture // sea/bar


arch380

STUDIO // CLIVE KNIGHTS // PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY // FALL TERM 2011

GATHERING AT THE EDGE // The opportunity arises at a wedding, birthday, reunion or other significant event, to engage with our vast web of human connection. This meaningful revelation was the design goal of my Celebration Hall, a flexible space for hosting celebratory events. It became an indoor-outdoor facility nestled on the side of Mt Tabor, in an idyllic clearing among pine forest, accessed by a network of wilderness trails. This site was chosen for its secluded, screened-in qualities, influencing the participants focus upon one another rather than the world beyond. As the paths come into the architecture, their tangents form walls and the journeys of the celebrants intertwine to form a space through their collection. The Hall means to reinforces relationships which may have been stretched by time or distance, and thus caters to the experience and underlying social significance of gathering.

ABOVE / model in context

BELOW / detailed section model, showing materiality and filtering quality of the louvered envelope. walnut and basswood.


BELOW / mt tabor park experiential pathway network RIGHT / moments of anticipation on the experiential path


430’ 420’

410’ 400’ 9

4

3

5 7

9

7

1

2 6 8 9

390’

1 2 3 4 5

Main Interior Space Main Exterior Space Storage, Food prep Dressing Room Secondary Exterior Space

6 7 8 9

Main Entry Landing Restrooms Fountain Entrance Point

380’

LEFT / site plan RIGHT / levels of intimacy


ABOVE / section through site and celebration hall


arch381

STUDIO // JASON JONES // PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY // WINTER TERM 2012

BELOW / exterior perspective RIGHT TOP / interior perspective of the theaters RIGHT BOTTOM / interior perspective of the entry

THE MOVIE HOUSE // The experience around viewing a film creates a subconscious conversation on ideas, culture, and interpretation in a way which makes it unique among media. The program for this project was a small-scale Movie House with two theaters seating 16 each and a medium-size café/ lounge. Through conceptual modeling and analysis of “Time” and “Projection” as they relate to film, I discovered a distinct relationship between film-maker and film-viewer that could be maintained through the architecture as a sequence of specific and intentional points, much like the medium of film communicates a story. Architecture could further enforce the role of the film as a way to absorb new ideas and broaden their understanding of the world through cultivating the actions of reflection and conversation. I utilized these concepts to examine and enrich the design.


MOVEMENT

The materiality of the building speaks to the difference stages of experiencing film. The viewer enters into a heavy, dark and quiet volume to engage with the film in an intimate environment. After the viewing experience is over, the viewer exits into the lounge, executed in heavy timber and glass so as to create a lofty and open atmosphere that caters to the enlightened conversation and post-processing of the new ideas and perspectives they witnessed. If the film succeeds in providing depth and conviction, the viewers spend a long time lingering and conversing in the filtered light drifting down from the projection rooms above.

MATERIALITY

BELOW / section perspective

1

CONSUME

2

PROJECT

3

LINGER

4

SERVICE


10

11

8

7 9

9

1

12 13 14

13

14

3 2

4

16

6

5

15

GROUND FLOOR

1 Lounge 2 Cafe 3 Bar/Concessions 4 Lobby 5 Box Office 6 Seating

UPPER FLOOR

7 Kitchen 8 Office 9 ADA Restroom 10 Theater One 11 Theater Two 12 Mezzanine

13 Projection Booth 14 Spiral Service Stair 15 Entrance 16 Exit

RIGHT / model in context ACROSS / interior perspective of lounge


arch480

STUDIO // SERGIO PALLERONI // PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY // FALL TERM 2012 high

way

1

IMAGINING THE URBAN FUTURE OF TITANYEN // As a class, this studio developed an urban design project for the future development of Titanyen, a Haitian village experiencing exponential growth as people escape the crumbled cities left by the 2010 earthquake. We examined the needs of the evolving community and synergies that exist within those needs. I specifically worked with a fellow student to address the development south of Highway One. This area was previously not part of the settlement, but since the earthquake it has become a new, informal neighborhood of tarp and plywood shelters with no access to services. Our design goal was to bring basic necessities to the neighborhood that would make it self-sustaining and ultimately help them prosper in their growth. Education as empowerment became the designs driving force. The neighborhood was thus designed on an easily phased structure to support the educational benefits of a garden-school synergy. Revolving around an agriculturally-minded school, the neighborhood would be permeated by the knowledge, encouraging a higher quality of living. Concept and graphics generated in collaboration with fellow undergraduate Andrew Durkin.

TOP / map of titanyen, area of development indicated by green ABOVE / section through main plaza, showing school and library


FOOD PRODUCTION & AGRICULTURE EDUCATION/SKILL BUILDING RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SANITATION LAUNDRY STATION

PRODUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL UNIFORMS

PHOSPHATE- RICH GREY WATER RUNOFF

TEXTILE COOP WASTE SCHOOL UNIFORM PRODUCTION AND REPAIR TEXTILE- RELATED SKILL BUILDING CLASSES

RESTROOMS

OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY SKILL BUILDING OPPORTUNITY

COMPOST

URBAN GARDEN

RESOURCE EXCHANGE COMMUNITY EDUCATION RESOURCES AND SPACE FOR CHILDREN’S LEARNING

LIBRARY

SCHOOL

EDUCATION AND SKILL BUILDING

LITERACY AND EDUCATION RESOURCES FOR COMMUNITY

CHICKEN COOP

FOOD FOR COMMUNITY

RESOURCE EXCHANGE COMMUNITY EDUCATION

PRODUCE FOOD FOR SCHOOL MEALS

ASSEMBLY PLAY

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

PLAZA SYNERGIES

MATERIAL EXCHANGE

COMMUNIT Y KITCHEN COMMUNAL GATHERING FOR MEALS

CENTRAL PLAZA PLAN


PUBLIC SPACE

HI

GH

W AY 1

WAT E R ACC E SS P OI N T

COMMUNITY HUB

COM M E RC I AL ZON E B U FFE R

P E R M AN E N T DW E L L I N G

BI OSWAL E / D R AI N AGE G ARD E N

V E GTABL E / F R UI T GA RD E N

central public space

localized public plazas

semiprivate gardens

NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT //

ROADS

primary

secondary

tertiary

Basic Facilities were added as community hubs within the neighborhoods. These services are of a local category and were intended to encourage the development at a sustainable rate and create small-scale community spaces serving a local radius of blocks. As the neighborhood increases in density, these can help delineate development of expanding services, significant community space, and even commercial zones. neighborhood plan


INTEGRATED DRAINAGE SYSTEM //

Titanyen has suffered massive erosion due to extensive deforestation, so a vital element in this neighborhood is a system of water management to control the heavy flow of rainwater during the wet season and even use it to their benefit. Using the natural grade of the landscape, the pathway infrastructure of South Titanyen is designed to double as a rainwater management system. A drainage network eases the strain of runoff, encouraging absorption and making use of the flow through gravity-fed irrigation canals. What is not absorbed by the neighborhood continues into the agricultural zone just south of the community.

U R B A N I ZE D FA B RIC

IRRI GATI ON N ET WO RK

WA T E R C O LL ECTI O N

LEFT / section through primary pathway

RA IN WA TER M ANAGEM ENT

BELOW / diagram of rainwater mitigation within blocks

drainage pipe siphons water from the system to irrigate gardens

canals on secondary paths distribute water evenly around blocks and provide overflow routes

ABOVE / section through neighborhood showing the system of rainwater management and mitigation built into the urban fabric

drainage canals run along primary roads and collect rainwater runoff from neighborhood

overflow continues to gardens downhill

large bioswales located to slow the water and allow it to percolate into the ground, while providing greenery and shade


KPSP06

DESIGN INTERN // KOUNKUEY DESIGN INITIATIVE // NAIROBI, KENYA // SUMMER 2013

BELOW / satellite image if southern kibera BOTTOM / rendering of the sanitation block in the site

KIBERA PUBLIC SPACE PROJECT 06 // In the summer of 2013, I spent 14 weeks in Nairobi Kenya, as the design intern at Kounkuey Design initiative, an organization that "transforms impoverished communities by collaborating with residents to create low-cost, high-impact built environments (Productive Public Spaces) that improve their daily lives." [kounkuey.org]. My duty was to assist with development of various Kibera Public Space Projects, namely to lead the design and construction of KPSP Site 06. Located just 4 kilometers from downtown Nairobi, Kibera is one of the oldest and largest informal settlements in west Africa, housing anywhere from 200,000 to 500,000 people on just 2.5 sq km and significantly lacking in proper sanitation and utility access, among many other things. KPSP06 is an expansion to the original site of KPSP01 built in 2008. Program requirements included public restroom and showers, and lack of utility accessibility on the site required us to use composting toilets and constructed wetlands for shower greywater recycling. This restriction was redesigned into asset in the final proposal, allowing the block to integrate with composting facilities already established on the site. Construction labor was sourced from the local community and the primary building material was interlocking red bricks fabricated on site, a technology specifically engineered by KDI for the area.

SITE


The sanitation block was design through a process that included direct community input. This involved researching and analyzing the various methods for composting technique and conducting community meetings to help members determine which system would work best for their capacity and maintenance plan. KDI also guided members to create a business development plan concurrent with the design, to ensure the sanitation block would be self-funded and sustainably managed by the community over the long term.

VENT

REMOVABLE BIN (SOLIDS)

SECTION THROUGH TYPICAL STALL

TO WETLANDS DRAIN (LIQUIDS) SCREEN

CORRUGATED METAL ROOF OPEN CLERESTORY FOR VENTILATION CONCRETE RING BEAM WINDOW FOR NATURAL LIGHT LOCAL BAMBOO SCREEN

EXTERIOR WALKWAY

RAMMED EARTH BRICK, MADE ON SITE

LAVATORY STALL, PLASTERED

EXCESS LIQUID DRAINAGE TO WETLAND

REINFORCED CONCRETE WASTE COLLECTION CHAMBER ACCESS DOOR

TOP / diagram of one-month rotation space requirements MIDDLE / demonstration model for different types of technology BOTTOM / community meeting


SANITATION BLOCK PLAN 1 SHOWER STALL 2 OFFICE 3 LIQUIDS-ONLY LAVATORY STALL 4 OUTDOOR WALKWAYS 5 LAVATORY STALL 6 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND 7 WASTE PROCESSING AREA

4

1

1

2

3

6

5 BELOW / final construction of block [photo courtesy of kounkuey.org]

5

4

7 5


K S PS01 /0 6 MAS T ER PL AN E X IST ING CHILDREN'S PLAY SPACE MULTIPURPOSE HALL PUBLIC GREEN SPACE SHAMBA + COMPOSTING BAMBOO PRODUCTION

F UTUR E P H AS E S COMMUNITY COOKER CAFE MULTIPURPOSE HALL EXTENSION

CU RRE N T P H AS E SANITATION BLOCK COMPOSTING TOILETS & SHOWERS EXPANDED COMPOST FACILITY


4th DIMENSION

PROJECT MANAGER + DESIGNER // PRO-BONO WORK // SCOTT EDWARDS ARCHITECTURE // PORTLAND, OR // COMPLETED 2015

INNER RESTORATION // During my free time and while at Scott/Edwards Architecture, I provided probono design services to the 4th Dimension Recovery Center, a local non-profit focused on providing resources and community support for young adults recovering from addiction. The project required renovating an old storefront on MLK Jr Blvd in Portland, OR, and building out the interior to accommodate the organizations wide variety of services on an extremely low budget. Many of the materials were donated, reclaimed, or funded through city grants. During the day, this facility provides addiction treatment resources and meeting space for the organization's pioneering mentor program. At night, it hosts everything from AA meetings to movie nights, fund-raisers to dance parties. Completing this multifaceted project required a coming-together of many people in the community, coordinating the needs of the client, the landlord, city code, budget restraints and available materials, to contribute to this vital and one-of-a-kind resource for Portland's sober young adult community.

PHOTOS LEFT-RIGHT / completed exterior storefront, cafe space, meeting/rec room, wood screen at reception desk, reception desk and small-group meeting space [all photos courtesy of pete eckert]


ENTRY & CAFE SPACE RECEPTION FLEX SPACE (REC ROOMS, MEETING ROOMS) OFFICE & RESOURCE ROOM STORAGE RESTROOMS YARD/OUTDOOR REC PARKING

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

8

7

5

ELEC.

6

6

5

concept sketches for reclaimed wood screen

4

3

2

3 1


SEA/BAR

FURNITURE DESIGN // SCOTT EDWARDS ARCHITECTURE // OCT-NOV 2013

Design for a mobile beer tap + coffee bar concept for the open office environment. Final solution used butcher block surface to create the illusion of 2x2 wood stacked and sliced through the middle to create two unique volumes with a dynamic relationship that also maximizes versatility in compact spaces. Designed in collaboration with Bob Carbaugh while at Scott/Edwards Architecture. To be built in 2017.

BUTCHERBOCK PANELS

CUSTOM TAP TOWER

OPEN SHELF; M&MS, PAPERWORK, DOUGHNUTS

END-GRAIN PANELS

+42” +42”

+37”

COFFEE PLUS STORAGE

INDUSTRIAL CASTERS

BEER

POWDER-COATED METAL DRINK RAIL, MOVE-ABLE PANEL W/ KEGERATOR BEHIND

SEA-YELLOW STOOLS, TBD


ALI KARLEN m.arch applicant portland, or amkarlen@gmail.com


M.Arch Portfolio - University of Minnesota  
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