Page 1

ALI KARLEN . DESIGN PORTFOLIO . 2019


MASTER’S FINAL PROJECT

. capital re/evolution

2019+

PROFESSIONAL

. the garlington center

2015

. kpsp06

2013

. 4th dimension: inner restoration

2014

ACADEMIC

. corporate dwelling on the riverfront

2017

. net positive housing

2018

. urban forestry research center

2018


.MASTER’S

FINAL

PROJECT.


CAPITAL RE/EVOLUTION . . . .

master’s final project university of minnesota minneapolis, mn 2019+

.recipient of the richard morrill final project award, 2019

All urban fabric is built through private or public investment. This accepted status quo inextricably ties the manifestation of the urban built environment with capitalistic valuations and reasoning. Conversely, we operate in a social society, where relationships and social infrastructures within our society have the potential to define new avenues of value and decision-making about the environment we create for ourselves. This project investigates the relationship between capital and architecture though the lens of small-scale housing development by weaving the sociological origins of the urban with the inherently capitalistic process of development to find an intersection between the two. When examined through this socio-theoretical understanding of how the Urban is formed, a disparity emerges between those who produce the ‘Urban’ and those who produce the ‘City.’ Consumers are the recipients, not the drivers, of development - but continue to make their spaces within the void between idea and reality. When conceived space (that which is planned and executed, top-down) is dominant in forming the city, it fails to address the wider, more complex lived processes and relationships that create the urban. Still, our society is designed to accommodate and encourage this mode of production that gives priority to capital over the lived experience. Architecture has simply become a means to achieve capital. Capital Re /Ev ol ution intends to to break that c y cle by re c o n n e c t i n g t h e m an i fe st at i o n o f h o us i n g w i t h th e s o c i o l o g i c al o ri g i n s t h at g i v e t h e b ui l t e nv i ro n m e n t its v al u e . I t c o n s i d e rs h o w i n d i v i d ual s o f a s o c i e t y b e c o m e more d i re c t l y i nv o l v e d i n t h e p ro c e ss e s t h at ac t ual l y m an ife st h o u s i n g an d s h ap e t h e c i t y o v e r t i m e .


BELOW LEFT -- LEFEBVRE’S THEORY OF URBAN SPACE AS APPLIED TO HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. BELOW RIGHT -- SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE VIA SMALL-SCALE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

perceived: HOUSE

lived: HOME

conceived HOUSING UNIT

EXISTING MODEL

CONCEIVED SPACE

LIVED ED SPA SPACE ACE

PERCEIVED SPACE

CONCEIVED SPACE

LIVED SPACE

PERCEIVED SPACE

CONCEIVED SPACE

LIVED SPACE

PERCEIVED SPACE

NEW MODEL


redlined districts

regional highways + railways

water-powered industrial areas

coal-powered expansion

+ expansion

urban core

commerical expansion

INDUSTRIAL

URBAN


RURAL/ NATURE

implosion/ explosion residential zones + local connector streets

ABOVE -- EXPLODED AXON OF THE THE URBAN REVOLUTIONS OF MINNEAPOLIS, EXAMINING HOW CAPITALISM HAS SHAPED THE MANIFESTATION OF THE CITY.


BLOOM I NGTON A V E

BELOW -- MAPPING EXERCISE TRACKING REVOLUTIONS AT THE NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE, LAYERING ON OBJECTIVE DATA ABOUT THE CENTRAL NEIGHBORHOOD IN SOUTH MINNEAPOLIS RELATED TOTHE EXISTING FABRIC, DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL AND HOUSING CHOICE.

29TH ST

GREENWAY

MI D T O W N EXCHANGE

QUATREFOIL LI B R A R Y

ma r k e t m a r ket

m a r ket

LAKE ST ma r k e t

ma r k e t

CHRIST CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

ME T R O PO LI T A N C O MMU N I T Y CHURCH

LI B R E I A 2 C U LT U R A S

URBAN VENTURES

3 1ST ST

c ommu ni ty g a r de n

m a r ket

c o m m un it y g a r d en

YMCA

LA U R A I N G A LLS W I LD E R S C H O O L

c o m m un it y g a r d en

C ENT RAL G YM PARK

UNITED ME T H O D I S T CHURCH

c o m m un it y g a r d en c o m m un it y g a r d en

POWDERHORN PARK

m a r ket GRE E N C E N T RAL E L E M E N T ARY S C H O O L H O S ME R LI B R A R Y

c o m m un it y g a r d en

c o m m un it y g a r d en

c o m m un it y g a r d en

c o m m un it y g a r d en

CANDO

S AB AT H AN I C O M M UN I T Y CENTER

C OMMERC IA L / INST IT UT ION / MIXED USE C OMMUNIT Y P OINT S V A C A NT LOT S MULT I- FA MILY H OUSING PARKS MA J OR ROA D S BIK E WA YS MINOR ROA D S A LLEY WA YS 0

1000

N^

CHICA GO AVE

PA RK A VE

PO RTLA ND AVE

4TH AVE

1 ST A VE

NICO LLE TE A VE

B LAIS DELL AV E

38TH ST

C E N TR A L N E I G H B O R H O O D - - S O U TH M I N N E A P O L I S


BELOW -- AXONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE CENTRAL NEIGHBORHOOD DATA, OVERLAYING 2040 INFORMATION AND ECXISTING SOCIAL NETWORKS AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS TO SUBJECTIVE PERCEPTIONS OF PLACE.

E X I ST ING CO MMO NING

com m unity p oints

c ommun it y gr een spac e/gar den in vac at ed lot

MI N N EA P O LIS2 0 40 BU IL T F O RM

PO

RT

LA

ND

AV

PA

RK

CH

38

TH

E

IC

AV

AG

E

O

AV

E

ST

29

NI

CO

LL

ET

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AV

GR

E LA

4T

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AV

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generic

g en er i c g en er i c ad j ac en t o v er -d en s e

g en er i c

V A CA NT LO T S

generic generic

o v er - d en s e

generic

KE

ST

EE

NW

AY

TH

ST


ABOVE -- SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE STUDIES.


This project develops a method of working though representation to understand and respond to the multiple facets present in Common Sector Development. These representations balance data from the system and ways that we currently do things with an understanding of how social relationships and the dialectic nature of space may come into play. This process is necessary in a commons-forward approach to development, as the traditional model of development often lacks the subjective nuances of place and lived experience in a neighborhood, whereas average individuals typically lack the objective understanding of the potential of a site and how it fits into the larger systemic context. In order to bridge this gap between developer and community, Common Sector Development must mix these two understandings together in order to successfully build on existing relationships and interface with the existing physical and social urban fabric.

ABOVE -- WOOD MODEL RECORDING OBJECTIVE/SUBJECTIVE SITE ANALYSIS.


ABOVE -- TRIPLEX SYNTAX ITERATIONS.


The generic Minneapolis vacant lot serves as the proto-site for this investigation. Under the traditional model of development, prescribed programmatic elements for ‘living’ would be combined within one shell. However, the same lot viewed through the lived experience reveals a ‘perceived lot’ that is defined by social potentials of the residential block and begins to blur across political preconceptions of ownership. This unleashes a more nuanced and valuable social-scape which the triplex design can engage with.

CLO SED SEMI P RIVATE

O P EN SEMI P RIVATE

OPE N S E MI PUBLI C

COMMON SPACE

PORCH

PATIO

PUBLI C E N GA G E ME N T

LOCAL

STREET/ALLEY/CITY

COMMON P U B LIC

PR IVATE

PUBLI C

YARD/ALLEY

SOCIA L PR IV A T E

LIVING SPACE

In concert with this perceived lot, the triplex itself can be designed as a series of spatial relationships which gradate from private to public realm. The resulting three typologies of triplexes are organized around how they handle the continuity of social relationship through these shared spaces. The forms of each also addresses access to daylighting and building massing needs with respect to the surrounding social and physical context.

a c c e s s

acce ss

TOP -- THE PERCEIVED LOT. ABOVE -- SOCIAL TRIPLEX PROGRAM GRADIENT AND SCALABLE COMMONS.


utility core

shared COMMON 220 s.f. UNIT C 590 s. f.

THE SOCIAL TRIPLEX

The fl exible programming arrangement allows variation within each triplex typology. In areas where less public and common resources are available, the triplex community takes on a more internalized pattern of commoning. Triplexes located where they are able to utilize the larger commons network can take on an externalized pattern of commoning, or create one between multiple triplexes. Providing this fl exibility and variety enables the triplex typologies to fi ll in gaps in Minneapolis’s community networks at a fi ner grain. Over time they can form interdependent clusters, or infi ltrate more homogenous areas with common shared spaces, thereby establishing and strengthen local commoning networks.

porch

shared COMMON 220 s.f.

porch UNIT B 690 s.f.

porch

shared COMMON 360 s.f.

UNIT A 760 s.f.

patio

DISTRIBUTED


utility core

utility core

utility core

utility core

utility core

porch

UNIT C 780 s. f.

shared COMMON 533 s.f.

porch

porch shared COMMON 710 s.f.

shared COMMON 730 s.f.

UNIT B 730 s.f.

porch UNIT C 780 s. f.

shared COMMON 780 s.f. UNIT A 780 s.f.

UNIT B 780 s.f.

UNIT A 780 s.f.

porch

porch

patio patio

CENTRALIZED

S P R AW L E D


DISTRIBUTED

LEFT -- CONCEPT MODEL.

The Distributed Commons feature eƉciently stacked units, with shared spaces located throughout and the circulation structure serving as the primary space for social interaction. These structures are exaggerated and extended to create occupiable space and bring occupants through and around each others’ personal spheres.


ABOVE -- POTENTIAL EXPERIENCE OF THE OCCUPIABLE CIRCULATION AS A SHARED SOCIAL SPACE.


CENTRALIZED

OPPOSITE -- POTENTIAL EXPERIENCE OF THE RE-OCCUPIED FRONT YARD, ENGAGING WITH NEIGHBORS TO THE SOUTH. ABOVE -- CONCEPT MODEL.

The Centralized Commons focuses all units inwards, and accordions back into the lot to allow for daylighting to all units. Shared spaces are distributed sectionally for maximum fl exiblity and engagment with the neighbors to both the North and the South.


S P R AW L E D

ABOVE -- CONCEPT MODEL.

The Sprawled Common remains low in form and spreads across the lot. Shared spaces are concentrated towards the back, in order to preserve and emphasize the social connections throughout the continuous back yard.


ABOVE -- POTENTIAL EXPERIENCE OF THE CONTINUOUS YARD.


The fl exible programming arrangement allows variation within each triplex typology. In areas where less public and common resources are available, the triplex community takes on a more internalized pattern of commoning. Triplexes located where they are able to utilize the larger commons network can take on an externalized pattern of commoning, or create one between multiple triplexes. Providing this fl exibility and variety enables the triplex typologies to fi ll in gaps in Minneapolis’s community networks at a fi ner grain. Over time they can form interdependent clusters, or infi ltrate more homogenous areas with common shared spaces, thereby establishing and strengthen local commoning networks. As these triplexes accumulate, they create a new layer to the urban revolution that consists of a micro-scale network of privately owned but commonly shared spaces across the city. As a totality, this gradually manifests a built environment that pushes back on the capital-centric idea of how change in the city is driven and creates a new “common” sector of development that enables greater agency at an individual grassroots level, allowing people to better shape the communities they live in and defi ne the next evolution of urban space production.

BREAKING S E T T L E M E N T PAT T E R N S

BREAKING DEVELOPMENT + I N V E S T M E N T PAT T E R N S


This project received the Richard Morrill Final Project Award 2019, and is on display at the HGA Gallery in Rapson Hall from May-September.


.PROFESSIONAL

WORK.


the GARLINGTON CENTER . . . .

design team member scott edwards architecture portland, or completed 2018

AFFORDABLE HOUSING + COMMUNITY WELLNESS The Garlington Center was an existing integrated behavior health clinic for low-income Portlanders. This project`expands their facilities into a 2-story, 24,000-square-foot clinic and adds a 4-story, 52-unit affordable housing building to create`a campus that addresses wellness on all levels. The development also remains tied to the Center’s deep roots in the NE Portland community and contributes meaningfully to the revitalization`of the the Martin Luther King Boulevard corridor. As a member of the Garlington Center design team, I assisted in the research, schematic design phase, Design Review process, presentation imagery, interior design, and capital campaign efforts for both buildings. For the Cascadia Housing building, I also assisted with documentation and detailing as well as designed the units and extensively verified their ADA compliance.

NE MONROE ST

STORMWATER BIOSWALES

HOUSING

CASCADIA HOUSING PRIVATE PATIOS

NE MARTIN LUTER KING JR BLVD

PRIVATE PATIOS

COURTYARD

COMMUNITY GARDEN STAFF COURTYARD

PARKING

65 TOTAL STALLS

WELLNESS CENTER GARLINGTON

WELLNESS CENTER

STORMWATER BIOSWALES

NE MORRIS ST

RIGHT -- CAMPUS SITE PLAN.


BELOW -- EXTERIOR RENDERINGS OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING (TOP) AND HEALTH CLINIC (BOTTOM). DRAWINGS BY ALI, DESIGN BY OTHERS.


ABOVE -- RENDERING OF PEDESTRIAN STREET AND COMMUNITY GARDEN. DRAWING BY ALI, DESIGN BY OTHERS. OPPOSITE -- EXTERIOR DETAILS. DESIGN AND DRAWINGS BY ALI.

TOP/MIDDLE -- DESIGN AND DETAILS FOR BENCH IN CASCADIA HOUSING LOBBY. DESIGN AND DRAWINGS BY ALI. BOTTOM -- TYPICAL 1-BEDROOM UNIT FLOOR PLAN AND REFECTED CEILING PLAN. DESIGN AND DRAWINGS BY ALI.


K I B E R A P U B L I C S PA C E PROJECT 06 . . . .

design intern kounkuey design intiative nairobi, kenya completed 2013

PRODUCTIVE PUBLIC SPACE Kibera is one of the oldest informal settlements in West Africa, housing nearly 1 million people and signifi cantly lacking in proper sanitation and utility access. KPSP06 is an expansion to the original site of KPSP01 built in 2008, adding restrooms and showers for the communitys’ use. Lack of utility accessibility on the site required the use of composting toilets and constructed wetlands for greywater recycling. The block was designed to integrate with composting facilities already established on site. Construction labor was sourced from the local community and the primary building material was interlocking red bricks fabricated on site, a technology specifi cally engineered by KDI for the area.

BELOW -- RENDERING OF THE SANITATION BLOCK IN THE SITE.

kibera park

SITE 01 multipurpose hall

composting facility


S A N I TAT I O N B LO C K P L A N 1 SHOWER STALL

1

2 OFFICE 3 LAVATORY 4 OUTDOOR WALKWAYS

1

2

5 COMOSTING TOILET

3

7

6 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND 7 WASTE PROCESSING AREA

4

4

5

5

15

6

SITE 06 sanitation block

greenhouse


CORRUGATED METAL ROOF OPEN CLERESTORY FOR VENTILATION CONCRETE RING BEAM

WINDOW FOR NATURAL LIGHT LOCAL BAMBOO SCREEN

EXTERIOR WALKWAY

RAMMED EARTH BRICK, MADE ON SITE

LAVATORY STALL, PLASTERED

EXCESS LIQUID DRAINAGE TO WETLAND

REINFORCED CONCRETE WASTE COLLECTION CHAMBER

ACCESS DOOR

LEFT -- SECTION THROUGH COMPOSTING TOILET.


The sanitation block was design through a process that included direct community input. This involved researching and analyzing the various methods for composting human waste and conducting community meetings to help members determine which system would work best for their capacity and maintenance plan. KDI assisted the members in creating a business development plan concurrent with the design to ensure the sanitation block would be self-funded and sustainably managed by the community over the long term.

“KOUNKUEY DESIGN INITIATIVE (KDI) transforms impoverished communities by collaborating with residents to create low-cost, high-impact built environments (Productive Public Spaces) that improve their daily lives.� -kounkuey.org

F U T U R E P H AS E S

SITE 01: EXISTING

K SPS01/ 06 M A S T ER PL A N

SITE 06: CUR R ENT PH A SE


4th DIMENSION I N N E R R E S T O R AT I O N . . . .

INNER RESTORATION Through SEA and during my free time, I provided pro-bono design services to the 4th Dimension Recovery Center, a local non-profi t focused on providing resources and community support for young adults recovering from addiction. The project required renovating an old storefront on MLK Jr Blvd in Portland, OR, and building out the interior to accommodate the organization’s wide variety of services on an extremely low budget. Many of the materials were donated, reclaimed, or funded through city grants. During the day, this facility provides addiction treatment resources and meeting space for the organization’s pioneering mentor program. At night, it hosts everything from meetings to movie nights, fund-raisers to dance parties. Completing this multifaceted project required a coming-together of many people in the community, coordinating the needs of the client, the landlord, city code, budget restraints and available materials to contribute to this vital and one-of-a-kind resource for Portland’s sober young adult community.

project manager + designer scott edwards architecture portland, or completed 2015

BELOW LEFT -- STOREFRONT ELEVATION DRAWINGS FROM PERMIT SET. BELOW RIGHT -- MULTIPURPOSE / MEETING ROOM.. OPPOSITE -- EXTERIOR STOREFRONT RENOVATION. [ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF PETE ECKERT]

 

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TOP -- RECLAIMED WOOD SCREEN AT RECEPTION DESK WITH CAFE SPACE. BOTTOM -- CONCEPT SKETCHES FOR RECLAIMED WOOD SCREEN. [ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF PETE ECKERT]


GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1

ENTRY & CAFE SPACE

2

RECEPTION / REFRESHMENTS

3

FLEX SPACE / MEETING ROOMS

4

OFFICE & RESOURCE ROOM

5

STORAGE

6

YARD / OUTDOOR REC

7

PARKING 7

5

6

ELEC.

5 4

3

2

3 1


.ACADEMIC

WORK.


C O R P O R AT E D W E L L I N G O N T H E WAT E R F R O N T . . . .

graduate studio university of minnesota st. paul, mn 2017

TRANSPARENCY + URBAN STREET FACADE Responding to the stratification caused by the dramatic topography if the site, my proposal for a high-rise office building on this riverfront location in St Paul strives to maintain the force of transparency and establish a physical and visual connection with the Mississippi. At the Kellogg Blvd level, the building’s mass pulls back to create a plaza and public gathering space at the beginning of the planned River Balcony, pinned by a vertical circulation core that acts as a way-finding beacon and takes pedestrians down to the River’s level. The hard and massive nature of the urban context also required the building to speak to this solidity. In order to marry these two opposing forces, the mass of the building pushes and pulls from the established street facade, while the materiality of the facade maintains the imaginary plane. The result is a building mass that dissolves away to create opening where necessary to maintain views and closes where necessary to created appropriately shaded work spaces on the interior. Commercial program is integrated at multiple levels to keep the building activated and connected to the urban context outside of traditional working hours.

LEFT -- CONCEPT MODEL BELOW -- MODEL IN CONTEXT, AS SEEN FROM MISSISSIPPI RIVER


LEFT TOP -- FLOOR PLAN AT KELLOGG BLVD. LEFT BOTTOM -- FACADE COLLAGE. RIGHT -- SELECTED FLOOR PLANS.

6

3

9 1

5

8

SECTION

11 2

10

7

4

9


ABOVE -- VIEW FROM KELLOGG BLVD.


CANTILEVERED GLULAM ROOF BEAMS 7-PLY CLT SLAB

CA N T I L E V E R & BR CON D I T I O N S

GLULAM BEAMS, SEE PLANS FOR SIZING GLULAM GIRDERS, SEE PLANS FOR SIZING

GLULAM COLUMNS, SEE PLANS FOR SIZING 12” CONCRETE SHEAR CORES 2-STORY TRUSS MEMBERS BRACE FRAME TENSION MEMBERS SUPPORTING SECOND FLOOR, SIM. AT 5TH & 6TH

9” TWO-WAY FLAT PLATE POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB

CON C R E T E SYST

EXPOSED CONCRETE BRACING BEAMS 21” CONCRETE COLUMN CONCRETE MOMENT FRAME, SEE PLANS FOR SIZING & LOCATIONS 10” CONCRETE BEARING WALL STEEL PILE CAP FOUNDATIONS ADDITIONAL SHEAR WALL 9” TWO-WAY FLAT PLATE CONCRETE SLAB (SEPARATE SYSTEM)

STRUCTURAL DESIGN -- This project was completed in tandem with a graduate-level structures class, so structural viability was integral to the design process, resulting in the engineering of a two-story truss that supports the 50-ft cantilever at levels 3-4, adding a further layer of complexity to the design. As a result, no two floors are the same and the tenant is provided with a wide variety of environments. The ground floor at Shepard Road is reserved as an incubator space for startups, with the intention of becoming another commercial tenant space in the future as the area becomes more developed.


W

KELLOGG BLVD

ABOVE -- SECTION N-S THROUGH MIDRISE AND BOTH GROUND LEVELS.

I

E NT

R

SO

LS

TI

CE


PUN C HE D O PE N IN G S AT WO RK STATION A RE A S FOR ACC E S S TO IN DIRE CT DAYLIGHT

RA IS E D FLOOR SYSTE M , RADIANT SYSTE M BELOW C LT ST R U C T U R E

GLA S S C U RTAIN WA LL AT TRA N S ITION FRO M IN TERIOR TO E XTE RIOR M ATE RIA L ITY

E XC E S S H EAT RA DIATE D AT O UTDO O R AREAS

STE E L TUBE S UB -STRUCTU RE W ITH S C REEN M O UN TING TABS W E LDE D 2 ’ O.C. E XTE RIO R STEEL STRUCTURE TO S PA N LA RGE O PE N IN G S INT HE S HE LL GLA S S RAILING AT TRA N SITION B E TW E E N E RO DE D VOLU ME A N D E XTERIOR S HE LL

W E ATHE RED STEEL FACA DE AND S C RE E N , BOLTED TO TA B S ON S UB STRUCTU RE

SHEPARD ROAD


NET POSITIVE HOUSING . . . .

graduate studio university of minnesota minneapolis, mn 2018

RIGHT -- SITE PLAN ONCEPT SKETCH. BELOW -- MASSING MODEL.

A FRAMEWORK FOR COMMUNITY AND IDENTITY This studio focused on proposing an affordable housing solution for a site in North Minneapolis that encompassed multiple imperatives of the Living Building Challenge and achieved net positive energy generation. Beyond technical sustainability, the intention of my project was to explore how social housing can become a foundational framework for the growth & development of connection within a community. Approaching the relationship between built environment and residents in this way, I wanted to create cooperative space, where identity and vitality to form in a way that is organic, internally sustained and unique to that specific community. Ultimately, this proposal rethinks the role of affordable housing`not as a social service, but rather as an investment that spawns a resilient node of community, which could strengthen and contribute to the greater social network of` North Minneapolis.


SEMI-PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACE

BEDROOM

WATER CLOSET

BEDROOM

STORAGE

KITCHEN

LIVING SPACE

MAIN ENTRY SEMI-PRIVATE OUTDOOR SPACE

OPPOSITE -- CONCEPT SKETCH AND SITE PLAN. ABOVE -- SECTION AT UNIT ENTRY. LEFT-- UNIT PROGRAM SYNTAX.


Formally, this goal is investigated through the potential of exterior circulation to enable informal interactions between neighbors. This exterior circulation strategy became a central four-season courtyard on to which each unit is focused, using biophilic engagement to drive the community’s connection and sense of identity. By creating this structured void for the inhabitants to build relationships, the architecture becomes a skeleton within which they can take ownership and create a home that converses directly with their collective experience of living.

water plants

rainwater er catc catchment + ret retention spring bulbs emerging e

rain dripping through structure ng thro native plant species attract act birds bir attract ct pollinators poll

animals air

rain smell

warming temperatures

light culture RIGHT -- FOUR-SEASON BIOPHILIC AND SOCIAL ENGAGMENT IN THE COURT YARD.

shady outdoor outdo spaces planning/planting plantin the garden V ED ERQĆ“UHV EDUEHTXHV

S P R I N G

lush h greenery gree

shelter from m rainstorms, rain der, lightning li thunder, gardening ardeni

capturing g sum summer breezes

nts/g plants/g blow in th

dappled ppled sunlight s through gh the leaves outdoor door play p

S U M M E R


gra grasses he wind

snow, accumulation and cumul n the courtyard c drifts within

breath appears h appe clouds in clo or chan color changes rvest ttime harvest

leavess pile in the nookss + cra crannies

icicles forming rming along way str walkway structure ons of trees / skeletons d plan dried plant stalks

vergre evergreens ELUGVĹ´\LQJVRXWK

cooling temperatures

smell of organics decomposing

dead leaves carried on the wind armth from the sun exposure, warmth outdoor tdoor play p

holidayy deco decoration att unit e entries

trails ls in the th snow

A U T U M N

holiday day meals me

W I N T E R


2x8 SHADE STRUCTURE

2x6 BUILT-UP COLUMN

PRIVACY SCREEN/PERGOLA @ UNIT ENTRY INTEGRATED WITH STAIR SCREEN SCREEN ATTACHED TO BEAMS

CROSS SECTION

RAILING SUB-STRUCTURE

STRIP LIGHTS WASHING WALL

CONCEALED GUTTER

RAILING CONNECTED TO JOIST LIGHT WASHING CIRCULATION JOIST THROUGH BUILT-UP COLUMN

DETAIL 2

METAL SCREEN


METAL PARAPET CAP

SCREEN ATTACHED TO BEAMS

2x8 T&G DECKING @ UNIT ENTRY PATIOS

ALUMINUM COMPOSITE CLADDING

2x4 T&G DECKING @ CIRCULATION

ROOF MEMBRANE OVER PROTECTION BOARD OVER 4-IN RIGID INSULATION OVER SHEATHING OVER WOOD JOIST EXPANDING SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

1x8 VENTED WOOD SOFFIT EMBEDDED STEEL PLATE CONNECTING JOIST TO WALL

DETAIL 3

VENTED SOFFIT

SCR EEN D ETAIL 3 ” = 1’-0” DETAIL 4

PERFORATED METAL RAILING FLUSH W/ FACE OF CLADDING

PEDESTAL FLOORING SYSTEM W/ DRAINAGE BELOW

RAILING CONTINUES INTO SECONDARY BUILT-UP COLUMN

OPPOSITE -- SECTION THROUGH LOWRY PORTAL.. ABOVE LEFT -- DETAIL SECTION AT UNIT ENTRY. ABOVE RIGHT-- DETAIL SECTION THROUGH UNIT BALCONY.

METAL FLASHING

DETAIL 1

WATERPROOF MEMBRANE OVER PROTECTION BOARD OVER RIGID INSULATION OVER SHEATHING OVER JOIST W/ EXPANDING SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

PART 2 -- This project was developed in two parts. The second phase of design involved selecting a portion of the building and developing the design in technical detail. The exterior stairway was further designed to be constructed in wood and other conventional materials to further the goals of simultaneous biophilic and social engagement of the inhabitants. The pedestrian portal connecting Lowry Ave to the biophilic courtyard was developed to further enhace vertical connection and intermixing between floors as well as the affordable housing community and the larger neighnorhood.


G R E AT L A K E S U R B A N FORESTRY RESEARCH CENTER . . . .

graduate studio university of minnesota detroit, mi 2018

. completed in collaboration with: Britney Lindsay (M.Arch) Alexis Kaufman (MLA) Nick Bad-Heart Bull (MLA) .nominated for student academic excellence award, 2019

RIGHT -- SECTION THROUGH MILL RUINS. OPPOSITE TOP -- AXON OF CIRCULATION THROUGH REINHABITED MILL RUINS.

COHABITATION IN POST-INDUSTRIAL URBAN ECOSYSTEMS Robinia Pseudoacacia, commonly known as Black Locust, is considered an invasive species. While this leguminous, thorn-ridden tree is native to the Ozarks and Appalachian Range, human activity and its own resilient nature have enabled it to spread throughout the Great Lakes Region. Relentless rhizome growth makes it impossible to eliminate once it has been established. Cutting, burning or otherwise harming it only causes the tree to grow back with a vengeance; sprouting more vigorously, with more thorns, and spreading further into unwanted areas. However, when considering the full lifecycle of the tree and its role as a pioneer species within ecological systems, the Black Locust is more of an asset to the post-industrial urban setting than a nuisance. This project proposes an Urban Forestry Research Center, which specializes in researching the symbiotic potential between Robinin Pseudoacacia, human beings, and the larger bio-temporal processes of the Great Lakes ecosystem. The research develops an accelerated method of human-assisted ecological succession in partnership with the Black Locust species. This can then be deployed throughout the vacant lots of the post-industrial Detroit to restore its ecological vitality, provide economic stimulus as a renewed specialty lumber source, and (un)pave the way for extensive and biodiverse urban hardwood forests.


informal mixing researcher circulation

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E NTR N NT AN C E FROM O M PA OM PAR A R KING

to

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visitor circulation

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YEAR 0-10

YEAR 10-20

YEAR 20-80


OPPOSITE TOP -- SITE SUCCESSION PLAN OVER TIME. OPPOSITE BOTTOM -- BLACK LOCUST SUCCESSION DIAGRAM. ABOVE -- SITE MODEL (YEAR 60).


MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

W I N D SO R W. ELEVATION

MINIMAL SPREADING

E. ELEVATION

PLAN

II. V ACANT LOT P IONEER WILD IN D IVID UAL

41’ - 0”

NO SPREADING

PLAN

38’ - 0”

UNDISTURBED

N. ELEVATION

II

S. ELEVATION

III. D EQUIND RE CU T GRO VE DOMESTIC COMMUNITY

W. ELEVATION

DISTURBED / MAINTAINED

GRADUAL SPREADING

DISTURBED

RE T A I NI NG W A L L

PLAN

W. ELEVATION

SHORELIN E TALL GRASSES TREE

TREE-SHRUB S H R UBS

PLAN

MOWLIN E

ABOVE -- ANTHROPOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS AND RESULTING GROWTH PATTERNS.

IV. B ELLE ISL E SU CKE RS W ILD COMMU N IT Y

IV

F E NC E

GRADUAL SPREADING

III

I . OL D G ROWTH CU L TIV AR DO ME S TIC INDIVIDUAL

I

DISTURBED / MAINTAINED

RESULT

DETROIT


TOP -- SECTION THROUGH RESEARCH FACILITY. BOTTOM -- COHABITATION COURTYARD WITHIN OLD MILL YARD.


M OR E

WO R K:

W W W.ALIK ARLEN.CO


CURRICULUM

VITAE

.EDUCATION.

B.S. IN ARCHITECTURE PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY 2009 - 2013 -- PORTLAND, OR focus: sustainability, public interest design

.WOR K

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA - TC 2017 - 2019 -- MINNEAPOLIS, MN focus: sustainability, housing, urban development

E X P E RI EN CE.

201 8 - 2019

MSR DESIGN -- MINNEAPOLIS, MN STUDENT INTERN. assisted with pre-design, schematic design, presentations and production work on civic, workplace and POE projects.

201 8 - 2019

UMN CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE BUILDING RESEARCH -- MINNEAPOLIS, MN RESEARCH ASSISTANT. assisted professor richard graves with sustainable development and international affordable housing research projects.

2018 - 5 MO.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA COLLEGE OF DESIGN -- MINNEAPOLIS, MN TEACHING ASSISTANT. arch 4561 architecture and ecology. assisted professor dan handeen with grading and student management, led two lab sections per week.

201 4 - 201 7

SCOTT | EDWARDS ARCHITECTURE, LLP -- PORTLAND, OR DESIGNER. project types included; commercial, residential, civic, workplace, healthcare, non-profit. participated in all phases of research, design and construction.

.AC HI EV E M E N T S . 201 9

RICHARD MORRILL FINAL PROJECT AWARD COLLEGE OF DESIGN STUDENT ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARD

201 8

AIA MN - ST PAUL CHAPTER FELLOWSHIP AIA MN - MINNEAPOLIS CHAPTER FELLOWSHIP SULLIVAN FAMILY FELLOWSHIP GEORGE GORBATENKO JR. AWARD KKE/RON KRANK VISION AWARD


Profile for Ali Karlen

Design Portfolio 2019  

Covering my top professional and academic projects, including my Master's Final Project completed at the University of Minnesota in 2019.

Design Portfolio 2019  

Covering my top professional and academic projects, including my Master's Final Project completed at the University of Minnesota in 2019.

Profile for alikarlen
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