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Glastonbury Pop-Up Shop Plan


TABLE OF CONTENTS

history

COMPANY PROFILE

7

8

S.W.O.T

16

DISTRIBUTION

11

CURRENT POSITION

10

12

growth plans

2

corporate structure

Brand Identity

18

COMMUNICATION/PROMOTION

14

20


TABLE OF CONTENTS

UK MARKET ANALYSIS

36

GLASTONBURY ANALYSIS

24

40

34 COMMUNICATION PLAN

60

STORE LOCATION, DESIGN AND PRODUCT

72

FINANCIALS

69

APPENDIX

LONDON TARGET MARKET

66

BIBLIOGRAPHY

3


4


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

ASOS is testing a new channel of distribution by conducting a Pop-Up shop at the Glastonbury Festival in Pilton, Somerset, England. The Glastonbury Festival is reaching its biggest numbers in history with 210,000 tickets selling out in 87 minutes. The festival is filled with fun, performances, music, dancing, arts and many Millennial females waiting to experience ASOS in a physical location. Through conducting this Pop-Up shop, ASOS aims to connect with its customers in a new way to generate helpful feedback. The Pop-Up shop also helps the company make educated decisions involving the possibility of opening a brick-and-mortar location and the many factors involved including location, design, ambiance and amount of merchandise necessary. Brand awareness and recognition are other main objectives of the Pop-Up shop. A large opportunity presents itself in the retail market at the Glastonbury festival. ASOS, being the only large-scale fashion retailer present at the festival, has the ability to capture the target customer and provide a service never before available at the festival. Through a physical location, the opportunity to generate a plethora of feedback and information from customers presents itself. ASOS has to keep the threats of low disposable customer income and many surrounding area attractions in mind. A value-pricing strategy and inviting retail space are implemented to best deal with these threats. With the combination of heavy promotional activities taking place before and during the launch of the ASOS Pop-Up shop, and a festival appropriate product offering and retail space, the female Millennial customer will be well aware of ASOS at Glastonbury and enjoy everything that ASOS has to offer.

5


HISTORY

5


HISTORY

As Seen On Screen Ltd, known to most as ASOS, was founded by Nick Robertson and Quentin Griffith in June 2000. In 2004, ASOS introduced its own label for women and launched ASOS Beauty a year later. In 2006, our buying and merchandising team doubled in size and ASOS became the first UK online fashion retailer to launch a virtual catwalk. In 2007, our headquarters moved to Camden, North London. The ASOS Magazine was launched, reaching 400,000 customers per month, and ASOS’s own men’s fashion label was introduced. In 2008, while the ASOS Magazine more than doubled its production, increasing from 5 to 11 issues per year. The ASOS Outlet opened, offering last season’s looks at 70% off (“Our Story”). In 2009, ASOS reached 1 million active customers in addition to going ‘designer,’ introducing a new array of high-end labels. That same year the ASOS Foundation was created to provide inspiration, support and training for disadvantaged young adults (Annual, 24). ASOS mobile and ASOS Marketplace were introduced in 2010 and German, French and American websites were added. The ASOS Facebook shop, Fashion Finder and iPhone and iPad apps were launched in 2011 while the ASOS websites expanded to include Australian, Italian and Spanish languages. The first international office opened in Sydney, Australia, followed by one in New York in 2012. Further international expansion continued in 2013 as offices opened in Lille, France and Munich, Germany. In 2013, the 8th language specific website was launched, adding Russian to the list. (“Our Story”) In July 2013, together with Fashion Enter Ltd., ASOS established The Stitching Academy as an extension of the National Apprentice in Fashion and Textiles Apparel (Annual, 24).

6


COMPANY PROFILE

MISSION “To become the world’s no. 1 online fashion destination for 20-somethings (“Our Ambition & Strategy”).”

vision “More than just an online retailer, we want to be as synonymous to fashion for 20-somethings as Google is to search and Facebook is to social networking. We’ll measure our success through, amongst other things, our share of online traffic, the number of followers we have on social media sites, and, of course, sales (“Our Ambition & Strategy”).”

values

8

We’ve named our corporate responsibility framework “Fashion With Integrity.” It is designed to support our wider business strategy and will help us to implement sustainable working practices at ASOS. It will also help the suppliers we trade with to do the same. Operating in a responsible way is essential to our long-term future. Our customers expect it and the long-term preservation of the environment depends on it (“Responsibility”).


COMPANY PROFILE

current status ASOS is the second most visited fashion website on the planet with 7.1 million active customers from 31 August 2012 – 2013 (Annual, 1). ASOS is ranked as #1 in retail apparel for monthly visitors ages 15-34 in Australia, Denmark, New Zealand and the UK. We currently hold 3rd place in Hong Kong, 7th place in Germany and Sweden, 8th in France and Italy, 9th in Spain and 17th in the US (Annual, 3). We closed 2013 out with a revenue of 769.4 million GBP, a 39 percent increase from the year prior. Currently our headquarters are in Camden, North London. We also have a 24-hour customer care office based in Hemel Hempstead, UK while our central distribution center is in Barnsley, Yorkshire, UK. From here, we ship to customers in over 190 countries around the world. As of August 2013, 63 percent of our total sales were from outside the UK.

the numbers (“The Numbers”)

9


CORPORATE STRUCTURE

Brian McBride, Chairman

Nick Robertson, CEO

Nick Beighton, CFO

Karen Jones and Ian Dyson, Non-Executive Directors

10

ASOS is a publicly traded company that trades under the stock name ASOS PLC ORD 3.5P. As of 24 February 2014 the ASOS stock closed on the market at 7,025 GBP (“London Stock Exchange”). Our board members find that maintaining appropriate standards of corporate governance is essential to the good management of the business. The Board is responsible for ensuring that ASOS lives up to these standards, and monitors our policies to ensure that they are appropriate for the nature, status, size and circumstances of our company. The Board is primarily responsible for enhancing shareholders’ interests. It does this by: setting the strategy and direction of the company, maintaining appropriate controls to ensure the effective operation of the company, approving revenue and capital budgets and plans, approving financial statements, material agreements and non-recurring projects, determining the financial structure of the company including treasury and dividend policy, overseeing control, audit and risk management, and lastly, setting and monitoring remuneration policies (“Corporate Governance”).


PLANS FOR GROWTH

what’s next At ASOS, we believe that in order to grow and stay ahead in the market place it is imperative that we continuously update our technology to be more user friendly, specifically in payment options. It is also important that we expand the reach of our websites by increasing the number of languages offered, allowing us to more effectively tap into the Chinese and Russian markets amongst others. As our international customer base continues to grow, we are considering opening distribution centers in a few carefully selected countries. We know quality is important to customers and we take it seriously. We have plans to begin quality control checks directly after manufacturing. In addition, we are working to increase our quality inspections at warehouses (“What’s Next”). During the next two years, we will significantly increase our investment in our IT and logistics infrastructure to 55 million GBP per year to support our future growth plans, including expenditures of 25-30 million GBP on Barnsley during the year to 31 August 2014 (Annual, 17). We have started the new financial year positively. Our 1 billion GBP sales target is now firmly in our sights and we have increased our investment in people, technology, logistics and marketing to support the significant global potential of the ASOS business (Annual, 17). future growth

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SWOT ANALYSIS

strengths • • • • • • •

• •

• • • •

Ranked in the top 10 in the Retail-Apparel category for monthly visitors aged 15-34 (“ASOS Blog”) Experiencing international expansion and growth (“ASOS Blog”) Operates 8 country-specific websites, with a ninth launching by spring 2014 (“ASOS Blog”) Accepts 11 payment methods in 15 currencies (“ASOS Blog”) Features an exclusive and diverse array of brands (“ASOS Blog”) Maintains innovative ways to display merchandise to customers and interactive ways to shop (“ASOS Blog”) Offers free shipping and returns to its global customer base (“ASOS Blog”) Produces a monthly ASOS magazine (“ASOS Blog”) Connects with its customers through social media platforms (“ASOS Blog”) Employs a strong management chain (“ASOS Blog”) Actively engaged in corporate/social responsibility (“ASOS Blog”) Award winning 24-hour customer service (“ASOS Blog”) Developed an emotional connection and earned credibility with target market (“ASOS Blog”)

weaknesses • • • • • •

12

Being primarily an e-commerce retailer, customers do not have the option of trying on or feeling products prior to purchasing (“ASOS Blog”) Quality of merchandise does not meet expectations of all customers (“ASOS Blog”) Offers free shipping which equates to excessive expenditures (“ASOS Blog”) Products are produced in five continents, resulting in logistical difficulties (“ASOS Blog”) Relies heavily on information technology systems to produce revenue (“ASOS Blog”) Warehouse disruption can lead to significant operational difficulties in order fulfillment (“ASOS Blog”)


SWOT ANALYSIS

opportunities • • • • •

Utilizes advanced technology to reduce the amount of returns and increase customer satisfaction (“ASOS Blog”) Opening brick-and-mortar stores to expand customer base and further develop brand identity (“ASOS Blog”) Development of a catalog to provide another distribution channel, potentially increasing revenue (“ASOS Blog”) Exploring different marketing and advertising avenues i.e. blogger relationships, print magazines, etc (“ASOS Blog”) Emerging markets (“ASOS Blog”)

threats • • • • • • • •

Sensitive to economic climate, particularly in Europe and Australia (“ASOS Blog”) Plethora of online competition (“ASOS Blog”) Fast-changing fashion marketplace, customer tastes and consumer demands (“ASOS Blog”) Constant fluctuations in foreign interest rates and currency exchange rates (“ASOS Blog”) Fast-changing, consistent technological advances (“ASOS Blog”) Interruption, deterioration or loss of supply of core category products from suppliers can affect ability to trade (“ASOS Blog”) Interruption, deterioration or loss of delivery services can affect the company’s ability to complete sales (“ASOS Blog”) Unauthorized access to customer data could lead to decline in consumer confidence (“ASOS Blog”)

13


BRAND IDENTITY MATRIX

brand as a person • Lover of fashion • Trend conscious • Young • Inspired by friends, celebrities and the media • Technology driven

• • • • •

Not afraid of taking fashion risks Values a deal Free spirited Immersed in popular culture Informed shopper

brand as a product Women’s: apparel, outerwear, sleepwear, hosiery, shoes, handbags, swimwear, beachwear, maternity, lingerie and nightwear, curve and plus size, petite, beauty Men’s: apparel outerwear, lounge wear, underwear and socks, formal wear onesies, shoes, ties, wallets, bags • Hats • Belts • Gloves • Scarves • Sunglasses • Jewelry and watches • Technology accessories • •

brand as a symbol

14

• Logo • Magazine • Marketplace

• •

Runway videos App Icon


BRAND IDENTITY MATRIX

brand as an organization • • • •

Publicly Traded Based in the UK Exceptional consistent growth Market leaders

• Technology driven • Strong global presence • Strong social media presence • Sales, online traffic and social media driven

matrix

15


CURRENT POSITION

price/accessibility matrix

16

With only 238 channels of distribution, ASOS is on the lower end of the accessibility chart; however, we do have a greater amount of accessibility than 10 of our listed competitors. Despite being an e-commerce and m-commerce store with no physical shops, we are still able to outreach the majority of our competition. Having over 3,000 stores worldwide, H&M is our leading competitor when it comes to the brands accessibility. When considering tops, shorts, dresses and hats, ASOS has the highest price-point reaching nearly 200 dollars on average, with The Iconic and Nasty Gal close behind. Many of our competitors operate on the opposite end of the spectrum, Forever 21 has an average of 21 dollars per item.


CURRENT POSITION

17


DISTRIBUTION

distribution channels

ASOS distributes merchandise through e-commerce and m-commerce. Shipping to 237 countries and territories, ASOS is able to serve customers globally. Mobile phone and tablets now account for 30 percent of visits to the website (Annual, 1). In 2013, the United Kingdom led retail sales for the company with 276 million GBP an increase of 34 percent since 2012 (Annual, 3). ASOS’s top selling countries and territories are: England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Russia, Australia and the United States (Sommerville). Sales in the United States increased 57 percent, totaling 77.7 million GBP. Sales in the EU increased 51 percent, totaling 177.7 million GBP. Sales in the Rest of the World increased 35 percent, totaling 222.4 million GBP. The overall revenue for the company was 769.4 million GBP (Annual, 3). ASOS recently took over management of the online fulfillment center located in Barnsley, England. In 2013, labor cost per unit decreased 11 percent. We transitioned to a new service provider in August 2013 and launched our merchandised dispatch sorter in October 2013. In January 2013, we gained bonded warehouse status and are extending the center by 140,000 square feet, providing the storage capacity for increased unit volumes. The returns center in Australia was relocated in March 2013 to reduce costs and provide capacity for future growth. In May 2013 we transitioned the US returns processing center from Atlanta to a more advanced center in Ohio. A logistics partnership with China has been established for future domestic distribution to Chinese customers (Annual, 11).

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DISTRIBUTION

Where we do it

Central distribution centre: Barnsley, Yorkshire Additional IT support: Birmingham, West Midlands

UK

Returns processing centre Ohio (US)

Retail sales £276.0m +34%

US

Retail sales £77.7m +57%

24-hour customer care office: Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

Payment accepted in 15 currencies 11 payment methods

Marketing services office and press showroom New York (US)

Headquarters: Camden, London

Global positioning according to Comscore* Our ranking in the Retail – Apparel category for monthly visitors aged 15-34

International growth

44% in 2013

we ship to

237

countries and territories

Marketing services office Berlin (Germany)

EU

Retail sales £177.7m +51%

RoW

Retail sales £222.4m +35%

#1 #1 #8 #7 #3 #19 #8 #1 #4 #9 #7 #1 #17

Australia Denmark France Germany Hong Kong India Italy New Zealand Norway Spain Sweden United Kingdom US

* August 2013

ASOS China trading operation Shanghai (China)

Marketing services office Lille (France)

Eight ASOS.com local country sites: UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia, US, Russia (added 2013) and China (coming soon)

Marketing services office Sydney (Australia)

ASOS Plc Annual report and accounts 2013

3

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COMMUNICATION/PROMOTION

ANNUAL Spend figures / changes

Currently ASOS has marketing service offices located in Berlin, Germany, Lille, France New York City, New York and Sydney Australia. In June 2013, ASOS was awarded Best Content Marketing / Best Social Media Marketing / Best Leading Edge Thinking by The Marketing Society (Annual, 7). Terri Westlake is ASOS’s Marketing Director and has made significant changes in the last year (Annual, 6). As of last year we spent 44.9 million GBP on marketing costs, up 93 percent from the year prior (Annual, 14). We invested in increased marketing activities during the year, specifically in digital marketing, including pay per click and affiliate marketing, and in country-specific campaigns. Our digital marketing efforts were targeted on the UK, US, Australia, France and Germany. Our marketing campaigns included our peak ‘Best Night Ever’ campaign in the UK, US and Australia, and local magazine partnerships in France and Germany. The results of these activities are already visible in the strong worldwide growth in sales and active customers during the year. We expect continued returns on this investment in each of our strategic markets during the new financial year (Annual, 15).

Advertising activities / TRADITIONAL

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ASOS is far more than just a simple shopping website. Fashion-focused 20-somethings can visit asos.com on their phones, tablets or laptops while searching for fashion or talking about the latest trends with their friends (“Multiple Channels”). Currently ASOS advertises on a number of different platforms. We traditionally advertise through their ASOS Magazine is sent to over 446,000 selected customers each month in a hard copy, glossy format. The magazine is also sent in digital format via the Fashion Up App to a further 50,000 customers. ASOS Magazine informs and entertains, helping ASOS build customer loyalty and brand awareness (“ASOS Magazine”).


COMMUNICATION/PROMOTION

Advertising activities / digital ASOS practices a plethora of digital advertising techniques starting with asos.com. ASOS is now a global fashion destination for 20-somethings with over 7.1 million active customers as of 31 August 2013. ASOS has country-specific websites for the US, Australia, France, Germany, Russia, Spain and Italy. Customers accessing ASOS on their mobile phones now account for over 30 percent of the site’s global traffic (“ASOS.com”). Fashion Finder is another great way ASOS advertises to its customers. Visitors to ASOS don’t just see themselves as shoppers, they want to be stylists, fashion bloggers, editors, trend-setters and designers. With Fashion Finder they can showcase their ideas, even if this includes an item from another retailer. Fashion Finder receives around 1.3 million visits per month. Users access the site through asos.com. Here they can browse styles and edits that MODEL either we’ve created or that have been put together by their fellow OUR BUSINESS users, build their own ‘outfit’, seek practical fashion advice, and shop from third party retailers. Fashion Finder is a totally interactive experience (“Fashion Finder”). ASOS is a global fashion destination for ASOS Marketplace is a platform which allows users to buy and sell fashion with anyone, 20-somethings. Selling over 65,000 products, anywhere world. Home to around 120,000 it’s alsoinathe forum where fashion lovers can items from over 130 countries, Marketplace is the destination theinspiration, best new, pre-owned and vintage fashion from around the globe. discover trends,for gain share ideas and trade with Competitive fees andeach easeother. of use makes Marketplace completely accessible to all. Wardrobes and

fashion start-ups can opt for an account which allows them to list up to 100 items for free and pay just 5 percent commission on anything that sells. 20 percent of the commission going directly to the ASOS Foundation. ASOS Marketplace Selling App Engagement Service In September 2013, the Product launched, making listing items on Marketplace easier thanOurever (“ASOS Marketplace”). Through publishing relevant content, We strive to offer an effortless online buyers scour the globe for the most a constant social media dialogue and our curated ‘edits’, we’ve developed an emotional connection and earned credibility with 20-something fashionlovers around the world. The monthly ASOS magazine is sent for free to almost 500,000 customers, while our Premier membership is hugely popular.

shopping experience from the moment a visitor arrives at ASOS.com, whatever device they are using and country they come from. We deliver for free, anywhere in the world, and offer hassle-free returns in our core markets. Our award-winning customer service team helps with any questions along the way.

relevant products at the best prices. Our 65,000 products include our own brand plus around 800 brands ranging from big names to up-and-coming designers. Each week up to 2,500 new styles go live, whilst ASOS Marketplace offers a further 145,000 products, ensuring our customers are never short of choice.

Social Media at ASOS HQ is based around our customers’ wants and needs. We tailor the content that we push across 10 social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube Channel, Google+, ASOS blog, Fashion Finder, ASOS Marketplace, ASOS App, Tumblr) to their gender, region and interests, allowing us to create the most engaging experience on a truly global level. As a brand we aim to innovate. We talk directly to every customer who follows or “Like’s” us on our social channels as part of our business objective is to hit 24/7 engagement. Interacting on social media is as important as emailing or taking phone calls, maybe even more so (“Social Media”)!

2.6m likes

2.2m followers

1m followers

540k followers

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COMMUNICATION/PROMOTION

direct marketing / sales promotion

ASOS currently engages in connecting with their customers through email. ASOS emails our customers on a daily basis, pushing content that fits each customer’s style and taste. Emails may include a coupon code that the customer can use instantly on the website to receive a percentage off or information on the latest products and trends available through asos.com. The ASOS website features a SALE category where all markdown merchandise is placed. Customers can receive up to 70 percent off merchandise in this category. ASOS’s current sales promotion depends heavily on their direct email marketing strategy.

OUR BUSINESS MODEL OUR BUSINESS MODEL (Annual, 2) ASOS is a global fashion destination for 20-somethings. Selling over 65,000 products, it’s also a forum where fashion lovers can discover trends, gain inspiration, share ideas and trade with each other.

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Engagement

Service

Product

Through publishing relevant content, a constant social media dialogue and our curated ‘edits’, we’ve developed an emotional connection and earned credibility with 20-something fashionlovers around the world. The monthly ASOS magazine is sent for free to almost 500,000 customers, while our Premier membership is hugely popular.

We strive to offer an effortless online shopping experience from the moment a visitor arrives at ASOS.com, whatever device they are using and country they come from. We deliver for free, anywhere in the world, and offer hassle-free returns in our core markets. Our award-winning customer service team helps with any questions along the way.

Our buyers scour the globe for the most relevant products at the best prices. Our 65,000 products include our own brand plus around 800 brands ranging from big names to up-and-coming designers. Each week up to 2,500 new styles go live, whilst ASOS Marketplace offers a further 145,000 products, ensuring our customers are never short of choice.


COMMUNICATION/PROMOTION

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS

THE UK’S FASHION RETAIL INDUSTRY Total sales of the United Kingdom’s fashion industry in 2009 equaled 59 billion GBP. Therefore, on average British consumers spent 900 GBP on fashion (“Facts and Figures in the UK Fashion Industry”). The UK fashion retail market employs 816,000 people across a wide range of jobs and is the largest employer of all the creative industries. The fashion industry is the fifteenth largest industry (out of 81) in the UK and is similar in size to the food/beverage services and telecommunications industries. It is bigger than the wholesale and retail of automotive, sports activities, chemical manufacturing and advertising/video sectors (Value of Fashion Report). In 2009, the UK fashion industry was estimated to have directly contributed 20.9 billion GBP to the UK economy, or 1.7 percent of total UK gross domestic product (GDP). The majority of this is derived through retail distribution, with estimates suggesting that 22.5 percent of all retail’s value added contribution to GDP in the UK can be attributed to the fashion industry (The Value of the UK Fashion Industry, 12). A regional analysis shows that in 2009 over 80 percent of the total expenditure on fashion products in the UK was spent in England, with the majority of the remainder spent in Scotland. Together Wales and Northern Ireland make up just over 6 percent of total spending. Lastly, London accounts for the largest share of all spending amongst the regions at 14.6 billion GBP or just over a quarter of the total spending (The Value of the UK Fashion Industry, 61). The UK women’s apparel industry shows to be one of the top categories that consumers spend their money on. In 2009, UK consumers spent 14.5 million GBP on women’s apparel products (The Value of the UK Fashion Industry, 62). Of that, the number 1 category purchased was women’s outer garments totaling 196,000 GBP weekly with women’s undergarments and accessories vastly behind (The Value of the UK Fashion Industry, 92).

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In order for ASOS to successfully expand into a brick-and-mortar location it’s very important to understand the size of the UK fashion retail industry and how it affects the company. With the majority of fashion retail sales coming from London, ASOS has a significant opportunity to expand because almost half of the Glastonbury festival attendees originate from the London region. It will be pertinent for ASOS to merchandise their pop-up shop assortments properly to reflect the UK consumer. Since the number 1 category purchased in the UK is women’s outer garments, it will be significant to ensure that a variety of items are available in this category for purchase at the Glastonbury festival.


UK MARKET ANALYSIS

THE UK’S REGIONAL SPENDING

FIGURE 6.1: BREAKDOWN OF FASHION RETAIL SPENDING BY STANDARD REGIONAL CLASSIFICATIONS

The results show that in 2009 over 80% of total retail expe was spent in England, with the majority of the remainder in ern Ireland make up just over 6% of total spending. Unsurp above-average income, London accounts for the largest sha (£14.6 billion or just over a quarter of the total). Moreover, C in London was somewhat of an outlier, even given its stron spending in London was significantly higher than might be e earnings. This is linked to the fact that a disproportionate London (in relation to its share of the UK population), whilst high street attracts shoppers from the Home Counties and

CHART 6.1: SCATTER PLOT OF TOTAL FASHION RETAIL SPENDIN ANNUAL EMPLOYEE EARNINGS (2009) Retail spend (£bns)

Retail spending on fashion products (£mns) 7,500 to 15,000 5,000 to 7,500 4,200 to 5,000 3,400 to 4,200 1,500 to 3,400

16 14 12 10 Scotland

8

South West

6 4

East

North East Wales

2 0

North East

Yorks & The Humber

East Midlands

N. Ireland

10

20

30

West Midlands

40

50

Source: Oxford Economics/ONS

The data was sufficiently disaggregated so that we could e regionally. Table 6.1 summarises spending by product and r

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS

PESTEL

POLITICAL: • UK has been a member of the EU since 1973. This allows for: free movement of goods, capital and services between member countries, allowing citizens to move, work, live and retire in any member country. All countries instill the same external tariff on all goods entering their market (Hussain, 19). • UK is a CRT-1 country with very low levels of risk across all three categories: political risk, economic risk and financial system risk (Hussain, 19). • UK government is run by Prime Minister whom appoints members of the government (“How Government Works”). • The government is reforming the laws that cover competition and anti-competitive activities in business (“Preventing and Reducing Anti-competitive Activities”). • 100% tax deduction on energy efficiency expenditures (Hussain,14). • Relationship with EU in danger, causing crises in European countries leading to depreciating value of UK economy and currency (Hussain,14). • UK has ninth highest tax rate for people earning over 125,000 GBP (Hussain,14). ECONOMIC: • Corporate tax rate is 21% (“Guide to UK taxation”). • Benchmark interest rate is .50% (“Trading economics”). • GDP growth rate equals .70% (“Trading economics”). • Government spending equaled 694.89 billion GBP in 2012 (“UK public spending”). • 7.2% unemployment rate (“UK National Debt”). • Great British Pound: 1 GBP = 1.64 USD as of 9 February 2014. • 1 USD = .61 GBP as of 9 February 2014. • Value added tax (aka sales tax) is 20% (“UK Government”). • National debt equals 1.7 trillion or 89.10% GDP (“UK National Debt”).

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS SOCIAL: • The estimated populations of the four constituent countries of the UK in mid-2012 were 53.5 million people in England, 5.3 million in Scotland, 3.1 million in Wales and 1.8 million in Northern Ireland (“Population Estimates”). • In 2011/12, median household income was 23,200 GBP (“Median Household Income Fell 3.8 percent between 2007/08 and 2011/12”). • Very poor social mobility (“Social Mobility”). • The percentage of people aged from 16 to 64 who were in work was 72.1 percent. There were 30.15 million people in employment aged 16 and over (“Labour Market Statistics, January 2014”). • In 2010/11, 78.5 percent of adults aged 16 and over in the UK who were in work reported being somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their job (“Measuring National Well-being”). • 16.8 percent of adults aged 16 and over in the UK reported they had done voluntary work several times a year or more in 2010/11, while 81.5 percent had never or almost never done any voluntary work (“Measuring National Well-being”). • 60.9 percent of adults aged 16 and over in the UK were somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their amount of leisure time in 2010/11 (“Measuring National Well-being”). • 83.2 percent adults aged 16 and over in England engaged with, or participated in, arts or cultural activity at least three times in the year prior to interview in 2012/13 (“Measuring National Well-being”). • Between October 2011 and October 2012, 36 percent of adults aged 16 and over in England participated in at least 30 minutes of sport at moderate intensity at least once a week, equivalent to 15.51 million people (“Measuring National Well-being”). TECHNOLOGY: • UK scientists are among the leaders in the development of science and technology, especially in the aerospace, motor and pharmaceutical industries (Hussain, 33). • UK is the second country with the most Noble laureates won: with 119 total and 94 in scientific research (Hussain, 35). • UK is a leading country in innovation which will encourage long-term productivity growth for businesses and encourage investments and exports alike (Hussain, 33). • Internet use and broadband is growing at a rate of 42,000 new subscribers per week (Hussain, 34). • 25 percent of retail sales in the UK are made online (Clift, 2). • There is an average of ten active technological devices per household, six of which have online connectivity (Clift, 3). • Research and Development expenditures have decreased within recent years (Hussain, 34-35). • UK has plans to allocate 600 million GBP for funding in science and technology. (Hussain, 36).

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS

PESTEL CONT’ ENVIRONMENTAL: • UK values its environment, putting 12.9 billion GBP into environmental protection (2011); however, the funding has been on the decline (“UK Environmental”). • UK’s average ecological footprint per capita is 5.45 global hectares (gha) (Hussain, 38). • At 78 percent, waste management is the largest segment of the Environmental Protection Expenditure (“UK Environmental”). • Recycling and use of renewable resources have seen an increase (“UK Environmental”). • Air pollution is a major concern for the UK government who continues to put great emphasis on its reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (Hussain, 37). • UK has regulations towards air, land, waste, recycling, water, packaging and hazardous material (Hussain, 38). • UK requires all companies to report their greenhouse gas emissions in accordance with the Companies Act 2006 (“Measuring”). • The Packaging and Waste Directive requires packaging materials to be minimal and recyclable (“Environmental Regulations”). • UK has 160.6 cu km of renewable water resources, only 9.9 percent of which is used yearly (Hussain, 37). • The Electricity Market Reform (EMR) program plans to invest 110 billion GBP for the UK to secure an affordable supply of electricity while being environmental conscious (“Increasing”).

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LEGAL: • All marketing and advertising must be: an accurate description of the product or service, legal, decent, truthful, honest and socially responsible (“Marketing Advertising Law”). • Labor & Anti-Discrimination Laws enforced (“Employment law in the UK”). • Health and safety laws enforced; Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (“Retail”). • Protected Employees Rights: Contracts & Laws (“Employment law in the UK”). • Selling and purchasing of alcohol is legal (“The law on alcohol and under 18s”). • Liquor license is required (“The law on alcohol and under 18s”). • Purchasing of alcohol is legal at 18 years of age (“The law on alcohol and under 18s”). • Ages 5 to 16 are allowed to drink alcohol at home or on other private premises (“The law on alcohol and under 18s”). • It is legal for someone over 18 to buy a child over 16 beer, wine or cider if they are eating a table meal together in a licensed premises (“The law on alcohol and under 18s”).


UK MARKET ANALYSIS

PESTEL ANALYSIS: The political structure of the UK provides a stable and positive business environment. Actions regarding business laws show the values of the government, proving the UK to be a smart business location. The high tax rate needs to be taken into account, in regards to lowering discretionary income and purchasing power. The UK economy continues to experience growth which is a positive factor for ASOS because the company is trying to expand into a new channel of dsitribution. With England having the largest population, this proves that marketing and promoting focus needs to be conducted here. This population values art and culture, giving ASOS insight in how to relate to and attract the target customer. Internet and broadband is prominent within the UK and continues to grow weekly. With a fourth of sales taking place online, the Internet and social media are excellent platforms for ASOS to conduct advertising and promotion initiatives. As the UK values the environment and its protection, it’s important that ASOS’s pop-up shop is as environmentally friendly as possible. In particular, the company will have to consider packaging and merchandising products are utilizing eco-friendly practices. Legally it will be pertinent to ensure that ASOS follows any and all laws that are relevant to our industry to ensure a successful pop-up shop.

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS

direct competitors The apparel industry of the United Kingdom is dominated by the brands NEXT, New Look, River Island, H&M and Zara. The principle players are all internationally well-known. In order for ASOS to successfully integrate themselves into the UK brick-and-mortar sector, it is important to understand who the main competition is and where they stand within the market. DIRECT COMPETITION NEXT • Multinational clothing, footwear and home products retailer • Based out of Enderly, England • Publicly traded under the stock name NXT (LON) • CEO: Simon Wolfson • Founded in 1864 by Joseph Hepworth • Distributes through three main channels: retail, directory and international • Annual sales equaled 3.5 million GBP in the UK in 2013 • Operates 400 brick-and-mortar stores in the UK NEW LOOK • Founded in 1969 by Tom Singh and Christian Dior • Based out of Taunton, UK • Holds 1,104 stores worldwide and an online store serving 120 countries • Mission is to help customers look and feel great • Carry women’s, men’s, maternity, plus size and teen lines • Annual sales equaled 1,484.0 million GBP in the UK in 2013 • Operates 84 brick-and-mortar stores in the UK

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RIVER ISLAND • Founded in 1948 by Bernard Lewis, current CEO • Headquarters are located in London, England • Leading high street fashion brand • Operates worldwide throughout Asia, the Middle East and Europe • Privately owned company by the Lewis family • Annual sales equaled 802.2 million GBP in the UK in 2013 • Operates 260 brick-and-mortar stores in the UK


UK MARKET ANALYSIS

direct competitors CONT’ H&M • Headquarters located in Stockholm, Sweden • Founded by Erling Persson in 1947 • CEO Karl-Johan Persson • Swedish multinational retail clothing company • Known for its fast fashion clothing for men, women, teenagers and children • Exists in 53 countries worldwide • Operates 228 brick-and-mortar stores in the UK ZARA • Founded in 1975 by Amancio Ortega and Rosalia Mera • Based in Arteixo, Galicia • Offers clothing for women, men and children and accessories • Operates 63 brick-and-mortar stores in the UK • One of the largest international fashion companies • Belongs to Inditex, one of the world’s largest distribution groups • Vertically integrated company • Annual sales equaled 442.7 million GBP in 2013 in the UK

KEY PLAYERS ANALYSIS/GRAPH The key players in the United Kingdom within the brick-and-mortar sector include Next, New Look, River Island, H&M, Zara, Miss Selfridge, Urban Outfitters, Uniqlo, American Apparel, Forever 21 and Independent Boutiques. ASOS faces competition with 17,137 brick-and-mortar locations throughout the UK. Next is leading the way with the most locations and greater annual sales equaling 3547.6 million GBP. With no brick-and-mortar locations, it is easy to see that ASOS falls exactly in the middle, with ZARA slightly above and Miss Selfridge right below. This chart shows a significant opportunity that is available for ASOS to expand and grow through a new channel of distribution. ASOS is the leading online apparel retailer with a vast amount of sales exceeding competition that is already established within the brick-and-mortar segment.

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS Key Players

Independent Boutiques

# of UK Locations

Annual Sales

400

3457.6  million  GBP

85

1248.5  million  GBP

260

802.2  million  GBP

228

777.6  million  GBP

63

442.7  million  GBP

0

276.0  million  GBP

171

141.4  million  GBP

27

138.3  million  GBP

10

63.0  million  GBP

260

29.1  million  GBP

400

23.2  million  GBP

15,  233

100,000  -­‐  300,000  thousand   GBPs

Annual Sales are based off of sales in the United Kingdom in 2013.

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UK MARKET ANALYSIS KEY PLAYERS ADVERTISEMENTS

Next

New Look

Zara

River Island

H&M

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GLASTONBURY ANALYSIS

INDIRECT COMPETITION At the Glastonbury Festival, “hundreds of food traders, charities, campaigning organizations and peddlers of the bizarre and unique apply to trade at Glastonbury each year” (“Traders”). The festival sets up market places where its selected vendors can set up shop. Here, anything from artwork to crafts, clothing, food, drinks and alcohol can be purchased. With over 250 food stalls on the festival grounds serving over 30,000 meals of various cuisine and prices, the food and drink stalls are major indirect competitors (“Food and Shopping”). Most of the vendors are local traders who do not provide financial information about their revenue earned during the festival. Some of the traders include: the Italian Kitchen, Vegetarian, Creperia, Fat Belly, Chicken Shack, The Grill, Miss Katie Cupcake, Fat Salad, Truly Crumptious, Frozen Yoghurt, Mr. Whippy, Somerset Cider, Juice Bar!, and Foliko. By Ticket Type

Standard

No. of trips in sample % of trips No. of trips in total Spend on Site Food and Drink Shopping Entertainment and Service Other Total on Site Spend Gross on Site Spend (000's) Spend off Site Food and Drink (Shops, supermarkets) Food and Drink (pubs, restaurants) Other Shooping Travel and Transport Entertainment and Service Accommodation Total off Site Spend Gross off Site Spend (000's) Total Gross Total Spend (000's)

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Trader Pass

1919 76.9 136467

£ 129.19 £ 23.02 £ 2.35 £ 1.32 £ 155.88 £ 21,272.53

273 10.9 19,414

£ 83.86 £ 17.59 £ 2.68 £ 0.48 £ 104.61 £ 2,030.01

Local Resident 46 1.8 3,271

Volunteer 153 6.1 10.88

£ 87.09 £ 15.49 £ 2.16 £ 0.33 £ 105.07 £ 1,143.20

£ £ £ £ £ £

86.81 14.25 0.11 0.55 101.72 332.75

Sample Average 2,496 100 177,500

Other 105 4.2 7,467

£ £ £ £ £ £

90.22 14.05 1.48 1.43 107.18 800.31

£ £ £ £ £ £

119.23 21.43 2.30 1.16 144.11 25,579.70

£

38.58 £

44.44 £

38.80 £

21.67 £

30.18 £

38.57

£

5.43 £

4.31 £

2.54 £

0.67 £

7.96 £

5.15

£ 55.89 £ £ 43.11 £ £ £ £ 2.97 £ £ 140.11 £ £ 1,046.19 £ £ 247.29 £ £ 1,846.50 £

51.14 50.39 1.59 2.29 149.13 26,470.23 293.24 52,049.93

£ 53.87 £ 39.39 £ 48.01 £ 82.26 £ 1.74 £ 2.01 £ 2.58 £ 1.25 £ 150.21 £ 173.66 £ 20,498.76 £ 3,371.45 £ 306.09 £ 278.27 £ 41,771.29 £ 5,402.35

£ 45.34 £ £ 40.53 £ £ 0.56 £ £ 0.81 £ £ 128.58 £ £ 1,399.00 £ £ 233.65 £ £ 2,542.21 £

15.18 9.81 47.33 154.83 149.05 487.58

Graph (above): How Consumers Spend Their Money At Festivals


GLASTONBURY ANALYSIS On sight spending for the standard ticket holder in 2007 averaged 42.22 GBP daily for an average of 3.6 days (“Glastonbury Festivals,” 33). On average, 119.23 GBP was spent on food and drink, 21.43 GBP was spent of shopping and 2.30 GBP was spent on entertainment with a typical on sight spending for the standard ticket holder totaling 144.11 GBP (“Glastonbury Festivals,” 32). The UK Millennial is “highly engaged with social media on their smart phones,” making tech toys another indirect competitor to consider as 98.6 percent of Millennials in the UK use mobile phones and 87.7 percent use smart phones (“Mobile Social Affects UK Millennials’ Path to Purchase”). The average UK household has 10 active technological devices including laptops, tablets, smartphones, desktops and game consoles, 6 of which have internet access (Clift, 3). Taking a glance at online shopping, 53 percent of 18-34 year olds purchase technology products and personal electronics online while 37 percent of these same consumers purchase movies/music/video games online (“Digital and the New Consumer: Emerging Paths to Purchase”). EE is the leading mobile telecommunications provider in the UK covering 43 percent of the population followed by O2. EE is one of Everything Everywhere Limited’s brands along with Orange and T-Mobile, which together have nearly 26.8 million customers (“Everything Everywhere Limited”). EE currently offers 17 phones and 6 tablets while featuring 8 brands (EE). O2 is a division of Telefonica UK Limited which earns 357 million GBP in revenue yearly. O2 sells 9 brands and offers a choice of 50 phones and 5 tablets in addition to tech accessories (Garwood and O2). Currys, PC World, KNOWHOW, Dixons Travel, and PC World Business are all brands of Dixons Retail that together have 552 stores in the UK, with underlying sales of 4,014.5 million GBP (“Dixons Retail”). Together, “Currys and PC World are the largest specialist electrical retailing and services operators in the UK.” They offer a variety of appliances as well as entertainment devices including: televisions, game consoles, DVD and Blu-ray players, soundbars, and movies, in addition to computers, tablets, e-readers, cameras and camcorders. The food and alcohol stalls are ASOS greatest indirect competition because the most amount of money is pent with this category at the Glastonbury festival. Strategically placing the pop-up shop near food and beverage stalls allows for high visibility due to the large amount of foot traffic. With the average ticket holder spending 21.43 GBP on retail at the festival ASOS needs to carefully select their product assortments and implement a value pricing strategy. With seemingly few apparel retailers at the festival in past years, consumer spending figures may be skewed. ASOS has the opportunity to raise the average spending on retail through its fashion forward product assortments. Seeing that the target market spends a large portion of their income on technology, teaming up with a technology retailer familiar to the consumer would allow ASOS to more easily reach the target market. Collaborations with EE or O2 to disperse promotional and advertising campaigns could strengthen brand awareness at the festival.

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LONDON TARGET CONSUMER

DEMOGRAPHICS Age: At 59 percent, the majority of music festival attendees in the UK are female (“Music Festivals”). 13 percent of music festival attendees in the UK are between the ages of 18-20. 17 percent of attendees are between the ages of 21-25, and 14 percent are between the ages of 26-30 (“Music Festivals”). Female Millennial consumers hold strong purchasing power at UK music festivals with a combined 44 percent of the population. This suggests a well-sized target consumer for the company initiative. Income: In 2010/11, male median income peaked at the 45-49 age range with 28,500 GBP, while the peak for females was reached at the 30-34 age range with 20,200 GBP (“Personal Income Statistics 2010-11”). In 2010/11, average females in UK ages 20-24 make around 13,000 GBP. Average females in UK ages 25-29 make around 17,000 GBP (“Personal Income Statistics 2010-11”). Creating value and implementing a low pricing-strategy are keys to success with this customer. Education: Education is highly valued within the UK. London had the most 16-64 year olds educated to NVQ level 4 and above (equivalent to degree level) at 45.9 percent in 2011. Northern Ireland had the lowest share with 25.7 percent (“Regional Economic Indicators - March 2013”). During the academic year 2011/12, the highest rate of achievement amongst the English regions for 5 or more GCSE’s (General Certificate of Secondary Education) A* to C, including Mathematics and English was 62.3 percent in London; the lowest was in Yorkshire and The Humber with 57.3 percent. NVQ level 1 is equivalent to GCSE grades D-F. Level 2 is equivalent to GCSE grades A-C. Level 3 is equivalent to AS/A levels. Level 4 and above is equivalent to higher education (“Regional Economic Indicators - March 2013”).

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Status: Around half of the London population between ages 20-59 years are single (“Relationships”). New research from the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) shows that the unemployment rate among under 25’s is now 3.74 times greater than the adult jobless rate (Jamil).


LONDON TARGET CONSUMER

PYSCHOGRAPHICS Geography: Most visitors to the Glastonbury Festival come from London and SE England. This area accounts for almost half (46.8 percent) of all Festival attendees, with London alone accounting for 25.8 percent (“Glastonbury Festivals,” 35).

Leisure: The cultural values and interests of Millennials in the UK are intertwined with the rise of the culture of digital media. The Internet, including social media, was seen as the best source of entertainment by 64 percent – trampling print magazines and newspapers, with a mere three percent (Gray). Millennials spend a large amount of their leisure time on mobile phones. 98.6 percent of Millennials in the UK use mobile phones and 87.7 percent use smart phones. 87.7 percent of Millennial mobile users in the UK use the Internet on their device, and 77.4 percent use social networks on their device (“Mobile Social Affects UK Millennials’ Path to Purchase”). Environmentally Friendly: Glastonbury Festival attendees value contributing to a healthy environment. Recently, 35,000 Glastonbury attendees signed the petition for the ‘Pump up the Volume’ campaign, promoting access to safe water and sanitation to everyone, everywhere by 2030. Over 4,000 people signed up to the ‘Save the Arctic’ campaign. ‘Oxfam’s Love Syria’ petition at Glastonbury 2013, calling

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LONDON TARGET CONSUMER for more aid for Syrians in need and progress on a peaceful solution to the crisis, was signed by nearly 10,000 people (“Worthwhile Causes�). At the Glastonbury location, it is imperative to display environmentally friendly actions to relate to the consumer and establish a reputable stance. Other Beliefs: Millennials in the UK are very in-tune with themselves. 70 percent feel it is important to be true to themselves no matter what, while 56 percent feel it is important to test their limits and stretch themselves (Havas Worldwide). Global change is in the forefront of the Millennial consumer’s mind. 80 percent of 18-25 year olds in the UK believe their generation has the power to change the world. The most important qualities this generation needs to possess are: creativity, determination and courage. 73 percent consider social media as a force for change. 42 percent believe that the things they consume have more power to change things than the people they vote for (Havas Worldwide). Product choices trump politics. It is important to make apparent the social corporate responsibility that ASOS possesses to attract and keep hold of the target consumer. They see the brands and products they buy not just as utilitarian but as reflections of themselves, including their personalities and values. Work: Millennials have developed a pragmatic and utilitarian approach to the work world. 45 percent look first at salary when choosing a job (Havas Worldwide). For them, work is primarily about earning rather than personal fulfillment or being a productive member of society. They understand they must earn a living to survive.

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LONDON TARGET CONSUMER

BEHAVIORAL INFORMATION Shopping Habits: 53 percent of 18-34 year olds in the UK purchase technology products/personal electronics online. 52 percent of 18-34 year olds in the UK purchase clothing/shoes/accessories online. 42 percent of 18-34 year olds in the UK purchase books online. 37 percent of 18-34 year old in the UK purchase movies/music/video games online. 66 percent of 18-34 year olds in the UK go to the Internet to shop first (“Digital and the New Consumer: Emerging Paths to Purchase”). Festival Behavior: The Glastonbury Festival hosts around 250 musical performances on over 50 stages each festival. Clean Bandit, will.i.am, Pharrell Williams, Gorgon City & MNEK, and Katy B are among the UK’s favorite artists (“The Official UK Top 40 Singles Chart”). Loud music, big crowds and many attractions bring about interesting behavior. 47 percent of music festival attendees in the UK do something at the festival that they would never consider doing outside of the festival. 25 percent have sex with a stranger at a festival and 21 percent of music festival attendees take drugs at the festival (“Music Festivals: Behavior of Visitors in the United Kingdom (UK) 2013”). Social Media Consumption: The largest demographic of Facebook users in the UK is 25-34 year olds, with just under 26% of total Facebook users. This remains the single largest concentration of consumers on any social media platform. Instagram has 150 million global users as of late 2013, an increase of 15% in just two months. There are over 2 million Pinterest users as of July 2013, a huge increase from the 200,000 users reported a year prior. Globally, the 13-20 year olds are the core audience of Snapchat, and 70% of users are female (Rose). Twitter ended 2013 with 12 million active users in the UK, and will see that increase to 13.6 million by the end of 2014. 25-34 year olds will account for 25.4% of British Twitter users. 18-24 year olds will take a 24.5% share of British Twitter users (Dredge). 80% of Twitter users are active on mobile devices, the majority of these likely to be Smartphone users (Rose). 54 percent of 18-34-year-old social users employed their smart phone as the main device to access social media. 56.2 percent of 18-24 year olds in the UK read posts from organizations/brands/events via social networks on mobile (“Mobile Social Affects UK Millennials’ Path to Purchase”). Top 5 Internet activities in UK: 75% sending and receiving emails, 72% shopping, 66% looking for information on shopping, 55% reading news and magazines, 53% social networking. 50% of users bought films or music accessed via websites (Summary of Internet).

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STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Location Justification: The Glastonbury festival serves as the perfect platform for ASOS to test their new physical space due to the large population of the company’s target market attending the festival. The 2014 Glastonbury festival is going to be the most popular festival attended to date. 210,000 tickets sold out in a record breaking 87 minutes. With 54,000 possible target consumers attending the festival from London, ASOS holds a strong presence to expand successfully. The ASOS Pop-Up shop will be located in the Market Area by the Pyramid Stage. The Pyramid Stage hosts the more popular music acts which in-turn draw more foot traffic. The Pop-Up shop will be open all five days (Wednesday, June 25th, 2014 to Sunday, June 29th, 2014) of the festival from 10am to 9pm.

Trading area analysis Lifestyle and Behavior Segmentation: The UK millennial consumer favors purchasing products online. As previously noted, 18-34 year olds purchase technology products, personal electronics, clothing, shoes, accessories, books, movies, music and videos online. Technology products, personal electronics, clothing, shoes and accessories are among the top purchases. The majority of 18-34 year olds in the UK go to the Internet to shop first (“Digital and the New Consumer: Emerging Paths to Purchase”). Millennial consumers need to be treated with care when making shopping decisions. When engaging Millennial consumers one must respect their time while recognizing their preferences and making meaningful suggestions. Millennials do not want to be bombarded with advertising when shopping. Strategic placement of selling tactics is crucial (Logistics UK). With social media being such a huge part of the Millennial consumer’s life, it is imperative to be available for questions and comments on social media sites, while providing feedback and response in a timely manner. Accessibility through multiple channels, i.e. having an omni-channel presence, is crucial (Logistics UK). Purchasing decisions are also influenced by Millennial consumer’s peers. Peer communication will help build brand awareness and loyalty (Logistics UK). 42 percent of Millennials believe that the things they consume have more power to enable change than the people they vote for (Havas Worldwide). The products they purchase hold meaning and are well thought out. They see the products they buy as more than reflections of themselves.

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STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Sales Potential: ASOS has a huge opportunity for sales at the festival because there are no other similar traders present in the market. ASOS will be the first women’s apparel Pop-Up shop available to festival attendees. The majority of our competition remains within the food and beverage stalls with 21.43 GBP on average being spent by one Glastonbury festival attendee. With no other stalls like us within the festival, ASOS will be filling a demand and becoming a market leader within the product categories. ASOS will have five days to trade within the festival and ensuring that proper merchandise is stocked will be imperative to running a successful Pop-Up shop. Estimating Competition: As the ASOS Pop-Up shop will be held at a festival, an unusual setting for similar large brands, ASOS’s normal direct competitors will not be present. The Glastonbury festival sells festival merchandise including apparel, in-turn making these stands a competitor. Women’s T-shirts are sold for 15 GBP while sweatshirts are sold for 25 GBP (“Shop”). The greatest competition will be the 300 or so food and alcohol vendors, as the average ticket holder spends 119.23 GBP on food and drink (“Glastonbury Festivals,” 32). There will be 400 non-food traders selling a variety of goods; however, as the average ticket holder only spends 21.43 GBP on retail, the other retail vendors don’t pose as much of a threat as the food stalls (“Glastonbury Festivals,” 32). Area Attractions: For five days Pilton Worthy Farm plays hosts to a tented city in Somerset. As well as music from nearly every genre imaginable on over 50 stages, there are performing arts including cabaret, theatre, circus, children’s entertainment, poetry, healing, green crafts and information and much more (“Glastonbury Festival 2013”). The Glastonbury festival offers many attractions other than the main music performances. Different areas within the festival host different activities: • • •

The Theatre and Circus Fields offer an array of entertainment including circus acts, installations, clowns, stilt walkers and many games (“Areas - Theatre & Circus”). The Green Fields host tribal dances, spiritual awakenings and eco-build solutions. This is a vast playground for kids of all ages. Music, poems and performance are available at Croissant Neuf. The Field of Avalon holds a laughter workshop, while King’s Meadow provides a tranquil place to relax. In the Green Futures and the Greenpeace Fields ideas and opportunities for responding effectively to the Earth’s challenges are present. In the Craft Field you can learn all different interesting trades including how to use a kiln, a forge, an axe, a lathe or even a treadle sewing machine “(Areas – The Green Fields”). The Tipi Field provides activities involving the enchantment of tribal culture and ancient ritual transformation “(Areas – The Green Fields”).

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STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

42

Area Attractions Cont’: • Available in The Park are open air stages, late night bars and cafes, tee pee villages, art installations and an illuminated 17 meter Ribbon Tower that looks out over the entire Festival site (“Areas – The Park”). • Kidz Field hosts a world of wonder and magic with things to do and see, make or join in with, bounce on, jump off, climb up and fly in. Castles, aliens, bubbles, clowns, swingboats, roundabouts, explosions, magicians, stuntmen and technicolour nuns can all be found here (“Areas – Kidz Field”). • Shangri-la is an area built by over 1,500 crew and artists and includes an abundance of music, DJs and dancing (“Areas – Shangri-La”). • Silver Hayes is a large dance village within the Glastonbury Festival where attendees can go to dance and express themselves (“Areas – Silver Hayes). • Arcadia is a massive show that includes alien like performers spinning from moving cranes while dry ice fireballs are erupting. Pyrotechnics go into overdrive as music, performance, visual mayhem and raw atmospherics crescendo together. The show is comprised of lights, lasers, acrobats suspended on ropes in the air, loud music and even fire (“Areas – Arcadia). • Block9 is a late night wonderland open from sunset to sunrise. Heavyweight sound systems, underground nightclubs, bars, huge art installations and some extremely alternative performance i.e. drag queens, exotic dancers are all part of the attraction. Genosys, a new art installation and electronic music arena, is also located within Block9 (“Areas – Block9). • The Unfairground is a broken, psychedelic circus and horror go-go show (“Areas – The Unfairground). • The Common is home to bustling music venues, urban circus, late night bars, and a range of intimate sideshows. The area has been home to a Wall of Death with vintage Indian motorcycles; Bassline Circus; The Old Curiosity Shop; after-hours gatherings; Medicine Sans Frontiers: and Campo Pequeno in the past (“First Details Revealed”). • Acoustic Field hosts unplugged music from a host of top names. The field is also home to the Pilton Palais Cinema tent. Pilton Palais Cinema hosts a huge projector screen with a digital projector showing films of all kinds. The screen now has 3-D capability as well (“Areas – Pilton Palais Cinema Tent“). • The Beat Hotel is a special space right in the hectic heart of Glastonbury. Music including reggae, soul, yacht rock, Balearica, and disco, is played here. BBQ, liquor concoctions and a new in-house food emporium, “The Naked Lunch” are all part of the hotel (“Areas –The Beat Hotel”). • Glasto Latino is Glastonbury’s Latin field with sets from world-famous Latin bands. Beginner salsa classes offered by some of the UK’s top instructors are available (“Areas – Glasto Latino”). • The Bandstand is a small stand that features interesting musical acts of all obscure kinds (“Areas – The Bandstand”).


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Area Attractions Cont’: • The Main Music Stages, Pyramid Stage, The Other Stage and John Peel Stage, host big music names and headlining bands (“Areas – Main Music Stages”).

Block 9

The Beat Hotel

Pilton Palais Cinema Tents

Glastonbury Signs

Croissant Neuf

Unfairground

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STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Area Factors: 64 percent of festival attendees traveled to the festival by private vehicle (car, van etc) and 33 percent via public transport (train, bus or combination of both). Over 71 percent of respondents spent 4 or 5 nights away from home on their trip (“Glastonbury Festivals 2007 Economic Impact Assessment”). Nearly a third of all ticket holders now come to the site on coaches, trains and other forms of public transport. Glastonbury festival has worked hard to improve its record in encouraging people out of cars and onto public transport, reducing the number of public cars on site from 60,000 in 2000 to 36,000 in 2007 (“Information - Getting Here”). • • • • •

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By coach – Glastonbury’s official coach travel partner, National Express, will be running services from over 60 locations direct to the festival’s own on-site coach station right by the festival gates (“Information - Getting Here – By Coach”). By train - Glastonbury is working with First Great Western as an official travel partner. First Great Western will be running many additional trains between London Paddington / Reading and Castle Cary stations, as well as regular services to Castle Cary from Bristol, Bath and Weymouth (“Information - Getting Here – By Train”). By bus - National Express runs a service from Bristol Bus Station. There’s a free shuttle bus for festival ticket holders running between Castle Cary Station and the Festival Bus Station throughout the festival. The bus station is next to Pedestrian Gate A. The shuttle operates from Wednesday to Monday (there is no service during the night when trains aren’t running). The buses serve all the main train arrivals throughout the day on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. On Saturday, they run from 09:00 to 17:00 and on Sunday they run from 08:00 to 20:00. The Monday service starts at 03:00 and the last bus from the festival to Castle Cary Station will be at 17:00. The festival will operate a bus service from Bristol Temple Meads railway station on Wednesday and Thursday 09:00 to 19:00. A return service will operate on Sunday 14:00 to 22:00 and Monday 06:00 to 19:00. The festival will run a bus service from Glastonbury town to the site on Wednesday 07:00 to 21:30 and Thursday between 0700 to 1:00, on Friday, Saturday and Sunday between 07:00 to 21:30 and on Monday between 06:00 to 18:00. The festival will also run a service to Shepton Mallet daily from Wednesday to Monday. The Brighton Peace and Environment Centre run coaches direct from Brighton to the festival (“Information - Getting Here – By Bus”). By bike - Details of cycling schemes running for Glastonbury festival 2014 will be available nearer to the festival. Those wishing to make their own, self-contained way to the festival by bike will still be welcome to come and camp in the Green Traveler cyclists’ field (“Information - Getting Here – By Bike”). By car - Car park tickets are needed to gain access to the festival car parks. In 2013, car parks opened at 9pm on the Tuesday night before Glastonbury 2013 (“Information - Getting Here – By Car”).


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Area Factors Cont’: • By campervan/caravan - Campervan/caravan tickets are needed to gain access to parking at the Glastonbury Festival 2014 (“Information - Getting Here – By Campervan/Caravan”). • By motorbike - Motorcycles are not allowed on site. They must be parked in the free, secure compound near the Festival Bus Station (“Information - Getting Here – By Motorbike”). • By air – The closest international airport to Glastonbury festival is Bristol International Airport. National Express runs coach services from Heathrow Airport directly to the festival. There is also a regular bus link from Bristol airport called the “Bristol International Flyer” which can take you from the airport to Bristol Temple Meads railway station. Regular buses go from Temple Meads to the Festival Bus Station on our site (“Information - Getting Here – By Air”). • Drop and collect point – A free 24 hour bus service will take you to the Festival bus station next to Gate A (“Information - Getting Here – Drop and Collect Point”). Human Resources: In order for ASOS to successfully staff the Glastonbury Pop-Up shop, 12 marketing personnel will be on site to run the shop at all times. It is imperative that the Pop-Up shop is run by personnel who are knowledgeable about the ASOS company and who are excited to spread and share the brand identity with others. It would be in the company’s best interest to staff the Pop-Up shop with personnel from the headquarters located in London because of the highly trained marketing team familiar with the ASOS identity. Also, considering that almost half the Glastonbury festival attendees are from London, it would be smart to hire personnel who are from the same region because they will better relate to the customer. Also on-site will be an ASOS PR team consisting of 25 personnel. The PR team will be hired from outside the company and will serve as a way to bring brand recognition to the Pop-Up shop at the festival. The team’s main focus will be to walk the festival in groups and spread the buzz about the ASOS Pop-Up shop and its location within the festival. Proper training of the PR team will be important to ensure that the company is accurately represented. The ASOS marketing team that will come from London will hire and train the 25 personnel hired for the PR team before the festival begins. When looking for individuals to hire for this team, ASOS will look to people that can relate to the ASOS identity and display positive customer interaction. Since these individuals will be the face of the company at the festival, ensuring that they can relate and communicate with our customer is imperative for success. The entire ASOS team will wear the ASOS designed Glastonbury festival T-shirt to ensure that brand recognition remains cohesive throughout the event. 5 nights for 12 people/daily 40 GBP food stipen costs: 4290 GBP (PR team costs are taken into account in the communication/promo plan portion)

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STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Legal Issues: Payment Payments for the Pop-Up shop location are nonrefundable and must be made in full between Tuesday April 1st and Monday the 7th, however, checks must be received prior to April 1st (“Terms and Conditions”). Building Traders may set up their stalls between 8:00 am Sunday, June 22nd and midday Tuesday the 24th (Armitage). Every stall is required to “display their trading name on the front of their stall” (“Terms and Conditions”). Generators are not permitted on the festival grounds. The market traders will be required to draw up an electrical contract with Aggreko specifying the amount of energy they will consume (“Terms and Conditions”). Sound systems must be preapproved for vendor stall use and will be monitored over the course of the festival. Failure to comply with noise level constraints or to have a sound system approved will result in its confiscation and the eviction of the vendor from the festival site (“Terms and Conditions”). “Mobile phone charging on site is provided by EE, traders are not permitted to provide this service” (“Terms and Conditions”). Trade Regulations Employers Insurance and Public liability insurance are required to sell merchandise at the Glastonbury Festival (Armitage). All traders must complete and return the Traders Checklist to their market manager in order to be eligible to trade at the festival. “The Licence to trade for 2014 is from 9am Wednesday, June 25th until 5pm Monday, June 30th, 2014. Traders must be at their site by 12pm, Tuesday, June 24th and be ready to trade by 9am, Wednesday, June 25th. No trader will be permitted to leave site before 6pm on Monday, June 30th” (“Terms and Conditions”). Traders are responsible for ensuring that their staff have approved passes. There are no restrictions on vendor sale hours during the festival (Armitage). Only merchandise at prices specified in the trade contract and application are permitted to be sold. Any merchandise displaying Glastonbury festival logos must be pre-approved. Diesel vehicles with insurance and appropriate parking accreditations are the only means of transportation permitted on vendor sites, where movement of the vehicles is to be kept to a minimum and not exceed 15mph at any time (“Terms and Conditions”). Trucks will not be permitted to transfer merchandise from outside of festival grounds to vendor stalls during the festival: all merchandise will need to be on-site prior to the festival opening (“Terms and Conditions”). Traders are prohibited to bring “alcohol, ice cream, cigarettes, bottled water, soft and energy drinks” on-site as there are concessions which sell these items (“Terms and Conditions”).

46

Health and Safety Every stall is subject to inspection by Glastonbury festival’s safety team and by the Local Authority and Fire Brigade officers (“Terms and Conditions”). The ASOS Pop-Up shop staff will need to produce a Fire risk Assessment of the shop including a plan in case of a fire. In addition ASOS will need to provide their own fire extinguishers, signs and training (“Terms and


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Legal Issues Cont’: Conditions”). Smoking is prohibited around the market place and every vendor stall is required to display a ‘NO SMOKING’ sign (“Terms and Conditions”). On festival premises many things are prohibited including glass containers, “sky lanterns or kites, unauthorized fireworks, or wax flares, large fires or burning of plastic” (“Terms and Conditions”). There will be wastewater containers provided where wastewater is to be disposed of (“Terms and Conditions”). The disposal of wastewater (and urine) into ditches or on the ground is strictly prohibited as it runs into the Whitelake River and affects the fish and wildlife alike (“Gaia’s Guardians”).

MAP OF GLASTONBURY SETUP FROM 2013 (ASOS pop-up shop will be located here)

47


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Design Of Space: Details The ASOS Pop-Up shop will be built out of a 40 x 8 x 9.5 ft. shipping container. A 31 x 8.5 ft. space out of the front wall will fold down to create additional floor space. On the left side of the shop will be 2 dressing rooms divided by a wall, each will have a mirror and a hook. Along the 1 ft. remaining front wall, a white awning with a watermarked ASOS logo will be installed to provide cover from sun and rain for the products and customers alike. Secured on the top of the shipping container will be the ASOS logo in 3-dimensional letters with lights within each. When the Pop-Up shop is closed, the ASOS logo will be seen watermarked across the front of the shop. Space Allocation and Productivity The ASOS Pop-Up shop is designed to maximize display space while allowing for easy traffic flow, without looking cluttered or overwhelming the customer. The brand experience should be hassle free and organized as it is on the ASOS website. We did this by utilizing 5 floor fixtures in the extended portion of the store and 2 overhead dress racks and a single merchandised wall within the store. Festival gear items are placed in close proximity to each other for the customer’s convenience. The tiered displays hold either T-shirts or a combination of tank tops and cropped tops to help the customer easily find exactly what they are looking for. With 4 sales team members present in the store to help customers, the monitoring of merchandise will not be a concern. There are 2 additional staff dedicated to restocking and will help monitor the store when not going back and forth between storage and the Pop-Up shop.

48

Fixtures The countertop for checkout will fit 2 employees and house shopping bags and the required fire extinguisher. 5 styles of shorts stacked 10 high fit on the centered round platform display. 5 styles of tank tops stacked 10 high can fit on the right round platform display. 5 styles of T-shirts can fit on the left round platform display, holding a total of 50 T-shirts. Each 3 tier platform square display can hold 24 stacks of folded T-shirts. 12 stacks can fit on the lowest shelf, 8 on the middle shelf and 4 on the top shelf. The tiered display on the right side of the store will house our 15 T-shirt styles and hold up to 240 T-shirts. The tiered display on the dressing room side of the store (left) will hold our 8 styles of crop tops and our 9 styles of tank tops and can hold up to 120 crop tops and 120 tank tops. The steel overhead dress rack by the dressing rooms will hold 90 dresses and the second steel overhead dress rack, near the sunglasses and hair accessories, will house 80 hangers that will be divided between sweatshirts and rain apparel. The shelf below the accessory wall will hold 2 styles of flasks and additional hair accessories if desired. On the right wall will be the 4 ft.6 tall slatwall which will house sunglasses and hair accessories. The left side of the slatwall will feature 5 vertical rows of the sunglasses with each row holding 12 of each style. On the right side of the slatwall will be 20 5-hook waterfall fixtures, each of which can hold 5 accessories. 2 of these fixtures will be dedicated to each style of hair accessory. At full capacity we can display 50 shorts, 290 T-shirts, 170 tank tops, 120 cropped tops, 90 dresses, 55 sweatshirts, 25 rain products, 24 flasks, 60 sunglasses and 100 hair accessories.


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

Design Of Space Cont’: Ambiance The ASOS Pop-up shop will have a sleek, modern and clean feel to it through a black, white and chrome color scheme. The Pop-Up shop sales team and representatives will all be wearing uniform black T-shirts with the ASOS logo on the front and a hashtag on the back. The playlist will feature songs from bands playing at Glastonbury that the company feels will resonate with the target customer. There will be 10 built-in circular florescent overhead light fixtures, 2 of which will be directly over the dressing room for our customer’s benefit. The bright lighting will add to the clean, sleek vibe that the company is going for while providing enough light for the customer to be able to see in an indoor space as they are coming in the store from an outdoor location. The extended floor space covered by the awning will utilize natural lighting. Visual Merchandising The ASOS Pop-Up shop is utilizing a combination of fixtures, mannequins and sleek yet colorful merchandising throughout the Pop-Up shop. The use of music and artwork will also be used to entice the customer. Unlike the competitors, the ASOS stand is a Pop-Up shop and that alone will drive interest and draw attention to the store. The fixtures are arranged symmetrically and spaced to allow clear view to the customer. Artwork The artwork will be along the back wall and feature a giant collage of album covers of bands playing at the festival who have allowed us to use their images. In this way we feel that we will be able to merge Glastonbury’s unique vibe with the ASOS brand. Window and In-store Displays As there are no windows in the ASOS Pop-Up shop, in-store displays will consist of an arrangement of 3 mannequins in the center of the extended floor space that will be positioned around 3 low, round fixtures. The mannequins will be redressed daily and display different selections of shirts, shorts, dresses and rain gear to entice the customer. Safety and Security As the Glastonbury festival has security guards, ASOS will not need to hire their own. The building will be securely locked with the awning retracted and the extended floor returned to its upright position, with all of the merchandise and fixtures secured within the closed container. The container will be bolted and locked nightly. The company’s stock storage will be in rented storage vans and securely locked. Cash will be transferred nightly from the in store cash box by a runner into a safe located in the living trailer.

49


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

ASOS Pop-Up shop in shipping state

50

ASOS Pop-Up shop with ASOS sign installed


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

FRONT VIEW: Awning Closed

FRONT VIEW: Awning Open

51


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT Right side wall w/ sunglasses and flasks

8’

3 Tier Platform Square

1.25’

4’ x 4’

4’

9.5’

2’ x 2’ 9”

2.5”

6”

10”

3’ x 3’ 2”

3’

52

Round Platform Displays

Right side wall w/ sunglasses and flasks (line drawing)


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

LEFT SIDE VIEW: Dressing Rooms

40’

Mirror 4.5’

Shelf

Curtain Rod

Wall

8’

5’ Suspended Dress Rack

Suspended Dress Rack

Mirror

8’

8’

3 Tier Platform Square

Mirror is 20”

4’ 9.5’

2’ x 2’

4.5’

3 Tier Platform Square Standing Mannequin 1.5”

Standing, Hand on Hip Mannequin 1.2’

.9’

Base

3’ x 3’

Round Platform

2.5’

3’

4’

Base

Seated Mannequin Round Platform

Shelf is 8” x 8’ Slatewall is 2” x 8’

Base

4’

FLOOR PLAN: Overhead View

Slatwall

Checkout Counter

Round Platform

2.5’ 4’

2.7’

3’ 31’

53


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

PRODUCT ASSORTMENT SUNGLASSES 12 GBP

404145 269458 377481 407790 400981

Purple/Green Gold Black Floral Print Blue

ASOS Oversized Round Sunglasses In Ombre Finish ASOS Aviator Sunglasses with Blue Mirrored Lens Monki Leora Round Sunglasses AJ Morgan Round Floral Print Sunglasses ASOS Chunky Flat Front Retro Sunglasses

HAIR ACCESSORIES 9 GBP

54

428456 449227 315422 411183 411176 413779 413787 409864 412893 424210

Multi Multi White Multi Multi Yellow Purple Multi Multi Cream

ASOS Flower Plait on Hair Grip ASOS Floral Print Bandana ASOS Daisy Hair Bun Holder ASOS Paisley Headband ASOS Double Seedbead Headband Limited Edition Flower Leaf Hairband Limited Edition Flower Leaf Hairband ASOS Mixed Flower Hair Garland Limited Edition Carnation Flower Hairband ASOS Beaded Hair Crown


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT PRODUCT ASSORTMENT FLASKS 20 GBP

445713 445695

Multi Pink

Wonderlust Hip Flask Hip Flask with New York Map Design

T-SHIRTS 16.50 GBP

441240 417367 420305 457879 451005 455340 445601 425416 404842 463324

Black/White Polka-dot White Light Blue, Pink, Lavendar, Ceramic Blue, Washed Lemon Gray Marl White White Pink and White White White Beige with Navy Sleeve

New Look Spot Tee J.D.Y Cassette T-Shirt ASOS Boyfriend T-Shirt with Roll Sleeve ASOS T-Shirt with Unicorn Print ASOS Cropped T-Shirt with Sketchy Pug Vero Moda Adviosry T-Shirt Glamorous Oversize T-Shirt in Sheer Daisy Jersey ASOS Mesh T-shirt with Downtown Print ASOS T-Shirt with Organza Panels Lavish Alice Dip Back Crop T-Shirt with Sheer Sleeve

55


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

PRODUCT ASSORTMENT CROPPED TOPS 13.60 GBP

457244 461491 441033 445834 463327

Black, Orange, Light Blue, White Black/White Cream White w/ black stripe Mint

ASOS Cropped Boyfriend T-Shirt with Roll Sleeve Monki Slogan Bra Top ASOS Cropped Cami Top Glamorous Crop T-Shirt in Variegated Stripe Lavish Alice Structured T-Shirt with Curved Hem and Ribbed Neck

TANK TOPS 17.20 GBP

420608 441630 445663 430295 

56

White, Neon Orange, Jade, Mint Black Navy Cream     

ASOS Cropped Woven Cami ASOS Daisy Print Cami Top Glamorour Basket Ball Vest Kiss The Sky Sleeveless T- Shirt      


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT PRODUCT ASSORTMENT RAIN GEAR 21.50 GBP

413894 418982

Pink Polka Dot

ASOS Clear Rain Mac ASOS Packaway Polka Dot Poncho

DRESSES 23.75 GBP

406805 407695 419676 455553 318582 426190 430357 449882

Hippie Print Black Pink Flower Mix Print White Print Pink, Black, Lilac Daisy Green

Monki Jewel Drink Dress Glamorous Cami Dress in Flower Print River Island Drop Waist Mix Print Dress ASOS Swing Dress With Floral Border Print ASOS Smock Dress In Marble Print ASOS Sleeveless Swing Dress Kiss The Sky Oops A Daisy Open Back Dress River Island Floral Waisted Dress

57


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT

PRODUCT ASSORTMENT SHORTS 27.20 GBP

437310 301766 302418 423341 439795

Blue Black, White Yellow Blue Washed Black

ASOS Denim Mom Shorts in Light Wash ASOS Shorts with Fringe and Bead Detail ASOS Shorts in Tie Dye with Lace Up Detail Bellfield Denim Shorts With Rose Embroidery ASOS High Waist Denim Mom Shorts in Washed Black

SWEATSHIRTS 16 GBP

427639 433320 419254

58

Multi Grey Pastel Blue, Baby Pink, Navy, Black, Dark Green

Monki Dog Print Sweat Top ASOS Cropped Sweatshirt with Sporty Number and Floral Sleeve ASOS Boyfriend Sweatshirt


STORE LOCATION, DESIGN, PRODUCT INTERIOR FIXTURES

Unit Cost

Units

Cost

4' x 8' Slatwall Melanine - White

28.05

1

28.05

Melamine Shelf 8" x 48" - White

4.65

2

9.30

Round Platform Gloss Display - White

213.00

3

639.00

3 Tier Platform Square 48"L X 48"W X 60"

108.00

2

216.00

Female Mannequin - Hand on hip

82.80

1

82.80

Female Mannequin - Wide Stance

82.80

1

82.80

Female Mannequin - Sitting

84.60

1

84.60

Single Mirror 20" X 60"

17.97

2

35.94

Maxgrade Satin Stainless Steel 8 ft Top Rod

4.68

1

4.68

Moen Stainless Flange

3.73

2

7.46

Merete Curtains 1 pair - White

16.79

1

16.79

8 ft. Long Galvanized Steel Dock Pipe (2-Pack)

26.87

1

26.87

4 ft. Long Galvanized Steel Dock Pipe (2-Pack)

19.67

2

39.34

1/2 in. Black Malleable Iron 90 FPT x FPT Elbow

0.97

4

3.86

1/2 in. Black Iron Floor Flange

2.56

4

10.25

Glasses Display w/ 6 Eyewear Slots

8.99

10

89.88

179.40

2

358.80

1.35

2

2.70

18.29

1

18.29

CC Swiper

5.97

2

11.94

Slatwall Watefalls- 5 Hook - Chrome

1.67

20

33.48

Left Side L-Shaped Counter - Black

597.00

1

597.00

3.59

4

14.38

Ipad Mini - Space Gray Dressing Room Hook Steel Tiered Tray Cash Box with Cam Lock

Hangers - 50 pack

EXTERIOR FIXTURES ASOS Letters

TOTAL

Unit Cost 264.60

Units

Cost 1.00

264.60 2414.21

59


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN Justification: The ASOS promotional plan strategy is based off of the research we collected about our target customer (page 36,37). The company feels that the best way to attract and connect with our customer is through social media. This will serve as the main platform for communication throughout the entire Pop-Up shop process. Although our projected ROI (-0.63) shows not profitable for ASOS, we feel that through our surveys, increased on-line traffic and ability to use the Pop-Up shop in the future, this is wise investment for the company. Pre-Initiatives: Social Media ASOS will use Facebook throughout the entire 7 month communication and promotional plan in order to target our customers who are using this platform. Through Facebook we will post regular updates in order to engage our customer and create buzz about the Pop-Up shop. ASOS will frequently post information that keeps our customer up to date on the progress of our Pop-Up shop before, during and after installment. We will post throughout the entire Glastonbury festival making sure to include our location within the festival on a consistent basis. ASOS will also post festival styles that will be available at the Pop-Up to create anticipation about our product selections. ASOS will encourage our customers to tag themselves in order to create buzz on Facebook. The ASOS Twitter and Instagram accounts will also be utilized to engage our customers. ASOS will create the hashtag #FESTIVALWEAR to encourage our users to post pictures of themselves at the Pop-Up shop and throughout the Glastonbury festival. We expect our social media efforts to create buzz about the ASOS Pop-Up shop and to encourage our users to visit us at the festival. Our social media efforts are costless and will allow us to create stimulation without a social media budget. The ASOS Pinterest page will host a board titled “Festival Fashion� that will consist of pictures taken by our videographer before, during and after the Glastonbury festival. This board will serve as pre, during and post initiatives to create awareness and excitement about the Pop-Up shop. All of our social media platforms will serve as the primary channel to introduce the ASOS Pop-Up shop at the Glastonbury festival, our artist collaboration and our launch, all in order to create excitement and anticipation for our new channel of distribution.

60


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN YouTube Channel ASOS currently hosts a YouTube channel with over 18,000 followers that features videos on how to get the latest looks, fashion and styling ideas, hair how to’s, makeup how to’s and nail how to’s. The company will utilize this platform for promotional videos that will feature product assortments that will be available at the Glastonbury Pop-Up shop. In addition, videos on festival styles and how to’s will be added to our YouTube account to create buzz and excitement about the festival and festival fashion. ASOS Magazine The ASOS magazine is sent to over 446,000 customers each month and reaches an additional 50,000 users monthly through the FashionUp App. With such a high visibility rate the company will utilize the ASOS magazine as a way to advertise the Pop-Up shop by creating promotional advertisements and articles relevant to festival wear. We will inform our readers of the ASOS Pop-Up shop by publishing behind the scene articles on the design plans for the Pop-Up shop, festival wear suggestions, how to’s and a sneek peak section on what items they might find available for purchase at Glastonbury. Bloggers In order for ASOS to create complete awareness about the Pop-Up shop, the company will collaborate with three famous UK based blogs such as “5 Inch and Up”, “Broken-Cookies” and “Style Marmalade”. The company has worked with these bloggers in the past and feels that their aesthetic fits the ASOS brand image the most. The company will do a collaboration with each blogger starting 3 months before the Pop-Up shop launch in order to create buzz and awareness. ASOS will send each blogger a festival wear product that will be available at the Pop-Up shop and will require that each blogger posts an outfit blogpost based around the product received. The bloggers will also be required to mention the ASOS hashtag #FESTIVALWEAR in order to increase awareness and to ensure that a cohesive marketing campaign is being built across all platforms. 1 Blog post costs: 298.94 GBP 5 Inch and Up Blog will post 1 blogpost in April 2014 Broken-Cookies will post 1 blogpost in May 2014 Style Marmalade will post 1 blogpost in June 2014 Total Blogger Initiatives costs: 896.82 GBP (How Much Does Social Media Cost Companies in 2012)

61


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN Glastonbury Website In order to reach ASOS’s entire target market, it is pertinent to exercise strategic communications through different platforms. With that being said, ASOS will pair with the Glastonbury festival committee to ensure that our Pop-Up shop is advertised through all of their social media platforms and their website. ASOS will require that all forms of advertisement conducted on the company’s behalf are approved and include the hashtag #FESTIVALWEAR. Glastonbury currently has over 420,000 Facebook followers and features several posts daily informing their followers on who will be playing at the festival and what type of entertainment will be available to them. Engaging our customer through these platforms is very important because they will be reading these sites to get information about the festival. ASOS Blog/Website ASOS will also initiate a plan through the company’s ASOS blog and website to add to the buzz created through our social media platforms. The company will host the YouTube Channel videos that are relevant to the Glastonbury event on these sites and execute article write-ups about festival fashion. We want all customers to feel as if they are a part of the process. Also, by promoting festival fashion on the company’s website we will engage online customers to browse our offerings, possibly generating additional revenue for the company. During Initiatives: ASOS Public Relations Team During the festival, ASOS will bring a PR team consisting of 25 workers to distribute flyers and lollipops throughout the festival. The flyer will feature a QR code that will inform our potential customers of our location and what products are available to them in the Pop-Up shop. The lollipops serve as a tactile method to engage our customers. The PR team will be wearing the black ASOS festival T-shirt that will feature our hashtag #FESTIVALWEAR to ensure brand recognition is generated. The PR team will also be required to scout out fashion forward festival attendees and post their pictures with our hashtag to our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts. We want our customers who are unable to attend the festival to feel as if they are a part of the experience. The main objective of the PR team is to create awareness of the ASOS’s Pop-Up shop and drive potential customers into store. PR Team hours: 12:00 to 18:00 on the first and last day (total of 12 hours) Minimum UK wage for over 21 year olds: 6.31 GBP Each PR team member will receive a 40 GBP food stipen Total PR Team rate for days: 3893 GBP

62

Lollipop costs: 795.07 GBP (43,000 lollipops) Flyer Card costs: 1,055.69 GBP (43,000 flyers) T-Shirt costs: 257.56 GBP (40 custom T-shirts)


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN ASOS Public Relations Team Cont’: Complete PR Team Costs (labor, lollipops and flyers, T-shirts): 6001.32 GBP

ASOS PR Team T-Shirt

Survey Once our customer has visited the ASOS Pop-Up shop we will electronically collect his/her email address, where an electronic survey will be sent upon making a purchase. In order to gather more information from our target customer, personal interaction is important. The survey will offer a coupon code that will be valid on the asos.com website after completion. Also, by collecting email addresses, this will serve as great platform to interact with our customers for future promotions or events. The survey will include the following questions: Do you shop on asos.com? What is your age? Where are you from? If available, would you shop at an ASOS boutique? What are your favorite items to purchase from ASOS? What prompted you to visit us today at the Glastonbury festival? How did you find us within the festival? Artist Collaboration Pending the announcement of festival artists, ASOS will collaborate with a major headliner in efforts to bring brand awareness to the festival attendees. We will pay a top-performing artist to mention our company and location and encourage the festival attendees to visit the ASOS Pop-Up shop. We will also pay for a meet and greet session with the performer at our Pop-Up shop. This will be a great way to attract attendees to our location in order to encourage shopping. Costs: 149, 459 GBP

63


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN Custom Tote Bags When a customer makes a purchase at the ASOS Pop-Up shop, their items will be placed in a canvas tote bag that has the ASOS logo on one side and our hashtag #FESTIVALWEAR on the other. This will serve as a great environmentally friendly initiative for the company as well as a form of advertising. 4000 bags costs: 1530.55 GBP (number of bags based off of financial projected purchases) ASOS Website/Blog During the festival, ASOS will stream live music on our website and blog to create an all-around interactive experience. By streaming the music live on our blog/website, a cohesive marketing campaign will be executed on all platforms during every promotional phase. YouTube During the festival, ASOS will bring a videographer from the London headquarters to record festival videos focusing on fashion and our customers. These videos will be used as a post marketing initiative in order to interact with our customers via social media a month after the Pop-Up takes place. The videographer cost is included in his/her annual salary. The company will pay for housing and food for the videographer while he/she is working the event. 5 nights for housing: 425 GBP 5 day meal stipen: 200 GBP Total costs: 625 GBP Post-Initiatives: Email The month after our Pop-Up shop concludes we will send out courtesy emails to everyone that visited ASOS as a way to say thank you for shopping with us. All of the emails collected at the festival will be added to the company’s email list to ensure that a consistent relationship is kept with each and everyone customer. Social Media ASOS will recap our Glastonbury Pop-Up shop on social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest) the month after the event takes place. We will include videos and pictures that were captured by our videographer and PR team, as well as photos collected from our customers. It is important to provide a conclusion to the ASOS at Glastonbury experience.

64

YouTube The ASOS YouTube channel will feature videos periodically throughout the month of July that were captured during the Glastonbury festival.


COMMUNICATION/PROMO PLAN

ASOS Website/Blog: ASOS will also utilize the company website by adding a side bar that enables our customers from the festival to email us with their favorite photos from Glastonbury. These photos will be displayed on a rotational basis throughout the month of July. Communication/Promo Spreadsheet: ASOS PROMOTIONAL/COMMUNICATION PLAN initiatives MEDIA TYPE

pre-launch JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

during

post

JUN

JUL

COSTS (GBP)

!"#$%&&' ()*(($+ ,&-(-%$

625

*./("0+"1 2*.($+$/( "/&/31"0"4*.$ %5&00$+/

896.82

05"/(&.%-+,3)$%/*($ "/&/3%5&0 "/&/3)$%/*($ "/&/32+3($"1 /-+6$, "+(*/(3#&55"%&+"(*&. #-/(&13(&($3%"0/ $1"*5 (&("5

6001.32 149,459 1,530

158,512.14

65


FINANCIAL PLAN BUDGET Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

NOTES

REVENUE Pop-Up Other Revenue Total Revenue

0.00

8957.89

8957.89

13436.84

13436.84

13436.84

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8957.89

8957.89

13436.84

13436.84

13436.84

0.00

4299.79

4299.79

6449.68

6449.68

1058.49

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

10584.89

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2414.21

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

3500.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

896.82

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 Includes blogger collaborations.

0.00

3431.77

431.11

149890.11

431.11

858.00

858.00

858.00

858.00

858.00

19417.41

8694.56

5693.90

157302.79

7843.79

10844.45

-19417.41

263.33

3263.99

-143865.95

5593.05

2592.39

58226.30

EXPENSES Cost of Goods Sold Design of Space Build of Space Interior Fixtures Storage Units (storing merchandise) Pop-Up Shop Allocation Pre-Launch Promotional Activities During Launch Promotional Activities Staffing Costs TOTAL EXPENSES

EARNINGS

6449.68 Based on a reported average gross margin of 52%

3431.77

Includes videographer, PR team, lollipops, promotional flyers, artist collaboration, 858.00 custom tote bags, and blogger collaborations.

-151570.61

*All figures are in GBP.

PROJECTIONS

66

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Daily Footfall

0

54,500

54,500

54,500

54,500

54,500

Conversion Rate

0

1.00%

1.00%

1.50%

1.50%

1.50%

Number of Purchases (1 per)

0

545

545

818

818

818

TOTAL

Notes Based on number of tickets sold and target customer. Conversion rate changes in response to large-scale performances occurring during the last 3 days of the festival.

Sunglasses

15%

0

82

82

123

123

123

531

T-Shirts

25%

0

136

136

204

204

204

886

Crop Tops

10%

0

55

55

82

82

82

354

Tank Tops

12%

0

65

65

98

98

98

425

Sweatshirts

5%

0

27

27

41

41

41

177

Rain Gear

6%

0

33

33

49

49

49

213

Dresses

9%

0

49

49

74

74

74

319

Shorts

5%

0

27

27

41

41

41

177

Hair Accessories

10%

0

55

55

82

82

82

354

Flasks

3%

0

16

16

25

25

25

106

100%

0

545

545

818

818

818

3,543

3,543


FINANCIAL PLAN

SALES FORECAST Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Total Units

UNIT SALES Sunglasses

82

82

123

123

123

531

T-Shirts

136

136

204

204

204

886

Cropped Tops

55

55

82

82

82

354

Tank Tops

65

65

98

98

98

425

Sweatshirts

27

27

41

41

41

177

Rain Gear

33

33

49

49

49

213

Dresses

49

49

74

74

74

319

Shorts

27

27

41

41

41

177

Hair Accessories

55

55

82

82

82

354

Flasks

16

16

25

25

25

106

AVG UNIT PRICE Sunglasses T-Shirts Cropped Tops Tank Tops Sweatshirts Rain Gear Dresses Shorts Hair Accessories Flasks

12.00

12.00

12.00

12.00

12.00

16.50

16.50

16.50

16.50

16.50

13.60

13.60

13.60

13.60

13.60

17.20

17.20

17.20

17.20

17.20

16.00

16.00

16.00

16.00

16.00

21.50

21.50

21.50

21.50

21.50

23.75

23.75

23.75

23.75

23.75

27.20

27.20

27.20

27.20

27.20

9.00

9.00

9.00

9.00

9.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

981.00

981.00

1471.50

1471.50

1471.50

2248.13

2248.13

3372.19

3372.19

3372.19

REVENUE BY CATEGORY Sunglasses T-Shirts Cropped Tops Tank Tops Sweatshirts Rain Gear Dresses Shorts Hair Accessories Flasks TOTAL PROJECTED REVENUE

741.20

741.20

1111.80

1111.80

1111.80

1124.88

1124.88

1687.32

1687.32

1687.32

436.00

436.00

654.00

654.00

654.00

703.05

703.05

1054.58

1054.58

1054.58

1164.94

1164.94

1747.41

1747.41

1747.41

741.20

741.20

1111.80

1111.80

1111.80

490.50

490.50

735.75

735.75

735.75

327.00

327.00

490.50

490.50

490.50

8957.89

8957.89

13436.84

13436.84

13436.84

58226.30

*All ďŹ gures are in GBP.

67


FINANCIAL PLAN Budget Using our projected sales, estimated revenue and calculated expenses, overall projected income was calculated. Cost of goods sold is based on a reported average gross margin of 52 percent. By adding the cost of goods, space allocation, design of the space, build of the space, interior fixtures, storage units utilized, promotional activities and staffing, the ASOS expenses for the Glastonbury Pop-Up shop. Sales Forecast When determining the unit sales figures ASOS is projected to sell at the Glastonbury festival, target customer preferences and income, festival conditions and festival spending habits are accounted for. Given our customer’s small number of retail purchases in the past and low disposable income, an estimated one item purchased per person can be assumed. Due to the festival conditions, sunglasses and T-shirts are projected to comprise 40 percent of sales. Next year’s Glastonbury Festival is going to be the most popular yet. 210,000 tickets sold out in a record 87 minutes when they went on sale on Sunday, October 6th, 2013 (Trendell and Braggs). With the ASOS Pop-Up shop located in the Marketplace next to the Pyramid Stage, 1 of the 3 main stages that host the festival headliners, a high daily footfall can be predicted. Given that 59 percent of UK festival attendees are female and 44 percent of those attendees are between the ages of 18 and 30, an average 54,500 daily footfall can be predicted. On average, 2 main headliners/large-scale performers perform at each of the main stages on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. No headliner performances take place on Wednesday and Thursday (“2013 Line-up”). Due to this, conversion rate is predicted to be highest on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and lower on Wednesday and Thursday. This conversion rate is then used to calculate sales predictions and merchandise requirements. In regards to pricing, the ASOS Pop-Up shop at Glastonbury will follow the same general pricing principles as the ASOS online selling price. Price was calculated by adding each individual item being sold and averaged to create one baseline selling price for the items in each category. A value-pricing strategy was put in to place to ensure resonation with the target customer. Proft and Loss Due to our high promotional and building costs, and low pricing strategies, the ASOS Pop-Up shop results in a 151,570.61 GBP loss. Although profit is not being generated, success is found in testing the idea and design of a physical location, as well as direct feedback from customers, enabling the company to better communicate and satisfy in the future.

68


FINANCIAL PLAN

BUDGET WITH NOTES

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

NOTES

REVENUE Pop-Up Other Revenue Total Revenue

0.00

8957.89

8957.89

13436.84

13436.84

13436.84

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8957.89

8957.89

13436.84

13436.84

13436.84

58226.30

EXPENSES Cost of Goods Sold Design of Space Build of Space Interior Fixtures Storage Units (storing merchandise) Pop-Up Shop Allocation Pre-Launch Promotional Activities During Launch Promotional Activities Staffing Costs TOTAL EXPENSES

EARNINGS

0.00

4299.79

4299.79

6449.68

6449.68

1058.49

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

6449.68 Based on a reported average gross margin of 52% 0.00

10584.89

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2414.21

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

105.00

3500.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

896.82

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

3431.77

431.11

149890.11

431.11

0.00 Includes blogger collaborations.

858.00

858.00

858.00

858.00

858.00

19417.41

8694.56

5693.90

157302.79

7843.79

10844.45

-19417.41

263.33

3263.99

-143865.95

5593.05

2592.39

3431.77

Includes videographer, PR team, lollipops, promotional flyers, artist collaboration, 858.00 custom tote bags, and blogger collaborations.

-151570.61

*All figures are in GBP.

69


APPENDIX

PROJECTIONS WITH NOTES

70

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Daily Footfall

0

54,500

54,500

54,500

54,500

54,500

Conversion Rate

0

1.00%

1.00%

1.50%

1.50%

1.50%

Number of Purchases (1 per)

TOTAL

Notes Based on number of tickets sold and target customer. Conversion rate changes in response to large-scale performances occurring during the last 3 days of the festival.

0

545

545

818

818

818

Sunglasses

15%

0

82

82

123

123

123

531

T-Shirts

25%

0

136

136

204

204

204

886

Crop Tops

10%

0

55

55

82

82

82

354

Tank Tops

12%

0

65

65

98

98

98

425

Sweatshirts

5%

0

27

27

41

41

41

177

Rain Gear

6%

0

33

33

49

49

49

213

Dresses

9%

0

49

49

74

74

74

319

Shorts

5%

0

27

27

41

41

41

177

Hair Accessories

10%

0

55

55

82

82

82

354

Flasks

3%

0

16

16

25

25

25

106

100%

0

545

545

818

818

818

3,543

3,543


71


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ASOS Pop-Up Shop