Page 1

DIRECTIONS

1. From the car park return to the main road (B3276), turn right and walk approximately 50 yards along the road to cross the bridge. Immediately after the bridge turn left, and before reaching the beach you’ll see the SWCP leading off to the right. 2. Join the coast path and head north in the direction of Treyarnon Bay (not NT). Follow the footpath for 2 miles; there are some points when the path forks but all routes re-join shortly. You’ll come across one section when the path leads between a hedge and an area of gorse. 3. As you approach Treyanon beach you’ll encounter a fork in the path; take the right hand fork, which will lead you behind a private dwelling and to some steps leading down on to the top of Treyarnon Bay. 4. Cross the top of the beach and take the path to the left of the life guard hut. This will lead to a stretch of tarmaced lane. After a short distance the footpath is signposted to the left.

5. After a stretch of coastline (not NT) which has a number of benches along it, take the path to the right of a house. The footpath leads to the top of Constantine Bay. Cross the top of the beach and ascend the wooden stairs at the far end to re-join the coast path. You’ll see Constantine Island on your left and Booby’s Bay is on the other side of the island. 6. Re-trace your steps across the top of Constantine Bay. Here you can choose to either follow the SWCP back to Porthcothan (the way that you came), take the inland route along the road or catch the bus back. If taking the inland or bus route turn left by the beach waste facilities. 7. Follow the path to a small parking space and public toilets. Continue following the road until you reach a Tjunction. There’s a convenience store on the corner to your left - the bus can be caught from this area. 8. To walk back to Porthcothan along the lanes, turn right at the T-junction and keep following your nose for 2 to 3 miles. 9. The road eventually comes to a junction. Turn right (re-joining the B3276) and walk the 200 yards or so down the hill to Porthcothan Bay.

BOOBY’S BAY

Start: Porthcothan Grid ref: SW859741 Map: OS Landranger 200 How to get here and local facilities.

By foot: The South West Coast Path (SWCP) runs south along the north Cornwall coast, passing through Padstow and on to Newquay

LOOK OUT FOR Booby’s Bay: At Booby’s Bay, a tiny Trust property faces due west into the wind. ‘Tom Parson’s’ hut (not open to the public) sits just above the beach, an old fisherman’s shelter originally made from driftwood. The view from Porthcothan towards Trevose Head. Minnows Islands are in the foreground. The stretch of coast from Porthcothan heading north is a haven for wild birds, in particular corn buntings. The Trust is collaborating with the RSPB to raise the public’s awareness of this site and protect the stronghold of this increasingly rare farmland bird.

Distance, terrain and accessibility. Allow about 2 hours for this 4 mile (6.4km) walk, following the coast path with a section along the top of Constantine beach; a little longer if walking the entire route. The return leg is along a relatively quiet country road but there’s also the options of either returning along the coast path or catching the bus from Constantine back to Porthcothan. Dogs welcome. Please keep on lead when in RSPB protected areas. All beaches along the route are dogfriendly.

By train: Newquay 10 miles By bus: Porthcothan and Constantine are served by Western Greyhound 556, Newquay to Padstow By car: Off B3276, Newquay to Padstow, 3 miles south-west of Padstow. Car park (council owned) in Porthcothan and public toilets at the start of the walk; Porthcothan Village Store is to the left of the beach call 01841 520289 to check for opening times; Tredea Inn pub

This popular stretch of the north Cornish coast offers walkers stunning views across Constantine Bay and onwards to the lighthouse at Trevose Head. See some rare species of bird and plant life, and hidden coves.

A booby is a seabird closely related to the gannet. These birds can be seen diving offshore in stormy weather, which might explain their name.

Contact us;

By bike: National Cycle Network Route 32 passes by the start of the walk. See www.sustrans.org.uk

Telephone 01208 863046

Email northcornwall@nationaltrust.org.uk


DIRECTIONS

1. Leave Gibson Mill by crossing the footbridge and turn right. Pass the weir for the lower mill pond and go up steps to walk around the upper pond. Walk carefully along the side of the river, passing the weir for the upper pond. Look across the river to the crags. 2. At the fork in the path, go left for the Railway Walk and straight on for the Crags Walk. Crags Walk: After roughly 100 metres, atop the first slight rise, look back down and right to see Fisherman’s Hut, a walled-in space under a rock in the bank. Continue on the path, crossing the river twice by footbridges, the first of which is made entirely from recycled plastic. At the next footbridge rejoin the Railway Walk at point 5. Railway Walk: Climb up the valley side, steep initially but soon eases. Where the path meets a wall, it levels – this was the old railway track. After a small cutting and a dip, leave the path to the left to view Hell Hole Quarry. Return to the path and continue.

PISSER -CLOUGH

3. Shortly after going up some steps, the route turns 90 degrees to the right and by more steps. Before descending, look ahead to see the remains of the supports for the wooden trestle bridge (pictured overleaf). At the bottom of the steps is a lovely spot for a picnic. Continue back along the riverside. 4. After passing a stream cascading down the opposite bank, the path turns right and uphill and then down steps. It goes up again almost immediately to meet a rough track. Go left downhill to the river. 5. Cross the river by the footbridge and go up the valley ahead to meet a rough road, then turn right. Follow the road along and through a gate to meet the road through the estate. Go downhill, passing Lady Royd Field on your left, (where local school children came to play) and then the top of Hardcastle Crags on your right. Continue on back to Gibson Mill.

Start: Porthcothan Grid ref: SW859741 Map: OS Landranger 200 How to get here and local facilities.

By foot: access via riverside walk from Hebden Bridge. Pennine Way passes nearby Distance, terrain and accessibility.

LOOK OUT FOR

Clough comes from the Old English ‘clōh’ meaning dell, while it is believed the pisser part of the place name may derive from ‘pissant’, meaning insignificant and slang for an ant. The Northern Hairy Wood Ant is found in large numbers at Pisser Clough. After Gibson Mill ceased spinning and weaving, it became an ‘Entertainment Emporium’ providing dancing, roller skating, teas and two restaurants. People walked here from Halifax and Littleborough for tea and a dance. Gibson Mill uses solar panels and water powered turbines; even the lift works on green technology! Look for the remains of dams and weirs which kept the valley’s mills running.

Allow 11⁄2 hours for the 2 mile (3km) Crags Walk, way-marked by green flashes on trees and posts. Allow 2 hours for the 3 mile (5km) Railway Walk, way-marked by purple. Both walks go through the steep-sided river valley and are steep and uneven in places. Even in dry weather it can be wet, muddy and slippery underfoot. Dogs are welcome under close control, but please do not allow them to foul the paths or picnic areas. No bins provided, please take their bagged waste home.

The valleys offer stunning riverside views while the oak, beech and pine woods are full of tumbling streams. Whether you decide to climb the rocky paths to the hilltops or enjoy a picnic by old weirs, there’s plenty of wildlife to see.

By bus: service 906, Hebden Bridge to Midgehole car park (summer weekends and Bank Holidays only) By train: Hebden Bridge station, 2 miles (3km) By car: A646 westbound from Halifax then A6033, 1.2 miles (2km) north of Hebden Bridge. From Midgehole car park walk up estate road to Gibson Mill, or take one of the other way-marked walks to get there Gibson Mill (award-winning ‘green’ visitor centre and café), picnic areas, car parks, WCs, events and guided walks. School groups welcome. Walk leaflets available from Midgehole car park and Gibson Mill.

A huge shanty town, nicknamed Dawson City, sprang up at Slack to house the workers. It was said to be a lawless place, ruled by two women – the Queens of Dawson City.

Contact us;

By bike: National Cycle Network route 68 (Pennine Cycleway), 2 miles (3km) from Hebden Bridge By bus: service 906, Hebden Bridge to Midgehole car park (summer weekends and Bank Holidays only)

Telephone 01208 863046

Email northcornwall@nationaltrust.org.uk


DIRECTIONS

Continue down the hill past a cluster of young oaks, until you arrive at the start of the walk. Now head down to Stackpole Quay for a nice bowl of Cawl or ice cream!

1. Start at the Scrubby Bottoms sign, and with the large oak and fire pit on you left, continue straight ahead. Where the path splits, take the left turning. 2. Continue along the path, entering further wet woodland and a marshy area covered in large tussock sedges and lichen-covered birch and ash trees.

Directions from the Stackpole Estate to the start of the Scrubby Bottoms walk route: By bike: Exit right from the main drive entering to the Stackpole Estate. Take the first right, sign-posted Stackpole (village). Continue on this road for approximately 1 to 2 miles until you come to Cheriton Bottom on the left side of the road. At the gate to Cheriton Bottom, turn left up the trail (muddy track). Ride up the hill for 0.5 mile exiting onto the road. Cross the road taking the road opposite. Continue down the narrow lane for approx 1 mile past Rowston farm. Turn right and you will see a lay-by on the left of the road, park and you have arrived

3. Walk over the boardwalk through the wetland. On the dead wood on the gound you may see a colourful orange fungi known as the scarlet elf cap. Fungi that grow on dead wood are known as saprophytic. Mind your step here. 4. The path then turns right and starts up a steep bracken-strewn hill, which was recently planted with native By car: Exit sharp right from the main trees. Buzzards can often been seen drive of the Stackpole Estate. Take the soaring high above the countryside here. first right sign posted Stackpole (village). Continue on this road for approximate5. At the top of the hill you’ll come ly 2 -3 miles, passing through an area across another fire pit, this is a stunning of woodland. Once you have passed view point. Turn right and follow the path through the village take the first left, signweaving through the Monterey pine. The posted Stackpole Church, and continue path along the ridge is uneven, so mind on for 0.5 miles. Turn first right opposite your step. Continue along the path for the church car park. Continue down the narrow lane for approx 1 mile past several hundred meters. the Rowston Farm. Turn right, and you 6. The path starts to descend will see a lay-by on the left of the road, downhill through clusters of gorse bush- where you can park es. During the spring the wire is filled their coconut scent.

SCRUBBY BOTTOMS LOOK OUT FOR

Scrubby Bottoms is so-called because of its location at the bottom of the valley and the large amount of scrub (vegetation dominated by shrubs).

Start: Scrubby Bottoms sign Grid ref: SS002976 Map: OS Explorer 36 (South Pembrokeshire)

By foot: Pembrokeshire Coast Path passes between Bosherston and Freshwater East via Stackpole Quay. Footpaths lead from Stackpole village across the estate By bike: Stackpole is 6 miles south of Pembroke via on-road cycle routes. The Coastal Cruiser shuttle bus carries bicycles. There are also cycle racks in all National Trust car parks on the estate. By train: Pembroke Station – 5 miles By bus: 387 Coastal Cruiser shuttle bus takes a circular route from Pembroke, close to the railway station, stopping at all the coastal highlights: Freshwater West, Broadhaven South, Bosherton Lily Ponds, Stackpole Quay and Freshwater East. For a timetable go to www.pembrokeshiregreenways. co.uk

Look out for colourful scarlet elf cap fungi, which can sometimes be seen growing on fallen dead wood in the winter and spring.

By car: B4319 from Pembroke to Stackpole and Bosherston

Contact us;

Allow 45 minutes for this 1⁄2 mile (0.8 km) walk. Uneven track interspersed with board walks crossing boggy areas. Part of the walk consists climbing a steep hill and traversing along the top of it. There are several small sections of steps throughout the wood.

How to get to the Stackpole Estate:

Much conservation work is undertaken at Scrubby Bottoms as part of the John Muir Award scheme. This scheme focuses on the care of wild places, encouraging people of all backgrounds to develop an awareness and responsibility for the natural environment in a spirit of fun and adventure.

The wooded wetland here is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and is home to a locally rare species of sedge grass. We‘ve created a boardwalk path through the area, allowing you to explore deep into this previously inaccessible habitat.

Distance, terrain and accessibility.

How to get here and local facilities.

Dogs welcome.

Discover a variety of habitats on this short, circular route around the woodland of Scrubby Bottoms, including sedge-covered wetland and a ridge lined with Monterey pine.

Lay-by car park at Scrubby Bottoms. Toilet facilities, hot and cold food available at the Stackpole Quay Boat House tea room, which is a 10 minute drive away.

Telephone 01208 863046

Email northcornwall@nationaltrust.org.uk


DIRECTIONS

1. FromthecarparknearBembridgeFo rt,followagrassy path on the right side of the road towards the coast. Keeping a hedge on your left and taking the left fork when the path splits, you’ll meet the road again by a cattle grid. Cross this road and emerge onto Culver Down. Head along the road towards the monument. Take care, this road can be busy at times. 2. TakealookattheYarboroughMonum ent(amemorialto Lord Yarborough, the first Commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron), then return to the road. Continue past the Culver Haven Inn and the site of Culver Signal Station (now a car park) to Culver Beacon and Culver Battery. 3. DescendsomesteepconcretestepsandcrossCulver Battery car park. Continue in the direction of Whitecliff Bay, along a grassy path which bends to the right and follows the crest of the chalk ridge of Culver Down eastwards to the sea.

4. Onreachingtheclifftopfence,turnrig htandfollowthe path southwest, in the direction of Sandown, for the next 11⁄2 miles. Pass through two kissing gates before reaching the natural amphitheatre of Red Cliff, shortly before a holiday park. 5. Marvelattheviewsbeforeturningroundandretracing your steps to the last gate you went through. 6. Taketheleftforkinthepathandfollowagrassytrack away from the coast. Head across the down, back towards Bembridge Fort, which is visible on the horizon. Keep a fence on your left and at the way marker follow the path uphill. Within 50m of the fort, branch right, under some electric wires, to reach the fort entrance directly. The fort is not open to the public. You can visit a viewpoint on the east side of the fort on the way back to the car park.

THE NOSTRILS Start: Bembridge Fort National Trust car park Grid ref: SZ626859 Map:OS Landranger 196

LOOK OUT FOR

The chalkhill blue is one of many insect and butterfly species which are attracted to the warm south-facing Wealden sand cliffs and the fresh new habitats offered by cliff falls along this eroding coastline. Other insects to be found in the area include types of burrowing bees and wasps. Culver Down is grazed in winter by hardy black Hebridean sheep. They prefer eating the tough brambles and coarse grass to tender chalk grassland flowers that live in the shorter turf. Look for fine displays of cowslip in spring. In summer you may see bush cricket and grasshopper. Culver Cliff is the eastern tip of the chalk ridge which runs across the Island from the Needles in the far west. It is one of the main seabird nesting sites on this side of the Island – look out for peregrine falcons (the fastest bird in the world!) and ravens.

Contact us;

Distance, terrain and accessibility. Allow about 1 1⁄2 hours for this 2 3⁄4 mile (4.5km) circular walk, which has an ascent of 250ft (75m). Two kissing gates, a steep flight of concrete steps and one step-stile. Mostly well- defined grassy paths with some stony and uneven surfaces. Keep well clear of the cliff edge, it can be slippery in wet conditions. Please keep dogs under close control, especially near livestock.

By bike: The Round the Island cycleway follows the B3395. See www.sustrans.org. uk By bus: Hourly service, Sandown-Newport, passes along the B3395 Road: On the east of the Isle of Wight, just off the B3395 close to Yaverland Car park (not National Trust), refreshments at Monument Café (seasonal, not National Trust) and Culver Haven Inn (both close to point 2 on map). No public toilets.

Although peaceful today, Bembridge and Culver Downs were once home to intensive military activity. This short, but energetic coastal walk will give you a fascinating insight into the Isle of Wight’s role in wartime defence and intelligence. It is also rich in wildlife and offers spectacular views over Sandown and Whitecliff Bays.

Telephone 01208 863046

Email northcornwall@nationaltrust.org.uk


DIRECTIONS

1. From the car park return to the main road (B3276), turn right and walk approximately 50 yards along the road to cross the bridge. Immediately after the bridge turn left, and before reaching the beach you’ll see the SWCP leading off to the right. 2. Join the coast path and head north in the direction of Treyarnon Bay (not NT). Follow the footpath for 2 miles; there are some points when the path forks but all routes re-join shortly. You’ll come across one section when the path leads between a hedge and an area of gorse. 3. As you approach Treyanon beach you’ll encounter a fork in the path; take the right hand fork, which will lead you behind a private dwelling and to some steps leading down on to the top of Treyarnon Bay. 4. Cross the top of the beach and take the path to the left of the life guard hut. This will lead to a stretch of tarmaced lane. After a short distance the footpath is signposted to the left.

5. After a stretch of coastline (not NT) which has a number of benches along it, take the path to the right of a house. The footpath leads to the top of Constantine Bay. Cross the top of the beach and ascend the wooden stairs at the far end to re-join the coast path. You’ll see Constantine Island on your left and Booby’s Bay is on the other side of the island. 6. Re-trace your steps across the top of Constantine Bay. Here you can choose to either follow the SWCP back to Porthcothan (the way that you came), take the inland route along the road or catch the bus back. If taking the inland or bus route turn left by the beach waste facilities. 7. Follow the path to a small parking space and public toilets. Continue following the road until you reach a Tjunction. There’s a convenience store on the corner to your left - the bus can be caught from this area. 8. To walk back to Porthcothan along the lanes, turn right at the T-junction and keep following your nose for 2 to 3 miles. 9. The road eventually comes to a junction. Turn right (re-joining the B3276) and walk the 200 yards or so down the hill to Porthcothan Bay.

SLAPPER’S ROCK Start: Bosveal car park Grid ref: SW775275 Maps: OS Landranger 204; Explorer 103 How to get here and local facilities.

On foot: Follow road out of Mawnan Smith village towards Glendurgan, Trebah and Helford Passage. Turn left at crossroads to walk down lane signposted ‘Durgan, Bosveal and Bosloe’.

LOOK OUT FOR

Distance, terrain and accessibility. Allow about 21⁄2 hours for this 41⁄2 mile (7.3km) walk, including stopping to admire the views. Paths are gravel and grass, with some narrow stretches over uneven terrain with stiles. There are some steep climbs and a 1⁄3 mile of walking along a road. Dogs welcome. Please keep on lead where livestock are present. No dog bins, so please take dog litter home.

The rock may well be named after the sound of the sea hitting it, and slap in Old English meant a ‘slippery muddy place’ that could well have an influence on its name. Nare Point marks the entrance on the other side of the river with its 1950s naval tracking station (now a volunteer coastguard lookout point). During the Second World War there was a decoy site to draw bombers away from nearby Falmouth. Partially covered by ivy, there’s a pill-box on Porth Saxon beach and, at low tide, the remains of a structure on Porthallack beach. During the Second World War the Helford River was the base for operations against German-occupied Europe.

Contact us;

By bike: Roads hazardous for cyclists due to narrow width and poor visibility. By bus: First 35, Falmouth to Helston, passes at nearby Glendurgan Garden By train: Penmere 4 miles; First 35 Falmouth to Helston is the connecting bus service By boat/ferry: Visitor moorings and some anchorage for visiting boats - no facilities for leaving boats at Durgan. Seasonal ferry operates from Helford Village (on Lizard (south) side of Helford River) to Helford Passage on the north side. By car: 4 miles south west of Falmouth, 1⁄2 mile south west of Mawnan Smith, on road to Helford Passage, signposted left out of Mawnan Smith village toward ‘Durgan, Bosveal and Bosloe’ on a white fingerpost sign

Running east of the valleys of the National Trust’s Glendurgan Garden, and next to the delightful Helford River, is a mixture of woodland and cliff-top, wildflower-rich fields, all interspersed with walks of varying lengths.

Telephone 01208 863046

Email northcornwall@nationaltrust.org.uk

rangey  

swdewfcewuhew, dwhufoew, idwo

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you