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Supporting families in Gloucestershire at a time when they need it the most. 1. your details: Title First name Surname Your Address: Postcode: Email: Telephone:

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2. Make your gift worth even more at no extra cost to you Do you pay tax? If so, by simply completing this form you can boost the value of your gift by 25p for every £1 you have already given.

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3. ARE YOU IN? JOIN US!

As a valued supporter, you are incredibly important to us. After all, without you we simply wouldn’t be able to do what we do. That’s why we make all our supporters a promise to provide the very best standards of support. We want to say thank you for your support and keep you up to date with our news. If you would prefer for us not to get in touch, please just let us know by filling in this form or by contacting our dedicated Supporter Care Team on 01453 886868 or email supporteradmin@longfield.org.uk. l

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We would love to keep you updated with details of our amazing work, fundraising activities and ways to get involved. Longfield respects your privacy. The data we gather and hold is managed in accordance with the Data Protection Act (1998). We will never sell your personal information to third parties but may need to share your details with suppliers who work on our behalf. Please tick the boxes if you would like us to contact you in the following ways: By email

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Looking after our Carers Innovative new services - heart failure focus

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Longfield Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire GL5 2PQ Registered in England No: 2213662 Registered Charity No: 298627

Tel: 01453 886868

Web: longfield.org.uk

Helping people to live well Spring/Summer 2016


Welcome A big part of my job is spreading the word about what we do at Longfield to help people live well with their life-limiting condition and to support those who want to be at home at the end of life.

Longfield has seen an 8% increase in the number of people using our services.

Why? Because we know that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of people we could be helping to improve the quality of their life but who, for whatever reason are not referred to us.

Chief Executive Andrew Fletcher says the increase is real proof that the charity’s strategy to take more services into the community is working.

So I, and the staff at Longfield, take every opportunity to get out and talk about what we do – to GPs, healthcare professionals, village agents, commissioners, patient groups, community leaders and organisations, companies, councillors and MPs. And not to mention fundraisers and supporters, without whom we wouldn’t exist. It is doubly important when we have a new identity which is already helping us to deliver more and more services in the community – care for patients, closer to home. We are delivering more care to different people, in different parts of the county, living with different conditions. I am grateful that some of them have shared their story here.

We have seen this rise in the number of referrals over the past 10 months.

Since Longfield launched its ambitious five-year strategy last June, the charity has been busy reaching out to more people. Because they show the difference we can make to people’s lives, when they know who we are and make the first step to talk to us. So a big thankyou to you, our supporters, for helping spread the message about Longfield. Together we can make sure that no one in Gloucestershire faces a life-limiting condition alone.

Andrew Fletcher Chief Executive

Longfield is an independent charity providing specialist care for people living with or affected by a life-limiting illness in Gloucestershire. It is through the generosity of the community that we are able to provide our vital care and support free of charge to the people of this county when they need it most.

T: 01453 886868 F: 01453 885282 E: info@longfield.org.uk www.longfield.org.uk

Published by: Longfield, Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire GL5 2PQ

Registered Company Limited by Guarantee. Number 2213662

Front page: The Prince of Wales, with Gwyneth Jeffries. The Prince, who is patron of Longfield, visited in December 2015

2

Our services are growing

Patron: HRH The Prince of Wales, KG, KT, GCB, OM

Longfield is a registered charity. Number 298627 Written by: Damselfly Communications Ltd Designed by: Silver Design Pictures by: Thousand Word Media Printed by: Severnprint

In December our patron, The Prince of Wales, learned about Longfield’s strategy during a visit at Minchinhampton. So far five art for health groups have successfully run in the Gloucester area and three more will be launched in May. Longfield’s new drop-in sessions were launched in October 2015. These take place every Thursday and they are going very well. People with life-limiting conditions and carers, plus those have been bereaved have been dropping in to access services, advice, support and taster sessions.

In addition health and social care staff who may not know about Longfield’s work are using the drop-in to learn more about Longfield’s services.

It gives people the “opportunity just to come and

have a look and to know what support is here when they need it, said Sian Cole, Director

of Care Services.

Longfield also continues to develop its support for carers. There are two carers’ groups which meet monthly. Longfield hosted for the second time the popular Positive Caring programme, with a third planned for April. An innovative pilot course for people with heart failure has proven so successful that the members are carrying on with their own informal monthly sessions. Longfield is working in partnership with the NHS heart failure team to run another course. A new programme, to help people who are living with fatigue and breathlessness to manage their condition, will be launched in early summer. The first six-week course will be based at Minchinhampton with community-based courses later on. Building on the success of its current bereavement groups, Longfield is looking into how this service can be delivered in the community. The Prince of Wales with Mikey Brown in the art space at Minchinhampton. 3


Welcome A big part of my job is spreading the word about what we do at Longfield to help people live well with their life-limiting condition and to support those who want to be at home at the end of life.

Longfield has seen an 8% increase in the number of people using our services.

Why? Because we know that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of people we could be helping to improve the quality of their life but who, for whatever reason are not referred to us.

Chief Executive Andrew Fletcher says the increase is real proof that the charity’s strategy to take more services into the community is working.

So I, and the staff at Longfield, take every opportunity to get out and talk about what we do – to GPs, healthcare professionals, village agents, commissioners, patient groups, community leaders and organisations, companies, councillors and MPs. And not to mention fundraisers and supporters, without whom we wouldn’t exist. It is doubly important when we have a new identity which is already helping us to deliver more and more services in the community – care for patients, closer to home. We are delivering more care to different people, in different parts of the county, living with different conditions. I am grateful that some of them have shared their story here.

We have seen this rise in the number of referrals over the past 10 months.

Since Longfield launched its ambitious five-year strategy last June, the charity has been busy reaching out to more people. Because they show the difference we can make to people’s lives, when they know who we are and make the first step to talk to us. So a big thankyou to you, our supporters, for helping spread the message about Longfield. Together we can make sure that no one in Gloucestershire faces a life-limiting condition alone.

Andrew Fletcher Chief Executive

Longfield is an independent charity providing specialist care for people living with or affected by a life-limiting illness in Gloucestershire. It is through the generosity of the community that we are able to provide our vital care and support free of charge to the people of this county when they need it most.

T: 01453 886868 F: 01453 885282 E: info@longfield.org.uk www.longfield.org.uk

Published by: Longfield, Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire GL5 2PQ

Registered Company Limited by Guarantee. Number 2213662

Front page: The Prince of Wales, with Gwyneth Jeffries. The Prince, who is patron of Longfield, visited in December 2015

2

Our services are growing

Patron: HRH The Prince of Wales, KG, KT, GCB, OM

Longfield is a registered charity. Number 298627 Written by: Damselfly Communications Ltd Designed by: Silver Design Pictures by: Thousand Word Media Printed by: Severnprint

In December our patron, The Prince of Wales, learned about Longfield’s strategy during a visit at Minchinhampton. So far five art for health groups have successfully run in the Gloucester area and three more will be launched in May. Longfield’s new drop-in sessions were launched in October 2015. These take place every Thursday and they are going very well. People with life-limiting conditions and carers, plus those have been bereaved have been dropping in to access services, advice, support and taster sessions.

In addition health and social care staff who may not know about Longfield’s work are using the drop-in to learn more about Longfield’s services.

It gives people the “opportunity just to come and

have a look and to know what support is here when they need it, said Sian Cole, Director

of Care Services.

Longfield also continues to develop its support for carers. There are two carers’ groups which meet monthly. Longfield hosted for the second time the popular Positive Caring programme, with a third planned for April. An innovative pilot course for people with heart failure has proven so successful that the members are carrying on with their own informal monthly sessions. Longfield is working in partnership with the NHS heart failure team to run another course. A new programme, to help people who are living with fatigue and breathlessness to manage their condition, will be launched in early summer. The first six-week course will be based at Minchinhampton with community-based courses later on. Building on the success of its current bereavement groups, Longfield is looking into how this service can be delivered in the community. The Prince of Wales with Mikey Brown in the art space at Minchinhampton. 3


Howard Sutton is a man who likes to keep busy. Howard has done so all his life, from maintaining motorcycles and rebuilding a Triumph Stag, to building an extension to the bungalow he shares with his wife Barbara. Then something happened. “I couldn’t get myself going. I’d end up sitting in the garage talking to the dog all day.

Regaining control of my life

“ I was frightened to go to bed at night because I thought I’d wake up dead. I know that doesn’t make any sense but that’s what it felt like.” The diagnosis of heart failure hit Howard hard and he admits he has struggled to come to terms with it. His doctor recommend Howard attend a new innovative group at Longfield for heart failure patients. Howard wasn’t keen. “ When you hear about heart failure you think you’re going to die. I had just got out of hospital and when I found out they wanted me to go to a hospice I thought they were just preparing me for the end.” But it proved to be a new beginning. Longfield, in partnership with the heart failure clinical nurse specialist for Gloucestershire Care Services, held weekly sessions for a group of people. It involved creative therapies, gentle Tai Chi exercise and a practical session with

4

the clinical nurse specialist on living with heart failure. The group enjoyed it so much that they are now getting together at Longfield every month to continue to support each other. Howard has also gone on to tap into other Longfield services and is attending one of Longfield’s art for health groups in Gloucester. “ It helped me because I met other people with similar problems,” says Howard. “We’ve had some good talks and that has been nice. Unless you’ve got heart failure then you don’t really know what it’s like.” Barbara agrees that the group has helped Howard come to terms with his new life.

Going to the meetings “allowed him to do something

constructive on his own and he wasn’t just waiting for me to come home. It was his thing and it was something he could share with me. I think it did him a lot of good.

Now Howard is looking forward to hopefully starting a part-time job in the spring. “ My doctor compared me to a boat. He said my sails and hull are in good condition but, when it is in the water, my engine needs a little help. At the moment I am just waiting for better weather so that I can get back in the water and regain some control of my life.” 5


Howard Sutton is a man who likes to keep busy. Howard has done so all his life, from maintaining motorcycles and rebuilding a Triumph Stag, to building an extension to the bungalow he shares with his wife Barbara. Then something happened. “I couldn’t get myself going. I’d end up sitting in the garage talking to the dog all day.

Regaining control of my life

“ I was frightened to go to bed at night because I thought I’d wake up dead. I know that doesn’t make any sense but that’s what it felt like.” The diagnosis of heart failure hit Howard hard and he admits he has struggled to come to terms with it. His doctor recommend Howard attend a new innovative group at Longfield for heart failure patients. Howard wasn’t keen. “ When you hear about heart failure you think you’re going to die. I had just got out of hospital and when I found out they wanted me to go to a hospice I thought they were just preparing me for the end.” But it proved to be a new beginning. Longfield, in partnership with the heart failure clinical nurse specialist for Gloucestershire Care Services, held weekly sessions for a group of people. It involved creative therapies, gentle Tai Chi exercise and a practical session with

4

the clinical nurse specialist on living with heart failure. The group enjoyed it so much that they are now getting together at Longfield every month to continue to support each other. Howard has also gone on to tap into other Longfield services and is attending one of Longfield’s art for health groups in Gloucester. “ It helped me because I met other people with similar problems,” says Howard. “We’ve had some good talks and that has been nice. Unless you’ve got heart failure then you don’t really know what it’s like.” Barbara agrees that the group has helped Howard come to terms with his new life.

Going to the meetings “allowed him to do something

constructive on his own and he wasn’t just waiting for me to come home. It was his thing and it was something he could share with me. I think it did him a lot of good.

Now Howard is looking forward to hopefully starting a part-time job in the spring. “ My doctor compared me to a boat. He said my sails and hull are in good condition but, when it is in the water, my engine needs a little help. At the moment I am just waiting for better weather so that I can get back in the water and regain some control of my life.” 5


Longfield out in Gloucestershire Big Heart returns The Big Heart art auction is returning for a second year to raise vital funds to support Longfield’s art for health community programme. Last year more than 100 speciallycommissioned pictures were sent to Longfield and sold anonymously on eBay. It raised £2,323 for the charity. Now plans are under way for an even bigger event. Renowned international artist PJ Crook, who is based in Gloucestershire, is backing the campaign and will create a piece of work for the auction. We are aiming for more than 200 artists and celebrities to get creative on our theme of living well. In October Longfield will be taking the art on tour with the Big Heart Roadshow and there will be exhibitions at The Wilson, Cheltenham, Regent Arcade, Cheltenham; Museum in the Park, Stroud; Bay Gallery, Tetbury; Gloucester Cathedral and the Corinium Museum, Cirencester.

6

PJ Crook said she hopes other artists will join her in supporting such a worthy cause.

Art can make such a “difference to our lives. Of

course it brings great joy but it has a powerful therapeutic benefit which Longfield taps into, said PJ.

Funds raised will support Longfield’s art for health groups which have been launched in the community. Art for health provides people with a focus and an outlet for their feeling and emotions. It also helps people relax and relieve anxiety and stress. To discover more about what a difference art for health makes to people read Sue Finney’s story on the opposite page. To find out how you can donate a piece of work to the auction, go to www.longfield.org.uk/bigheart or email fundraising@longfield.org.uk.

Before Sue Finney started attending Longfield’s art for health group, she seldom left her home in Quedgeley. Over the past few years, Sue, who is usually outgoing, spent more and more time at home. The more ill she became the more her confidence seemed to fade. “ I have felt so handicapped with the illness, the trouble with my breathing and with the difficultly in moving around. I felt quite useless in society. “ My life had become limited to my family and I had become very insular. I felt like the rug had been pulled out from beneath me.” Sue, who is bipolar and has arthritis and a respiratory condition, admits she went to the first meeting in Quedgeley with “fear and trepidation”. The group was for people with respiratory conditions.

When we had our sharing week there was no way I was going to say to the group that I was bipolar - there’s such a stigma to mental illness. “ But it all came out anyway and everyone was so kind. Anne (who runs the group) has released something in me. Thanks to this group we all realised that we have something within us, that we can all do something to add to society.” Sue made friends in the group and now, that the art for health course is finished, they meet weekly at Longfield’s drop-in sessions.

I’m going out more. I’m “beginning to think that I can do these things, that I can go out. My husband says Longfield has given me back my ‘sparkle’. I feel a bit more of my old self - the old self that I thought was lost and gone forever.

7


Longfield out in Gloucestershire Big Heart returns The Big Heart art auction is returning for a second year to raise vital funds to support Longfield’s art for health community programme. Last year more than 100 speciallycommissioned pictures were sent to Longfield and sold anonymously on eBay. It raised £2,323 for the charity. Now plans are under way for an even bigger event. Renowned international artist PJ Crook, who is based in Gloucestershire, is backing the campaign and will create a piece of work for the auction. We are aiming for more than 200 artists and celebrities to get creative on our theme of living well. In October Longfield will be taking the art on tour with the Big Heart Roadshow and there will be exhibitions at The Wilson, Cheltenham, Regent Arcade, Cheltenham; Museum in the Park, Stroud; Bay Gallery, Tetbury; Gloucester Cathedral and the Corinium Museum, Cirencester.

6

PJ Crook said she hopes other artists will join her in supporting such a worthy cause.

Art can make such a “difference to our lives. Of

course it brings great joy but it has a powerful therapeutic benefit which Longfield taps into, said PJ.

Funds raised will support Longfield’s art for health groups which have been launched in the community. Art for health provides people with a focus and an outlet for their feeling and emotions. It also helps people relax and relieve anxiety and stress. To discover more about what a difference art for health makes to people read Sue Finney’s story on the opposite page. To find out how you can donate a piece of work to the auction, go to www.longfield.org.uk/bigheart or email fundraising@longfield.org.uk.

Before Sue Finney started attending Longfield’s art for health group, she seldom left her home in Quedgeley. Over the past few years, Sue, who is usually outgoing, spent more and more time at home. The more ill she became the more her confidence seemed to fade. “ I have felt so handicapped with the illness, the trouble with my breathing and with the difficultly in moving around. I felt quite useless in society. “ My life had become limited to my family and I had become very insular. I felt like the rug had been pulled out from beneath me.” Sue, who is bipolar and has arthritis and a respiratory condition, admits she went to the first meeting in Quedgeley with “fear and trepidation”. The group was for people with respiratory conditions.

When we had our sharing week there was no way I was going to say to the group that I was bipolar - there’s such a stigma to mental illness. “ But it all came out anyway and everyone was so kind. Anne (who runs the group) has released something in me. Thanks to this group we all realised that we have something within us, that we can all do something to add to society.” Sue made friends in the group and now, that the art for health course is finished, they meet weekly at Longfield’s drop-in sessions.

I’m going out more. I’m “beginning to think that I can do these things, that I can go out. My husband says Longfield has given me back my ‘sparkle’. I feel a bit more of my old self - the old self that I thought was lost and gone forever.

7


we all need a hand at some time Gill Tomlinson is adamant that the Postive Caring course at Longfield saved her life.

I didn’t know who to contact or where to turn to because I was just so busy looking after my husband. I was just coping but it was getting beyond me. “Coming here saved my life. It was the knowledge that there was someone there to support you and we all need a hand at some time or another.” Gill’s husband Peter was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 2006. The couple shared a love of music. Both played in the Cheltenham Symphony Orchestra. Peter, who played flute, was also orchestral manager of Cheltenham Chamber Orchestra.

Peter Tomlinson playing the flute for the last time during a Parkinson’s taster day at Longfield 8 8

Peter was also diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Among its symptoms are delusions and visual hallucinations, challenging behaviour and sleep disorders.

As his condition worsened Gill, who worked as a physiotherapist and later with Minchinhampton nursery, became his full-time carer. Peter, due to the DLB, had restless, disturbed nights and grew increasingly frail. Through Parkinson’s UK she learned about the Positive Caring course hosted at Longfield. She decided to sign up.

I never thought of myself as “a carer. You just struggle on

and face what’s thrown at you. If there was a problem I just tried to sort it myself rather than asking for help.

But before the course started Gill had a fall while getting up in the night to help Peter and had cracked her ribs. Now she needed support to care for Peter and didn’t know where to turn. Their four children helped as much as they could but Peter needed 24-hour care. Longfield staff and the Positive Caring team stepped in to help Gill. “ Everyone here at Longfield gives you support and encouragement. I can’t thank them enough. I cannot recommend the carers’ course enough if people find themselves in a carers’ position.”

The couple have also attended Longfield’s new weekly drop-in sessions. Peter also thoroughly enjoyed the day therapy sessions. Peter suffered a fall in January where he received serious spinal injuries. He is now in hospital and Gill is hoping to move him into long-term care. Gill continues to access the specialist support and advice from Longfield’s drop-ins and says the therapy sessions and support remains invaluable. “ You always feel guilty that you’re not good enough, that you are not patient enough or kind enough. On the course we were asked to write down what aspect of our caring we were most proud of. I was honest and admitted I couldn’t think of anything. Much to my amazement every carer said the same thing. I received so much support from the other people on the programme.

you care you don’t “stopWhen for self-reflection or to

take any pride in what you do but I learnt we should.

Their connection with Longfield has provided support for the couple in a variety of ways. Gill attends the monthly carers’ support group. They both attended the Parkinson’s taster day at Longfield where Peter played the flute for the last time. 9


we all need a hand at some time Gill Tomlinson is adamant that the Postive Caring course at Longfield saved her life.

I didn’t know who to contact or where to turn to because I was just so busy looking after my husband. I was just coping but it was getting beyond me. “Coming here saved my life. It was the knowledge that there was someone there to support you and we all need a hand at some time or another.” Gill’s husband Peter was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 2006. The couple shared a love of music. Both played in the Cheltenham Symphony Orchestra. Peter, who played flute, was also orchestral manager of Cheltenham Chamber Orchestra.

Peter Tomlinson playing the flute for the last time during a Parkinson’s taster day at Longfield 8 8

Peter was also diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Among its symptoms are delusions and visual hallucinations, challenging behaviour and sleep disorders.

As his condition worsened Gill, who worked as a physiotherapist and later with Minchinhampton nursery, became his full-time carer. Peter, due to the DLB, had restless, disturbed nights and grew increasingly frail. Through Parkinson’s UK she learned about the Positive Caring course hosted at Longfield. She decided to sign up.

I never thought of myself as “a carer. You just struggle on

and face what’s thrown at you. If there was a problem I just tried to sort it myself rather than asking for help.

But before the course started Gill had a fall while getting up in the night to help Peter and had cracked her ribs. Now she needed support to care for Peter and didn’t know where to turn. Their four children helped as much as they could but Peter needed 24-hour care. Longfield staff and the Positive Caring team stepped in to help Gill. “ Everyone here at Longfield gives you support and encouragement. I can’t thank them enough. I cannot recommend the carers’ course enough if people find themselves in a carers’ position.”

The couple have also attended Longfield’s new weekly drop-in sessions. Peter also thoroughly enjoyed the day therapy sessions. Peter suffered a fall in January where he received serious spinal injuries. He is now in hospital and Gill is hoping to move him into long-term care. Gill continues to access the specialist support and advice from Longfield’s drop-ins and says the therapy sessions and support remains invaluable. “ You always feel guilty that you’re not good enough, that you are not patient enough or kind enough. On the course we were asked to write down what aspect of our caring we were most proud of. I was honest and admitted I couldn’t think of anything. Much to my amazement every carer said the same thing. I received so much support from the other people on the programme.

you care you don’t “stopWhen for self-reflection or to

take any pride in what you do but I learnt we should.

Their connection with Longfield has provided support for the couple in a variety of ways. Gill attends the monthly carers’ support group. They both attended the Parkinson’s taster day at Longfield where Peter played the flute for the last time. 9


Frampton-on-Severn Open Gardens Around the village of Frampton, 1.30 - 5pm. Organised by Rotary Club of Severn Vale. There will be 13 open gardens and teas available. Free parking. Tickets are £5 entry and free for children under 13.

JUNE 8

WHAT’S ON MAY 3

50 Shades of Boden Fashion Show Renishaw New Mills, Wotton-under-Edge, 7pm for 7.30pm. Tickets are £10 to include cheese and wine and can be booked online at www.longfield.org.uk

MAY 3

Fashion Show, with Cousins of Cheltenham The Barn at Calcot Manor Hotel, Tetbury, 2pm for 2.30pm. With Cousins of Cheltenham. Tickets are £15 to include afternoon tea. Organised by Tetbury Supporters’ Group. Contact Barbara Ball on 01666 504656 for details.

MAY 22

Afternoon teas Wotton-under-Edge Town Hall, 2.30pm5pm. Enjoy tea or coffee and delicious homemade cakes. 10

Fashion Show Cotswold Edge Golf Club, 7.30pm. Tickets £5 available from Wotton shop or Longfield reception. Many quality high street brands including M&S and Wallis will be on sale at vastly reduced prices. Everything you see on the catwalk will be available for purchase on the night in a range of different sizes.

JUNE 12

Box Village Open Gardens There are 17 gardens open around the village as well as book stall, plant sale, raffle and cream teas. Tickets are £5 in advance and £6 on the day. Organised by the Dakin family with 40% of proceeds coming to Longfield.

JUNE 17

Solstice Walk Longfield, Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton. Enjoy a 5km or a 10km evening walk across Minchinhampton Common. Tickets are £15 adult, £5 child until May 16th and £18 adult and £7.50 child after that date. Free for under 5s and dogs are welcome. More details on www.longfield.org.uk.

JUNE 25

Open garden Katherine’s Woodland Garden, Katherine’s Farm, Wotton-under-Edge. Proceeds being divided between Longfield and St Peter’s Hospice.

JULY 13

The Longfield Games Walls Sports and Social Club, Gloucester. Be part of Gloucestershire’s first fun Olympic-style team event. Sponsorship: £350 for primary schools, £500 for secondary schools, £1000 for corporates or groups. Details www.longfield.org.uk/Event/ the-longfield-games-2016

SEPTEMBER 9

‘Bling’ it on! Its back by popular demand! Enjoy a girls’ night out on a 10km walk around Cirencester in the twilight hours, starting at Deer Park School, Cirencester. Details at www.longfield.org.uk

SEPTEMBER 25

Cheltenham Half Marathon Free registration, £200 minimum sponsorship. Longfield has 25 spaces. Set in the heart of the town. Interested runners to contact events@longfield.org. uk for further details and discount code for free registration.

OCTOBER TO NOVEMBER 2016

Big Heart Exhibition Roadshow and Auction Visit the Longfield website to find out more about the Big Heart exhibitions we are holding across Gloucestershire, and how you can have the chance to bid on over 200 artworks to raise money for our art for health community groups service. Details: www.longfield.org.uk/bigheart

Longfield Games2016

The

MAY 29

Let the Games begin

Be part of Gloucestershire’s first fun Olympic-style team event on July 13. It’s an Olympic Year! So come and join us at Walls Social Club in Gloucester for an amazing day which will see school and business teams competing for the title of Longfield Games Champion 2016. The challenging assault course will include such wacky obstacles at the Energy Zapper and the Wheels & Wellies. During the day school children (aged 8 and over) will take to the assault course. In the evening it will be the adults turn and companies or groups can sign up teams of 12. During the games there will be food and refreshments on sale, so families and colleagues are welcomed to come and cheer you on. Sponsorship: £350 for primary schools, £500 for secondary schools, £1000 for corporates or groups - get your family on the team! Details www.longfield.org. uk/Event/the-longfield-games-2016 11


Frampton-on-Severn Open Gardens Around the village of Frampton, 1.30 - 5pm. Organised by Rotary Club of Severn Vale. There will be 13 open gardens and teas available. Free parking. Tickets are £5 entry and free for children under 13.

JUNE 8

WHAT’S ON MAY 3

50 Shades of Boden Fashion Show Renishaw New Mills, Wotton-under-Edge, 7pm for 7.30pm. Tickets are £10 to include cheese and wine and can be booked online at www.longfield.org.uk

MAY 3

Fashion Show, with Cousins of Cheltenham The Barn at Calcot Manor Hotel, Tetbury, 2pm for 2.30pm. With Cousins of Cheltenham. Tickets are £15 to include afternoon tea. Organised by Tetbury Supporters’ Group. Contact Barbara Ball on 01666 504656 for details.

MAY 22

Afternoon teas Wotton-under-Edge Town Hall, 2.30pm5pm. Enjoy tea or coffee and delicious homemade cakes. 10

Fashion Show Cotswold Edge Golf Club, 7.30pm. Tickets £5 available from Wotton shop or Longfield reception. Many quality high street brands including M&S and Wallis will be on sale at vastly reduced prices. Everything you see on the catwalk will be available for purchase on the night in a range of different sizes.

JUNE 12

Box Village Open Gardens There are 17 gardens open around the village as well as book stall, plant sale, raffle and cream teas. Tickets are £5 in advance and £6 on the day. Organised by the Dakin family with 40% of proceeds coming to Longfield.

JUNE 17

Solstice Walk Longfield, Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton. Enjoy a 5km or a 10km evening walk across Minchinhampton Common. Tickets are £15 adult, £5 child until May 16th and £18 adult and £7.50 child after that date. Free for under 5s and dogs are welcome. More details on www.longfield.org.uk.

JUNE 25

Open garden Katherine’s Woodland Garden, Katherine’s Farm, Wotton-under-Edge. Proceeds being divided between Longfield and St Peter’s Hospice.

JULY 13

The Longfield Games Walls Sports and Social Club, Gloucester. Be part of Gloucestershire’s first fun Olympic-style team event. Sponsorship: £350 for primary schools, £500 for secondary schools, £1000 for corporates or groups. Details www.longfield.org.uk/Event/ the-longfield-games-2016

SEPTEMBER 9

‘Bling’ it on! Its back by popular demand! Enjoy a girls’ night out on a 10km walk around Cirencester in the twilight hours, starting at Deer Park School, Cirencester. Details at www.longfield.org.uk

SEPTEMBER 25

Cheltenham Half Marathon Free registration, £200 minimum sponsorship. Longfield has 25 spaces. Set in the heart of the town. Interested runners to contact events@longfield.org. uk for further details and discount code for free registration.

OCTOBER TO NOVEMBER 2016

Big Heart Exhibition Roadshow and Auction Visit the Longfield website to find out more about the Big Heart exhibitions we are holding across Gloucestershire, and how you can have the chance to bid on over 200 artworks to raise money for our art for health community groups service. Details: www.longfield.org.uk/bigheart

Longfield Games2016

The

MAY 29

Let the Games begin

Be part of Gloucestershire’s first fun Olympic-style team event on July 13. It’s an Olympic Year! So come and join us at Walls Social Club in Gloucester for an amazing day which will see school and business teams competing for the title of Longfield Games Champion 2016. The challenging assault course will include such wacky obstacles at the Energy Zapper and the Wheels & Wellies. During the day school children (aged 8 and over) will take to the assault course. In the evening it will be the adults turn and companies or groups can sign up teams of 12. During the games there will be food and refreshments on sale, so families and colleagues are welcomed to come and cheer you on. Sponsorship: £350 for primary schools, £500 for secondary schools, £1000 for corporates or groups - get your family on the team! Details www.longfield.org. uk/Event/the-longfield-games-2016 11


Photography: Rosy Webb

When Sara Webb was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease it came as a blow, with real challenges and struggles. This is how she approached it Two years after I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s I decided to learn to play the saxophone. I had played violin but the Parkinson’s affected my left side making playing difficult. I decided to sell it.

I’m always looking for the positive

It’s easy to say what I have lost through Parkinson’s but it is much harder to say what is positive from my diagnosis so I decided to take up something new and that was the saxophone. There is not a day now when I don’t play. It is always out on the stand in the living room and I often play short bursts. When I play I lose myself in the music and rhythm and that way my fingers follow and the music flows. I sometimes freeze with my Parkinson’s. That happens when my brain sees an obstacle and stops my legs from moving. They feel like they are stuck to the ground. I have to distract my brain in order to start walking again. By focusing on the beat of the music I can trick my body to keep moving. Music has got me out of lots of pickles in the countryside. Walking is a complex thing and with Parkinson’s you can’t take it for granted any more. Someone asked what is it like to freeze

12

when you walk, what is it like to have the problems of movement with Parkinson’s. So I decided I would try to explain it in a piece of music. I called it The Thaw because that is the opposite of freezing. The music starts with movement and then there is a section in the middle of short notes which is when I freeze. The music slows down and then slowly starts to flow which is when I take my pills and I can move freely again.

It was the piece of music I played for The Prince of Wales during his visit to Longfield. When he came into the garden room I had been playing for more than an hour, he looked at us and said he was very impressed. That made it all worth it. I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s four years ago and it came as a surprise to everybody. I love the outdoors especially walking. It was becoming harder to walk and I was getting slower and slower. I had a lot of pain especially in my left shoulder. Hills I had found relatively easy were becoming a struggle and I knew something was wrong. 13


Photography: Rosy Webb

When Sara Webb was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease it came as a blow, with real challenges and struggles. This is how she approached it Two years after I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s I decided to learn to play the saxophone. I had played violin but the Parkinson’s affected my left side making playing difficult. I decided to sell it.

I’m always looking for the positive

It’s easy to say what I have lost through Parkinson’s but it is much harder to say what is positive from my diagnosis so I decided to take up something new and that was the saxophone. There is not a day now when I don’t play. It is always out on the stand in the living room and I often play short bursts. When I play I lose myself in the music and rhythm and that way my fingers follow and the music flows. I sometimes freeze with my Parkinson’s. That happens when my brain sees an obstacle and stops my legs from moving. They feel like they are stuck to the ground. I have to distract my brain in order to start walking again. By focusing on the beat of the music I can trick my body to keep moving. Music has got me out of lots of pickles in the countryside. Walking is a complex thing and with Parkinson’s you can’t take it for granted any more. Someone asked what is it like to freeze

12

when you walk, what is it like to have the problems of movement with Parkinson’s. So I decided I would try to explain it in a piece of music. I called it The Thaw because that is the opposite of freezing. The music starts with movement and then there is a section in the middle of short notes which is when I freeze. The music slows down and then slowly starts to flow which is when I take my pills and I can move freely again.

It was the piece of music I played for The Prince of Wales during his visit to Longfield. When he came into the garden room I had been playing for more than an hour, he looked at us and said he was very impressed. That made it all worth it. I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s four years ago and it came as a surprise to everybody. I love the outdoors especially walking. It was becoming harder to walk and I was getting slower and slower. I had a lot of pain especially in my left shoulder. Hills I had found relatively easy were becoming a struggle and I knew something was wrong. 13


When I was first diagnosed, a friend suggested I come to Longfield. I attended day therapy. As part of the programme I received counselling which helped me come to terms with what was happening.

I found coming to Longfield a positive thing to do. It was a day for yourself and taking time to sit down and create something. Even chatting to others who attended the weekly sessions was therapeutic. Last year we arranged a taster day at Longfield for members of our Parkinson’s support group. Learning to play the saxophone has given me confidence to try new things and stop worrying about whether I succeed or fail. I play to show people that you can do something really positive, regardless of the Parkinson’s.

Though when I was first learning to play even my springer Lily would leave the room! I have clearly improved as she stays with me now when I play.

Photography: Rosy Webb

If I am feeling low I can concentrate on the music and it always makes me feel better. I’m achieving something and the playing has helped my breathing and my facial muscles. On the anniversary of my diagnosis, friends and family join me to walk a section of the Thames path. I call it the “two fingers to Parkinson’s” walk. I am determined we will walk all the way to London - just not all in one go. Before I was diagnosed I did stop and look at the views when I was walking but now I see even more. When I get to the top of that hill now I want to bottle that view. I still love my walking I just don’t go as far or as fast. To take up something new is positive. It can be anything. You don’t have to be good at it. If you love it, you enjoy it.

Longfield understands that joy of creating and helps you rediscover that creativity. Being diagnosed doesn’t mean you are no longer creative. It just means you may have to create in a slightly different way.

Before I was diagnosed I did stop and look at the views when I was walking but now I see even more. 14

15


When I was first diagnosed, a friend suggested I come to Longfield. I attended day therapy. As part of the programme I received counselling which helped me come to terms with what was happening.

I found coming to Longfield a positive thing to do. It was a day for yourself and taking time to sit down and create something. Even chatting to others who attended the weekly sessions was therapeutic. Last year we arranged a taster day at Longfield for members of our Parkinson’s support group. Learning to play the saxophone has given me confidence to try new things and stop worrying about whether I succeed or fail. I play to show people that you can do something really positive, regardless of the Parkinson’s.

Though when I was first learning to play even my springer Lily would leave the room! I have clearly improved as she stays with me now when I play.

Photography: Rosy Webb

If I am feeling low I can concentrate on the music and it always makes me feel better. I’m achieving something and the playing has helped my breathing and my facial muscles. On the anniversary of my diagnosis, friends and family join me to walk a section of the Thames path. I call it the “two fingers to Parkinson’s” walk. I am determined we will walk all the way to London - just not all in one go. Before I was diagnosed I did stop and look at the views when I was walking but now I see even more. When I get to the top of that hill now I want to bottle that view. I still love my walking I just don’t go as far or as fast. To take up something new is positive. It can be anything. You don’t have to be good at it. If you love it, you enjoy it.

Longfield understands that joy of creating and helps you rediscover that creativity. Being diagnosed doesn’t mean you are no longer creative. It just means you may have to create in a slightly different way.

Before I was diagnosed I did stop and look at the views when I was walking but now I see even more. 14

15


Longfield nurses were our own rays of sunshine While thousands of Brits are pondering retiring to India, there was no place like the Cotswolds for Alan and Helen Robertson. The couple moved from Cirencester to India in 1995, long before the hit film Marigold Hotel made retiring to India trendy. They loved it but when Alan became ill with prostate cancer, there was only one place they wanted to be - in the Cotswolds to be near their family.

It was becoming increasingly costly as we were having to fly out to support mum and dad, says daughter Lorna Irwin.

16

If we had been on our own I couldn’t have coped, said Helen.

Just days after returning to Gloucestershire Alan, aged 77, was taken to hospital. He spent six weeks in an isolation ward due to an antibiotic resistant infection. The family decided that they wanted to bring him home.

Dad was a very sociable man and loved company,” said Lorna. “He was on his own in hospital and it was not where he wanted to be. We didn’t want him to die alone.

Alan and Helen moved in with Lorna, husband Clive and their two children. The family dining room was converted into Alan’s bedroom.

Longfield, working in partnership with Alan’s GP and the community nurses, provided care. Longfield hospice at home nurses supported the family for eight weeks, coming three times a day and providing care overnight three times a week. “Those ladies from Longfield were like a ray of sunshine. Dad would brighten up as soon as they showed up. He loved a bit of banter,” said Lorna. Lorna, her sister Valerie and her mum Helen, along with the rest of the family, took it in turns to sleep in Alan’s room. “The night staff gave us a chance to get some sleep and they taught us how to turn dad over when we cared for him. They kept us informed,” said Lorna.

Alan died at home surrounded by his family. They all agree that bringing him home was the right decisions and though it was difficult they had no regrets. “We couldn’t have coped without Longfield’s support. We did everything we could for him and dad was so happy just to be here at home with us.”

thought that a hospice “wasWesomewhere you went to die.

We never realised that you could get all this wonderful care at home.

we were told what “to Though expect we never really understood what bringing dad home would mean.

17


Longfield nurses were our own rays of sunshine While thousands of Brits are pondering retiring to India, there was no place like the Cotswolds for Alan and Helen Robertson. The couple moved from Cirencester to India in 1995, long before the hit film Marigold Hotel made retiring to India trendy. They loved it but when Alan became ill with prostate cancer, there was only one place they wanted to be - in the Cotswolds to be near their family.

It was becoming increasingly costly as we were having to fly out to support mum and dad, says daughter Lorna Irwin.

16

If we had been on our own I couldn’t have coped, said Helen.

Just days after returning to Gloucestershire Alan, aged 77, was taken to hospital. He spent six weeks in an isolation ward due to an antibiotic resistant infection. The family decided that they wanted to bring him home.

Dad was a very sociable man and loved company,” said Lorna. “He was on his own in hospital and it was not where he wanted to be. We didn’t want him to die alone.

Alan and Helen moved in with Lorna, husband Clive and their two children. The family dining room was converted into Alan’s bedroom.

Longfield, working in partnership with Alan’s GP and the community nurses, provided care. Longfield hospice at home nurses supported the family for eight weeks, coming three times a day and providing care overnight three times a week. “Those ladies from Longfield were like a ray of sunshine. Dad would brighten up as soon as they showed up. He loved a bit of banter,” said Lorna. Lorna, her sister Valerie and her mum Helen, along with the rest of the family, took it in turns to sleep in Alan’s room. “The night staff gave us a chance to get some sleep and they taught us how to turn dad over when we cared for him. They kept us informed,” said Lorna.

Alan died at home surrounded by his family. They all agree that bringing him home was the right decisions and though it was difficult they had no regrets. “We couldn’t have coped without Longfield’s support. We did everything we could for him and dad was so happy just to be here at home with us.”

thought that a hospice “wasWesomewhere you went to die.

We never realised that you could get all this wonderful care at home.

we were told what “to Though expect we never really understood what bringing dad home would mean.

17


Make your special day one to remember Mark a day that is special to you by sponsoring a day at Longfield. It can be a birthday or an anniversary. Your donation goes towards the cost of running Longfield on your chosen day. Simply nominate the day that’s important or symbolic to you and then pledge to either raise £250 (for individuals) or £1,000 (for companies, clubs and societies) to sponsor a Longfield day.

You will receive an exclusive Sponsor a Day lapel badge and be invited on a tour of Longfield, so that you can see for yourself the care you are helping us provide.

In return we will display your name or your organisation’s name on our wall of hearts in our foyer in Minchinhampton.

To find out more contact Hattie Allsop, Supporter Relations Manager, on hattie.allsop@longfield.org.uk

Gifts that reach far into the future

legacy is one of the most selfless deeds you could undertake as it will help a complete stranger, some time in the future, get the care they need.

‘It’s a privilege to look after patients and their families,’ that’s what we hear time and time again from our team of staff and volunteers who provide a variety of support each year to over 600 patients. Often we find that the care we provide inspires people to make a donation to help someone else who needs Longfield.

We are fortunate enough to receive in the region of £275,000 a year in legacy gifts - gifts of all sizes, from £500 right up to £200,000, have been donated to Longfield to ensure we are there to care for the future.

One type of gift that makes an amazing difference is a donation left to Longfield in someone’s Will. People across the county have chosen to leave Longfield a gift to help ensure that we can provide care for others, not only today but for years to come. It could be said that leaving a 18

We would like to invite you to come and learn more about leaving a legacy to Longfield. We will be holding an information event on Monday 9th May at 11:00am here at our Minchinhampton centre. For more details, please contact Michelle Thompson 01453 886868 or michelle.thompson@longfield.org.uk

welcome to our new shop As part of Longfield’s plans to expand its services across the county, the charity is also working hard to raise more money to pay for this expansion. In December, 2015, Longfield opened a new shop in Pittville Street, Cheltenham. It features heavily on ladies’ fashion and bric-a-brac but also stocks a good range of other gifts and goods. The new shop, which is the charity’s 15th, is a showcase store for our higher quality donations.

We pride ourselves on “providing high quality goods

at reasonable prices. Our shops are fitted out to the same high level as other retailers because we want our customers to enjoy their shopping experience, says Ian

Cherry, Head of Retail for Longfield.

More than 75% of the funding Longfield needs to provide its care comes from the public through donations and shop sales. “ Our first few months have been fantastic and we have received lots of praise for the new shop,” said Mr Cherry. With the arrival of spring it is a good time for people to have a clear-out and support Longfield’s shops with donations. “Our shops are only as good as the support and donations we receive. We always have a need for good quality clothing and bric-a-brac, which help us raise needed funds to support more patients in the county,” said Mr Cherry.

To find the shop nearest you, visit our website www.longfield.org.uk 19 19


Make your special day one to remember Mark a day that is special to you by sponsoring a day at Longfield. It can be a birthday or an anniversary. Your donation goes towards the cost of running Longfield on your chosen day. Simply nominate the day that’s important or symbolic to you and then pledge to either raise £250 (for individuals) or £1,000 (for companies, clubs and societies) to sponsor a Longfield day.

You will receive an exclusive Sponsor a Day lapel badge and be invited on a tour of Longfield, so that you can see for yourself the care you are helping us provide.

In return we will display your name or your organisation’s name on our wall of hearts in our foyer in Minchinhampton.

To find out more contact Hattie Allsop, Supporter Relations Manager, on hattie.allsop@longfield.org.uk

Gifts that reach far into the future

legacy is one of the most selfless deeds you could undertake as it will help a complete stranger, some time in the future, get the care they need.

‘It’s a privilege to look after patients and their families,’ that’s what we hear time and time again from our team of staff and volunteers who provide a variety of support each year to over 600 patients. Often we find that the care we provide inspires people to make a donation to help someone else who needs Longfield.

We are fortunate enough to receive in the region of £275,000 a year in legacy gifts - gifts of all sizes, from £500 right up to £200,000, have been donated to Longfield to ensure we are there to care for the future.

One type of gift that makes an amazing difference is a donation left to Longfield in someone’s Will. People across the county have chosen to leave Longfield a gift to help ensure that we can provide care for others, not only today but for years to come. It could be said that leaving a 18

We would like to invite you to come and learn more about leaving a legacy to Longfield. We will be holding an information event on Monday 9th May at 11:00am here at our Minchinhampton centre. For more details, please contact Michelle Thompson 01453 886868 or michelle.thompson@longfield.org.uk

welcome to our new shop As part of Longfield’s plans to expand its services across the county, the charity is also working hard to raise more money to pay for this expansion. In December, 2015, Longfield opened a new shop in Pittville Street, Cheltenham. It features heavily on ladies’ fashion and bric-a-brac but also stocks a good range of other gifts and goods. The new shop, which is the charity’s 15th, is a showcase store for our higher quality donations.

We pride ourselves on “providing high quality goods

at reasonable prices. Our shops are fitted out to the same high level as other retailers because we want our customers to enjoy their shopping experience, says Ian

Cherry, Head of Retail for Longfield.

More than 75% of the funding Longfield needs to provide its care comes from the public through donations and shop sales. “ Our first few months have been fantastic and we have received lots of praise for the new shop,” said Mr Cherry. With the arrival of spring it is a good time for people to have a clear-out and support Longfield’s shops with donations. “Our shops are only as good as the support and donations we receive. We always have a need for good quality clothing and bric-a-brac, which help us raise needed funds to support more patients in the county,” said Mr Cherry.

To find the shop nearest you, visit our website www.longfield.org.uk 19 19


Thank you These are some of the great contributions we have received from our supporters: Three Coventry Building Society branches have raised £30,138 – enough to pay for more than 1,200 hours of care from Longfield’s Hospice at Home team. The 15 staff in the Nailsworth, Dursley and Stonehouse branches chose Longfield as their community charity because of its strong connections to the area. The money was raised through its affinity scheme, which sees 1% of the interest from savings accounts redirected to a chosen cause. Five members of staff from Gardiner Haskins, Cirencester, cycled to each of our shops – 100-mile journey – raising over £600. The company also supplied 15 TVs for our shops at cost price. Faye Best told how Longfield cared for her son as part of our Christmas appeal, which raised just under £6,000. Teenager Emily Jenner raised more than £600 by running the Minchinhampton 10K and the Birmingham Half Marathon.

Colour Connection and The Print Room are sponsoring the Longfield Games. Brian Ireland organised a series of brass band events raising £3,000. Sir Alastair McDuff raised more than £2,000 with his presentation on the Murder Trials. Fifteen branches of Midcounties Co-operative have chosen Longfield as their charity of the year. RDS Technology Ltd and staff donated £800 as part of its Christmas support. Park Junior School, Stonehouse, raised £585 by staging a coffee morning and raffle. They have also signed up to The Longfield Games and have committed to raised £350. Eastington Primary School held a collection after their school performance and raised £412. St Dominic’s Catholic School, Stroud, has signed up for The Longfield Games and are committed to raising £350.

It’s back by popular demand a great girls’ night out in support of Longfield. Join the party and bling it up. Our girls’ night walks have raised more than £250,000 for the charity. Now we want to smash that total and make those fundraising coffers go ‘ka-bling’. So join us on Friday September 9 for our Girls’ Night Out walk. Bling is the theme so it’s your chance to shine - in as many ways as you fancy. Tiaras, gold shoes, sparkly nails, sequins - the sky’s the limit. OTT is the dress code so let your imaginations run riot.

The 10km walk will start and finish at Deer Park School. To get you in the party mood there will be a pre-walk party with entertainment, refreshments and music. Then the walkers set off on a mass start. Children aged 12 and over are welcome to join us. There will be an early bird entry fee of £15 until May 25. Entry after that is £18. Walkers will receive a free T-shirt, a fundraising pack and refreshments on their return from the walk. However, your registration fee will be fully refunded, if you can raise more than £150 in sponsorship! You can register online. Just go to our website, www.longfield.org.uk for the link. You can also request an entry form from the fundraising team 01453 886868 or events@longfield.org.uk

Renishaw donated 18 hampers and £300 of gift vouchers and also supplied their Innovation centre for a successful Fifty Shades of Boden, helping to raise £2,500. 20

21


Thank you These are some of the great contributions we have received from our supporters: Three Coventry Building Society branches have raised £30,138 – enough to pay for more than 1,200 hours of care from Longfield’s Hospice at Home team. The 15 staff in the Nailsworth, Dursley and Stonehouse branches chose Longfield as their community charity because of its strong connections to the area. The money was raised through its affinity scheme, which sees 1% of the interest from savings accounts redirected to a chosen cause. Five members of staff from Gardiner Haskins, Cirencester, cycled to each of our shops – 100-mile journey – raising over £600. The company also supplied 15 TVs for our shops at cost price. Faye Best told how Longfield cared for her son as part of our Christmas appeal, which raised just under £6,000. Teenager Emily Jenner raised more than £600 by running the Minchinhampton 10K and the Birmingham Half Marathon.

Colour Connection and The Print Room are sponsoring the Longfield Games. Brian Ireland organised a series of brass band events raising £3,000. Sir Alastair McDuff raised more than £2,000 with his presentation on the Murder Trials. Fifteen branches of Midcounties Co-operative have chosen Longfield as their charity of the year. RDS Technology Ltd and staff donated £800 as part of its Christmas support. Park Junior School, Stonehouse, raised £585 by staging a coffee morning and raffle. They have also signed up to The Longfield Games and have committed to raised £350. Eastington Primary School held a collection after their school performance and raised £412. St Dominic’s Catholic School, Stroud, has signed up for The Longfield Games and are committed to raising £350.

It’s back by popular demand a great girls’ night out in support of Longfield. Join the party and bling it up. Our girls’ night walks have raised more than £250,000 for the charity. Now we want to smash that total and make those fundraising coffers go ‘ka-bling’. So join us on Friday September 9 for our Girls’ Night Out walk. Bling is the theme so it’s your chance to shine - in as many ways as you fancy. Tiaras, gold shoes, sparkly nails, sequins - the sky’s the limit. OTT is the dress code so let your imaginations run riot.

The 10km walk will start and finish at Deer Park School. To get you in the party mood there will be a pre-walk party with entertainment, refreshments and music. Then the walkers set off on a mass start. Children aged 12 and over are welcome to join us. There will be an early bird entry fee of £15 until May 25. Entry after that is £18. Walkers will receive a free T-shirt, a fundraising pack and refreshments on their return from the walk. However, your registration fee will be fully refunded, if you can raise more than £150 in sponsorship! You can register online. Just go to our website, www.longfield.org.uk for the link. You can also request an entry form from the fundraising team 01453 886868 or events@longfield.org.uk

Renishaw donated 18 hampers and £300 of gift vouchers and also supplied their Innovation centre for a successful Fifty Shades of Boden, helping to raise £2,500. 20

21


I felt my voice counted for something When Julie Jenner’s mother recommended she contact Longfield for support, she wasn’t totally convinced. She had started chemotherapy for breast cancer but never once did she feel anything but positive about her future.

was mum’s insight into “theIthospice that made me

make an appointment. The first day I came I pulled up in the car park and thought ‘what am I doing’? I’m not at the end of my life. But when I walked inside I was immediately put at my ease.

Julie first found a lump in her breast in January 2015. When she was told she had cancer Julie decided she would not tell her three daughters until she knew exactly what was going on. “Those 13 days’ waiting were the hardest part. Yet it gave me time to come to terms with it. Telling the girls was the hardest thing I’ve had to do. “This whole journey is so much harder for everyone around you than it is for the person with the cancer. The patient can do nothing but go along with the treatment being thrown at them.”

22

She attended day therapy once a week for three months and said the access to the specialist services made such a difference to her recovery. “The oncology department is the NHS at its best but they are so stretched. They can only treat the condition. “At Longfield you’re treated as a person and that is what needs healing. To lose myself in the art, to be asked ‘what are your concerns’ and ‘how is the family coping’ - that was exactly what I needed.” Julie received counselling and reflexology. Her favourite place in Longfield was the art space. “I love art but I had been too busy being a mum and a wife that I didn’t have time for art. The power to lose myself in it was so healing. I’d look at the colours I had used in a picture and only then realise that it allowed me to express so much I couldn’t put into words. “Never did I leave Longfield feeling anything but uplifted. I felt totally at ease there and was treated with the utmost respect. I felt my voice counted for something.” Julie is planning to mark her 50th birthday with a fundraising bash to say thank you to Longfield. She wants to be able to help others facing a similar journey. She volunteers with Longfield as an ambassador and is very honest about her experience with cancer.

I want to raise awareness and I want to be “completely open. From this journey I’ve learned so much about myself. The support I’ve had around me has been phenomenal. It was that support that got me through it.

23


I felt my voice counted for something When Julie Jenner’s mother recommended she contact Longfield for support, she wasn’t totally convinced. She had started chemotherapy for breast cancer but never once did she feel anything but positive about her future.

was mum’s insight into “theIthospice that made me

make an appointment. The first day I came I pulled up in the car park and thought ‘what am I doing’? I’m not at the end of my life. But when I walked inside I was immediately put at my ease.

Julie first found a lump in her breast in January 2015. When she was told she had cancer Julie decided she would not tell her three daughters until she knew exactly what was going on. “Those 13 days’ waiting were the hardest part. Yet it gave me time to come to terms with it. Telling the girls was the hardest thing I’ve had to do. “This whole journey is so much harder for everyone around you than it is for the person with the cancer. The patient can do nothing but go along with the treatment being thrown at them.”

22

She attended day therapy once a week for three months and said the access to the specialist services made such a difference to her recovery. “The oncology department is the NHS at its best but they are so stretched. They can only treat the condition. “At Longfield you’re treated as a person and that is what needs healing. To lose myself in the art, to be asked ‘what are your concerns’ and ‘how is the family coping’ - that was exactly what I needed.” Julie received counselling and reflexology. Her favourite place in Longfield was the art space. “I love art but I had been too busy being a mum and a wife that I didn’t have time for art. The power to lose myself in it was so healing. I’d look at the colours I had used in a picture and only then realise that it allowed me to express so much I couldn’t put into words. “Never did I leave Longfield feeling anything but uplifted. I felt totally at ease there and was treated with the utmost respect. I felt my voice counted for something.” Julie is planning to mark her 50th birthday with a fundraising bash to say thank you to Longfield. She wants to be able to help others facing a similar journey. She volunteers with Longfield as an ambassador and is very honest about her experience with cancer.

I want to raise awareness and I want to be “completely open. From this journey I’ve learned so much about myself. The support I’ve had around me has been phenomenal. It was that support that got me through it.

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Supporting families in Gloucestershire at a time when they need it the most. 1. your details: Title First name Surname Your Address: Postcode: Email: Telephone:

Our promise to you

2. Make your gift worth even more at no extra cost to you Do you pay tax? If so, by simply completing this form you can boost the value of your gift by 25p for every £1 you have already given.

Please tick if you are a UK taxpayer. Yes I want to Gift Aid my donation of the amount stated above and any donations I make in the future or have made in the past 4 years to Longfield. I am a UK taxpayer and understand that if I pay less Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax than the amount of Gift Aid claimed on all my donations in that tax year it is my responsibility to pay any difference. If my status as a taxpayer changes, I will inform Longfield. Please tick if you are not a UK taxpayer Signature(s):

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3. ARE YOU IN? JOIN US!

As a valued supporter, you are incredibly important to us. After all, without you we simply wouldn’t be able to do what we do. That’s why we make all our supporters a promise to provide the very best standards of support. We want to say thank you for your support and keep you up to date with our news. If you would prefer for us not to get in touch, please just let us know by filling in this form or by contacting our dedicated Supporter Care Team on 01453 886868 or email supporteradmin@longfield.org.uk. l

We will communicate with you in a way that suits you. If you tell us you would prefer less contact or don’t want to hear from us at all, we will respect your wishes.

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We will keep our costs to a minimum.

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We take all feedback seriously and will aim to respond within 10 working days.

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We’ll deal with any comment quickly and accurately.

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We will keep personal details in a safe place and they will be kept confidential. The data we gather and hold is managed in accordance with the Data Protection Act (1998).

We would love to keep you updated with details of our amazing work, fundraising activities and ways to get involved. Longfield respects your privacy. The data we gather and hold is managed in accordance with the Data Protection Act (1998). We will never sell your personal information to third parties but may need to share your details with suppliers who work on our behalf. Please tick the boxes if you would like us to contact you in the following ways: By email

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If you would like to change your communication preferences, please call 01453 886868, email supporteradmin@longfield.org.uk or write to Longfield, Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton, GL5 2PQ.

make a difference, make a donation Please tell us why you have donated to Longfield

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We are always clear about who we are and open and honest in what we do.

l We will use your fundraising to support the people of Gloucestershire who are living with a life-limiting illness.

Longfield Burleigh Lane, Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire GL5 2PQ Registered in England No: 2213662 Registered Charity No: 298627

Tel: 01453 886868

Web: longfield.org.uk

Helping people to live well Spring/Summer 2016

Profile for Longfield

Longfield Magazine Spring / Summer 2016  

Longfield's supporter magazine - filled with news, upcoming events, patient stories and much more.

Longfield Magazine Spring / Summer 2016  

Longfield's supporter magazine - filled with news, upcoming events, patient stories and much more.

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