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ALICE CHILANGWA FARMER STAGE 3 UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY 2015/2016


ALICE CHILANGWA FARMER An Academic Portfolio submitted in fulfilment of the BA Architecture Honours degree, Newcastle University, 2016. Design Group: Variations Newcastle University


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LEARNING SUMMARY

THE SHOW STORE

PORTUGAL PRECEDENT STUDY

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PAGE 67

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THE CHAMBER

FROM PRECARITY TO PERMANENCE

THINKING THROUGH MAKING

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00 LEARNING SUMMARY As the year comes to an end I am filled with both relief that I have made it, and perhaps apprehension of what is to come. So far, the majority of my life has been dictated by academic timings, September to July, new years, new experiences and new ways of learning. To me change is something to be organised and controlled making the reality of entering ‘the real world’ is both daunting and exciting. Having conquered another academic hurdle, I can look back on everything last three years; from our first trip to Kielder to exploring the historical impact of Newcastle City Centre’s architecture, and wonder both, where the time has gone and how I managed to accomplish so much. This third and final year of my undergraduate has allowed me to focus conceptually and work outside the parameters of construction specifications, by manifesting my own brief stemming from my interests. To reflect on this journey I can highlight key points in the year, at the time seeming insignificant, yet on reflection housing influential moments impacting my learning. As shown in my design project the theme of Layering is the basis for most of my thinking during the year. Rather coincidentally this theme was planted in my head during Charrette, although somewhat subliminally. By working with artist Louise Mackenzie we used the idea of breaking substances down into their individual elements and reconstructing them into something new; a science orientated approach. On reflection this impacted my primer and lead too much of my conceptual thinking during stages to come. The Primer phase was something new and allowed me to develop my conceptual interests and explore in medians I was previously not confident in, for example presentational drawing. Working solely conceptually was a fresh experience,

but reflecting back I can see what an impact and advantage it gave me for my future projects. Being forced to work conceptually and in detail, without the design of a whole building, which was admittedly a challenge. However, the first model I produced of the year, as shown to the left, was to become the basis to my architectural thinking, bridging the move from concept to reality. By looking at how surfaces and blocks could be manipulated to create space and form, I was introduced to a new approach to architecture. This model was key to all my thinking, becoming a physical manifestation of my ideas and representations. This model stemmed my primary theme of layers and spatial layering as an architectural operation. Its importance is what thus lead me to use it as my front cover, and why it continuously plays part in the design of The Chamber and The Show Store. The Chamber and The Show Store where both challenging design tasks, however they allowed me to learn how to represent conceptually and convert it into architectural entities, as well as required me to work structurally. Typically architectural technology and structural intents have been a fear and weakness of mine, never sure of what goes where, or how something connects. However, by incorporating this into my design I learned to use my structure as architectural elements, researching different types specific to the needs of the brief and my ideas. The alternative approach to this year and the freedom to develop my on brief based on my interests, has helped me to develop as a designer and as a person. Controlling my stress levels and organising my thinking has played a large part in my work effort this year, and developed into a strength of mine. Taking this forward into my future I feel more prepared to tackle the challenges and uncontrollable aspects which may come my way.

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01 THE SHOW STORE

The brief asks to design a show and store for a specific collection. The brief works in two phases. Phase One consists of the declaration of a collection, and the design of an incubator, within Newcastle City Centre. The Incubator is a pop up kiosk constructed to display an object from the collection. Phase Two is the design of the Show Store for said declared collection and focuses on a central archive. An additional aim for the Show Store is to create a cultural entity for the wider community. This links with The Chamber project which focuses on Music, situated on the same site, both buildings encompass the arts and architecture, creating public community spaces.

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THE COLLECTION The collection for my Incubator and Show Store is Polaroid images. This collection selection originated from the idea of societies need for instant gratification. Instant gratification has developed rapidly due to the use of technology, especially with photography. The Polaroid Camera, however, was the first to allow people to take a photo and view it within minuets, without the need for professional development.

SECTIONAL DRAWING OF 1947 LAND CAMERA

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THE CONCEPT

During The Chamber I was interested in Layering as a concept to lead an architectural operation. Through researching into Polaroid images I began to look at the physicality of the development process. Polaroid images react solely on the light and colour intensity of the photo subject. This creates dramatic difference between photos, making each individual. Contrary to digital cameras, you additionally don’t get a pre-view of the image. This generated the concept of ‘Layering’, as the film reacts in layers to produce the final image.

DIAGRAM SHOWING POLAROID LAYERS

To experiment with this I used boiling water to strip back the layers of a Polaroid image to reveal the various layers, and document what each layer conveys. Each layer contains a different level of information, each unique in creating the image. This stripping back theme links to my chamber project, looking at spatial layering, which also features similar themes as presented from the idea of Semblance, established in The Primer. This layering concept is therefore thread throughout my designs for this year influencing, The Chamber, The Incubator and The Show Store.

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EXPERIMENTAL STRIPPING OF LAYERS OF SITE PHOTO

EXPERIMENTAL STRIPPING OF LAYERS OF CONCEPT MODEL PHOTO

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THE INCUBATOR My Incubator imagines a photographer studying people and how technology has influenced the human experience of listening music. The incubator is a kiosk allowing buskers of Northumbria street to perform on a slightly raised platform, to an audience, whilst the photographer documents the audiences experience through the use of Polaroid images. The kiosk also houses some of the photographers collection and a room of relaxation and contemplation. Through studying current buskers who perform along Northumbria street you can see how different types of people might interact with the busker, either sitting and watching, listening as their past by, perhaps stopping to take pictures. These different interactions influence how they experience the music, ranging from viewing it as a mini concert or simply as background music to their everyday activities. It is this varying experience that the photographer is interested in, and wants to document.

1:1500 MAP OF POPULAR BUSKING SITES ALONG NORTHUMBERLAND STREET AND GREY’S MONUMENT 9


BUSKERS ALONG NORTHUMBRIA STREET

To determine the appropriate site, I conducted a busking study along Northumberland Street, as shown on the Busking Study Map, of surrounding busking sties. I wanted a site which is public, with a large volume of foot traffic, yet is acoustically distant from other bucking sites along Northumberland Street. This study determined my site to be a desirable busking area. The volume of public movement around the space makes it ideal for the busker, as they may also want to collect money. A raised platform, additionally creates a stage presence, making them stand out around passing people. 10


THE INCUBATOR SITE

The Incubator site is in the alley between Northumberland street Newcastle library. On either side is Scott’s and Moss Bros retail stores. There is also a cafe further along the alley. At the end of alley is the Newcastle City Library.

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The narrow space between surrounding buildings also creates intimacy to display photographs, as well as the ability to control the lighting to highlight elements of the photographs. As a pedestrianised area, there is less noise pollution from traffic.


SCALE 1:250 SITE MAP

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DEVELOPMENTAL DRAWINGS

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The Incubator is made up a series of layers pulled apart from one another. This is similar to what happened to the Polaroid image when I stripped back each layer. The layers then create partitions, with the spaces between them becoming circulation. With each partition the spaces get smaller and more intimate, starting with the very public busking space and ending with a reflection space for the photographer. Polaroid images would be displayed on the partition walls, allowing the public to view the photographs whilst listening to the music. Circulation is controlled throughout the incubator, with strategic openings in the walls and access points, as shows in the diagrammatic drawing.

1:100 INCUBATOR MODEL

1:100 DEVELOPMENTAL MODEL

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1:200 SITE MODEL

INCUBATOR PHOTO MONTAGE

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THE INCUBATOR

THE CHAMBER

THE SHOW STORE

The Incubator then paves the way for The Show Store design. Both sites are a short distance apart, with The Incubator becoming a linking point between The Chamber brief and The Show Store brief.

1:200 MAP SHOWING INCUBATOR, CHAMBER AND SHOW STORE 16


THE SHOW STORE SITE

MAP SHOWING POINTS OF INTEREST From the site, you can view down towards the Quayside and the River Tyne, as well as across the Tyne Bridge over to The Sage. The Sage is another cultural hub within Newcastle. This visual link between The Sage and the site is very important, as the masterplan plan aims to create a Arts and Cultural Hub within the city centre. This view links both sides of the river, connecting them thematically. 17


VIEWS OF THE SITE

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THE MASTERPLAN - LANDSCAPE INFRASTRUCTURE

Due to the size of the site, the initial stage of the project involves the production of a new masterplan for the regeneration of the site. The key concept focuses on Site Layering, with the use of landscape infrastructure to provide a framework for a diversity of architectural developments over time. These building fabrications and park entities are developed through site layering considering the current saturation of the site and encompassing future developments and considerations for the site. The key precedent used to generate the Site Layering is Parc de la Villette by OMA.

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Horizontal and vertical levels are used to define base levels and orchestrate movement and pauses into and through social condensers. This creates an articulation of foreground and background, identifying surfaces rather than objects placed on site and expressing circulation. These site layers were additionally focussed on regenerating the local area of southern Pilgrim Street, and creating a Art’s and Culture Hub for the community, as well as encourage local businesses and retail outlets into the area, in line with Newcastle Council’s Regeneration plan.


OMA PARC DE LA VILLETTE

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NEWCASTLE CHARES

A central, narrow, stair way down the middle of the site will act as a key circulation route and be a mimic of a Newcastle Chare. ‘Chares’ is a Newcastle colloquial word used for the narrow alley-ways in Newcastle. There used to be about 20 chares which led back from the Quayside in

the medieval town. The map below highlights some of the Chares near the Show Store Site. I chose to implement a Chare into the masterplan, as I want the design to be Newcastle specific, further implementing Newcastle’s Historical Land Infrastructure.

MAP SHOWING SOME EXISTING CHARES IN NEWCASTLE

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PLUMMER CHARE

CASTLE CHARE

JAVEL GROUPE CHARE

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LAND INFRASTRUCTURE DIAGRAMS FOR MASTERPLAN

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SCALE 1:2000

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MASTERPLAN SITE MODEL This model shows visually the layers on and around the site. Vertically the first dominant layer is the street that joins the masterplan to the surrounding buildings. The second layer read on this model is the retaining walls dividing up the site. The third layer is the most present on this model being the buildings both on site and surrounding the site. The final layer represented in this model is my two buildings, The Chamber, green, and The 27


WESTERN SUN

SOUTH-EASTERN SUN

SOUTH-WESTERN SUN

EASTERN SUN

Using the model I also conducted a light study, looking at how the sun pattern of the site changed the lighting within the site over the course of the day.

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THE SHOW STORE

The Show Store leads on from The Incubator,designing a public photography institute for local photographers and a Polaroid archive store, on the site established using the Masterplan. The incubator focused on the music experience and documenting it, where as the Show Store evolves from this, thinking about displaying and storing the photographs. The archive stores the Polaroid images produced at the incubator, as well as other Polaroid collections. The archive is specific to Polaroid images, ensuring maximum preservation. The institute contains public entities such as a Black Room, White Room, Media Space and Printing Space for local photographer enthusiasts to hire out and use. A public Gallery is also designed to display a variety of photograph types.

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EXPERIENCE THE MUSIC

DOCUMENT THE EXPERIENCE

DISPLAY THE POLAROID

STORE THE POLAROID

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DESIGN STRATEGY

The Show Store conceptually aims to use Spatial Layering in line with the selection of three layers; points, lines and surfaces. This allows for design in surface planes to dictate the creation of voids and control circulation between said voids. Materiality helps

SHOW STORE VISUAL COMMUNICATION

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to modify social interactions, with surface planes being either solid, filigree or translucent, regulating circulation and modifying views throughout the building. Using the theme of variations I

CIRCULATION PASSAGES

experiments with varies way to spatial layer the building, taking into consideration circulation, access points and verticality. The drawings below are some of the designs which lead to my final design.

SHOW STORE ACCESS POINTS


EXPERIMENTING WITH BUILDING LAYERING

EXPERIMENTING WITH CIRCULATION THROUGH SPATIAL LAYERS

EXPERIMENTING WITH SPATIAL LAYERING

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1:50 CONCEPT MODEL This Concept Model stemmed the basis for my final design. Using foam board to create physical layers and balsa wood to interrupt the spaces and create a sense of circulation, demonstrated conceptually how surfaces and voids could connect to disrupt negative spaces. The white walls became the core of the space.

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DEVELOPMENTAL DRAWINGS Using the concept model, I imagined the partition walls as sold concrete load bearing walls, with rooms, platforms and opening intersection to create controlled spaces. Circulation is controlled by the openings in the walls, restricting access to parts of the building that are private, and encouraging people to stop for certain views and points of interest,

for example vertical views down. The load bearing walls will be made up of two thickness’s, 400mm and 1000mm. This allows for windows to be stepped dependent on the view and space. It also alters the experience when passing from one space into another.

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SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

From my concept model and developmental drawings I began to apply this design approach to the site. Physically dividing up the site I created the partition walls. These walls divided up the building, altering views from one space to another and creating verticality between each wall.

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Thinking about the voids created between the walls I experimented with how and where the walls could be perforated to create circulation paths into the spaces. Instead of looking at the areas as negative space, I considered them as thick layers which embodied the rooms of the building.


I began to think about the different needs of the building and what spaces were required, developing the brief specifically to my project.

From this is developed how to close some of the voids to create habitable spaces. By closing spaces there also became a contrast between open and closed areas, connected visually through vertical views throuhout the building.

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1:50 CONCEPT MODEL OF ARCHIVE

DEVELOPMENTAL DRAWING OF ARCHIVE AS CENTRAL ELEMENT

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DEVELOPMENTAL DRAWING OF CABLE SUSPENDED ARCHIVE


As the core of the building, I experimented with a hanging or suspended archive, to show visitors how the archive intersected through the concrete walls throughout the middle of the building. I want the archive to be seen from all angles and dominate the building; a private space that interrupts the public layers of the building. The concept model and developmental drawings experimented with this idea of a hanging archive. However, structurally it proved complicated due to the dead load of the concrete structure and the live load of the Polaroid images to be stored. After researching, I decided on a design that would allow the building to appear like it was floating, whilst actually being supported above by the concrete walls. From below the archive looking up, like from the Gallery, the archive appears to float within the space.

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1:100 SOUTH-WEST FACING SECTION

Each layer has specific openings, this means views and movement horizontally are controlled.

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LIGHTING ANALYSIS

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The Show Store will be seen throughout the building, but will only be accessible to the photographer and archivist, from above. Openings in the concrete walls will show the depth of each layers and frame views vertically though adjacent space.

natural light, drawing people into the middle of the building. The use of lighting to influence circulation is similar to the precedent Museu dos Coches, Lisboa, as studied during the trip to Portugal, and mentioned in part 02.

This lighting study shows how light comes primarily from the glass decking roof; thus from a single direction, much like the lens of a camera.

The closed elements of the building will be lit using controlled artificial lighting, which is specific to each space. For example, The white room will have very white lights, which can be moved and adjusted on the need of the user.

The centre of the building will be flooded with

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1. CAFE 2. GALLERY 3. WC 4. CLEANERS STORE

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1:100 SPATIAL LAYERING MODEL This model shows the spatial layering through the building, and the openings within the retaining walls.

LAYERING DIAGRAM OF CONCRETE WALL

The wall openings works back to The incubator, which illustrated a similar approach linking the exhibition to the performance. For the Show Store, these openings create circulation paths.

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5. LIBRARY 6. MEDIA SPACE 7. ARCHIVE RESEARCH ROOM 8. WC

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1:100 GROUND FLOOR 48


9. STAFF ROOM 10. STAFF OFFICE 11. BLACK ROOM 12. PHOTOGRAPHERS STUDIO 18. ARCHIVE

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1:50 SPATIAL MODEL

The Spatial layering of the building also mimics the Site Layering from the masterplan. The Site Layering created varying layers within the site, this is continued in the building. Each story is a manipulation of layers with a series or double or triple height spaces, which overlook one another. This visually connects public and private spaces, whilst maintaining a physical separation.

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13. BLACK ROOM 14. DRESSING ROOM 15. WHITE ROOM

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PRIVATE

The floorplan of the building is organised so as you go up the building becomes more private; starting with the public Gallery on the lower ground floor and ending with the photographers accommodation on the third floor.

PUBLIC

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16. ARCHIVE OFFICE 17. PHOTOGRAPHERS ACCOMMODATION

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The Pilgrim Street facade of the building is made of filigree weathered steel. This filters views and light into the building. This image is inside the photographers accommodation. Light coming into the space is therefore also altered, having an experiential quality as well as a practical one, regarding solar shading.

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PILGRIM STREET FACADE ANALYSIS South Pilgrim Street is made up of many facade types, all illustrating different styles of architectural design within Newcastle. Although no faรงades opposite our site demonstrate more modern designs, most are of a masonry brick type, the use of weathering steel for the Show Store will aesthetically match the red bricking of surrounding buildings. New builds within the site will also be made from red masonry, matching the retaining walls already on site.

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Using the precedent study of the state museum of SĂŁo Paulo, I designed the masterplan buildings to incorporate materials already on site, with the contrast of a weathered steel facade for my show store to make it stand out. Crossing a traditional material with a modern one. More information on the state museum of SĂŁo Paulo can be seen in part 02.

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1:500 SECTION THROUGH PILGRIM STREET 58


STRUCTURAL LAYERING 1:200 AXONOMETRIC DRAWING OF PERFORATED METAL FACADE WITH CURTAIN WALL

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1:50 PLAN DETAIL SHOWING METAL FACADE TO STEEL FRAME CONSTRUCTION.

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BUILDING LAYERING

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SPATIAL LAYERING

FLOORPLATE LAYERING

FACADE LAYERING

MATERIAL LAYERING


1:500 AXONOMETRIC DRAWINGS SHOWING BUILDING ELEMENTS

The Building is made up of a series of concrete layers, these act as load bearing walls. These are in two thickness’s, 400mm and 1000mm. The thick walls allow services to run through them, into the floor slabs of various floors of the building. A concrete feature wall, containing exhibition slots within the wall also displays work throughout the building vertically. Furthermore, the roof is primarily made up of structural glass decking, allowing light into the building through one source, above; much like through the lens of a camera.

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1:50 STRUCTURAL SECTION 63


1:20 ROOF DETAIL Structural glass decks and concrete roof slabs will make up the roof of the building. The glass decks will sit at the top of the concrete load bearing walls, with a lightweight concrete parapet placed on top, to aesthetically appear like the glass comes out of a continuous concrete wall. This encompass the lighting strategy I am aiming for.

1:20 GLASS BALCONY RAILING DETAIL

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ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES

VENTILATION

MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Natural cross ventilation could be used, as the openings in the concrete walls allow for air to move through the building. Stack ventilation could also be implemented, as skylights will be in the glass deck roof.

The archive will require mechanical ventilation to ensure a suitable temperature is maintained within the store. This will be implemented in the ceiling of the room, with piping up through the retaining walls allowing for air to travel in and out of the space from above.

However, the site is next to an A road, so another solution could be to use mechanical ventilation, to reduce noise pollution entering into the building.

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SOLAR SHADING

CONCRETE SUSTAINABILITY

The Pilgrim Street facade is made up of a steel structure curtain wall, with perforated weathering steel panels. This steel facade creates solar shading into the building. This reduces solar gain entering the building, which could cause overheating, as well as reduces the likelihood of glare.

Structurally designing for longevity, concrete is assumed to have a lifecycle of longer than 25 years, therefore, although initial CO2 emissions are high the sustainability and longevity of concrete would justify its use. Its inherent mass and damping qualities additionally mean a high level of thermal mass, and good acoustic performance, as well as the creation of a fire retardant building.

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02 PRECEDENT STUDY

To conduct an in depth precedent study, as a group we travelled to Lisbon, Portugal and Porto Portugal. The precedents I focused on are Museu dos Coches and The State Museum Of SĂŁo Paulo, both by architect Paulo Mendes Da Rocha. The study of these precedents influenced ideas in my Show Store and created a fluid link between designing The Chamber and The Show Store, looking at controlling light and the use of existing materials on site.

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MUSEU DOS COCHES

ARCHITECT - PAULO MENDES DA ROCHA Situated in Lisbon, what interested my was the simple and linear approach to the interior architecture, and the framing of natural light. Thick internal walls hide services and ventilation, (as does in my Show Store) whilst the ceiling glorified them using perforated aluminium panels. The use of lighting was minimum yet impacted significantly highlighting circulation points. This influenced my show Store as I thought about controlling light

into the space, and using light as an aid to controlling circulation; as people naturally move towards light. Although specifically designed for the carriages, as highlighted through large lift openings and service entrances, a criticisms of the space is the lack of plinth or physical exhibition of the carriages. This has resulted in black tape being used to prevent the public from touching the exhibit.

STRUCTURAL INFORMATION The pavilion focuses its loads on fourteen pillars, on which four braced metallic trusses rest. The adjacent building is composed of a concrete

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framework which contains three independent prisms, covered by a metallic grid that lets natural light make its way into the building.


THE STATE MUSEUM OF SĂƒO PAULO

ARCHITECT - PAULO MENDES DA ROCHA

Working on the organization of gallery spaces to created new spaces, and resolved problems with humidity, the traditional exterior of this building was maintained and the interior renovated. Glass roofs framed with metal were placed over the central and side courtyards. This idea of a glass roof helped in the design of my Show Store. Frames were stripped from the internal window openings so that

they would provide outside views. The central courtyard was turned into a slightly sunken auditorium to accommodate 40 people. Metal catwalks were installed through the courtyards to connect the galleries at the upper levels. What intrigues me is the materiality and over simplicity of the renovation. Using the already present masonry and partnering this with steel and concrete; similar to what my

Masterplan incorporates when using mainly material types already present on site. Using the existing symmetrical openings to create natural ventilation through the building and a glass external structure to allow for natural light. This creates a balance between the original architecture and the new modern elements.

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03 THE CHAMBER

The chamber works along the idea of an architectural complex, with facilities for music and conservatory, as well as some accommodation. The brief ignites with analysing two text by an architect and musician and establishing themes relevant to both. These themes are then used to influence your design. A type of music was declared, I looked at contemporary classical music. This project introduced the site and was an initial incite in to how Layering could be used as an architectural operation, becoming more literal than

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THE PRIMER

...So what moved me? Everything. The things themselves, the people, the air, the noises, sound, colour, material presences, textures, form too - form I can appreciate. Forms I can try to decipher. Forms I find beautiful. What else moved me? My mood, my feelings, the sense of expectation that filled me while I was sitting there. Which brings that famous Platonic sentence to mind: <Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.> Meaning; it is all in me. ...I could never have had those feelings without the atmosphere of the square. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite logical really. People interact with objects. ATMOSPHERES - PETER ZUMTHOR

I do not mean the process of composition but rather pieces of music that are, literally, processes. The distinctive thing about musical processes is that they determine all the note-to-note (sound-to-sound) details and the overall form simultaneously. (think of a round or infinite canon.) I am interested in perceptible processes. I want to be able to hear the process happening throughout the sounding music. To facilitate closely detailed listening a musical process should happen extremely gradually. WRITING ON MUSIC- STEVE REICH

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THEMES PROGRESSION: The process of developing gradually towards a more advanced state, with people interacting with objects. SEMBLANCE: A process of composition, focusing on the details and the outward appearance or apparent form, when the reality is different. ENSEMBLE: Viewing things as a whole, rather than individually, as a an overall form simultaneously.

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TIMBER CONCEPT MODEL

FORM AND SPACE Stemming from the themes established, I used Semblance as conceptual inspiration to create form and space, through the use of linear plains. Using three types of timber, chipboard, mdf and balsa wood, I experimented to create dimension and form. Using the same material but different types drew from the theme Semblance, whereby on initial site the model looks like it is just timber, but it is the properties of the different types which allow the forms to be created.

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CONCEPT DRAWING - ADDING AND SUBTRACTING MASS

ADDING AND SUBTRACTING TO MASS Drawing the planes of the timber model in section and then drawing the negative spaces, I experimented with adding and subtracting to mass, asking which could be rooms or circulation or walling?

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REPEAT COMPONENT CONCEPT MODEL

DISTORTION AND INTERRUPTION OF SPACE Using regular repeat shapes, determined by the linear, regular masses and forms created in the timber model and drawing, I experimented with how these regular shapes might be manipulated or distorted to create irregular patters and forms. Illustrating again, semblance, the image shows a large number of the same component, overlapping and interlinking, however upon closer inspection you can see the individual

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THE SITE

Set on the same site as The Show Store, initial problems created by the site are the drastic change in heights between the bus shelter and current car park, as well as the number of retaining walls in place throughout the site. At present there is a large number of vehicular traffic, due the A176 slip roads and roundabout leading into the city centre; as well as the A167 itself leading to and from the Tyne Bridge.

1:5000 SITE PLAN

1:2500 SITE PLAN - CHAMBER LOCATION

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PILGRIM STREET LAYERING

1. TYNE BRIDGE

2. THE QUAYSIDE

A key feature in the Newcastle Skyline, the Tyne bridge is a vital transportation route between Newcastle City Centre and Gateshead.

A somewhat upmarket area of Newcastle the Quayside is home to pubs, bars and restaurants.

Pedestrian usage is limited, with vehicular use dominant, as it also provides a connection to important motorways

Vehicular access is not available using East Pilgrim street, however, by using some of the Newcastle Chares, as previously mentioned regarding to my masterpan, pedestrians can travel from our site down to the river. Pedestrian traffic is large along the Quayside, with the Millennium Bridge and The Sage being tourist attractions.

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3. RETAIL LEADING TO GRAINER STREET

4. PRIMARY RETAIL AREA

During the day, this layer of Newcastle is home to offices and local businesses, however, it is not as busy as layer 4, further north of Pilgrim Street.

A main transport connection route for Newcastle Bus Services and a direct link to Northumberland Street and Greys Monument. This layer is highly populated and a primary retail area within Newcastle City Centre.

At night, this area is home to many pubs and clubs, increasing pedestrian traffic. Directly opposite this site, this area is important in bringing people down from layer 4 and booting local business within this layer. Both these will influence the regeneration suggest for the masterplan.

The masterplan aims to draw people to the site from this layer, connecting the two areas.

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DESIGN STRATEGIES

Key themes from the prototype staging were ‘Layers’ and ‘Adding and Subtracting from Mass’, originating from my timber concept model and massing drawings. The Chamber draws from this through the layering of building entities determined by room type. A core circulation path separates the Music and Accommodation (Public and Private) parts of the building. Materiality encompass this with three main materials used, brick, glass and perforated steel. This alters the transition between spaces when moving through the building. The concept ‘Adding and subtracting from Mass’ influenced room and circulation heights. Skylights and frosted glass flooring through the circulation core allow light throughout the building. Angled ceilings and floors also allow spaces to feel bigger than they are, or in some cases smaller and more intimate, for example in the recording space.

CONCEPT MODELS

CONCEPT SPATIAL MODELS

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MASSING

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SPATIAL LAYERING

CIRCULATION THROUGH WALL

LIGHTING


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1. 2. 3. 4.

MUSIC HALL WC SEAT STORE INSTRUMENT STORE

2 2 4 3 4

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LOWER GROUND FLOOR 1:100


1:200 NORTH FACING ELEVATION

1:200 SOUTH FACING ELEVATION

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5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

G 89

KITCHEN AND BAR FOYER CLOAK UTILITY ROOM KITCHEN STORE LIVING ROOM STUDY ROOM

GROUND FLOOR 1:200


11 10 8

9

6

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12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

REHEARSAL STUDIO MUSIC LIBRARY RECORDING STUDIO WC BEDROOM + WC BEDROOM + WC 16

15 17

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14 13

1 91

FIRST FLOOR 1:100


18. 19. 20.

BEDROOM + WC BEDROOM + WC OFFICE

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20 18

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SECOND FLOOR 1:100 92


STRUCTURAL STRATEGIES

Rehearsal Space

From the beginning, during Prototype 3 of The Primer. I focussed on designing for specific instrument types, brass, wind and string. The Rehearsal space and recording space are a result of this, both designed with timber veneer acoustic panels. This makes both spaces acoustically isolated, so people in surrounding rooms or corridors are no disturbed. The rehearsals space has stepped acoustic panels, allowing the sound waves to be partially scattered around the room and be partially

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Recording Studio

absorbed. This reduces the reverberation time, whilst maintain adequate sound coverage for players. The panels can however be covered by curtains to create a further absorbing material if desired. This illustrates material layering as well. The recording studio needs to be sound proof for adequate recording. The perforated acoustic panels absorb the sound waves, reducing the reverberation time and preventing sound waves from leaving the room.


1:20 DETAIL, SHOWING RECORDING ROOM ACOUSTIC PANEL FINISH.

1:50 SECTIONAL DETAIL OF SOUTH FACING FACADE 94


04 THINKING THROUGH MAKING

Thinking Through Making Week consisted of workshops each varying in style and type. The focus of the week is to experiment in a number different design techniques, from textile to sculpting, to broaden our thinking and approaches when designing architecture. I partook in the workshops of Helen Pailing, Sebastian Kite, Amara Roca,

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Rachel Cruise and Magnus Casselbrant and Jesper Hendriksson. This linked back to my making in the primer stage. I thought about materials and textures to create form and surfaces. I focused on the raw elements, rather than the final project, much like with my products produced during the thinking through making week.


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Sebastian Kite - Working with steel rods, silicone tubing, zip ties and electrical tape, we worked abstractly to create a free spatial sculpture.

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Helen Pailing - This workshop operated on the basis of using sewing and weaving techniques to look at patterns and joining methods. I worked with cassette tape to produce a weave.

Magnus Casselbrant and Jesper Hendriksson - Using only huge pieces of polystyrene, we thought about spaces for an artist to live and what they would need. We then built this inhabitable space using the polystyrene

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05 FROM PRECARITY TO PERMANENCE

Charrette Week is project that unites all members of the Newcastle Architecture School, through a variety of group projects, aiming towards a school wide exhibition at the end. The week works as a source to breach the line between architecture and art, whilst bringing together new and returning students across all years.

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Precarity to Permanence invited a group of students to shadow local artists residing at The NewBridge Project, a local art studio. My group interacted and collaborated with artist Louise Mackenzie using the idea of breaking substances down into their individual elements and reconstruction them into something new; a science orientated approach. Our concept was based around the preservation of the elements that build and create NewBridge. By breaking NewBridge down into its small, minor, even microscopic details, what really forms The NewBridge can be identified.

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THE EXHIBITION

Our exhibition showed the physical and chemical process of breaking elements, as well as displaying produced microscopic images of objects used and found within NewBridge. A final display consisted of organic elements found at The NewBridge, allowed to naturally decay and change naturally. This project was an initial introduction to breaking down elements into their raw forms. This continued throughout the year manifesting in The Primer and become a base to my key concept of Layering for The Chamber and The Show Store.

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Stage 3 Architectural Portfolio | Newcastle University  
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