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ATAYLAN@PRATT.EDU (646) 286 03 85

ALICAN TAYLAN PORTFOLIO 2017 UNLESS MENTIONED, ALL ACADEMIC PROJECTS WERE DONE AT THE PRATT GAUD IN THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE TRACK AND ALICAN IS THE AUTHOR OF ALL THE MATERIAL.

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PROJECTS ACADEMIC

PROFESSIONAL

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YENIKAPI ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUM VISUALIZATION AT EISENMAN ARCHITECTS

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XIAOMEISHA INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION - HOTEL AND OCEAN WORLD

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A MILITARY PLEASURE UNDER CONSTRUCTION

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DECOY AND CAMOUFLAGE, MEDIATEK IN THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD

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CITY OF THE CAPTIVE HILLS

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LINKAGE, RESILIENCE, PRIMARY SCHOOL IN LOWER MANHATTAN

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THE PLENUM AND THE PLINTH, CONCERT HALL IN BERLIN

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LA ROTONDA COMMUNALIZED

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PARANOID PARK: A PAVILLION IN PRIVETLY OWNED PUBLIC SPACE

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TWO CONVERSATIONS, PRATT GRADUATE JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE

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SMALL SCALE, HIGH RES, FABRICATION SEMINAR

PROJECT LIST

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BIO

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YENIKAPI ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT & CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS “With one of the longest, richest, and most culturally varied histories of continuous habitation of any of the world’s great cities, Istanbul is a monument to the idea of the city as a palimpsest, as a physical record and trace of its evolving history. Perhaps more than any other city it represents collisions of time, space, and organization. For this reason, the three ideas that have dominated major urban interventions in the 20th century – the grid, the collage, and the contextual diagram – seem particularly ill suited to Istanbul, and especially for a site as large as the Yenikapı project. While the tabula rasa power of the grid can afford invaluable rationalization and organizational equivalencies, these are precisely what is not needed in a city whose spatial, organizational, and architectural variabilities are its most precious urban assets. For similar reasons, the collage – whose power is to intensify variability where it is lacking – is an ineffectual urban strategy in so complex a place. The contextual diagram technique affords the architectural urbanist the ability to read latent urban typologies in a given circumstance and make these vividly manifest, but Istanbul is already rich with superbly manifest urban typologies, making such a strategy unnecessary. In short, these three strategies would fail in the case of the Yenikapı site because they either erase the invaluable qualities of the city’s layers or merely reinscribe features that are already abundantly present. [...]

on the north edge, by the remaining fragments of the Theodosian seawall, and on the south edge by conforming to an important former ridgeline on the site. The building itself, embedded in the site, becomes a series of layers analogous to the archaeology of the site, rather than a formal object placed on the ground. Together the museum and archaeo¬logical park create a flowing nucleus that establishes Yenikapı as a distinctive place in the city. [...] The adventure of the new – a new urban precinct that is both passage and attraction – is, in its difference from the existing fabric of Istanbul, a symbolic gateway to a reinvigorated city. It reflects both the sedimentation of history and the inchoate complexity of urban life with a loosely woven fabric that allows for future threads to be added – whether in an expanded educational complex or by new archaeological findings or by something still to be imagined. In the four-square plan proposed here there is a little bit of paradise, a little bit of dancing, and very real potential for 21st-century Istanbul.” Yenikapi Archaeology Museum Architectural Report Peter Eisenman

Therefore, the goal of our project is to introduce a new organizational force into the city that both weaves together the incongruent features of the existing site into a series of different urban matrices and generates an energy that flows out from the site and thus reenlivens the major elements of the existing palimpsest of the city as a whole – its histories, archaeologies, and organizational and stylistic diversities. While our competition project was understood at three different scales, the project as it stands today has two scales, one of urban design and the other of architectural design, which incorporate the museum buildings, transfer plaza, and Archaeopark. The major north-south axis, Namik Kemal Boulevard, which will eventually become pedestrianized, passes between Archaeology Museum A (east) and Archaeology Museum B (west). Although there are two buildings, they are thought of as a single cultural complex and are named in order to indicate the phasing strategy of the project. Adjacent to the newly opened Marmaray and met¬ro stations, Museum A (east) is conceived of as the first stage of development. It contains the museum’s temporary exhibition galleries, as well as commercial and retail space. Museum A will also house a portion of museum storage, gallery administration, and a new on-site research center until the second phase of the project, Museum B (west), is constructed. With a direct connec¬tion to the Archaeopark, Museum B comprises the Archaeology and Children’s Museums, administration offices, the primary re¬search center, and conference facilities. Museum B allows for the connection between the Archaeopark to its north and the continuation of the transit plaza to its south. The outlines of the Museum B building and the garden are determined,

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Note: I drew the presented drawings except for the sectional working models and sections that have been made collectively throughout the design development phase and the render below. I designed the gift shop and found adequate to present this render here.

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Hagia Sophia, axonometric perspective

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XIAOMEISHA OCEAN WORLD AND HOTEL (INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION SHORTLISTED AMONG 3, SECOND PHASE DESIGN) The goal with our design is to focus on the following three points 1. To design and build the worlds’ best facility of its kind. The Ocean World and Xiaomeisha Hotel are designed to satisfy the world’s highest standard of hospitality as well as to provide a Water World themed facility as a unique unparalleled experience with an enjoyable educational focus for visitors of all ages and from all over the world. The hotel exclusively provides 100% of their rooms with expansive ocean views and exclusively offers extensive choices of health conscious spa and fitness activities as well as separate children’s play areas with safe pool and entertainment environments for it’s guests. Business travelers will find everything needed to run meetings and to connect with business partners through video interfacing in the various meeting facilities and business centers conveniently located throughout the hotel in dedicated areas with top quality food and beverage services provided in close proximity.

able with today’s technology. The buildings have structurally been optimized as particular the Ocean World presents structural challenges due to its programmatically required large volumes of water. The design manages to efficiently transfer these extreme loads to the foundations while at the same time creates the appearance of lightness for the rest of the structure. The undulating floors create a sense of a naturally floating landscape of waves which in turn allow the visitors a sense of “journey” throughout the facility. The tripartite design of the three circular buildings clearly and understandably elucidates the themes of the three water worlds, the Pacific Ocean, the Arctic Ocean as well as the South China Sea. From its central “meeting” point, one can explore the three water worlds in succession or randomly as one prefers. Thomas Leeser

Restaurants and bars with ocean views are distributed throughout the hotel and located on various levels of the hotel to provide ample choice and to maximize the experiences enabled through optimizing the locations. Through this careful design strategy, one can experience the sunset while dining many floors above the beach front, or enjoy a drink at the bar overlooking the stunningly glowing color variations of the dichroic glass facade of the Ocean World after dark.

2. To design a sustainable and energy efficient, functional and executable project. Focus is uncompromisingly placed on the realizability as well as optimum efficiency and sustainability of the design. Water management, heat reuse and energy consumption and production are carefully calibrated to provide the best sustainable design achiev-

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A MILITARY PLEASURE UNDER CONSTRUCTION A boat for outdoors living.

The hull shape of a trawler makes it unable to plane. Hence the boat is not intented to be a fast one but a long range vessel. It was designed to be able to travel throughout the Mediterranean safely and surely.

Kubikus is a 68 ft. trawler designed for the Mediterranean sea. In this first building project, I worked with steel. Twelve 10x10 cm profiles hold the superstructure in order to provide a 360 degrees view from the interior, a very unique feature in boats of this size.

The design was informed by millitary warships as an oxymoron. A pleasure yacht is surely the complete opposite of a millitary vessel.

The project is a private commission for a Turkish industrialist who asked to accomodate six persons on board. My design partner was Ozan OzkusaksÄąz, an industrial designer with great experience and knowledge in naval design. The naval engineering was done by Turhan Soyaslan, a renowned naval architect in Turkey. To watch the construction process time lapse: https://vimeo.com/155150682 Trawlers were originally used as fishing vessels as they have a high stability in sea and permit relatively large storage spaces inside.

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DECOY AND CAMOUFLAGE, MEDIATEK IN THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD The Mediateque program fosters a reflexion on the nature of media. Here, it has been understood as an illusion. Mediated surfaces, by making the viewer believe in a certain material presence pull her or him into another reality. Since the Renaissance, architects have been working on orientation and disorientation methods in space for different ends. Bernini’s Scala Regia is perhaps the most emblematic example of a space stretched using an optical illusion. The Brooklyn Navy Yard has had a multi-layered history related to military presence throughout its history. During the American War of Independence, more Colonist Americans died as prisoners of war on British prison ships through intentional neglect than died in every battle of the war combined. Later, some of the larger warships of WW1 were built in the Yard. In 1963, the site was converted from a military usage to a commercial one. The project suggests following the military-commercial usage succession by public usage. The recent development and gentrification process Brooklyn underwent made of Williamsburg and Dumbo one of the most prominent neighborhoods in the city. Yet, the Brooklyn Navy Yard is blocking the waterfront connection between the two neighborhoods.

For Woods, the rock is a reminder that Manhattan could have high skyscrapers because it sits on a strong granite base. Woods also argues in a 1999 interview that Le Corbusier’s infamous comment on New York skyscrapers being “too small” had been misunderstood, that Le Corbusier was referring to the groundfloor plans of the skyscrapers being small and not their heights. The proposal is reflecting on this vertical-horizontal divide and defends an urban strategy of horizontal land reclamation rather than a vertical one. The residential Vinoly tower replica on firm ground is there to contrast with the horizontal spreading building complex and make a humorous note on the real estate market’s obstinacy at building on small lots. The future of media will be all immersive. An extraordinary amount and quality of sensorial stimulation is already triggering all our senses in the contemporary technological setting, and another revolution is yet to come. Media creates a para-reality that keeps getting more about the real, less about the and perceptual intelligence. This project seeks to record and appropriate itself with one of the most inventive graphic millitary deception techniques of the 20th century, the razzle dazzle.

The grids in Manhattan and Brooklyn are oriented orthogonally to the waterfront, to facilitate the transfer of goods from the ground to the sea. Hence, the project proposes to connect Williamsburg to Dumbo by tying the existing gridded urban fabric with a “missing” grid. This grid is oriented with a main axis and a cross-axis. The program is disseminated in the main axis while the cross-axis is used for bike and pedestrian circulation between Williamsburg and Dumbo. The premise of the studio was a Lebbeus Woods drawing (Lower Manhattan, 1999). In it, we see Manhattan sitting on a rock.

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CITY OF CAPTIVE HILLS

In 1623, 30 families sail from Holland to Manhattan to plant a colony. Since their whole country is man-made, there are no “accidents” for the Dutch. They plan the settlement of Manhattan as if it is part of their fabricated motherland. In 1807, Simeon deWitt, Gouverneur Morris and John Rutherford are commissioned to design the model that will regulate the final and conclusive occupancy of Manhattan. Four years later they propose 12 avenues running north-south and 155 streets running east-west. In its indifference to topography, to what exists, it claims the superiority of mental construction over reality. The plotting of its streets and blocks announces that the subjugation, if not obliteration, of nature is its true ambition. It is the most courageous act of prediction in Western civilization: the land it divides is unoccupied. The population it describes, conjectural. The building it locates, phantoms. The activities it frames, nonexistent. The Grid – or any other subdivision of the metropolitan territory into maximum increments of control- describes an archipelago of “Cities within Cities.” The more each “islands” celebrates different values, the more the unity of the archipelago as system is reinforced. Here are some of the qualities hills call for. A hill demands a low density of inhabitation. A hill dictates to have generous spaces below it. A hill invites light to be choreographed in a delicate way. History has shown that carved spaces are some of the most durable, long lasting specimens among built spaces. Hills desire silence and a strong sense of space. For example the daily sequence engendered by urban rush hours could benefit from that strong sense of place, while the ground level of topographies would enjoy remaining virgin, untouched. This sequence presents an array of typological articulations between a tower and a topography. A tower meets a hill at half way. A tower connects to another tower through a carved space. The hill becomes the entry sequence for a tower.

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LINKAGE, RESILIENCE PRIMARY SCHOOL IN LOWER MANHATTAN “Instead of building large public schools for children 7 to 12, set up tiny independent schools, one school at a time. Keep the school small, so that its overheads are low and a teacher-student ratio 1:10 can be maintained. Locate it in the public part of the community, with a shopfront and three or four rooms.“ A Pattern Language Christopher Alexander “In fact, it [the grid system] is the most courageous act of prediction in Western civilization: the land it divides, unoccupied; the population it describes, conjectural; the buildings it locates, phantoms; the activities it frames, nonexistent.”

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“The organization of a serial space was one of the major technical mutations of the elementary school system. It permitted to overcome the traditional system where a student works with the teacher a couple of minutes while others wait in confusion. By assigning individual places to each, it made possible the control of each and the simultaneous work of all. It made the educational space work as a learning machine.”

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Discipline and Punish Michel Foucault

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Adopting the methodology proposed in the studio, this project conceives the elementary school system as an emergent phenomena. Rather than designing pre-defined “box spaces” for the educational act to happen, it loosens the frontiers between open and closed spaces. The goal is to create interstitial places of different scales where education can happen as “efficiently” as in a standard classroom.

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Following Alexander’s indications, the project claims that a fruitful learning environment can exist only if the school is embedded with “real” life, hence suggesting to open spaces for other usages, inserting additional program where professional life is enacted and making the auditorium and gymnasium public spaces.

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Analog computation simulation, thread model

The site is located in the windiest part of Manhattan. To protect it from wind and generate (a small amount of) energy using wind turbines appears to be an interesting symbolic event for engaging young children to think about energy at an early age. Aerodynamics are important for that agglomerate of school buildings. Through aerodynamic shapes, the building’s form records, or is embedded with, dynamic forces acting upon it. Hence, like a boat’s hull capturing the dynamic forces of the sea on its shape, the building captures its present location on the shore and windiest part of Manhattan. If the city was to be extended south by landfill, the building would keep a record of its former location through its form.

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THE PLENUM AND THE PLINTH CONCERT HALL IN BERLIN ‘Our site is the Cultural Forum in Berlin, Germany. The Cultural Forum (“Kuturforum”) is an urban assembly of museums, libraries and concert halls in the center of the German captial. It is located just west of the former Berlin Wall, near the large buildings of Potsdamer Platz, and between the southern Tiergarten park and the Landwehr canal. The project site is in the center of the Cultural Forum and it has two prominent architectural neighbors, Mies van der Rohe’s National Gallery and Hans Sharoun’s Philharmonie

each material in a way that is true to its inherent properties, and that adheres to the highest craft of the given medium. Architectural intention is articulated at the very moment that it can be expressed in all three media, adhering to the material’s specific properties and inherent means of manipulation.’ Studio syllabus Jonas Coersmeier

While Berlin commonly adheres to continuing the urban fabric in a strictly contextual tradition, the studio identifies this site as an assembly of mutually complementary urban solitaires, and encourages the expression of strong urban form for the capital’s new performance space. In the studio we consider the urban intervention as a decisive act of architecture, and we promote the new performance space as a proactive participant in the changing city -ecology, -fabric and form. Our urban apporach to context has clearly moved on from the indexical project, and it has emancipated itself from the regime of the network and the relational doctrine of 20C contextualism. This approach does not assume that any urban intervention is justified by sustaining the city’s current condition or its historical continuity, but It welcomes the arrival of an architectural prodigy.

We are invested in the full integration of architectural design and structural engineering as we focus on the fundamental relation between structure, form and organization. We think about architectural form in terms of structure systems, and we understand structures in terms of the multiplicity of architectural requirements and desires. We start with the study of structural system taxonomies and engage in a critical discussion of the implicit biases of various categorization systems. The theoretical part is followed by physical model explorations of one specific structure system, which we study with respect to its intrinsic formal opportunities. In a swift move towards design production we generate speculative physical models, in order to internalize the structural principals and to test and invent beyond the given categories. - Physical model making is a primary means of design production in the studio. The method of probing, testing and rewriting serves as an introduction to the Generative routine, whether it is employed for the making of computational, manual or conceptual models. In principal we do not discriminate between bits and atoms, and we consider digital material and physical material as equally defined by specific behaviors and resistances. During the initital phase of design production we engage in the making and remaking of form and structure in three different ‘materials’: 2d line drawing, 3d wireframe geometry and paper. We consider the frequent transposition between these three materials as the primary space of architectural invention. We strive to handle Precedent study for plenum, Kirishima Concert Hall, Fumihiko Maki

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Top of page: Precedent study, Arts United Center, Louis Kahn

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Left Page: Height and sightlines study / Below: Thread model at 1:1000, height study / Left page below: Internal geometric organization

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Massing study, foam and cardboard

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LA ROTONDA COMMUNALIZED, SHARED HOUSING IN BROOKLYN

German art historians Reinhard Bentmann and Michael Muller have argued in their critique of the villa typology that the villa is a “negative utopia” which attempts to construct an idyllic image of living, freed both from pressure of the city and the burden of reproductive work. It is the villa typology that needs to be addressed in order to propose a critical project that re-imagines domesticity. Homogeneity is the word of order in urban residential developments as the typical urban housing project appears as a collection of identical independent private cells. This typology reinforces, or naturalizes the formation of the antisocial nuclear family social structure so dear to the existing order of capitalistic production. Hence heterogeneity, or diversity in the domestic environment and in architectural design was the point of departure of this project. I looked at the most idealized built example of the villa, Palladio’s Villa Rotonda in order to discern the heterogeneous qualities of the spaces in it. Because of its double axial symmetry, the villa Rotonda lures its viewer into thinking that it proposes a set of homogenous spaces, which is not the case. The Rotonda is composed of a set of interlocking heterogeneous spaces. The ceremonial loggia is a political space of reception, the central drum a place of contemplation and the enfilades, personal spaces.

propose frontality for the adjacent city grid that can see the highest two floors. The ground floor and public terrace on the first floor is a museum. The cultural relevance of the mixed-use component justifies the formal expression of the building and can become an asset for a strategy on how to fund the development of the project. The independent suites would be owned by different public or private structures such as a syndicate of tenements that would rent rooms through its own social network. This would produce a gathering of people from similar cultural, social or vocational groups. Because of the prime location of the site, the museum development should provide financially more, permitting the residential development structure to have a lower financial burden and hence future residents to have a lower rent. To conclude, one can say that heterogeneity is achieved through communal spaces in the domestic environment where the inhabitants can share material amenities but also knowledge, and help each other while living in generous spaces rather than smaller isolated private units. The ultimate aspiration is to provide a space of political dignity and of expression for the residents.

The programmatic requirement was to provide domestic space for 250 people. The different spatial typologies of the villa Rotonda lead me to conceive a project where the social and personal spaces interlock, blurring the line between public and private. The project is articulated on four floors, where each floor is composed of four suites. Each suite is an independent domestic environment for 40 to 50 people. The organization of these suites is as follows. The ceremonial loggia space of the villa becomes what I call political space. The political space is a place of meeting and living together. All the occupants of the suite share it. It is a place where a child gets to encounter in his daily territory persons outside of his nuclear family, hence requires him or her to be a political being not only outside of “home” but also when in it. The set of spaces articulated as an enfilade in the Rotonda becomes the places for production and reproduction. These are personal bedrooms and small personal workspaces, where the inhabitants can return to themselves, have time for the self. The production space is the kitchen, shared by the inhabitants of the suite. The central drum in the villa becomes the circulation core. The sculptural elevator core and cylindrical void it sits in gives the communal clusters its palace-like quality. It is the most refined space of the project that bridges the domestic life to the urban rhythm. The adopted massing strategy aimed at acknowledging that the building is taller than the surrounding ones and hence can be seen from a larger perimeter in Williamsburg. The site is at the intersection of two city grids, hence the floorplates rotate as they rise to

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PARANOID PARK PAVILLION IN PRIVETLY OWNED PUBLIC SPACE “In any case I believe that the anxiety of our era has to do fundamentally with space, no doubt a great deal more than with time. Time probably appears to us only as one of the various distributive operations that are possible for the elements that are spread out in space. Now, despite all the techniques for appropriating space, despite the whole network of knowledge that enables us to delimit or to formalize it, contemporary space is perhaps still not entirely desanctified (apparently unlike time, it would seem, which was detached from the sacred in the nineteenth century). To be sure a certain theoretical desanctification of space (the one signaled by Galileo’s work) has occurred, but we may still not have reached the point of a practical desanctification of space. And perhaps our life is still governed by a certain number of oppositions that remain inviolable, that our institutions and practices have not yet dared to break down. These are oppositions that we regard as simple givens: for example between private space and public space, between family space and social space, between cultural space and useful space, between the space of leisure and that of work. All these are still nurtured by the hidden presence of the sacred. [...] The mirror is, after all, a utopia, since it is a placeless place. In the mirror, I see myself there where I am not, in an unreal, virtual space that opens up behind the surface; I am over there, there where I am not, a sort of shadow that gives my own visibility to myself, that enables me to see myself there where I am absent: such is the utopia of the mirror. But it is also a heterotopia in so far as the mirror does exist in reality, where it exerts a sort of counteraction on the position that I occupy. From the standpoint of the mirror I discover my absence from the place where I am since I see myself over there.” Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias Michel Foucault

The first studio sequence emphasized on formal manipulation and was an introduction to think about site, context and program. The site is the urban plaza in front of 345 Park Avenue, one of the fıve hundred Privetly Owned Public Spaces (POPS) in Manhattan. The plaza being underused, the intervention seeks to inverse the roles of its main users: white collars working in the building (the “visible people”) and “alien” people such as night workers and people passing by (aka the invisible people). Through linework manipulations, a continuous ribbon is formed. Singular, ecclectic shapes transform into anonymous functional elements such as stairs, a passageway, a skylight and doors.

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TWO CONVERSATIONS PRATT GRADUATE JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE Starting in spring 2017, we, as a group of graduate students, decided to revive the graduate journal of architecture of the school. The last issue that was published in 2012 was a forerunner of the Object Oriented Ontology discussion in Architecture. As its primary instigator, I thought it to be a good idea to start the journal by asking questions. We started interviewing the guest lecturers at Pratt and started our own investigation into the contemporary discourse. We interviewed a dozen of practitioners and theoreticians in two years. Among them were Bruce Mau, Neil Denari, Anton Garcia-Abril, Laurie Hawkinson and Henry Smith-Miller. We were interested in the role of the digital in design today, its effect on the design process, on the result and on the built environment.

Here, you can find excerpts from two interviews. The first one is with Bruce Mau, where we discussed his approach to design for all the senses. The second interview is with Neil Denari, who told us about the early days of the digital in architecture and his take on two typologies that we brought to him as visual questions.

EXCERPT 1

BRUCE MAU

Designer, co-founder of the Institute Without Boundaries, The Massive Change Network and founder of Bruce Mau Design

TARP: Let’s start with the studio you are teaching at the GAUD this semester; the students are investigating signs in senses other than the visual. One does smell, the other taste and so on. This appears to be a very indirect way to approach space, or rather, the question is a difficult one. An aggregation of candies is still a visual result, however tasty those might be. Recently, artists such as Rirkrit Tiravanija have been exploring the artistic and social potentials of the culinary, and one understands that Art is using taste as a tool to stimulate social interaction, but does a space have taste? How do you design with taste? BRUCE MAU: Okay, first of all, I would say I’m not really teaching the studio, I am here working together with the students, and it is an experiment, and that’s the spirit of the work we’re experimenting with; how do we design for all the senses? We think about the advantages that we have in creating immersive environments. If we think of it as a medium, which we mostly don’t, we think of this as a medium [shows his smartphone], we don’t think of this as a medium [grand gesture to the room we’re in]. Once we start to think of this [room] as a medium, what we realize is that we have a competitive advantage in having you inside of our medium as opposed to outside of it. When you interact with this [smartphone], I’m here and it’s there, it’s very poor, it’s a very low-resolution medium. When we take this [grand gesture to the room again] as our medium, we have the bandwidth of reality to work with. If we start to think of that as our medium and design for it, we get to a totally different way of thinking about our work, and our work is not a visual product anymore. 60


If you think about the sound in this room, it’s a very beautiful room for sound, right? The design of the sound of the room is an interesting part of our work. Almost no attention goes to it. Almost nobody thinks about the design of the sound of their architecture when, in fact, it fundamentally changes the experience that you have. I think that when you start to think of architectural practice as an immersive practice, and design for the senses, you get to a very different way of thinking about our practice and really understanding what our competitive advantage is relative to other dominant forms of media. Is that where you make the distinction between viewer and visitor? Exactly. The more I think about the way we teach and practice architecture, the poorer it gets! We’re dominated by one sense, when, in fact, our real competitive opportunity is all the senses. If we’re going to take advantage of that and take some territory back, we should be thinking about it as a method. I say I’m not teaching it because I don’t actually know how to do it yet. We don’t know how to do this kind of work. There doesn’t seem to be a methodology yet. Part of what we’re trying to understand is, if you were going to think that way, what is the methodology that you would create? So you’re all in for VR [Virtual Reality] for example. Well, I’m not all in for VR as a departure from reality. I’m much more interested in AR [Augmented Reality]. In other words, how do you integrate the physical and the digital? I think the future of design is the intersection of the physical and the digital, that ultimately what we are going to design in the future is a world that is both synthetically virtual and digital and physical and analog. We’re going to create the real kind of synthesis of those worlds; we’ll create a new medium. We’ll create a new kind of environment because the opportunity is huge. If you can have all of the power and beauty of this [smartphone] and the full bandwidth of reality, that’s a very powerful design space. How do you see those two things coming together? Well, if you look at historical media that have been developed over time, in those practices there are really good analogs or models of methodology. If you look at cinema, for instance. Think about how wild the processes of getting a story onto a screen is. [It] is sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars and [requires] thousands of people. The method to do that is interesting to look at as a correlate to what we’re trying to do, to say, ‘We’ve got a similar process of synthesis. We’re trying to get a very very complex set of actors, things that actually make an impact [into] one coherent beautiful experience. How this happens, we can borrow from previous media’. For me the story board is a powerful architectural concept. Instead of thinking of our work as an object, let’s think of it as a time, and design the time rather than the physical object. Now to organize the time, we’ll have to make physical objects, but we’re coming out of a very different perspective. 61


EXCERPT 2

NEIL DENARI Architect, Professor, UCLA Founder, NMDA

TARP: We want to try and ask you a visual question. With a series of two sets of images, we would like to ask you on the first set about the broken tower typology and what happens to it, and the second is about facade strategies. [The first set of images in åquestion are Grande Arche de la Defense by Johan Otto von Sprekelsen, OMA/Rem Koolhaas’ CCTV building, The Max Reinhardt Haus by Peter Eisenman and Denari’s Keelung Harbor Service Building.]

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ND: People have talked to me about this particular reference [CCTV by Rem Koolhaas] and Peter’s project. This one [Arche De La Defense] I wouldn’t put in there because I call it an inverted cube. It turns into an arch even though it has a void and it’s also a giant super graphic, so I don’t consider it to attack the problematic of the vertical building. But that’s the rorschach test of it- you can say ‘How tall can I have a tower, why can’t towers have a certain kind of girth, why can’t you say it’s two towers with a beam?’ Of course you can. Peter’s project is brilliant in asking questions about the tower that I think allowed for this project [Rem] to emanate from it -and I’ll talk about my project in a second- because this is either a slumping tower that falls over and then collapses on itself. I can’t remember if he’s referred to it as a flaccid tower or an ambivalent figure with a void in it, but either way the whole thing is supposed to remain elusive about how you finally deconstruct it and finally read the single object that’s collapsed on itself. I’ve always read it in the most powerful way, as a much taller tower which deflected to overcome the problematic of the singular object, and maybe the phallic object. I think Rem’s project..it’s super tall, it’s [about] 80 stories, and one of the things it does is it defamiliarizes that sense of height, you see it in the Beijing landscape, the way in which the grid works, this odd fishnet really breaks it down in an odd way. I also think that this project is not about whether it was one figure becoming two figures, but this project, as it would relate to my project, is about making a space, and at the same time it’s making a figure. This project is formally- if I say primitive, I don’t think Rem would say ‘you’re wrong’- because of the nature of the proportions, these are super big towers in and of themselves, and the fact that the grain continues, more or less. You can turn it upside down and it would virtually be the same project. [In regards to the Keelung Harbor Service Building] When we did this, I’ll tell you the specific story of this, this is much lower, 70 meter, so it’s tall but within the whole complex this does not represent as an accumulation a project which is a tower, this is a tower and the tower exists to be able to support the restaurant. There wasn’t a tower in the program, there was nothing that suggested that you could stack program in a certain way, so this device is actually something that is there structurally but also one other thing, which is we decided that a tower, even though it’s lodged in the project. if we isolated that, the tower it was an element for a signal device for a building that wanted to become a signal like a icon, but if you just left it it was an office building and a cruise ship terminal wanted a big courtyard building not if the form of anything iconic or classical iconic, that in terms of breaking the profile of the landscape couldn’t do it, so that why this device which puts the two things together allows the restaurant to be positioned where it should be with an unobstructed view and to be able to put it out there so detached from either one of these programs- you’re not going to put it down here or in the back of the building- so this became an armature to support in some ways the smallest program of the project- a 15,000 square foot restaurant- but which we could argue would give us the reason to make a form like that. The last thing this would have to do with is this building [CCTV] - I didn’t consciously refer to these buildings, the language and the narration is how 63


it is. But the base and tower problem, the first one I don’t consider to be a tower and base problem. Peter got around the base and tower problem by just making the footprint of the two towers become the base. And then Rem’s project with a horizontal, let’s call it a podium, as it merges to a vertical project. That’s how these two relate to one another, it’s not strictly about the cantilever, it relates to the horizontal and the vertical.

It empowers your argument about continuity. The second set is three images relating to facade [the images in question are of the Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg by Zaha Hadid Architects, The Tirana Cultural Center in Albania by BIG and Denari’s Keelung Harbor Service Building in Taiwan]

This one [Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Zaha Hadid Architects] steps out of the loop quite a bit, because of course typologically these two buildings [Phaeno Science Center and Keelung Harbor Service Building] ask the question of ‘When is a column so big it’s not a column?’ or ‘Can’t buildings support other buildings?’, or the issue of proportion of width- these aren’t piles, they aren’t stacks, they really are still piloti projects. I would say this has a lot to do with that, but this just falls into a classic topological category where you don’t want to express because it doesn’t really exist within the building a clean grid of fine columns, so this [Zaha] is late brutalism. Ours borrows from the weight and kind of mass, and levitating weight, that we turned of course not this graphic metallic project which send different messages. [On Zaha] If you see this building, what’s interesting about it is that, when you look at the board work around where the cones are, the boards are really small and funky and you see the flat wall and it’s nice and smooth, so this material in its extension of brutalism really does do what we’re trying to do here [referring to Keelung], which is to try to move the project in some way. I think in this way it’s moving it toward kind of level of formal tweaking that mainly only [Marcel] Breuer got to in some of his [work]. If you try to put these two projects [Keelung and Tirana Cultural Center by BIG] together, of course the fenestration pattern and the geometry might be the thing that pulls them together. Not being familiar with this project [Tirana Cultural Center] it’s a bit harder to read, my affinity with this one is 64


just in terms of the orientation of the cores and the columns and the mass and so forth. I think one thing about let’s say dealing with enveloppes where one is a cultural center, it may not have specific demands for it in terms of natural light is supposed to be used. This [Keelung] is an office building. What we’re doing with the office building here, it’s related to these kind of things- but I have to take it more particular- there is a curtain wall, this is a double skin perforated with full glazing behind it, this is punched diagonal windows. They are two stories tall, so there are two floors inside this. That is a graphic trick which we used to bring in the scale of the project. There are different zones and projects to the office building program that these kind of conditions, on the one hand, are available to us-maybe this is going a little bit too far but it tells a story. So this is a harbor authority office building, not a speculative office building for hedge fund billionaires. Hedge fund billionaires would say ‘I don’t want a diagonal window and a column in the middle of my window, I want a view of Manhattan.’ But since this is a 17 meter wide quirky doughnut, there is light coming in from both sides but it’s not strictly about who owns the view, it’s all about the landscape of the offices, so this type of skin articulates this geometry because of the transitional geometry. These are flat surfaces, there is no glazing on a curved surface, these are just disciplining devices so this is trimmed by the cone. We stop all the windows and where we got a radius or a cone we also trim the floor back so that there is a void and we’re not creating problem. So all of these imaginations in there are about giving the building- this particular piece is 500,000 square feet, it’s a giant project- to give it a kind of ecology of difference and differentiation within something that otherwise would be thought of as being very bureaucratic... and unfortunately this project got cancelled. It was cancelled a year and a half ago for pure politics, not because of budget or cost. The government changed, but there were a lot of behind of scenes things, what we understand was that there were two warehouses on the site, neither of which were historical buildings, one of which were had to be torn down to make way for this project. We did the construction documents of the terminal in the first phase, and then three weeks away from starting demo, someone called and said ‘Maybe we shouldn’t tear that building down because it might be too important to the history of the harbor.’ So the project was stopped and I think it was a strange excuse, but it also brought on preservationists who worried about the change of the grain of the harbor. But this is a city that was really in my opinion in desperate need of, I wouldn’t even say something like a new fancy building that would produce an identity, but they needed a new cruise ship terminal because it’s a giant industry. Was there protest by the people [of Keelung]? It was well received, it was very exciting for people, there were mugs and t shirts and all kinds of things, posters, I have mugs and t shirts. It was all exciting and then I think in the end the transportation ministry- well there’s all kinds of conspiracies, so there was the preservationist one which could have been real or not, there was one that was not a conspiracy, but a form of, you could go so far as to call it extortion, but the small town asked the harbor authority to pay the fee, a tax, on all the retail space which came to [about] 12 million dollars, a one time only payment that came out of the 65


woodwork. The last one could have been the hangover from China’s trying to move away from uh strange architecture, because this project shut down, Sugimoto’s tower shut down... That was what, in 2012? [The government announcing they wanted no more strange architecture] Yes, which is the year we won. Sanaa won one in Taichung which is not being built, Ishigami won a cruise ship terminal in Kinmen which is an island near China, so everyone subsequent cancelled and now they’re not putting out competitions anymore. So the ambition of Taiwan with the series of these you know grand competitions of which only foreign architects were winning them, and in the case of [my team], architects of a certain size that would never get that project, only Gensler and HOK would get a project. Anyway, sorry to go off on that, that may be relevant or not… It seems as though the architect is the last to learn about things.. Is there a theme to this book yet? We’re working on things...The issue based concept is tricky...sort of a permanent curated online continuously updated format... Well, I think that if this, what would you call this sort of game format [referring to the visual question] is a pretty interesting way to do a number of things, one which is to prove to your colleagues here, as students, that you understand that architecture does not exist it a vacuum; it exists in the field. And everything gets related to everything, number one. And I think number two, the idea that we could talk about typology and formal language and let it lead into issues of urbanism and politics I think is good too. I think if you can apply these things together, that’s what schools need to do. It’s not about “oh let’s just do this social project now and forget about being a designer” because you know..you’re obsessed with your nerdy narrow world, I think just cultivating the language to be able to put it all together. Do you have a take on OOO? I do very much and an odd one as well. I stumbled across Graham Harman prior to- not that other people haven’t- I wasn’t turned onto him by the community- just because i think i was in a frame of reference of trying to as I always do, work from in my case a kind of semiotic project, which is to talk about the language systems and the messages that are being sent through the work by decoding things and talking about the life of the building. So i made my early forays into it because I was interested in not only Harman’s kind of variant take on objects, and going back to the tool problem which in the 80’s we, Wes Jones and others, talked about in terms of cobbling a machine identity revealing nature functionality, etc, taking that into a sense of building- a building has its own sense of referential logic and its not about the association of it to its context, that was pretty fascinating to me. I let the colleagues in the community of architecture look at in their own direction and I just turned my attention personally to other things, but I have my own understanding of the methodology. I like the work of the people who are interested in it, [such as Tom] Wiscombe. 66


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SMALL SCALE, HIGH RES

Following Rene Binet’s literal application of formal qualities found in Ernst Haeckel’s seminal Art Forms In Nature, this project looks at flies’ and ants’ aesthetic to propose an object that speculates on the contemporary zeitgeist in architecture. We start by distinguishing three fundamental formal attitudes, namely the object, field and ornamental conditions. these conditions are observable at the scanning electron microscope’s scale, at nearly the nano scale. Things are not as they appear to be, new formalisms emerge from unexpected macroscopic shapes. The complex formal language unleashed by the potential of the digital at the beginning of the 21st century is shrinking in scale. This project speculates that it will reach the scale of the appliqué, will become the most performative ornamental tool ever seen.

Detail of ornamental structure model 68


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PROJECT LIST & CREDITS

PARANOID PARK A PAVILLION IN PRIVETLY OWNED PUBLIC SPACE FALL 2015 CORE STUDIO I - ALEXANDRA BARKER WITH CHRISTINA OSTERMEIER

YENIKAPI ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUM VISUALIZATION AT EISENMAN ARCHITECTS SUMMER & FALL 2016 SPRING & SUMMER 2017 EISENMAN ARCHITECTS XIAOMEISHA INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION WINTER 2018 DESIGN LEAD LEESER ARCHITECTURE

DECOY AND CAMOUFLAGE MEDIATEK IN THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD FALL 2017 ADVANCED STUDIO - INSTRUCTOR: HENRY SMITH-MILLER WITH ALEX CORHNILL

A MILITARY PLEASURE UNDER CONSTRUCTION 2015-2017

CITY OF CAPTIVE HILLS SPRING 2017 ADVANCED STUDIO - STUDIO OF EXPERIMENTS INSTRUCTOR: DEBORA MESA WITH OLIVIA VIEN

DESIGN TEAM OZAN OZKUSAKSIZ ALICAN TAYLAN ENGINEERING TURHAN SOYASLAN CAN SOYASLAN

LINKAGE, RESILIENCE, PRIMARY SCHOOL IN LOWER MANHATTAN SPRING 2016 CORE STUDIO II - INSTRUCTOR: GISELA BAURMANN WITH ALEX DAVIS

CONSTRUCTION LT INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS

THE PLENUM AND THE PLINTH CONCERT HALL IN BERLIN SPRING 2017 COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN STUDIO JONAS COERSMEIER WITH DANICA SELEM TEAM JOSEPH YOUNG JISI CHEN SANGHOON SEO ALICAN TAYLAN LA ROTONDA COMMUNALIZED FALL 2016 HOUSING STUDIO - INSTRUCTOR: CARLOS ARNAIZ WITH CHRISTINA OSTERMEIER TWO CONVERSATIONS, PRATT GRADUATE JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE SPRING & FALL 2017 TARP GRADUATE JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE ROLE: SENIOR EDITOR SMALL SCALE, HIGH RES, FABRICATION SEMINAR SPRING 2017 ELECTIVE SEMINAR - INSTRUCTOR: JONAS COERSMERIER

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CV 1991

born in Istanbul, Turkey

EDUCATION 2018 2015

PRATT INSTITUTE GAUD, Brooklyn, NY Master of Architecture, Atkinson Memorial Scholarship

2014

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP, New York, NY Summer Studio

Fall 2013

UNIVERSITEIT TWENTE, Enschede, Netherlands Industrial Design Study Abroad / Erasmus Scholarship

2014 2009

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF APPLIED SCIENCES (INSA), Lyon, France. MEng Degree in Mechanical Engineering Design Minor in Theater Studies and Acting Specialization in Acoustic Design Scholarship for academic excellence from the French government Thesis: Noise Level Optimisation Techniques in Naval Structures Using Energy Level Analysis and Finite Elements

PROFESSIONAL New York, NY Ongoing 2018

LEESER ARCHITECTURE Design lead on invited international competition for a science complex in Xiaomeisha, China. Shortlisted among 3 competing firms for stage 2.

Spring 2017

GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nanotectonica, fabrication seminar - Instructor: Jonas Coersmeier, GAUD Assisting instructor with course content and research.

Fall 2017

GRADUATE ASSISTANT Mass Customization in Architecture - Instructor: Stephanie Bayard, GAUD Assisting instructor with course content and research.

2016 2017

EISENMAN ARCHITECTS Junior architect, part time during school year, full time during summers. Yenikapi Archaeology Museum in Istanbul Design development, construction drawings and architectural drawings for publication Proposal for Extension and Renovation of Sports Complex in New Haven, CT Second designer on design team

2016 2017

TEACHING ASSISTANSHIP Assisting students with CAAD at the GAUD. Core Studio I - Instructor: Alexandra Barker Core Studio II - Instructor: Dylan Baker Rice

2015 2016 Spring 2016

PRATT ROBOTICS Monitor and assistant at the robotics workshop at the School of Architecture. RISING ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS Teaching a 10 week class at the Unison Citizen Middle School, Brooklyn. Introduction to 3D CAD for 13-14 year olds.

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Istanbul, Turkey 2015 2013

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION personal commission for a 68 ft. trawler yacht. Under construction.

2014

EPA ARCHITECTURE Junior architect, part of design team of the National Mimar Sinan Prize 2014 Ersen Gürsel on the Ayvalık Cultural Center Project, Turkey

2014 (freelance)

URAN BADUR Architectural representation for the restorator Uran Badur of a small Mimar Sinan Mosque restoration project in Besiktas, Istanbul

PUBLICATIONS 2018 Ongoing

NANOTECTONICA, TEN YEARS OF DESIGN RESEARCH AT PRATT INSTITUTE Editor. Publication compiling ten years of research conducted by Jonas Coersmeier throughout his seminar focusing on the study of natural systems at the nano scale.

2018

INPROCESS 23 Pratt GAUD student work book, 2015-2016. Comprehensive design project featured.

2017

INPROCESS 22 Pratt GAUD student work book, 2015-2016. Core I and Core II projects featured.

2017

EISENMAN ARCHITECTS Book presenting the Yenikapi Archaeology Museum project from early conceptual phases to construction documents. Architectural representation featured (see worksample).

2017 2018

TARP MANUAL OF ARCHITECTURE Student lead Architecture publication of the GAUD. Senior editor and contributor. Upcoming interviews:

Spring 2018

Michael Young - March 1st 2018 Elizabeth Diller - April 5th 2018 Conducted interviews

Spring 2017

Fall 2017

Stanley Saitowitz - February 23th 2017 Laurie Hawkinson and Henry Smith-Miller - March 12th 2017 Eric Howeler - March 30th 2017 Bruce Mau - April 11th 2017 Ensamble Studio - October 16th 2017 Neil Denari - November 9th 2017

SOFTWARE KNOWLEDGE 3ds Max, Maya, Rhino3d, After Effects, Illustrator, Indesign, Photoshop, Maxwell Suite, Vray, Mental Ray Grasshopper3d, Visual Basic, CATIA V5, Solid Edge, Solid Works.

LANGUAGES Turkish (First Language) French (First Language) English (Second Language) Spanish (Intermediate) 72

Portfolio 2018 - Alican Taylan  
Portfolio 2018 - Alican Taylan  
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