Page 1

2015

GRAPHIC

MARCH

DESIGN

SELECTED WORKS

Yvon Chouinard Quote Urban Therme History of Clarendon Tandem Felix Letterpress Great Miami Rowing Center Jillian Gutierrez Hair Design Perspective The Future of Convenience CANstruction Mad Men Cards + Invitations Photography

ALEX PAULETTE KAPLAN


ALEX PAULETTE KAPLAN 605 W. Madison St., Apt. 1213 Chicago, IL 60661 630.885.9772 alexpkaplan@gmail.com


SELECTED WORKS

Yvon Chouinard Quote Urban Therme History of Clarendon Tandem Felix Letterpress Great Miami Rowing Center Jillian Gutierrez Hair Design Perspective The Future of Convenience CANstruction Mad Men Cards + Invitations Photography


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Y VON CHOUINARD QUOTE

This poster is a visualization of the quote by Yvon Chouinard, “Returning to a simpler way allows us to regain our dignity.� The strategy behind this poster is to create a visual riddle that draws the reader into the content. The top half of the poster is visually simple, featuring only upper case letters all of the same weight, but semiotically it is complex as the reader has no real understanding of its meaning. The final line on the poster is visually complex, using both upper and lower case type, but is simple semiotically as the reader can finally read and understand the quote.

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URBAN THERME

As an entry to the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennial Lakefront Kiosk Competition, Urban Therme is a mobile spa kiosk to enable a dynamic winter activation of the lakefront by blurring the boundary between culture, lifestyle and retail. The Urban Therme brand was developed so as not to overwhelm. The washed out, tonal blues, greens and greys seek to convey a calm that accompanies the day-spa experience at the iconic Chicago lakefront. The logo mark “UTBH” is multi-directional, being read as “Urban Therme”, “Thermal House”, and “Urban Bath” to reflect it’s programmatic flexibility and innovative concept. An expansion of the venture would include an app and an online reservation platform to check availability and book instantaneously.

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CARVE

ENCLOSE

LIFT

CLOSED

TUB + SAUNA

SIXT Y TO SEVENT Y THOUSAND

people visit the 18 miles of the iconic Chicago lakefront each day during the summer months according to a recent CPD study. However, during the winter, the lakefront is incredibly under-utilized. Urban Therme seeks to enable a dynamic winter activation by blurring the boundary between culture, lifestyle, and retail. Urban Therme would be a joint venture between the CPD that brings the spa experience to the Chicago lakefront, serving as the sole retail component of the kiosk. The form takes on a powerful simplicity, beginning with a standard rectangular kiosk enclosure. The interior spaces are then carved from within to create a monolithic form with sliding doors that play with open / closed, mimicking the public and private duality of communal bathing.

OPEN

SPA H U B

HERD

The kiosk is designed to accommodate three separate types of spa experiences: hot bath, cold bath, and dry sauna. The kiosks can be positioned together in couples or groupings of three to provide a more holistic experience. The main spa hub that provides towels, reservations, and additional services will be a grouping of 4 kiosks. These groupings will move as a herd along the lakefront, re-locating to enhance and provide new views of the lake and skyline, creating a unique micro-climate in each new location.

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CHANGING ROOMS

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LEVEL ONE PLAN I NS I D E SPA

is enclosed on two sides so as to blocks winds, provide a sense of privacy, and frame views. The roof begins to slowly lift at the corner to open up the views further, so that each relocation and orientation will provide a unique experience. In the summer the kiosk will face east, to open to Lake Michigan and benefit from the easterly winds and turning the large faces of the form from the southern sun. In the winter, the kiosk will face west, opening to the iconic Chicago skyline and absorbing the southwestern sun.

runners or shade for beachgoers. In this way, the kiosk is open, even when it is closed. When the large cedar track doors are opened, the interior is revealed. The Urban Therme staff begin the small fire that heats the tub as patrons change in the rooms provided.

The initial huts are designed for 2-4 people, but with further expansion will allow for larger groups of between 5 and 8 people. The generous deck will allow the kiosk to be used by the public when the spa is not in use, providing respite for

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WEB AND APP INTERFACE

BRAND IDENTITY

The Urban Therme brand was developed so as not to overwhelm. The washed out, tonal blue, green, and greys seek to convey a calm that accompanies the day-spa experience and the iconic Chicago lakefront. The logo “UTBH” is multidirectional, being read as “urban therme,” thermal house,” and “urban bath” to reflect it’s programmatic flexibility and innovative concept. An expansion of the venture would include an app and an online reservation platform to check availability and book instantaneously. Once transferred to the Chicago Park District this venture will provide much needed municipal revenue.

PROJECTION MAPPING

POTENTIAL ARTISTS

E X H I B I T I O N S T R AT E G Y

For exhibition in Millennium Park during the Chicago Architecture Biennial, a curved fabric screen would enclose the two open sides of the kiosk, to be used as a surface for projection mapping. Urban Therme would like to team up with several artists, filmmakers, and students from the nationally ranked film schools at DePaul University and Northwestern University, to develop vignettes and interpretations of the kiosk space and its possibilities. In keeping with the theme of the “State of the Art of Architecture” we would like to offer our kiosk as a testing ground for an artist’s interpretation of the kiosk competition that would sit within our proposal’s footprint. Ideally these projected mappings would convey a sense of depth, emphasizing storylines and landscapes that draw viewers into the kiosk. The projection mapping would also serve to mask the true identity of the spa, providing incentive for Chicagoans to visit it at the lakefront upon its installation in spring of 2016.

W I N T E R AC T I VAT I O N

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K YLE BIGART

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER

C L E A N TOW E R

Kyle Bigar t is a recent graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology where he graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Architecture and a specialization in digital design. His work has been exhibited at the Chicago Architecture Foundation and has past professional experiences at both IIT and Gensler. He currently practices at Perkins + Will in Chicago, IL.

CHIC AGO, ILLINOIS

E D U C AT I O N

BACHELOR OF ARCHITEC TURE Illinois Institute of Technology 2012

Alpha Rho Chi Medal, Schif f Foundation Scholarship Finalist, Samuel Hor witz’s Memorial Scholarship Winner, Women’s Architec tural League Foundation Scholarship Winner, Resident Advisor RECOGNITION

Jacques Rougerie Foundation Competition

Architec ture and Sea Level Award 2014 Special Mention

Chicago Architecture Foundation Exhibition

Clean Tower studio projec t in collaboration with Peter Binggeser on display at ‘The Unseen City: Designs For A Future Chicago’ exhibition in 2012

Architects should consider public experience. How can this site affect the community, city, country and world? Can we give something back? Solve a problem? Architecture is much more than just a building.

WETLANDS IN THE SKY

Clean Tower answers the challenge to create a supertall skyscraper that addresses problems standing in the way of Chicago becoming a zero carbon city. The tower achieves this by focusing on water purification and public space, therefore redefining the way Chicagoans interact with the river. Dramatic views South and East down river corridors and large riverfront access are what make this leaning high-rise at Wolf Point so appealing. The tower celebrates the river rather than mistreating it. The current typical design strategy for architecture on Wolf Point is to locate buildings as far South as possible to maximize views for inhabitants. Clean Tower makes the gesture to ‘push back’ in order to ‘give back’. By moving the tower’s base to the North end of the site, a public wetland park is created to help reconnect the community to the river. The tower’s program includes residential spaces in the upper half, while the lower contains hotel, office and retail components. The shifting form allows for stunning river views for residential spaces, while retaining more traditional cityscape views for the lower programmatic levels. A secondary form penetrates the shifting tower, providing a structural circulation core. A living machine wetland is installed across the top of the Merchandise Mart building adjacent, cascading down the mall plaza and terminating in the public wetland park to ultimately clean the river.

P R O J E C T D E TA I L S • 10 5 S TO R I E S , 15 3 0 ’ TA L L • 240 LUXURY CONDOS • 350 HOTEL ROOMS • 8 0 0, 0 0 0 SF O FFI CE SPACE • 12 S TO R Y R E TA I L M A L L • 4 8 0 V E R T I C A L B OAT D O C K S • 8 5 0 AU TO M AT E D C A R PA R K • 3 2 E L E VATO R S • 650,000SF WETL AND • 60,000GAL ANNUAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION

K Y L E B I G A R T I N C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H P E T E R B I N G G E S E R

Association of Licensed Architect’s Student Merit Award Recipient Student profile feature in AL A’s Fall 2012 issue

IIT CoA Website Feature

River Pure studio projec t displayed in the undergraduate advanced studio web galler y in 2011-2012

First Prize Conqueror of the 2007 Hill Engineering Competition $30 0 0 savings bond awarded

Peterhan’s Visual Training Project Prize Nomination 20 08-20 09

SELECTED EXPERIENCE

PERKINS + WILL Arch II / Chicago, IL / October 2012-Present

Nor thwestern Prentice Competition, Xuhui Hospital, Oberoi International High School 02, CR Land Residential Development

SCHOOLS FOR THE CHILDREN OF THE WORLD Architectural Intern / Léogâne, Haiti / May 2012-October 2012

National School of Deslandes, Lycee Elementar y School, Sainte Rose School, Darbonne School, Guerin School, Fond de Boudin School

ILLINOIS INS TITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Teaching Assistant / Chicago, IL / August 2011-May 2012 First Year Undergraduate Architec ture Studio

GENSLER Model Builder / Chicago, IL / May 2010-August 2010 Four th Presby terian Church physical model

URBAN THERME | 1

P H O T O V O LTA I C A R R AY

URBAN THERME | 1

URBAN THERME | 2

S O L A R WAT E R H E AT E R C O L L E C TOR

OPTIMUM PASSIVE SHADIN G

RAINWATER COLLECTION SNOW MELTED FROM THERMAL RADIATION

HEAT RECOVERY

RAINWATER TANKS

LOW ENERGY LED

BATTERY BANK

RECYCLED CEDAR PLANKS

BLACK METAL PANEL TO ABSORB SUN

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NT WI

HYPOCAUST HEATED FLOO R S

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ES

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T

AS

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WOOD FIRE THERMAL EXC H A N G E

ELECTRO-MAGNETIC CLEA R WAT E R B AT H F I LT R AT I O N S Y S T E M

URBAN THERME

tones down the opulence that normally accompanies the day spa, through it’s passive strategies. In order to maintain its mobility and the herd mentality, the thermal bath must remain largely autonomous from city resources. The roof cavity serves a rainwater catchment that is stored in reservoir tanks in the back wall. The black metal panel and cavity wall serve as a thermal mass to help heat these stores in the winter. In the winter, the radiant heat from the interior will help to melt the snow on the roof above. A solar water heater is also used to maintain a consistent hot temperature in the hot bath. The precipitation is cleaned through an electro-magnetic clear water bath filtration system that is powered by a 24V battery that is charged with the

photovoltaic array. The process involves using pulsed electro-magnetic fields to control biological growth and corrosion. This method avoids health issues associated with the use and management of chemical water treatments, and maintains a consistently clean water store throughout multiple uses. The life-time costs are much lower with this type of treatment and does not require employees or attendants to check water levels and handle chemicals. The huts will largely be warmed by the fire/coil exchange contained near the tub that transfers to a hypocaust system. The hot air and smoke will pass through the open floor cavity where ceramic boxes remove hot burned air and heat the walls. This air is then transfers through and back through the flume to exhaust.

This single hearth will serve as the sole heat source for the kiosk, conditioning the changing rooms as well as the tub area. All materials will be locally sourced. Recycled softwood pallets will be recycled and planed to a smooth finish to be used on the interior. Aluminum composite panels allow the structure to achieve high performance at a minimal weight, aiding in its mobility.

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The Industrial Revolution brought forth great changes to society throughout the 19th century. This radical shift from agriculture to industry is said to have begun in England — causing society to flock toward the city-centers to seek employment in new factories. The working class traded their jobs out in the fields for 13-hour days, little wages, and unsanitary conditions in new urban factories. Machine manufacturing developed the division of labor system, which in turn increased speed and efficiency in the production of new materials such as iron and steel. Advancements in machine technology also enabled the mass production of these new products and materials. The vast development in technology quickly established a sense of dominion of man over nature that

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carried through the 19th century as society began to exploit the planet’s resources for its own growth (Meggs). Even though the Industrial Revolution contributed to the adversity of factory workers across the globe with its unsafe conditions and long hours, it gave birth to the rise of a new middle class that was motivated and empowered to seize a greater role in society. A desire for greater human equality led to increased public education and literacy throughout Europe and America. This posed new challenges for those in the field of communication, especially graphic designers and typographers. The vast developments in technology of the 19th century significantly lowered costs and increased the production of print materials — allowing for information to be more readily available to the masses, and creating an unquenchable demand that designers had to make an effort to supply. The mechanization of production allowed for a range of typographic sizes and styles to be

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The mass-communication needs of an industrialized society enabled a large expansion of graphic advertising and posters.

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the first excessively bold fonts to come out of this era. He developed this typestyle under his Fann Street Foundry, located in the heart of London. It was here where Thorne The mass-communication needs of an industrialized “produced his ‘improved printing types’ which were the society enabled a large expansion of graphic advertising first recorded examples of ‘modern’ faces with strong and posters. Traditional letterpress printers sought out vertical color and fine, horizontal bracketed serifs” typefounders to expand their design possibilities in order (Macmillan, 171). Thorne is said to have applied the term to compete with skilled lithographic printers. The 19th Egyptian to these original square-shaped serifs he decentury was a time of innovation in the world of typogra- signed. The Egyptian typefaces have continuous curves phy, leading to the creation of a new, bolder category of with a generally round aspect, and are unbracketed with type: the slab serif. The earliest versions of these types medium to heavy slab serifs. The derivation of the term were developed in an attempt to “meet the demands of Egyptian is unknown, although widely credited to the the new entrepreneurs” (Lawson, 308). The thickening of the main stem of a letter paired with the reduction of the weight of the serif was thought of as the maximum boldness required in this new fast-paced market. English typefounder Robert Thorne began his exploration in this category of typography by creating a “fat-face” roman typestyle around 1803. This type was deemed one of

popular interest in Egypt at this time. In 1816, the foundry He stated, “To the razor-edged fine lines and ceriphs of of William Caslon IV produced a specimen book with a type just observed upon, a reverse has succeeded, called single size of sans-serif caps that he too called Egyptian, “Antique,’ or ‘Egyptian,” the property of which is, that the providing later confusion as to who should receive credit strokes which form the letters are all of one uniform for designing the typeface. At an auction upon Robert thickness! — After this which would have thought that Thorne’s death in 1820, William Thorowgood, a man from further extravagance could have been conceived? Oh! Staffordshire with no previous connection to typefound- Sacred shades of Moxon and Van Dijke, of Baskerville ing, purchased the Fann Street Foundry and debuted his and Bodoni! What would ye have said of the typographic first specimen book shortly after. During the next years monstrosities here exhibited, which Fashion in our age he introduced Greek, Hebrew, and Russian typefaces as has produced?” (Hansard, 618). Although strongly worded, Hansard’s criticism had no apparent effect on the well as three Frakturs (Macmillan, 171). popularity of the new bold styles, as they continued to Although many commercial printers were extremely enthusiastic about these new bold typefaces, the more traditionally oriented practitioners highly criticized their development. Thomas Curson Hansard published his famous printer’s manual Typographia: An Historical Sketch of the Origin and Progress of the Art of Printing in 1825, which included great criticism of the Egyptians.

explored, while diminishing the handicrafts of the past (Meggs).

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thrive throughout the rest of the 19th century. In 1828 Thorowgood purchased the Fry Foundry, which added many “oriental and learned faces as well as book fonts, blacks, titling and flowers” to the Fann Street Foundry’s typeface collection (Macmillan, 172). In 1838, Robert Besley joined the Fann Street Foundry and created a new slab-serif typeface in 1845 that would have a large impact on the history of typography: Clarendon. Unlike the Egyptians, this new typeface was “issued as a text type rather than for display purposes” (Lawson, 314). Its purpose was to accompany a roman type as a sister boldface to provide emphasis where needed. Although it stems from the Egyptian style, the Clarendon typeface differs in that its serifs are bracketed and have a clear differentiation between the thick and thin lines (Baines,

clarendon | 5

Besley worked together with skilled punch-cutter Benjamin Fox to develop the original Clarendon series. 71). Another name given to the Clarendon style of typeface is Ionic — which is later used as a lighter take on the original Clarendon for setting newspapers.

HISTORY OF CL ARENDON

This project illustrates the history and development of the typeface Clarendon. Large shifts in scale showcase the playful nature of the typeface characters as well as point out the salient features of its anatomy.

Besley worked together with skilled punch-cutter Benjamin Fox to develop the original Clarendon series. Clarendon was the first ever registered typeface under England’s Design-Copyright Amendment Act of 1845 (Lawson, 315). This new act permitted a copyright on the typeface for a three-year period, and when the patent expired, many competing foundries were quick to copy its design. In the next Fann Street Foundry specimen book, Besley included a paragraph set in Clarendon discussing his view on plagiarism of his typeface, “Piracy is the

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great sin of all manufacturing communities: — there is scarcely any Trade in which it prevails so generally as among TYPE FOUNDERS…nearly all the respectable Printers in Town and Country who claim to have either taste or judgment, have adopted the original Founts, and treated the Imitations with the contempt they deserve” (Reed and Fox).

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The origin of the name Clarendon is said to have come from the Clarendon Press at Oxford University. Theodore Low De Vinne, American printer and author of typography, notes in his work Plain Printing Types: The Practice of Typography that Clarendon was “to serve as a display letter in a mass of text-type, and for side headings in dictionaries and books of reference” (Lawson, 315). In England, the name Clarendon became synonomous for “boldface type weight” as it was the most commonly used typeface for that reason. By 1850, the Clarendon typeface was a great commercial success. Besley was extremely

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The popularity of Clarendon can be seen in the development of new technologies in the 1900s. proud of his creation, noting “the most useful Founts that a Printer can have in his Office are the Clarendons: they make a striking Word or Line either in a Hand Bill or a Title Page, and do not overwhelm the other lines: they have been made with great care, so that they are distinct and striking and possess a graceful outline” (Lawson, 315). The popularity of Clarendon can be seen in the development of new technologies in the 1900s. The Linotype machine, designed by Ottmar Mergenthaler, a Germanborn inventor, “revolutionized the publishing industry by allowing metal type to be set from a keyboard similar to a typewriter instead of each piece of type being set by hand” (The Columbia Encyclopedia). It utilized a matrix, which contained two letterforms for a single character of a typeface; the second letterform on each matrix, when not an italic, was usually that of a Clarendon-style. Using a boldface character for emphasis as opposed to an italic character was a radical idea that was well estab-

lished with Clarendon, and became an extremely common practice in commercial printing, especially in newspapers in the early 1900s. As the development of this machine continued, manufacturers developed bold variants of their popular roman typefaces, and didn’t need to depend on the standardized Clarendon style. It was soon after, that Clarendon began appearing in expanded and lightface versions. Clarendon’s expanded variant became the model for German cuttings, and appeared in the catalogues of American foundries. The Bruce Foundry in New York and the Cincinnati Foundry were the first two American firms to issue the typeface (Lawson, 316). Most foundries in the United States produced slab-serifs during this time as well, and when the American Type

Founders Company was formed, they issued a specimen book in 1896 showcasing 26 variations including Ionic, Clarendon, Antique, French Clarendon and Doric. Just as quickly as the Clarendon style of typefaces was brought to popularization, they seemed to disappear from specimen books across the United States. In 1906, the American Type Founders Company released a new specimen book, where only 10 examples of slab-serifs were shown in the entirety of its 1,180 pages. None of which were Clarendon. Similarly in 1923, slab-serifs were reduced to only 6, again with the exclusion of Clarendon. The last large-scale American type catalog was released in 1925 by The Barnhart Brothers & Spindler, which sparked the revival of the slab-serifs. This specimen book exhibited 5 slab-serifs, three of which were

called Clarendon. By the 1930s, Clarendon began the same path of renewal the Gothic typefaces had taken just a few years prior, spurred by the “experimental typography of the Bauhaus movement” (Lawson, 318). American type manufacturers were already in fierce competition with Europeans, and responded to the new challenge of designing new slab-serifs throughout the 1930s. One variation of Clarendon that was developed during this time was Memphis by Rudolf Wolf. The Bauer foundry produced Benton, a geometric square-serif that proved to be one of the most popular at the time as well. After World War II, the Clarendon style once again was at the forefront of graphic design when the English foundry Steven, Shanks & Son revived three series in 1951. In 1953, the Stevenson Blake foundry of London returned to the original Fann Street Foundry punches and reissued the typeface as Consort. These original punches now reside at the Type Museum in London. A similar

revival was seen in the United States when the American Type Founders Company commissioned typographic designer Freeman Craw to produce a new type with the Clarendon model (Lawson, 321). Craw created Craw Clarendon, Craw Clarendon Book, Craw Clarendon Condensed — all primarily designed for photocomposition (Type Directors Club). Another style of Clarendon that remained popular throughout the late 19th century was French Clarendon. Here, the slab-serifs are overemphasized for display purposes. This typeface was generally used as the type in circus posters and “Wanted” notices in old western movies. With the expansion of commer-

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TA NDEM FELIX LET TERPRESS

Engaging graphic design as visual journalism, I am currently participating in a research-based studio to investigate the identity of a specific location in Chicago. I chose to explore the studio space of Tandem Felix Letterpress located in Pilsen and have worked with photography, typography and sound as a means to create initial visual compositions.

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GREAT MIAMI ROWING CENTER

The Great Miami Rowing Center is a competitive rowing club located in Hamilton, Ohio. In hopes of recruiting younger athletes, GMRC wished to update and modernize their overall look. I began this project by developing a new custom logo for the club. This new logo showcases the sport and creates a recognizable icon for the club. A complete marketing package including posters, flyers and other print collateral as well as a series of digital advertisements gave the club the fresh feeling it needed to attract talented athletes.

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JILLIAN GU TIERREZ HAIR DESIGN

Jillian is an independent hair stylist located in Los Angeles, California and was looking for a way to distinguish herself from others in her field. Incorporating her love of everything pink and feminine, her brand includes a handlettered logo and illustrated floral elements.

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PERSPECTIVE

As an exercise in visualization as a graphic process instead of illustration, I developed this poster to show Perspective.

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THE F U T URE OF CONVENIENCE

I participated in a research-based studio partnered with The Kroger Company to explore the possible futures of the American convenience store. The semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work was published in a book detailing the history of convenience stores, retail trends, and student concepts for future convenience stores. As a member of the design team, I aided the project manager in the development of content as well as graphic elements of the book. The Kroger Company also sponsored a gallery exhibition in downtown Cincinnati where guests were invited to explore the studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research and designs. As project manager for the event, I created a general graphic poster template for students to showcase their individual projects. I also developed a series of introductory boards, remaining consistent with the overall branding established in the design of the published book.

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CA NSTRUCTION MAD MEN

CR architecture + design located in Cincinnati, Ohio hosted a 60s themed cocktail party February 2014 benefiting the 17th Annual Cincinnati CANstruction design/build competition. As a part of the marketing team, I established the overall creative direction for the event, as well as developed digital and print promotional materials.

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CA RDS + INVITATIONS

Custom paper goods have always been a passion of mine, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the opportunity to work with clients on a variety of holiday cards, event invites and stationery.

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A LEX P K APL AN PHOTOGRAPHER

I am inspired by textured forms and capturing moments of lifestyle and personality in my photography work. My portfolio consists of portrait, event and architectural imagery. I am also currently the instructor for an Undergraduate Design Photography class at University of Illinois at Chicago, focusing on observation, composition and meaning in the photographic medium.

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ALEX PAULETTE KAPLAN 605 W. Madison St., Apt. 1213 Chicago, IL 60661 630.885.9772 alexpkaplan@gmail.com


EDUCATION

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Architecture, Design and the Arts Master of Design in Graphic Design, 2016 Graduate Teaching Assistant, Graduate Research Assistant, 2014 Board of Trustees Tuition Waiver Recipient

University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 2013 Cincinnatus Scholar, Dean’s list, First Place Undergraduate Professional Writing Award

EXPERIENCE

SKILLS

Design portfolio consists of brand development, illustration and print materials. Photography portfolio consists of portrait, wedding, event and architectural imagery.

Brand development, Corporate Identity, Experience Design, Digital Photography, Presentation Development, Hand Modeling, Illustration, Typography, Design Research

Alex P Kaplan Design & Photography Independent Designer & Photographer Chicago, Illinois | August 2013 - Present

University of Illinois at Chicago Design Photography Graduate Teaching Assistant Chicago, Illinois | January 2015 - Present

Undergraduate introduction to photography class. Objectves include familiarity with the camera, studio, digital techniques and software programs in the contexts of observation, composition and meaning.

CR architecture + design Designer & Marketing Coordinator Cincinnati, Ohio | October 2013 - November 2014

Responsible for the creation of proposal documents for new architectural projects. Developed branded presentations and other collateral for both internal and external use. Managed company social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and the CR Connect Blog. Maintained the company website keeping it up to date with current projects.

Gensler Architectural Intern Los Angeles, California | March - August 2012

Was a design team member for a large retail project in the process of a nationwide store roll-out. Participated in the schematic design of retail projects varying in scale from furniture design to international concept flagship stores. Was responsible for generating drawings and renderings for client presentation packages. Was a primary designer for a set of mall kiosks installed across the country.

Design

Software

Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Office, Rhinoceros 3D modeling, Google Sketchup, AutoCAD, V-Ray Rendering, Podium Rendering

DESIGN RESEA RCH

Design and the 1950s American Dream Master’s Thesis Topic Alice Timber in the City Design Competition The Future of Convenience Design Research Studio

TR AV EL A BROA D

Turkey: Cappadocia, Istanbul, Seluçk; Mexico: Guadalajara, Guanajuato, Mexico City; Germany: Munich, Frankfurt; Greece: Mykonos, Santorini, Rhodes; Spain: Barcelona, Madrid; Italy: Rome, Pompeii; France: Paris

EXHIBITIONS & PUBLICATIONS

Adobe Creative Jam Chicago Participant Chicago, Illinois | April 2015 University of Cincinnati Alumni Art Show Cincinnati, Ohio | November - December 2013 Marmara University International Student Triennial: Connecting the Dots & Artist Diaries Istanbul, Turkey | June - August 2013 The Future of Convenience University of Cincinnati and The Kroger Company Cincinnati, Ohio | 2012

INTERESTS

Fashion, Lifestyle blogs, Yoga, Truffles, Photography, Hand lettering

ONLINE PRESENCE

behance.net/alexpkaplan linkedin.com/in/alexpkaplan alexpkaplan.vsco.co/grid/1 alexpkaplanphotographer.pixieset.com


ALEX PAULETTE KAPLAN

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SELECTED WORKS

Alex P Kaplan Graphic Design Portfolio March 2015  

Selected works by Alex P Kaplan, Graphic Designer

Alex P Kaplan Graphic Design Portfolio March 2015  

Selected works by Alex P Kaplan, Graphic Designer

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