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ALEXANDER JACKSON PORTFOLIO

SELECTED WORKS University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design The Ohio State University Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture


Alexander Jackson

University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design 419 S 19th St. Unit 1A Philadelphia, PA 19146 aljacks@upenn.edu


SELECTED ACADEMIC + RESEARCH WORKS

Zep-Port

7

The Port, the Pods and the Park

21 Antropofagia Cultural Cannibal 27 SymphoNEXUS Radical Sound Board 33

[in] Verse Courtyard London Public Library

43

Stereo-type-Writer

Radically Desirable Suburbia

SELECTED ADDITIONAL WORKS

65

Socio-Spatial Map

77

Mission: I’mPOSSIBLE

Penn Museum

Networks of Ecosystems for Learning

SELECTED PROFESSIONAL WORKS

85

Connected Community

95

Into the Garden

Madison Health Modernization

UPMC Hillman Cancer Center


SELECTED ACADEMIC + RESEARCH WORKS

Zep-Port

7

The Port, the Pods and the Park

21 Antropofagia Cultural Cannibal 27 SymphoNEXUS Radical Sound Board 33

[in] Verse Courtyard London Public Library

43

Stereo-type-Writer

Radically Desirable Suburbia


7

ZEP-PORT The Pods, the Port, and the Park Autumn 2018 - Eduardo Rega Publication forthcoming ABSTRACT Museum archives are not to be stowed away from the public. Archived artifacts many times do not see the interaction with the public, to which these treasures once belonged. These artifacts should engage with the community and embed themselves within their existing contexts. The role of the ethnographic museum is to showcase and engage the public domain to educate and explore those cultures of the ancient and present world. The archives are no longer shelves of closed, concealed space, locked away in a building. The artifacts are housed within zeppelins that liberate themselves from the dock at the museum, now a port of call. The Zep-Port houses The Dock, The Factory, and the Park. The Dock houses and exhibits the archival zeppelins, the Factory manufactures these zeppelins lead by research faculty at the museum, and the Park that integrates onto the roof of the Zep-Port where projections of exhibits are showcased. The museum is a media machine.


8 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Archival Hub The museum now becomes a hub for zeppelins to dock and for the public to engage with the archive. Always changing, the museum is now an activated part of the urban fabric. From new zeppelin manufacturing to rotating gallery exhibits, a new public domain is created. Any person that is walking by can look into directly see what things are happening and looking onto those that work at the museum. The roof becomes a new extension of the street, a highline of sorts. Here, zeppelins land and engage directly with the public. Those in the medical center next door can even look directly into the courtyard to see the events happening at the museum. Projections in the courtyard can be seen from the theater within, but also the roof park and as well, gives views toward the Schuylkill River and Center City; where one can see the zeppelins flying about to remind and share the archive with the public. The crane acts as a new icon for the city of Philadelphia; a shining beacon of the decolonized ethnographic museum of the University of Pennsylvania.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 9


Crane and landing dock

Roof garden

Structure

Gallery promenade

Existing museum courtyard

System of Layers The building creates incidental relationships and interactions to occur when each program blends into one another. Each callout showcases the engagement of the zeppelins with the factory, roof garden, and museum. 10 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 11


Integrated Interiority The interior of each zeppelin becomes a new way to display an archive. Also, performances and ceremonies can be held within the interiors of the zeppelins. The walls and structure of the zeppelin become ways to display artifacts as a catwalk lifts patrons on a plane, directly engaging with the archive.

12 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


The Zep-Port The Pods, the Port, and the Park “Chunky Choisy”

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JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 13 Choisy Isometric Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Visual Studies I | DeLuna | Alexander Jackson


14 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 15


16 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


The Mixing Machine The museum is no longer just archive and gallery. Now, it is a performance hall, a factory, a park, an extension of the public domain. Each individual program can visually see eachother. Zeppelins engage with the museum by docking, or lodging into the structure to become part of the permanent exhibit. Others dock on the roof and engage the park bringing people into a new context. The archive is now decontextualized and one reads new meanings and readings from a now decolonialized archive and exhibit. JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 17


18 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Urban Deployment Each zeppelin not only docks at the museum, but also engages with the city to bring and return artifacts back to the public domain. The zeppelins engage within the public realm through occupying vacant lots in underrepresented areas of the city, areas where the museum has little reach. The zeppelins project onto the facades of the surrounding buildings; acting as an attractor for the public parks within the city. This brings the message of the museum to areas that cannot be accessed. Finally, the zeppelins engage with the skyscrapers, which now become billboards not to their private owners, but now to the decolonialized message.

As a new form of colonial exploitation, the Capitalist regime of American business takes advantage of those who cannot escape. The efďŹ gy of the skyscraper is a monument to the pilaged land of those that formerly inhabited this place. Those individuals that own JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 19 these structures need to be reminded of the not so distant history.


21

ANTROPOFAGIA Cultural Cannibal Autumn 2018 - Eduardo Rega in collaboration with Jay Greene, Hillary Morales, and Eddy Sheng MANIFESTO We have a respect and admiration for museums because they represent the grandeur of society. But in reality, they give us a completely distorted view of history. We converge hundreds of unique cultures and time periods into one dehumanizing “Africa� gallery. We show objects from Japan and China next to each other with complete disregard for their conflicting and completely unique histories. These artifacts have been ripped away from disenfranchised societies violently and illegally. Geography has been used as low hanging fruit to put cultures and artifacts into neat boxes for our display. We need to do better. Museums have an opportunity, with their resources and physical space to properly engage us in a more authentic history. The Penn Museum must reject its current colonial classification system. Engage indigenous voices in exhibit design and museum staff. Teach people to ask questions about the prescribed historical stories. People must physically and emotionally engaged in learning. Museum exhibits are not just clear boxes.


22 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Installation Using balloons as formwork, each enclosed chamber is enclosed using tape to create self-compressive structures. The viewer must contort to read the information of the text regarding each object as it swirls around the exterior of the installation. The vessels are held within each balloon structure. Meant to be implemented at museums quickly and cost effieciently, the Antropofagia can invade all.

CHAMBER

PAVILION

BUILDING

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 23


24 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Blended Gallery With expansion to various scales, the Antropofagia grows to fill each context it surrounds. Each visitor must engae with the exhibit, and move about to discover new engagements with ancient artifacts.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 25


27

SymphoNEXUS Radical Sound Board Schenk-Woodman Competition - Finalist in collaboration with Alan Fan and Miki Ji SYNOPSIS Located at the intersection of the local regional transit line, the SEPTA, Green Lane, a major thouroughfare into the town of Manayunk, and its connection to Main Street and local residents, the pop-up engages all the communities at large. Transforming the un-activated Cresson Street and Conarroe Street, the SymphoNEXUS brings in a contemporary concert hall and performance space to draw people and spectacle to that which is underneath. Isolating the road into a new venue, the existing facades of the buildings act as one of the primary acoustical treatments. The planting create a sound barrier and separation from the railroad above, whie the panels carve new acoustical experiences into the urban fabric. The system is a series of pop-ups, each unique to create various spatial and experiential zones. Attaching to the existing structure of the SEPTA line above, the new concert venue is created in mere days instead of months. This fast, sudden, and easy temporary infrastructure invites spectacle and awe, engaging within the local community, and that at large.


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Engaged Underneath With the interaction of the railway, a new concert hall is created, allowing for the increasing millenial population in the city to engage with music in a new manner. The Shells help to create tunnels of sound, each with unique acoustical properties to create programmatic zones of sound. The rails begin to bridge the landscape that is existing with the numerous bars and restaurants located in this area. The street is now activated beyond simply vehicular transportation. The site is the nexus of the major parties in the city. 28 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH

pulling in local stores


End tie rods Pre-fabricated Panel Tie rods

Gr ee

n

La ne

Pre-fabricated planter boxes

commercial district

you are here

System of Panels Each of the panels is hung from the existing structure of the railroad.

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engaging the local transit systems introduction of plantings serves as sound deadening to create acoustic shell

bringing nature into the new space

Section 1/4” = 1’ - 0”

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 29


i at eg gr n g u a of a d e ro bl rail a ap g m , c ti n ra up xis ag op- e e i D h n ap st tio l is ros a c z e a li n ne pa em Pa ch yst a s E e th

Zones of Sound Backstage - the zone for roadies, equipment, back of the house passes Dance - full on bodily movements required Head Banging - brain rattling may be symptomatic of this space Refreshments - grab a drink or libation for refueling as needed Breakout Space - shy zone, good for discussing acoustical qualities of space break out space

30 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH

refreshments


zones create diffferent acoustical experiences designated to enhance performance qualities

empty lots can be used as additional performance spaces and dancing zones

Plan Oblique 1/8” = 1’ - 0”

head banging zone

dance zone

Section 1/8” = 1’ - 0”

backstage

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 31


33 [in] VERSE COURTYARD LONDON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Autumn 2015 - AJ Montero James E. Gui ‘59 Competition Studio Honorable Mention, Finalist ABSTRACT In an increasingly digital age, one must ask the question: what is the role of the library in the 21st Century and how can the library become more than just a place to store books? The role of the public library is not simply a depository of books, rather the library functions as a repository of information; a dynamic incubator for the community. The library should engage the community, and give access of knowledge to the citizens that utilize this open resource. While the cherished book stacks that adorn many of today’s libraries is still present in the project, many other programmatic elements become part of the library. These include spaces for learning technology, providing housing for the homeless, offering children’s daycare centers and opening up cafes and other local businesses, for the library is the place of the community. The project for the London Public Library is located at Potter’s Field Park, behind City Hall and located within the rising financial district of London. Flanked by new developments as object buildings and the old London urban fabric of courtyard buildings, the new London Public Library blends these typologies. Retaining the notion of public space that is open for the community, one courtyard is elevated while the other, the inverse, is the submerged book stacks ever present in libraries. Situated around the public courtyard are public programmatic elements, like the technology tower/digital library, cafe, and children’s centre. Each tower provides spaces for interaction and investigation. The London Public Library sets a new precedent for libraries. Engaging within the community and giving back the public domain that was claimed for the building creates a new role of the library. The public library will not go away, and the role of these spaces will only grow more important as an incubator for the community.


Courtyard typology

Submerge and extract

Roof becomes platform

Public programs flank

Technology tower

Business disctrict face

Solar and view optimization

Conference + Structure

Engagement of landscape

A new Tower of London The Library acts as a new Tower of London, referencing the towers flanked by landscapes which is reflected across the River Thames. The building blends the urge for a courtyard typology of historic London fabric and the new object buildings surrounding the site. The two fronts to this library are the business district on the south end, and the public entry, located up the graded landscape and onto the courtyard, lifting one off the street realm; a reinterpretation of a piano noble.

34 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


c

A

DIGITAL LIBRARY LOBBY B REPROGRAPHICS

BOOK STACKS C

NEWSPAPER & MAGAZINES

D

E

F GREAT READING HALL BELOW G

H

J A

A GALLERY

K BOOK RETURN

L

B

B M

N ENTRY & RECEPTION

P

1

2

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4

5

6

c

GROUND FLOOR PLAN SCALE = 1:250

Ground Floor Plan The business entry to the library gathers patrons and directs them into the stacks. Rooms and spaces are determined in a play with the standard column grid, and major asymmetrical elements that dance about the project.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 35


SECTION C-C SCALE = 1:100

36 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Model view from River Thames c 1

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3

4

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3

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c 5

6

1

2

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c

DIGITAL LIBRARY

A

BOOK STACKS

DIGITAL LIBRARY

A

A

B

B

B

C

C

C

D

D

E

E

F

F

F

G

G

G

H

H

D BAR & CAFE

E

CHILDREN’S CENTRE

GREAT READING HALL

H ADMINISTRATION HUB

J A

A

J A

A

K

J A

A

K

L

K

L

L INVESTIGATION SPACE

INVESTIGATION SPACE RECEPTION

AUDITORIUM B

B

B

B

M

B

B

M

M

ENCOUNTER TOWER N

N

P

U3 FLOOR PLAN SCALE = 1:250

c

THIRD FLOOR PLAN SCALE = 1:250

c

P

SEVENTH FLOOR PLAN SCALE = 1:250

c

Selected floor plans

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 37


Book Stack Section The section showcases the connection from the towers and the Book Stack Excavation. The landscape extends onto the courtyard, creating a new public space in which views showcase the iconic Tower Bridge.

INVESTIGATION ROOMS

ENCOUNTER AND CONFERENCE CENTRE

LONDON PUBLIC LIBRARY

RECEPTION GALLERY

AUDITORIUM

SECTION C-C SCALE = 1:250

38 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 39


Columns as landscape Columns act as extension of trees

Circulation of Towers and Excavation

Circulation

40 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH

Columns act as extension of trees


Connection to River The remainder of Potter’s Field Park pulls onto the building’s new courtyard and extends the public realm up into the library. From the Conference Centre, one has expansive views of the River Thames and the park.

Tower Density Each of the three towers reflects the new fabric of London developed along the riverfront, while the courtyard-style reflects the old London fabric across the street, as lowrise courtyard buildings, made of multiple structures.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 41


43 STEREO-TYPE-WRITER

RADICALLY DESIRABLE SUBURBIA Spring 2016 - Sandhya Kochar + Dow Kimbrell Architecture Honors Design Studio in collaboration with Kristina Bertocchi and Justin Gurtz ABSTRACT The American suburban house has become a signal of the American lifestyle. Today, developers offer ‘custom’ homes to provide the end user an array of options that are geared towards their lifestyle. However, these options do not produce meaningful difference, but rather create the illusion of choice within a very tightly-controlled system of building. The family landscape of America is diverse and varied, and no one developer-designed home will suffice regardless of options. With similar intentions, but creating a much more radical output, Yona Friedman developed the Flatwriter, a machine that designed homes based on rational programmatic inputs. We have redeveloped and deployed a new Flatwriter, called the Stereo-type-writer that is based on American marketing stereotypes formulated by both the developers and as defined by ESRI’s Tapestry Segmentation. Our project, Stereo-type-writer, radically redeploys typical stereotypes of the American family and creates “perfect” homes for each definition. The Tapestry segmentation stereotype data is as follows: Affluent Estates, Upscale Avenues, Uptown Individuals, Family Landscapes, Cozy Country Living, Up & Coming, Middle Ground, Senior Styles, Rustic Outposts, Midtown Singles, Hometown, Next Wave, Scholars, and Patriots. Each of these stereotypes has a particular set of desires, the origins of which were initially taxonomized by Dr. Reiss. These desires, typically used by developers, has been systematized and mapped onto a kit of parts contained within the image of a developer home. The assumptions of mapping desires onto the kit of parts is typically based on a stereotyping of American culture and an associated narrative. It is precisely here that the architect can play a role in speculating new urbanisms that are based on co-opting data, desire and narrative, rather than turning a blind eye to the hegemony of developers who produce Grade B architecture. The Stereo-type-writer co-opts these 16 desires and stereotype data to produce a new urbanism that aims to please, but backgrounds reason in favor of difference and diversity. Each desire maps to a particular design element within the developer home. The kit of parts are assembled and reassembled based on the data assumed and collected. As a result, providing each category with all their desires may not always create desired outcomes. It is within this paradoxical condition that the architect operates, pushing the potentials of the system to create unexpected situations and forms that redefine the possibilities of the suburban condition. A new form of urbanism can be created by exactly redeploying suburban conditions, one that relieves boredom of suburbia to new forms of architectural interest and production. Stereo-type-writer takes the place of “customized” mask developers over self-similar housing types (the idea of tailoring to individual tastes and needs) and transforms it into a creative grotesque. The agency is given to both the “suburbanites” and the architect. The stereotype writer can ultimately be understood as a kind of avarice machine, making clear the gulf between perceived desires and the forms they prescribe, redefining domesticity and the larger suburban condition.


DESIRES 2nd Floor Land

Sq. Footage

Column

Attic

POWER

SAVING

Circulation

Dormers

Land

Master Suite

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Porch

VENGEANCE

Circulation

SOCIAL CONTACT

Sq. Footage

Pediment

Land

Pediment Column

INDEPENDENCE

Column

IDEALISM

SOCIAL STATUS

Lift/ Pedestal

Breakfast Nook

Porch

Bay Window

Pediment

Breakfast Nook

Attic

EATING

HONOR

ORDER

2nd Floor

Lift/ Pedestal

Dormers

2nd Floor

Attic

TRANQUILITY

CURIOSITY

FAMILY

Facade

Master Suite

Bay Window

ACCEPTANCE

44 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH

Dormers Porch

Porch

ROMANCE


COMPONENTS

ATTIC

• Idealism • Order • Saving

PEDIMENT

• Honor • Social Status • Power

SECOND LEVEL • Family • Saving • Tranquility

SKIN/FACADE • Acceptance • Social Contact • Social Status

MASTER’S SUITE

DORMERS

• Romance • Family • Physical Activity

• Romance • Social Status • Curiosity

STAIRS ROOF STYLE • Idealism • Order • Acceptance

• Physical Activity • Independence • Tranquility

Garage

• Physical Activity • Social Status • Social Contact

BREAKFAST NOOK • Eating • Family • Idealism

COLUMNS

• Social Status • Power • Order

PORCH BAY WINDOW

• Acceptance • Social Contact • Idealism

• Social Contact • Romance • Acceptance

SQ. FOOTAGE • Social Status • Power •Family

LAND/TERRITORY •Power • Social Status •Vengeance

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 45


Sq. Footage

13,192,801 HOUSEHOLDS

12.3% of US

AFFLUENT ES TATES Sq. Footage

13,192,801 HOUSEHOLDS

12.3% of US

13,192,801 HOUSEHOLDS

12.3% of US

AFFLUENT ES TATES AFFLUENT

ES TATES

Sq. Footage

POWER

POWER

Column

Column

Sq. Footage

POWER

Column

Column

Sq. Footage

Column

Column

Column

SOCIAL STATUS

IDEALISM

Sq. Footage Column

SOCIAL STATUS

SOCIAL STATUS

Column

IDEALISM

IDEALISM

The Top Tier Middle-aged married couples that own lavish vacation homes, hires financial advisors. The Affluent Estates shop at high-end retail and chain stores. Leases fully equipped luxury imported SUVs. The house manifests through the prototypical suburban home (because “they are just like us”) transforming into a column, the exhibition of their wealth. The garage extends down to create more space for the numerous cars, and the walls flip out to view the neighbors, and increase the home’s square footage.

46 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


2nd Floor Sq. Footage

11,765,272 HOUSEHOLDS

11.0% of US

U PSCAL E AVENUES

Land

Sq. Footage

Column

Column

SOCIAL STATUS

POWER

SAVING

2nd Floor Sq. Footage

11,765,272 HOUSEHOLDS

11.0% of US

11,765,272 HOUSEHOLDS

11.0% of US

UPS CAL E AV ENU UPS CAES LE

AV E N UE S

Land

Sq. Footage

Column

Column

2nd Floor Sq. Footage

Land Column

SOCIAL STATUS

SOCIAL STATUS

Sq. Footage

Column

POWER

SAVING

POWER

SAVING

The Urban Chic Married couples who visit museums and art galleries, owns healthy portfolios. Practices yoga every morning and skis in the winter. Opts for late-model, imported vehicles while shopping and banking online. The house transforms into a hypostyle of Corinthian columns, with the house breaking into multiple sections. While Upscale Avenues have money, they want to seem as if they have even more money than Affluent Estates. The footprint of the house trumps all surrounding lots and expands into the neighborhood.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 47


Circulation

10,122,571 HOUSEHOLDS

9.5% of US

UPT OWN IN DIV IDUALS Circulation

10,122,571 HOUSEHOLDS

9.5% of US

U PT OW N INDIVID UA LS HOUSEHOLDS

ACCEPTANCE

9.5% of US

INDEPENDENCE

2nd Floor

Porch

ACCEPTANCE

TRANQUILITY

TRANQUILITY Facade

Land

ACCEPTANCE

2nd Floor

Porch

INDEPENDENCE

UPT OWN INDIVID UALS

2nd Floor

Porch

INDEPENDENCE

Facade Land

Circulation

10,122,571

Facade Land

TRANQUILITY

Laptops and Lattes Singles in their 30s that support environmental groups, saves for retirement. Takes public transportation, walks, and bikes. Stays connected via Apple computers, iPads, and iPhones. Active on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram. Gardens, and eats organic, local foods. From the street, the wall masks the house behind. Wanting to show off the eco-friendliness, the entry house is a take on the garden pavilion, where the garden becomes a wall. The home is pulled open through the platform showcasing the hidden nature around.

48 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


2nd Floor

Breakfast Nook Pediment

14,690,420 HOUSEHOLDS

14,690,420 HOUSEHOLDS

13.7% of US 14,690,420 HOUSEHOLDS

13.7% of US

FAMILY LANDSCAPES

FA MILY L A NDS CA P ES FA MILY L A NDS CA P ES

13.7% of US

2nd Floor

2nd Floor

FAMILY

FAMILY

Breakfast Nook

Pediment

Breakfast Nook

EATING

EATING

Pediment

IDEALISM

FAMILY

EATING

IDEALISM

IDEALISM

Soccer Moms & Home Improvement Married couples with 2.5 children, a dog and cat that lives with a white picket fence. Visits amusement parks and zoos annually. Indulges in DIY television and frequents large warehouse stores and eats at fast food restaurants. Owns a minivan and drives to soccer practice. The house is the prototypical suburban home, the “perfect” house for American households developers use to sell. Featuring all the elements for soccers moms and children alike, this cookie cutter home is the base for which contemporary suburban context is created.

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Dormers

COZY COUNTRY

8,887,129 HOUSEHOLDS

8.3% of US

Dormers

8,887,129 HOUSEHOLDS

8.3% of US

C OZ Y C OU NTRY HOUSEHOLDS

8.3% of US

ROMANCE

SOCIAL STATUS

INDEPENDENCE

Land

ROMANCE

C O ZY C O U N T RY

Land

Sq. Footage Porch

SOCIAL STATUS Dormers

8,887,129

Sq. Footage Porch

INDEPENDENCE

Sq. Footage Porch

ROMANCE

Land

SOCIAL STATUS

INDEPENDENCE

The Great Outdoors Wanting to live far away in the country, these citizens belong to AARP and veteran’s clubs. Owns pet dogs and 4-wheel drive trucks. Watches Fox News, goes fishing and camping, and does home improvement projects. The house gives its residents a little bit of away, through the personal mountain dedicated to each home. The house brings up romance through the dormers in the roof, recalling the “good-ol’ days” and long afternoons watching the sunset on the porch. The porch creates a new ground for which the mountain occupies.

50 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


2nd Floor

8,335,647 HOUSEHOLDS

7.8% of US

8,335,647 HOUSEHOLDS

7.8% of US

UP AND COMING

UP AN D C OM G UPI NAND

8,335,647 HOUSEHOLDS

7.8% of US

C OMING

Attic

2nd Floor

SAVING Frame

Attic

Frame

IDEALISM

FAMILY

2nd Floor Frame

Attic

IDEALISM

SAVING

SAVING

IDEALISM

FAMILY

FAMILY

American Dreamers Young married couples who have young children, hold student loans and mortgages. Buys new clothes, goes clubbing and visits zoos, theme parks and water parks. Spends money carefully, buys necessities; pays bills and socializes online through cell phone. The house is currently beings assembled, with only the portions of the home that are necessary. Other parts of the home are framed out, ready to go when they need the space. Plans are laid out on the lot for future expansion, saving money for later.

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7,592,029 HOUSEHOLDS

7.1% of US

29

DS

S

MIDDLE GROUND

M ID D L7,592,029 E GRO U N D 7.1% of US

INDEPENDENCE

ORDER

MIDDLE GROUND Grid

HOUSEHOLDS

ORDER

Roof

Territory

Grid

CURIOSITY

Territory

Grid

INDEPENDENCE

Roof

Roof

Territory

CURIOSITY

ORDER

INDEPENDENCE

CURIOSITY

Old and Newcomers The catch-all of the American landscape. These are the individuals, couples, families that just blend together. From buying lottery tickets to shopping with coupons, this category is everyone that doesn’t belong in the other categories. The house represents the equal nature of the Middle Ground. Undifferentiated, equal space showcases the generic category of this segment. The only differentiation is the roofs, where each roof expresses itself individually.

52 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

HONOR

SOCIAL CONTACT

Lift/ Pedestal

Circulation

7,479,915 HOUSEHOLDS

7.0% of US

SENIOR ST YLES

Porch

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

HONOR

SOCIAL CONTACT

Golden Years Elderly married couples with no children that draw from retirement income. These individuals exercise regularly, read newspapers and watches cable television. Following a round of golf, they like to relax in their rocking chair. The house transforms into the rocking chair the Senior Styles desire. The home shifts to and fro based on the time of day - maximizing the sunlight entering the house. The entry into the house is a ramp, that helps the couples exercise and gives them an accessible entrance for them and their neighborhood friends.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 53


834,903

OUSEHOLDS

.4% of US

Porch

6,834,903 HOUSEHOLDS

6.4% of US

RUS T IC OU T POS T S

RUS T IC O U TPOS T S Porch

EATING

Lift/ Pedestal Land

EATING

HOUSEHOLDS

6.4% of US

RU S T IC O U T PO S T S

INDEPENDENCE

TRANQUILITY

TRANQUILITY

INDEPENDENCE

Porch

6,834,903

Lift/ Pedestal Land

Lift/ Pedestal Land

EATING

INDEPENDENCE

TRANQUILITY

Diners and Miners These couples live in the country and live off the land; frequently fishing and hunting with their dogs. Owning ATVs and a used domestic truck, the Rustic Outposts listen to faith-based radio, shops with coupons and watches Animal Planet from satellite TV. Desiring eating, the house becomes a large porch in which the walls disappear, enabling a constant sight-line for hunting. This porch also becomes the place to store the spoils of the hunt, showing off the fresh kill and independence from society.

54 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


Facade

MIDT OWN SING LE S 6,960,167 HOUSEHOLDS

6.5% of US

Sq. Footage

Roof

Facade

MIDT OW N SING L E S

ACCEPTANCE

SOCIAL STATUS

ACCEPTANCE

Sq. Footage

Roof

IDEALISM

SOCIAL STATUS

IDEALISM

Young and Restless Fresh out of college and discovering what real life has to offer, the Midtown Singles are still searching for “the one” and want desperately to be accepted by society. With their little money and high debt, these singles prefer clubbing, dressing to impress and rock concerts. The house tries to be like the other suburban homes, but begins to peel away showing the lack of stable ground the single life offers. Within the home, only what is necessary to living is inside including a single bedroom and simple kitchen.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 55


4,710,070 HOUSEHOLDS

4.4% of US

4,710,070 HOUSEHOLDS 4,710,070 HOUSEHOLDS 4.4% of US 4.4% of US

HO HO ME ME TOWN TOWN

HOME TOWN SOCIAL CONTACT SOCIAL CONTACT

ACCEPTANCE

SOCIAL CONTACT

ACCEPTANCE ACCEPTANCE

TRANQUILITY

Lift/ Pedestal Lift/ Pedestal

Bay Window Bay Window

Porch Porch

Lift/ Pedestal

Bay Window

Porch

TRANQUILITY TRANQUILITY

Small Town Simplicity The singles that stay in their hometown living in the same home they grew up in. From weekly grocery visits with the parents, the Hometowners eat at fast food and watches endless streaming TV services. Still drives the first car they purchased, but enjoys premium cable. Maintaining social contact with their buds back at home, the house arranges into a courtyard in which each house is connected. Perched above the street, these singles are away from the street and those neighbors who always ask “when you going to move into your own place?”

56 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


2nd Floor

Lift/ Pedestal

4,357,532 HOUSEHOLDS

US 4,357,5324.1% ofNEXT HOUSEHOLDS

4.1% of US

4,357,532 HOUSEHOLDS

4.1% of US

WAVE NEXT WAVE

NEXT WAVE

2nd Floor

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HONOR

HONOR

Lift/ Pedestal

Lift/ Pedestal

Lift/ Pedestal

2nd Floor

FAMILY

FAMILY

HONOR

TRANQUILITY

Lift/ Pedestal

FAMILY

TRANQUILITY

TRANQUILITY

Fresh Ambitions The multi-generational households create the Next Wave. Typically pays with cash, plays soccer, and visits theme parks annually. Shops at warehouse clubs and specialty markets. Buys baby and children’s products and prefers to purchase used, fun-to-drive vehicles. The house capitalizes on the desire of honor and family. Lifting segments of the copycat houses and nestling them within, the house showcases the nurturing nature of the Next Wave. Each subsequent home fits within, yet displaces the usable space.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 57


Lift/ Pedestal

Attic

Porch

SCH O LAR S CURIOSITY

INDEPENDENCE

SOCIAL CONTACT Lift/ Pedestal

Attic

1,939,021 HOUSEHOLDS

1.8% of US

Porch

SCHOLARS CURIOSITY

INDEPENDENCE

SOCIAL CONTACT

Dorms to Diplomas Looking for that 4 year degree and discovering themselves, the Scholars use computers and cell phones for everything. Shops impulsively, buying the trendiest clothes. Carries a credit card balance and eats frozen TV dinners. Studies frequently, drinks constantly. With no money to spend on housing, the Scholars dwell on top of their families’ homes. Desiring curiosity and seeking knowledge, the house occupies the attic, but transforms into a bachelor pad of sorts: perfect for studying, perfect for parties.

58 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


39,021

EHOLDS

% of US

Lift/ Pedestal Lift/ Pedestal

1,939,021

PATR 1.8% IOT S HOUSEHOLDS

of US

Attic Attic

PATRIOT S TRANQUILITY

Land

Land

POWER

TRANQUILITY

ORDER

POWER

ORDER

Military Proximity Recently released from duty with the military, Patriots have joined veteran’s clubs, watches ESPN, History Channel, and Comedy Central. Typically owns an SUV. With their companion pets, these singles and recently married couples are seeking a return to normalcy. The house lifts off the ground for protection and all the windows are blocked with a large paneled wall for safety, but a lookout with views toward the neighborhood is open. The rear of the house’s roof becomes a place to practice shooting and hiding from the enemy.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 59


60 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH


New Suburbia Patriots house at the entry of the suburban cul-de-sac, watching over the neighborhood. The Patriot sits atop his home, ready to take aim at any intruders. The Rustic Outposts house takes over two lots, maximizing the amount of nature for hunting season. The lack of walls allows easy access for hunting and drying of meat.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 61


SELECTED ADDITIONAL WORKS

65

Socio-Spatial Map

77

Mission: I’mPOSSIBLE

Penn Museum

Networks of Ecosystems for Learning


SOCIO-SPATIAL MAP PENN MUSEUM LEGEND NEW ACQUISITION

VISITING RESEARCHER

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

VISITING SCHOLARS ADULT RESEARCHER

EXECUTIVE MARKETING DEPARTMENTS

DISPLAY ARTIFACVTS DORMANT ACTIVE

STUDENT RESEARCHER

RESEARCH STAFF

PENN STUDENTS OTHER STUDENTS

RESEARCHERS COLLECTIONS COORDINATORS VISITING SCHOLARS

STORAGE - ACTIVE LEISURE VISITORS

ACADEMIC STAFF

FAMILY GROUP SUMMER CAMP MEMBERSHIP VISITORS TRAVEL VISITORS

PROFESSORS LECTURERS

GREEK ARTIFACTS FOR CLASSICS CLASS

FACILITIES STAFF

STUDENT VISITORS

BUILDING MAINTENANCE HOUSEKEEPING

PENN STUDENTS OTHER STUDENTS

STORAGE - DORMANT

FINDINGS WORKER FLOW

LOWEST INCOME

G IN T E K R L T A N M ITA ME IG OP S D EL N

S S L OP A T G N IN E R LD Y I IT U B UR C OR E S IT N A J

V

E

Income ($) 2017

IO

IT

IB TY H I R U R C E TO I N A

D

Total

J

Resource Transfers

2,066,801 Income ($) 2017

University Subvention (Programmatic & Allocated Costs) Total Sponsored Program Revenue Resource Transfers

9,449,000

H

C

R

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S

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H TY C R RI U R C E TO I N

C

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A

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R

E

S

N

O

M E G D A IN G C N N E A R A IC E L EM Y D IT A C R A U R C E TO S I N A J

Investment Income Sponsored Program Revenue

24,357,934

677,313 2,066,801

Gift Income University Subvention (Programmatic & Allocated Costs)

S

IC

24,357,934

INCOME MONEY

X

E

S

The spaces that receives the lowest income are mostly the spaces for exhibitions, events and communications

INCOME MONEY

7,345,939 9,449,000 677,313

$4,818,880

Gift Income

7,345,939

EXPENSES MONEY

Investment Income Expenses ($) 2017 $4,818,880 Total Library Charges Professional Services Total Research & Development Library Services Charges University Professional Services Communications & Computing & Development Building OperationsResearch & Facilities Maintenance

EXPENSES MONEY

24,101,832

779,000 Expenses ($) 2017 2,579,596 1,355,000 779,000 1,428,000

2,579,596 658,603 1,355,0004,605,735

University Services Traveling Exh. & Entertainment

1,428,000 664,687

Communications & Computing

658,603

24,101,832

HIGHEST INCOME SPACES

The spaces that receives the highest income are from building operations and facilities maintenance


65 SOCIAL SPATIAL MAPPING Penn Museum, University of Pennsylvania Autumn 2018 - Eduardo Rega Collective Rega ARCH 501 Studio Research Publication forthcoming ABSTRACT The map analyzes relationships between social interactions and physical spaces by means of circulation. The map showcases representative spaces within the museum, each as an axonometric drawing, ranging from the most public (left) to the most private, and secluded (right). All levels of employees (ranging from the president, to the student workers) are mapped and overlayed with the flows of money (from the university to salaries to exhibitions) and the processes and spaces that artifacts from the collection go through. Axonometric drawings and notations depict both material conditions and immaterial processes that contribute to defining the functioning of the PennMuseum: Material conditions can be split in three types: (1) the spaces in which objects are typically housed (2) the spaces typically inhabited by workers and (3) the spaces for visitors. Immaterial processes can also be structured in three types that relate to the material conditions: (1) the movement of objects from their place of origin to the museum’s storage, restoration and exhibition, (2) the movements, interactions and hierarchical relations between workers in the building and (3) the types of visitors, their demographics and their flows through the PennMuseum. Each of these material and immaterial aspects is intersected by the flow of capital. Through this map, flows and overlaps highlight the existing structure of the PennMuseum.


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JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 69


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JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 73


WORKER FLOW

LOWEST INCOME

G IN T E K R L T A N M ITA ME IG OP S D EL N

S S L OP A T G N IN E R LD Y T I U RI B U C OR E S IT N A J

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University Subvention (Programmatic & Allocated Costs) Total Sponsored Program Revenue Resource Transfers

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Gift Income University Subvention (Programmatic & Allocated Costs)

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INCOME MONEY

7,345,939 9,449,000 $4,818,880

677,313

Gift Income

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EXPENSES MONEY

Investment Income Expenses ($) 2017 $4,818,880 Total Library Charges Professional Services Total Research & Development Library Services Charges University Professional Services Communications & Computing & Development Building OperationsResearch & Facilities Maintenance

779,000 Expenses ($) 2017 2,579,596

HIGHEST INCOME SPACES

The spaces that receives the highest income are from building operations and facilities maintenance

24,101,832

1,355,000 779,000 1,428,000 2,579,596 658,603 1,355,0004,605,735

University Services Traveling Exh. & Entertainment

1,428,000 664,687

Communications & Computing

658,603

Building Operations & Facilities Maintenance Traveling Exh. & Entertainment

24,101,832

EXPENSES MONEY

4,605,735 664,687

Museum staff movement is primarily destinationbased and siloed based on work function.

VISITOR FLOW FREQUENCY OF EVENT TAKEN PLACE

DURATION OF EVENT’S

FLEXIBILITY AND CONVENIENCE OF EXHIBITION AREA

Duration (Hrs)

General Student Event’s

+/- 1 hr

University of Pennsylvania Student Event’s

+/- 2 hrs

Children & Family Event’s

+/- 5 hrs

Adult Event’s

+/- 2 hrs

CIRCLE

RECTANGLE

DIFFERENT KINDS OF LAYOUTS FOR EVENTS COST OF EVENT’S Min. Total Cost ($) 2018 Regular General Student Event’s

Wedding

min. $229

University of Pennsylvania Student Event’s *

EXHIBITION GALLERY TENDS TO BE A BETTER PLACE TO HOLD EVENTS RATHER THAN TO EXHIBIT .

free

Children & Family Event’s

min. $760

Adult Event’s

Celebration

min. $291

Lecture

Excluding Internship Cost *

ARTIFACT FLOW 10%

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74 | ACADEMIC + RESEARCH

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11

1. Egypt 2. China & Japan 3. Cultures in the Crossfire 4. Canaan & Israel 5. Rome 6. Greece & Etruscan Italy 7. Africa and Mexico & Central America 8. Native American Voices 9. Middle East Galleries 10. Special Exhibitions 11. Egypt (Sphinx)


China & Japan Gallery The existing gallery has a number of physical constraints that do not allow for efficient use of the space. The height of the exhibit creates loud reverberations and poor sound quality. The circular space is not conducive to the nature of exhibiting the collection for the gallery.

INFLEXIBLE OBJECT PLACEMENT

PLAN

TRIPPLE HEIGHT SPACE

NO CLIMATE/SOUND CONTROL

Additionally, the lack of air conditioning and environmental tempering in turn, destroys the artifacts inside the gallery. The space actually is more suited to large event spaces and good for hosting addtional possibilities for rental revenue.

T

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GALLERY

EVENTS

Courtyard The courtyard is one of the most public spaces in the museum. Besides being a natural transition from the sidewalk into the realm of the museum, the courtyard can be transformed into various event spaces. During the summer months, summer nights at the museum are curated. It occupies the entire courtyard. Concerts are often hosted in the courtyard as well. However, in the concert setting, the two corners of the courtyard close to the museum are utilized as small stages, while audiences sit on the lawn. 1

8

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SUMMER NIGHT

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CONCERTS

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 75


?

EDUCATION PROJECT

?

INQUIRY PROJECT

Jesuit University of East Africa KENYA Nairobi

?

EDUCATION PROJE

?

INQUIRY PROJECT

?

BIQ QUESTION PROJECT


ECT

77 MISSION: I’MPOSSIBLE

(NETWORKS)networks INSPIRING ECOSYSTEMS OF LEARNING Autumn 2015-Spring 2016 - Ann Pendleton-Jullian The Future of the University as a Design Problem in collaboration with Sarah Clapper ABSTRACT What is the future of education? With a rapidly changing world, how are we to teach for a world which has not been invented yet? The current educational system at the university scale only encompasses the world of the present, not the world of the future. Without a formal way to teach resilience, students learn and engage each other through various technologies and social media sources; proving successful methodologies of learning: that of homo ludens, learn through play. The proposal of an educational model is taken through the lense of the Jesuit University of East Africa. A radical approach to education is employed. The university will be focused around Dynamic Attractors; unanswered questions about the world we live (and will live) in and the role they play. Supplementing these focii, include various scales of projects which faculty and students work together through. These projects are studio-based curricula, that have varying degrees of completion and time frame. Projects can range from 2 weeks in length, or up to years. The projects have varying goals: Educational, Inquiry, and Big Questions. Educational projects are meant to teach skill or knowledge. Inquiry is used as investigation. Big Questions channel the Dynamic Attractors, challenging the notions of the world. The university places a strong emphasis in physical location. With an increasing world population and more digital content, a space devoted to education and learning creates a more lasting educational experience. One of the key components to this education model is the First Year Discovery Program. This year-long intensive program challenges students to engage in all aspects of the university and struggle through the collegiate transition. From here, students may enter and exit the university as they need, with a supplemental education through digital content. The university is a concrete location, but simultaneously digital. With an increasingly digital and connected world, the education we teach needs to emphasize adaptability and resilience. The future of education has a global campus.


INPUT --- OUTPUT

STUDENTS

STUDENTS

ENTREPRENEURIAL SPRIRIT

AGENCY WITHIN CHANGING SOCIETY

WILLINGNESS TO LEARN

ABILITY TO LEAD CHANGE AMONGST COMMUNITY, REGION, GLOBE

OPEN TO BIG QUESTIONS FACULTY EXPERIENCE OPEN TO BIG QUESTIONS UNIVERSITY INFRASTRUCTURE TO TEACH AND ENGAGE PHYSICAL LOCATION TO PROMOTE LEARNING COMMUNAL SPACES

JESUIT UNIVERSITY OF EAST AFRICA

FACULTY BROADENING THE SCOPE OF SOCIETY CHALLENGING BIG QUESTIONS ENGAGING WITH THE WORLD UNIVERSITY ADAPTABILITY AND RESILIENCE ABILITY TO CHANGE PHYSICALLY TO A DEVELOPING WORLD

Through the university, students and faculty bring their own cultural identities, spirit, and willingness to learn new ideas. The pedagogical model aims to output every aspect of learning through the lense of the resilience and having agency within changing society. STUDENT PATHWAYS DIGITAL CONTENT GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSES ON CAMPUS SMALL SCALE MISSION PROJECT

LARGE SCALE MISSION PROJECT

This student began their education by taking mostly general education courses and supplemented classes with small scale Big Question projects. After developing an interest in these projects, they increased the scale and scope and devoted their learning to this topic.


FIRST YEAR DISCOVERY PROGRAM A Hero’s Journey

Faculty and University driven Awareness of Problem

Pursue education of chosen path

Acquisition of Knowledge and ready to tackle Body’s of Knowledge

Orientation Introduction “Choosing” a MISSION PROJECT

Wrestling with Big Question through “Bootcamp” experience Planning the future of one’s education

with Expert Help and Consultation

Reflection upon experience

Acquired knowledge and skills on Project

Seminars Culmination of Bootcamp and Discussion

Lectures

Conclusion of Project within Big Question

Small Portion Project Big Question Project

Real attainable aspect

AHA! Moment “Personal Epiphany”

A pinnacle entry experience at through the university is the First Year Discovery program, where all students combat ideas both mentally and physically. Through this process, the model curates the “personal epiphany” and frames individual educations. STUDENT PATHWAYS DIGITAL CONTENT GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSES ON CAMPUS SMALL SCALE MISSION PROJECT

LARGE SCALE MISSION PROJECT

This student was mainly interested in receiving the knowledge necessary to receive their degree. This student expressed little interest in Big Question projects and took a leave of absence during university to assist at the family farm. JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 79


PROFESSOR C

PROFESSOR A

INDEPENDENT STUDY

PRACTICE GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE

VERTICAL STUDIO VERTICAL STUDIO

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE SEMINAR CLASS

BIG QUESTION PROJECT

RESEARCH

COMMUNITY SERVICE

RESEARCH

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE

COMMUNITY SERVICE

INDEPENDENT STUDY

INDEPENDENT STUDY INDEPENDENT STUDY VERTICAL STUDIO

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE

SEMINAR CLASS

PRACTICE

RESEARCH

SEMINAR CLASS

PROFESSOR B

Co lle ge

BIG QUESTION:

Collegiate Interaction

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION DESIGN STUDIO

ng

of En gi ne er i

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 101: MECHANICS

College of Inte rnation al Pe ace

With faculty centering research around Big Questions projects that act as Dynamic Attractors, students will travel in and out of various classes and studios each professor devotes to learning.

PROFESSOR ODENIGBO

INTERNATIONAL PEACE 101: IS PEACE REAL?

INTERNATIONAL PEACE 330: SUSTAINING OUR FUTURE AS CITIZENS OF KENYA

PEACE AND US SEMINAR

RESEARCH: FUTURE OF GLOBAL RELATIONS AMONG CITIZENS

WHAT IS SUSTAINABILITY?

RESEARCH: GREEN TECHNOLOGIES FOR INFRASTRUCTURE

INTERNATIONAL PEACE 331: SUSTAINING OUR FUTURE AS GLOBAL CITIZENS

INDEPENDENT STUDY WITH STUDENT ON SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE

SERVICE TRIPS WITH STUDENTS VISITING THE INTERNATIONAL PEACE INSTITUTE

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SANCHEZ ANALYZING PEACE AMONG AFRICAN NATIONS

CIVIL ENGINEER PRACTICE

CIVIL ENGINEERING 210: ADVANCED WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR ENGINEERS

Co lleg eo

REMOTE INSTALLATIONS OF WELL SYSTEMS STUDIO

fW

il d lif

tion rva e C o nse

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 520: SUSTAINABLE LAND MANAGEMENT IN KILIMANJARO

RESEARCH: CLEAN WATER TREATMENT IN REMOTE LOCATIONS

TOPICS IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION: GLOBAL IMPACT OF WILDLIFE SEMINAR OUR NEED FOR CLEAN WATER THROUGHOUT MASS CLIMATE CHANGE SEMINAR

PROFESSOR JONES

RESEARCH: CONSERVATION OF THE NATIVE AFRICAN LARGE MAMMALS

VISITING SCHOLAR JOHN PEACOCK

At a larger scale, inter-disciplinary work and research among faculty members all key into the Dynamic Attractor attributions the university provides. Multiple colleges pull together to collaborate on large scale, non ending research; continually adapting to the ever changing world.


FACULTY PATHWAYS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SANCHEZ

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 101: MECHANICS

FUTURE RESEARCH: CONTINUES BASED ON BIG QUESTIONS TO COME...

RESEARCH: GREEN TECHNOLOGIES FOR INFRASTRUCTURE

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION DESIGN STUDIO

INDEPENDENT STUDY WITH STUDENT ON SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE

WHAT IS SUSTAINABILITY?

Geraldo Sanchez is a new professor at the university with his PhD in Civil Engineering. Sanchez is very interested in sustainable infrastructure, and leads studios and Big Question projects challenging sustainable design technologies in Africa.

FACULTY PATHWAYS PROFESSOR ODENIGBO

ANALYZING PEACE AMONG AFRICAN NATIONS

PEACE AND US SEMINAR

INTERNATIONAL PEACE 101: IS PEACE REAL?

SERVICE TRIPS WITH STUDENTS VISITING THE INTERNATIONAL PEACE INSTITUTE

RESEARCH: FUTURE OF GLOBAL RELATIONS AMONG CITIZENS

PAST RESEARCH: THE INTERRELATION BETWEEN PEACE STUDIES AND OTHER ACADEMIC BOIES OF KNOWLEDGE

FUTURE RESEARCH: CONTINUES BASED ON BIG QUESTIONS TO COME...

INTERNATIONAL PEACE 330: SUSTAINING OUR FUTURE AS CITIZENS OF KENYA INTERNATIONAL PEACE 331: SUSTAINING OUR FUTURE AS GLOBAL CITIZENS

WHAT IS SUSTAINABILITY?

Prof. Odenigbo has been at the university since its conception. He is very interested in Big Questions and Dynamic Attractors and his past research in Peace Studies Have led him to questions of Sustainability. He is interested in how we can create a sustaining ecosystem among all peoples.

JACKSON PORTFOLIO | 81


SELECTED PROFESSIONAL WORKS

85

Connected Community

95

Into the Garden

Madison Health Modernization

UPMC Hillman Cancer Center


October 2016

Planning and Pre-design

January 2017

Schematic Design

March 2017

October 2017

November 2017

January 2018

March 2018

Design Development Clinical + user-group investigations Clarifying systems

Construction Documentation Development of contract documents

Phase 1 - Power Plant Demolition of existing power plant and installtion of new plant in basement

Phase 2 - Core and Shell Construction of exterior once new plant is online to feed new construction

Phase 3 - Interior Fit Out Obstetrics Clinical Suite + Encology

Emergency + Surgery + Concourse

January 2019

Occupation All services open and available Complete site demolition/new work


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CONNECTED COMMUNITY Madison Health Renovation and Modernization 2016 - 2019 - Project Associate + Designer Trinity: Planning, Design, Architecture PROJECT INFORMATION

STATISTICS

Trinity collaborated with clinical staff to design the first phase of the master plan: a 37,500 sf expansion and modernization of an 8,000 SF specialty health center. Reorienting the front of the hospital along Park Avenue creates enhanced parking for patient and visitor friendly access, while a fresh and contemporary image at the main hospital expansion reflects and reinforces the hospital’s brand for excellent health care service.

Size:

The project includes a new 11,200 SF outpatient natural light filled public concourse linking the diagnostics department to an existing medical office building; a new 2-story, 26,000 SF annex at the front of the campus housing a modernized and expanded 13,400 SF emergency department on the first floor, a 5,500 SF cancer clinic with 7-public and 2-private infusion spaces on the second floor, plus a 5,200 SF obstetrics department modernization with best practice clinical design spa atmosphere and 300 SF of pre/post space.

Orthopedic | Clinics

Oncology

Surgery

Birthing Center

61,600 SF

Services: Medical Planning

Architecture

Interior Design

Program: Emergency


Connecting Concourse By turning the orientation of the hospital to Park Avenue, and re-aligning the extry sequence, the new concourse connects what was once four separate buildings, into one, cohesive building that is connected. New power plant located in the basement of the hospital, and connecting the existing medical office building, the new Madison Health Hospital opens up to the community.

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Nurse station sketch study

Nurse station sketch study

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Home Base Nurse stations in emergency become the new home base for the staff, hosting the carts and all equipment needed to staff the department.

Nurse station section

Nurse station section

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Integrated Infusion One of the key design drivers of the new oncology suite was the open infusion. Not only patients, but the providers and the staff valued the “small town� feel from their existing facility, being open and essentially being one giant room, when patients would converse openly, and roll their chairs nearby one another. This would drive the flexibility of the open infusion to provide this atmosphere for healing. 90 | PROFESSIONAL + COMPLETED WORKS


A Home for every last thing Learning from the clinical staff, a need prioritized was designing a specific location for all of the equipment associated with the infusion process in accordance to the latest FGI Guidelines and their best practices. Key to the implementation was extensive design meetings and charrettes with the staff at Madison Health and their partner, the Wexner Medical Center of Ohio State University.

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Reaching out to the Community The new addition and renovation seeks to capture more of the market share of patients that are travelling far distances to find care. With increasing the quality of the physical space and access to the community, the project reaches out to those markets not utilizing the services provided by the Madison Health system.

Service area market share

Service area populations

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INTO THE GARDEN University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hillman Cancer Center, Divine Providence Hospital 2018 - 2020 (anticipated) - Project Associate Trinity: Planning, Design, Architecture CONCEPTUAL SUMMARY

STATISTICS

The new Hillman Cancer Center is located at the Divine Providence Hospital in Williamsport, PA. Framing the end of the existing drive, this addition re-orients the front of the cancer care model toward the front face of the hospital, opposed to the rear facade, where it is buried beneath the grade in the basement of the hospital. Openning up this building, the north facing glazing allows for light to penetrate deeply in the building, while the “tower� portion connects toward the existing cancer care services.

Size:

Infusion Center

In addition to the new addtion and re-orientation, the project includes an extensive renovation to the existing cancer clinic and infusion spaces. Bringing an extension of the healing garden, up and around the building, pulls connection from the exterior to the interior. The scenic mountains are showcased as a picturesque escape.

Healing Garden

12,000 SF

Services: Medical Planning

Architecture

Interior Design

Program: Oncology


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Pulling the Garden within The transition between interior and exterior blends through the curtain wall as the garden is brought into the building. The relationship to nature is further emphasized through the mossy pit located at the bottom of the monumental staircase. Illuminated rocks tie in the garden in the double-heighted, open circulation.

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Surrouded by Nature Re-orienting the entrance into the cancer center toward the front of the hospital, the new Hillman Cancer Center stands above grade, welcoming patients into this light-filled addition. Even below grade, the garden dips into the lower level.

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EDUCATION

Master of Architecture, anticipated 2021 Certificate in Real Estate Design + Development University of Pennsylvania School of Design, Wharton School William Morris Mehlhorn Scholar B.S. in Architecture, magna cum laude, 2016 The Ohio State University, Knowlton School of Architecture Architecture Honors with Research Distinction

EXPERIENCE

Project Associate, Trinity: Planning, Design, Architecture Columbus, OH -- March 2016 - present Project architect and healthcare architecture designer. Organized architectural development of healthcare facilities, from planning and programming through construction administration. Developed conceptual and bid/permit sets adhering to healthcare guidelines and buildings codes. Project Architect for 4 renovation projects for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center community hospitals, additionally developing masterplanning and feasibility analysis. Architecture Aide, OHM Advisors Columbus, OH -- June 2015 - March 2016 Worked on projects focused in K-12 and hospitality design. Involved with the schematic design through design development for a hotel. Drafted construction documents, completed renderings, and worked with other designer professionals on a large scale, K-12 educational building and office renovation. Architecture Co-op, Tony Ravagnani Architects Columbus, OH -- May 2014 - August 2014 Worked on projects focused on amusement park design. Drafted schematic design and construction documents. Assisted with administrative tasks within office.

ACTIVITIES

PennDesign Student Council Graduate and Professional Student Assembly Representative Diversity Committee Student Representative Knowlton School of Architecture Ambassador, 2014-2016 Undergraduate Representative, 2013 - 2016

HONORS

Schenk-Woodman Design Competition, PennDesign Finalist: SymphoNEXUS | SP 2019 PennMuseum + PennDesign Selected for Exhibition: Antropofagia: Cultural Cannibal | AU 2018 James E. Gui ‘54 Design Competition, Ohio State University Honorable Mention, Finalist: [in]verse Courtyard | AU 2015


2020+

2019

UPMC Lock Haven 2018 UPMC Hillman Cancer Center

2017

Madison Health MedStar Timonium 2016

2015

Home2 Hotel

2014

Fury 325

beyond

Profile for Alex Jackson

Alexander Jackson Portfolio  

Selected academic and professional works

Alexander Jackson Portfolio  

Selected academic and professional works

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