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SLEEP SYSTEM

Designed by alexis victor 3


4 Photo from The Irish Medical Times


BACKGROUND STORY WHAT | This project addresses the user experience of night shift and irregular shift workers, and by extension those that have similar sleeping schedules- regardless of profession.

zzz...

WHO | Lucy is in residency at the Cleveland Clinic. She works long hours, sometimes 16 hours a day or night. When she’s not working she tries to catch up with her family and friends, but finds it difficult to coordinate schedules since she works long irregular hours.

WORK

FAMILY

FRIENDS

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SLEEP RESEARCH STAGES OF SLEEP | There is a lot we do not really know about sleep. However, we do know the body’s signals for different stages of sleep. Signals like eye movement, blood oxygen levels, and brain wave activity are recorded by polysomnographic technicians in sleep labs everyday.

NREM

non rapid eye movement

STAGE 1

STAGE 2

SLEEPINESS

LIGHT SLEEP

Slow eye movements

Eye movements cease

• •

• •

Muscle tone decreases Still aware of surroundings

FALLING SENSATION During this stage you may have experienced the sensation of falling or sudden muscle contractions. Theta waves

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Muscle tone decreases Heart rate and respiratory rate decrease Body temperature drops

PARTIALLY RESTORATIVE This stage in sleep results in feeling only partially restored upon awaking.


REM movement rapid eye

STAGE 3

STAGE 4

DEEP SLEEP

ACTIVE SLEEP

*Most restorative sleep

No eye movements

Rapid eye movements

• •

• •

• •

Muscle tone decreases further Heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure decrease Growth hormones are released Tissue growth & repair occurs

SOUND ASLEEP It’s very difficult to wake someone from this stage of sleep.

No muscle tone Heart rate and blood pressure increase Eyes dart back and forth, hence the name “rapid eye movement”

DREAMING This is the stage of sleep when dreams occur

Delta Waves

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SLEEP RESEARCH 2 PROCESSES REGULATE SLEEP | The first is homeostasis, and the second is the circadian process. These two sleep managers are also called “Process S” and “Process C”, respectively. PROCESS S | This means that the longer that you stay awake, the more sleep pressure you feel building up.

Busy day! I feel totally drained.

PROCESS C | Because of your biological clock, there are certain times of day when you’re likely to feel sleepy regardless of how much you’ve already slept. Afternoon siesta time?

ZZZ

ZZ

ZZ

ZZ Z

ZZ

ZZ

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SLEEP RESEARCH SLEEP DEBT | The concept of a sleep debt is more easily explained through a monetary metaphor. So, for this example sleep is money, and your brain is a loan shark.

PIGGY BANK IS LOW.

SO YOU BARROW SOME MONEY.

This is when you haven’t gotten enough sleep.

This is like drinking cafiene, or forcing yourself to stay awake.

$ $ YOU SPEND THE MONEY, BUT YOU STILL OWE THE SHARK. You get some sleep the next night, but don’t sleep any extra.

$ $ 10

$ ... AND HE DOESN’T FORGET!!! Research shows that your brain keeps track of your sleep debt for at least two weeks.

$ $


Sure, I’ll lend you some money.

I still want my money!!

YOU MAY HAVE A 30 HOUR SLEEP DEBT.

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USER RESEARCH SHIFT WORK | Almost 15 million Americans (or 5% of the population) work full time on evening shift, night shift, rotating shifts, or other employer arranged irregular schedules.

the US 5% of population

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USER RESEARCH NIGHT SHIFT: AREAS OF WORK 32% did not individually constitute a significant percent 3% installation, maintenance, & repair 4% building grounds cleaning & maintenance 4% arts, design, entertainment, & sports 4% food preparation & serving related 6% farming, fishing, & forestry 7% healthcare practitioner & technical 9% production 9% transportation & material moving 11% healthcare support 14% protective services

32%

}

didn’t individually constitute a significant percent

11% healthcare support 14% protective services

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INTERVIEWS FIELDS OF WORK | I began my research by interviewing 13 individuals from various fields of work. The interviews were conducted in-person with semi-structured format. A set list of questions was asked of each individual, however new topics emerged through conversation. Those interviewed were aged from 21-41; 6 were female and 7 were male.

Assembly

Utilities guy

Bar tender

Actor

Videographer Welder

Waitress Actor

PRODUCTION 16

Stock boy

Model

ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD SERVICE


ICU nurse practitioner

Police officer

Pediatric nurse

Military Cryptographer

Military nurse

Security guard

HEALTHCARE

PROTECTIVE SERVICE

I draw

STUDENT 17


INTERVIEWS NIGHT SHIFT WORKERS SLEEP LESS | Each interviewee is linked with the percent of the day they slept. For a variety of reasons, night shift workers get fewer hours of sleep than day workers.

ZZZZ...

PRODUCTION 18

ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD SERVICE


ak e

AVERAGE JOE GETS MORE SLEEP PER 24 HOUR PERIOD.

As

le

ep

Aw

And even I feel tired...

ZZZZ... ZZZZ...

HEALTHCARE

PROTECTIVE SERVICE

STUDENT 19


INTERVIEWS COMMON ISSUES | Common issues include: feeling rested, scheduling sleep, initiating sleep, remaining asleep, when to run errands, feeling out of sync with society, not seeing sunlight, low level of supervision during night shift, fewer staff members, using caffeine, coordinating schedules with friends, attending family events, flipping sleep schedule on days off, driving home from work.

I love my job and I have to be at my best. Transitions are worst. My heart is in my day job. But, I have to work nights to make a living.

My coworkers are my social circle

Breaks?! What breaks?

I don’t sleep....

PRODUCTION 20

ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD SERVICE


I have no choice! My schedule isolates me from the world. I want to be there for my kids. I miss the sun.

It’s difficult to eat well.

HEALTHCARE

I feel isolated.

I miss my family...

PROTECTIVE SERVICE

STUDENT 21


MEDICAL RESEARCH DOCUMENTED HEALTH ISSUES | In addition to interviews, I read recent medical research. I learned about sleep in general, and also researched Shift Worker’s Disorder (SWD).

Injury

Depression

Drug abuse

Difficulties in relationships Impaired memory Poor mental agility

Irritability

Alcohol abuse

Dejection Psycho-motor impairment

PSYCHOLOGICAL 22


Death

Job loss

Accidents on the job Accidents at home Compromised pregnancy Weakened health Insomnia Chronic sleepiness

Digestive troubles Stress

Cancer?

Disease?

Fatigue

PHYSICAL 23


RESEARCH SUMMARY

THE PROBLEM

THE ALTERING OF AN INDIVIDUAL’S SLEEP CYCLE CAN HARM THEIR PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING.

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HYPOTHESIS

A PRODUCT WHICH DECREASES THE BEHAVIORS AND PATTERNS THAT LEAD TO THESE NEGATIVE EFFECTS CAN IMPROVE AN INDIVIDUAL’S QUALITY OF LIFE

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CONCEPTS RANGE AND VARIETY | Four areas of concern were targeted: individual, home life, social life, and work conditions. Concepts ranged from solar powered blinds that simulate daylight to systems that reward healthy eating and social interaction at work. Other issues such as scheduling family and friend time, assuring safety while driving, and switching to a polyphasic sleep schedule were addressed also through concepts.

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DIRECTION SLEEP REGULATION | The combination of concepts that appealed most to potential users addressed an individual’s sleep-wake cycle at home as well as at work. In order to confront the problem statement most effectively, I narrowed my focus to the of regulation sleeping patterns.

EP

RING SLE

MONITO

INVOLVEMENT OF EMPLOYER

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SLEEP ENV

IRONMEN T

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REFINEMENT COLOR AND FORM | In order to monitor sleep and circadian shift progress, unobtrusive sleep mask and arm band monitors needed to be designed. Their form should reflect their night and day functions and the idea of rest and energy.

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Connect to turn on

Elastic band

Push to turn on

Size adjustment

Plush inside, silky outside

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REFINEMENT COMFORT AND EASE | I tested mock-ups to get a better idea of how the mask and arm band should be shaped and constructed for maximum comfort and ease. Different types of bands (in size and method of fit) were tested as well as different materials.

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REFINEMENT TESTED FORM | Based on the ergonomic testing, the form and materials were narrowed down to those illustrated on this page. Important features include a scooped out area in front of each eye, a three quater inch thick band and a simple, clean form.

Lights show countdown to sleep time

Connects on side for easy reach

Domed so that the material does not touch eye

Adjustable strap

Coordinated shape

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Domed eye area

Relaxing color

Location of electrodes

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3 PART SYSTEM SIMPLIFYING THE DATA | Information is gathered by monitoring the user is an unobtrusive way during the day and at night. The information is uploaded with Bluetooth to a website that interprets the data in an easy to understand way.

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SIZE AND FIT AWAKE BAND | Awake band fits nearly any hand size. It’s supported by a bistable steel spring band, allowing it to easily snap into a contoured curve. This snap also keeps the band centered on wrists of many sizes, which is important for its monitoring feature. Awake band is covered in durable silicone with three small buttons centered on its surface.

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SLEEP SHADE | Sleep Shade is an adjustable sleep mask that records data about your sleep. It’s covered in a soft, Lycra cover that can be removed for cleaning. Its form comes from molded Ariaprene, and it fits comfortably on a wide range of face shapes and sizes, while cover no more of the face than necessary. The inner side of the mask is scooped out so that the mask does not press down on the wearer’s eyes.

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AWAKE BAND MONITORING WAKEFULNESS | Many night shift workers have irregular sleeping schedules comprised of napping at various points throughout the day. By detecting an individual’s circadian rhythm, naps can be scheduled at the best times. Users can feel more rested and awake while at work, creating safer, more productive work environment.

Band is off

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TECHNOLOGY | Awake Band’s inner surface is lined with two monitors utilizing infrared to detect melatonin levels. It’s powered by a rechargeable flexible film battery.

Melatonin monitor

Nap notification

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MONITORING SLEEP AT HOME | In a clinical setting, doctors use polysomnograms to learn about a patient’s sleep. The routine of staying overnight in a sleep lab is often inconvenient and very expensive (around $1,500 per night). Sleep Shade gathers bio-signals though monitoring eye movement and blood oxygen levels at home.

Pulse Oximeter

Clip to turn on

Electrode

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GRADUAL LIGHT AND TONE | User is gradually introduced to low levels of light half an hour before they are scheduled to wake up. If they do not awake because of the light, an alarm tone will sound. The tone and light increase if the user does not awaken. The monitor can learn which level of light and sound will wake up the user.

Scoop Light

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DOCK & CHARGE INDUCTIVE CHARGE | The case’s cover easily slides off and attaches to the bottom, leaving the case open for use as a charging dock. The cord is kept tidy by a channel on the underside of the case and can be hidden for transport.

Cord unwinds

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Top slides off

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BIO-SIGNAL INTERPRETATION AT HOME | To upload the recorded biosignals to Circa Online, simply turn your device on, log in using a computer or smart phone, and turn on Bluetooth.

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INQUIRIES? COMMENTS? CONTACT ALEXIS VICTOR AT DESIGN@ALEXISVICTOR.COM

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/Circa_Victor  

http://www.alexisvictor.com/images/Circa_Victor.pdf

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