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ALEX BODKIN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2014


CURRICULUM VITAE

ALEX BODKIN I am a fourth-year student at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, and this is a collection of my work. I treat each project as an opportunity for in-depth research, which allows me to push my design responses beyond the brief and into unpredictable (and sometimes messy) territory. This mentality challenges me to dive headfirst into a wide range of unfamiliar topics that enrich my brain and my work, from hybrid landscapes to fabrication, Roman mythology to music composition, highly conceptual ideas to very practical skills. Currently, I’m interested in the cultural narratives/identities that are embedded within certain materials, planning strategies, and methods of construction, how digital applications/ infrastructures/entities now shape our cultural identities, and ultimately, how different cultures deal with these realms as they overlap and integrate.

EDUCATION 09/2009 - 08/2014

UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Cambridge, Ontario, Canada Candidate for Honours Bachelor of Architectural Studies, Co-op

09/2013 - 12/2013

Rome, Italy 4A Semester in University of Waterloo Rome Studio

AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, EXHIBITIONS 04/2014 10/2013 05/2013 04/2013 04/2013 11/2012 09/2009 - Present 05/2012 08/2010 08/2010 09/2009

Final Projects Review Exhibition 2014 for Ab Urbe Condita, University of Waterloo Ontario Professional Engineers Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship, University of Waterloo J.R. Coutts International Experience Scholarship, University of Waterloo 3B Outstanding Design Award, University of Waterloo Final Projects Review Exhibition 2013 for Greenland Industrial Ecology, University of Waterloo International Experience Scholarship, University of Waterloo Excellent Academic Standing, University of Waterloo Summer Works Government of Ontario Grant, Brothers Studio Dean’s Honour List, University of Waterloo 1B Outstanding Design Award, University of Waterloo President’s Scholarship (Admission average of 90% to 94.9%), University of Waterloo

RELEVANT SKILLS 3D 2D Other

Rhino, V-Ray, SketchUp. Currently Learning: Revit, Grasshopper AutoCAD, Vectorworks, Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign Physical Modelling, Laser Cutting, CNC Milling, MIG Welding / Metal Fabrication, Traditional Shop Tools, Microsoft Office Suite, Experience on Construction Site.

OTHER 2013

Founding member, web developer, designer, and contributor at BRIDGE Waterloo Architecture

2012

Active member and 3B Studio Representative at Waterloo Architecture Students Association (WASA)

2011

Co-Director of Music for 2B Cultural History Play, Ilion. Directed, composed, played, and recorded the soundtrack to Ilion with our ensemble.

2010

Designed the Guide to Life and Design in Cambridge with Stephanie Koltun, given to first year students for Orientation Week.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

PROJECTS

MJMA

01/2014 - 05/2014

Lakeshore MURF Guelph Mitchell Centre U of A Arena

Toronto, Ontario, Canada Student Architect

02/2013 - 08/2013

UNO TOMOAKI ARCHITECTURE OFFICE

Hoshino House Hitotsuyama House Kojima House

BROTHERS STUDIO

Furniture Design & Fabrication

Overall, I only had a positive impression of Alex. He really was an excellent intern. He was

Ottawa Arts Court Complex

KPMB ARCHITECTS Toronto, Ontario, Canada Architectural Intern

Various Project Graphics Awards Submissions

GLUCK+ (PETER GLUCK & PARTNERS) New York, NY Architectural Intern 宇野友明建築事務所 Uno Tomoaki Architecture Office

Alex Bodkin worked here as a co-op intern from the amiable, University of Waterloo in our for four honest, hardworking, and office curious. months, from January to April 2011. During that time his tasks varied from conceptual to specific. I have high expectations for his future as an architect. He worked on presentations using highly sophisticated graphic design ideas, elaborating on the ideas inherent in our buildings. He also developed initial programmatic and conceptual 宇野友明 Uno Tomoaki organizations for in-house publications that will be used as the basis for our future books. His skills are extraordinary. He is smart, talented, committed, engaging and a joy to be working with.

I would be happy to discuss his abilities at any time and can only recommend him highly.

464-0032 名古屋市千種区猫洞通1-13 TEL 052-783-1213 FAX 052-783-1265

We all felt a great sense of loss when he returned to school. But of course we hope he will return one day to build on his strong interest in pursuing design and construction in an integrated process.

Alexander Bodkin worked at my office as an intern from February 2013 until August 2013. His ability to adapt to the working environment in the office and his enthusiasm for learning new things were truly extraordinary. Although there was a huge language barrier, he tried to communicate with me and my staff in a positive manner. He could understand the Japanese-style design and construction drawings quickly and www.gluckpartners.com thoroughly. Above all, I noticed his extraordinary talent while working on the construction site and making physical models. He was rigorous, patient, and clever with his fingers. Overall, I only had a positive impression of Alex. He really was an excellent intern. He was amiable, honest, hardworking, and curious. I have high expectations for his future as an architect. 宇野友明 3 June 2011 Uno Tomoaki

To Whom It May Concern:

Alex Bodkin worked here as a co-op intern from the University of Waterloo in our office for four months, from January to April 2011. During that time his tasks varied from conceptual to specific. He worked on presentations using highly sophisticated graphic design ideas, elaborating on the ideas inherent in our buildings. He also developed initial programmatic and conceptual organizations for in-house publications that will be used as the basis for our future books. His skills are extraordinary. He is smart, talented, committed, engaging and a joy to be working with. We all felt a great sense of loss when he returned to school. But of course we hope he will return one day to build on his strong interest in pursuing design and construction in an integrated process.

Peter L. Gluck

464-0032 名古屋市千種区猫洞通1-13 TEL 052-783-1213 FAX 052-783-1265

宇野友明建築事務所 www.gluckpartners.com Uno Tomoaki Architecture Office

REFERENCES

London, Ontario, Canada Founder, Designer, Fabricator

To Whom It May Concern:

01/2011 - 04/2011

He could understand the Japanese-style design and construction drawings quickly and thoroughly. Above all, I noticed his extraordinary talent while working on the construction site and making physical models. He was rigorous, patient, and clever with his fingers.

09/2011 - 12/2011

3 June 2011

05/2012 - 11/2012

Alexander Bodkin worked at my office as an intern from February 2013 until August 2013. His ability to adapt to the working environment in the office and his enthusiasm for learning new things were truly extraordinary. Although there was a huge language barrier, he tried to communicate with me and my staff in a positive manner.

Nagoya, Japan Architectural Intern

I would be happy to discuss his abilities at any time and can only recommend him highly.

Peter L. Gluck


AB URBE CONDITA Museum of the Fora 4A Studio, Lorenzo Pignatti, Fall 2013 Project Partner: Miguel Sanchez Enkerlin

This museum focuses on the multiple histories associated with the founding of Rome, overlaying powerful mythological narratives with archaeological accounts in order to create a complex, rich, and layered reading of Rome’s history and Roman identity. Being a civic building, the museum’s form and scale respond to the diverse contextual conditions to frame a series of unique public spaces linked by a continuous ground plane. Objects chosen for the museum relate to one (or more) of the multiple histories of Rome, from iconic representations to artifacts, archaeological records and scientific studies. These objects are treated as fragments that can be (re) arranged to create new interwoven narratives. Important moments from the legend of Romulus and Remus are manifested as major elements of the internal architecture, allowing visitors to viscerally experience this potent myth while also organizing the galleries.

Key Terms: Context Public Realm Urban Armature Fragments Narrative Rome


BUILDING SKIN

+2 MUSEUM GALLERIES

+1 MUSEUM GALLERIES

STRUCTURAL SPINE CORE

C B

D

GROUND FLOOR FULLY PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AXES NEGOTIATED A. VIA FORI IMPERIALI B. BASILICA MAXENTIUS C. NEIGHBOURHOOD & COLOSSEUM D. CARDO DECUMANUS

A

5

2

3 4

1:500 MASSING MODEL

1

NEW PUBLIC SPACES 1. FORUM 2. PIAZZA 3. WETLAND 4. GARDEN 5. VIEWING PLATFORM


FRATRICIDE VOID

SECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY THE FRATRICIDE VOID IS A VIOLENT CUT THROUGH THE BUILDING. THICK CONCRETE WALLS RUN ALONG EITHER SIDE OF THE VOID, PROVIDING STRUCTURAL SUPPORT AS WELL AS CIRCULATION SPACE FOR THE REST OF THE MUSEUM. A SEQUENCE OF SECTIONS THROUGH THE BUILDING REVEAL THE FORM CONSTANTLY CHANGING AROUND THE FRATRICIDE VOID.


7

3

8

A

6 9

2 10 3 1 A

5

4

7

11 12

PLAN 0

SECTION A-A

1. CENTRAL ATRIUM / FRATRICIDE VOID 2. LOCAL GALLERY 3. LIBRARY & BOOK SHOP 4. CAFE

5. TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS / PARALLELS 6. NATURE AND TOPOGRAPHY / ORIGINS 7. FORUM 8. PIAZZA

9. WETLAND / THE SWOLLEN TIBER 10. GARDEN 11. NEW ENTRANCE TO THE ROMAN FORUM 12. NEW METRO STATION


1:500 MASSING MODEL

5 1

1

2

2

3 4 3

4

5

PLAN 1

1. NATURE AND TOPOGRAPHY 2. HISTORY AND MEMORY / CONFLICT 3. IMAGO HOMINIS / CHARACTERS 4. ROMAN MAN’S DUAL NATURE 5. CITY AND LANDSCAPE / FOUNDING RITES AND RITUALS

NATURE & TOPOGRAPHY / ORIGINS

PLAN 2

1. MODEL ROOM / FRAGMENTS OF THE PLAN 2. IMAGO HOMINIS / CHARACTERS 3. CARDO DECUMANUS ROOM 4. CITY AND LANDSCAPE / FOUNDING RITES AND RITUALS 5. RESEARCH


CITY & LANDSCAPE / CARDO DECUMANUS ROOM

MUSEUM FRAGMENTS

Certain artifacts sit in a grey zone. They are tools - still self-referential and functional but embedded with meaning and mystery.

DEIFICATION OF ROMULUS BELVEDERE TORSO

MARS

Therefore, the internal form of the museum and the individual galleries themselves are developed around architectural manifestations of the legend of Romulus and Remus, which are revealed as visitors move through the museum.

LUPERCAL STATUE ETRUSCAN MIRROR DEPICTING THE READING OF THE LIVER

AUGUR STATUE

RAPE OF THE SABINES

FOUND AT LAPIS NIGER

LIVER

READ BY A HARUSPEX DURING THE DIVINATION OF A NEW TOWN

LAPIS NIGER STONE ROMULUS’ GRAVE MARKER

FORMA URBIS FRAGMENTS

USED FOR ROME’S POMERIUM

GROMA

USED BY AGRIMENSOR TO ALIGN A NEW TOWN

EXCAVATION DOCUMENTATION OF LAPIS NIGER

CIPPI / BOUNDARY STONE

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

BASALT

ARCHAEOLOGICAL OBJECTS

Of the many stories associated with the founding of Rome, the legend of Romulus and Remus stands out as being particularly influential to the ancient Roman’s themselves while also leaving behind very few (if any) physical artifacts. This myth is potent, and it cannot be understood through objects alone. It must be understood corporeally, viscerally. It must be experienced.

FAUSTILUS DISCOVERS ROMULUS AND REMUS

HERCULES

GOD OF WAR, AGRICULTURE

Iconic objects are representations of events, scenarios, rites, rituals. They are paintings and sculptures - cultural creations that are able to give meaning and context to various other objects and stories. In the museum, all of these objects are treated as fragments that can be (re) arranged to give visitors a new reading of Rome’s history and Roman identity.

ICONIC OBJECTS

Archaeological and scientific objects come in the form of excavation records, geological studies, and cultural landscapes. They appear as raw facts. They are true because they exist, but they may not offer any explanations as to why they exist or what they mean.


GREENLAND INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY Project in Greenland 3B Studio, Lola Sheppard, Fall 2012 Project Partner: Samuel Ganton Exhibited in University of Waterloo Final Projects Review 2013 Awarded 3B Outstanding Studio Design

Greenland is facing an influx of international interest in exploiting its mineral and energy resources. The financial power and resource capability of multinational corporations far exceeds the abilities of the Greenlandic government. At the same time, outlying communities in the country are struggling with unemployment and declining populations. South Greenland presents a spatial juxtaposition between corporate resource exploitation and local efforts in agriculture, fishing, and sheep and reindeer farming. We present a catalogue of spatial typologies derived from overlaps between macro- and micro-scale industrial programmes. Our goal is to position local interests to take advantage of corporate capabilities.

Key Terms: Speculative Strategic Partnerships Local Interests + Corporate Capabilities Resource Extraction Agriculture Environmental Challenges


002 B

DIGESTIVE DAM

LEGEND

RESERVOIR PASTURE DIGESTIVE DAM AGRICULTURAL SPILLWAY

PRODUCTIVE REGION

RESERVOIR PASTURE

002 A 002 B 002 C

A NEW PRODUCTIVE HUB CENTRED AROUND A PLANNED HYDROELECTRIC DAM, WHICH SUPPORTS BOTH AGRICULTURAL AND INFRASTRUCTURAL OPERATIONS AS WELL AS THE PUBLIC REALM OF A NEW COMMUNITY.

PROPOSED PROJECT COMPONENTS EXISTING PROJECT COMPONENTS

002

PRODUCTIVE REGION

002 A

COMPLETION DATE: 2020 - 2040 STAKEHOLDERS: MINING INDUSTRY, LOCAL TOWNS, THE COOPERATIVE SHEEP FARMERS’ ASSOICATION, UPERNAVIARSUK AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL, MINISTRY OF INFRASTRUCTURE, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION GROUPS, GREENLAND NATIONAL ENERGY COMPANY

TOWNS EXISTING FARMS EXISTING ROADS, UNPAVED

HYDROELECTRIC DAM POWER IS GENERATED BY DIRECTING WATER THROUGH TURBINES.

PLANNED ROADS, PAVED

RESERVOIR WATER IS STORED BEHIND THE DAM. THE WATER LEVEL CAN FLUCTUATE BY 2.5M.

LICENSED MINING EXPLORATION AGRICULTURAL SPILLWAY

LICENSED OIL EXPLORATION

SPILLWAY EXCESS WATER IN RESERVOIR MUST BE RELEASED TO AVOID FLOODING.

002 C

AGRICULTURE TERRACED LANDSCAPE PROVIDES FRAMEWORK FOR NEW PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPE SHEEP FARMING SHEEP ARE PASTURIZED, FED, SLAUGHTERED, AND SHIPPED FROM THE REGION

REINDEER FARM HERDING

IRRIGATION A DISTRIBUTED SPILLWAY NETWORK USES EXCESS WATER FOR IRRIGATION SILT SOIL HIGH QUALITY SOIL FROM DREDGED MATERIAL AND ALGAE FERTILIZER AGGREGATE PRODUCTION QUIET 24H ACCESS FOR WORKERS, SKIIERS, BLASTED ROCK, AND PROCESSED ORE

003

SKI MINE

SKI MINE

OPERATIONS PORT

001

IGALIKU POP. 55

HERD MONITORING 004

003

A GESTURE OF GOOD FAITH BETWEEN INDUSTRY AND LOCAL POPULATION, THESE NEW SKI HILLS SCULPTED BY MINE MACHINERY ARE SERVICED BY A QUIET, SELF-POWERED CABLE CAR COMPLETION DATE: 2020 STAKEHOLDERS: GREENLAND MINERALS AND ENERGY, NARSAQ, LOCAL PEOPLE MINE GREENLAND MINERALS AND ENERGY IS DEVELOPING AN OPEN PIT REE MINE

NARSAQ POP. 1613

TERRACE BLASTING OPEN PIT MINES EXTRACT MINERALS THROUGH BLASTING OF TERRACES HEAVY MACHINERY MACHINES CAN DO DOUBLE DUTY, WORKING FOR BOTH INDUSTRY AND LOCALS SKI RESORT LEISURE ACTIVITIES FOR MIGRANT WORKERS AND LOCALS CABLE CAR QUIET 24H ACCESS FOR WORKERS, SKIIERS, BLASTED ROCK, AND PROCESSED ORE

HERD MONITORING

004

REINDEER FARM HERDS FITTED WITH SENSORS AND RFID TAGS GATHER ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AS THEY MOVE ACROSS THE LANDSCAPE, STOPPING AT DATA UPLOAD FIELD STATIONS

QAQORTOQ POP. 3230

COMPLETION DATE: 2016 STAKEHOLDERS: MINING INDUSTRY, UNIVERSITY, ISORTOQ REINDEER STATION, REINDEER FARM HERD MOVE ACROSS LANDSCAPE AS SEASONS CHANGE TO ACCESS FOOD FIELD STATION UPLOAD ENVIRONMENTAL DATA, BUILT USING EX-MINING EXPLORATION CAMPS

EQALUGAARSUIT POP. 144

MONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF NEW INDUSTRIAL OPERATIONS ARE STUDIED

AMMASSIVIK POP. 74

HERD WAYFINDING MEASURE WATER QUALITY FOR OIL SPILLS, WARN OPERATIONS CENTRE

SAARLOQ POP. 44

SEAWEED RIG

005

EXTRA PARTS FROM OIL RIGS ARE USED TO CREATE SEAWEED RIGS, WHICH PROVIDE A NEW SOURCE OF INCOME & ACT AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND WAYFINDING NETWORK.

ALLUITSUP PAA POP. 303

SEAWEED RIG

005

COMPLETION DATE: 2025 STAKEHOLDERS: POLAROIL, LOCAL WORKERS, FARMERS, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION GROUPS SHIFT LABOUR BOATS BRING WORKERS TO OIL RIG FOR ONE WEEK ON, ONE WEEK OFF OIL RIG DRILLING PLATFORM WITH MODULAR BUILDING COMPONENTS WAYFINDING BEACONS FOR TRAVEL DURING LONG ARCTIC WINTER NIGHTS MONITORING MEASURE WATER QUALITY FOR OIL SPILLS, WARN OPERATIONS CENTRE SEAWEED HARVESTING SEAWEED AND AQUACULTURE FOR MARKET SALE AND PRODUCTION OF FERTILIZER

OPERATIONS PORT

001

MANAGEMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURAL OPERATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE COMPLETION DATE: 2016 STAKEHOLDERS: GREENLAND MINERALS AND ENERGY, NARSAQ, MINISTRY OF INFRASTRUCTURE

NANORTALIK POP. 1448

PORT BUILT FOR GREENLAND MINERALS AND ENERGY AND THEIR REE MINE AT NARSAQ CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE STORAGE OVERBURDEN + BLASTED ROCK FROM MINE USED TO CREATE NEW ROAD NETWORKS HEAVY MACHINERY SHARING MACHINERY FOR LANDSCAPE TRANSFORMATIONS STORED AND MANAGED HERE OPERATIONS MEASURE WATER QUALITY FOR OIL SPILLS, WARN OPERATIONS CENTRE EMERGENCY RESPONSE COORDINATION OF EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTERS


PRODUCTIVE REGION

LEGEND SHEEP MOVEMENT

The Productive Region includes the Reservoir Pasture, the Digestive Dam, and the Agricultural Spillway.

WETLAND

The Digestive Dam is a fulcrum between the Reservoir Pasture and the Agricultural Spillway. It primarily functions as an instrument for the translation of energy - from water to electricity.

SILT BUILDUP PASTURE

We propose to concentrate other transformative processes at this point to service local industries such as sheep farming, agriculture, and construction while also taking advantage of by-products of the reservoir and the dam, such as silt and spillway water.

AGRICULTURAL STRATEGIES

SHEEP TO SLAUGHT IN FALL

TERRACE + RAMP

DISTRIBUTED SPILLWAY IRRIGATION

EXTENDABLE FARM

Terraces are blasted to provide necessary construction material for Dam. Terraces enhance soil quality and irrigation efficiency. Ramp systems are integrated in to the terraces, providing access to two farm properties and allowing for continuous planting

Overflow water from the dam reservoir is distributed through pipelines to a network of irrigation cisterns across terraces. They provide a reliable source of water for the farms.

Farm buildings are organized in a linear fashion along the major road. Two farming families use this site. Shared, core functions are near the middle. As buildings move further from the middle, they become more specialized to each specific farm’s focus.

PASSIVE CULTIVATION STRATEGIES

ALGAE HARVEST STATION

DREDGE EDGE

MELTWATER CISTERN STATION

Freshwater algae harvested from Dam Reservoir. Processed and used for fertilizer.

Blasted rock placed in a ring around edge of reservoir collects silt for soil and creates a wetland edge condition

Collects meltwater for pasturized sheep to drink in the Spring and Summer. Also provides shade in long Summer days as well as salt. SHEEP TO BARN IN WINTER


TER

BUILDING STRATEGIES

SHEEP IN PASTURE FOR SPRING AND SUMMER

STRIP BUILDINGS

SECTIONAL ADVANTAGE

PORTAL FRAME

The terraces provide an organizational framework for the buildings, regulating the plan width but creating various unique sections. Linear processes step down the section and relate laterally to other programs.

Buildings take advantage of the sloping topography wherever possible.

Portal frames allow for easy, modular construction. The wrapped wall and roof also allow for easy, modular construction and a consistent, high R-value mass.

TYPICAL GREENLANDIC FARM

TYPICAL HYDROELECTRIC DAM

SECTION OF DAM

SECTION OF DAM, GENERATION STATION

SECTION OF FARM

Dashed lines show harsh reservoir edge condition caused by steep slope and volatile water levels.

Silt buildup damages turbines and leads to costly replacements. The reservoir must be dredged regularly.

Farms are located where fertile land is available, usually far from any town or settlement. Everything is brought in by boat, including 90% of all the sheep fodder. Strong winds off of the glacier create a harsh climate for farming. Weather is increasingly erratic, creating demand for irrigation systems.


DIGESTIVE DAM The building uses the structure and shape of the dam to augment operations involving aggregate, silt, algae, vehicles, sheep, agricultural products, and environmental monitoring. It forms the connective tissue for the convergence of local production with processing, trade, and distribution. PHASE 4 - COMMUNITY PROGRAMME 1 SCHOOL + CHAPEL PHASE 4LOCAL - COMMUNITY PROGRAMME 2

1

3

24

WORKSHOPS

LOCAL SCHOOL + CHAPEL ADMINISTRATION

WORKSHOPS SHARED PARKING

35

ADMINISTRATION SUPPLY STORE

46

WATER MONITORING SHARED PARKING FACILITY

57

AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY STOREEXTENSION CLASSROOMS

68

LABORATORY BELOW FACILITY WATER MONITORING

9

7

10

3

6

2

3

2

8

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION CLASSROOMS

9

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION LECTURE HALL

10

FIELD LEARNING CENTRE

7

5

9

1

FIELD LEARNING CENTRE

LABORATORY BELOW

6

4

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION LECTURE HALL

8

7

5

4 8 10

1

9

10

PHASE33 -- HYDRO HYDRO ++AGRICULTURAL SUPPORT PHASE AGRICULTURAL SUPPORT 1

1

2

2

3

3 4

4 5

56

SHEEP SHEARING

SHEEP SHEARING SHARED LIVESTOCK YARD

SHARED LIVESTOCK YARD SLAUGHTERHOUSE

SLAUGHTERHOUSE

WATER PURIFICATION

1

WATER PURIFICATION

1

WASTEWATER TREATMENT

WASTEWATER GRAIN ELEVATORTREATMENT / PROCESSING

67

GRAIN ELEVATOR / PROCESSING PARKING

78

WATER INTAKE / PENSTOCKS PARKING

4

3 2

4

3

5

2

9

8

10

9

11

5 7

6

HELICOPTER LANDING

8

WATER INTAKE / PENSTOCKS TURBINE HALL

6

HELICOPTER LANDING

7

9

8

STEP-UP TRANSFORMER

10

TURBINE HALL

11

STEP-UP TRANSFORMER

9

10 11

10 11

PHASE 2 - AGRICULTURAL PREPARATION 1

DREDGE UNLOADING

2

DE-WATERING

PHASE 2 - AGRICULTURAL PREPARATION 1

3 MATURATION DREDGE UNLOADING

2

DE-WATERING

3

MATURATION

4a

BIOREMEDIATION (SEE PHASE 1 IMAGE)

5

SOIL STORAGE

4a

BIOREMEDIATION (SEE PHASE 1 IMAGE)

5

SOIL STORAGE

6

TRUCK LOADING AND DISTRIBUTION

1

1 2

3

2

3

5

6

TRUCK LOADING AND DISTRIBUTION 6

5

6

PHASE 1 - DAM CONSTRUCTION PHASE 1 - DAM CONSTRUCTION 1

1

2

2

3

3

TRUCK UNLOADING

TRUCK UNLOADING

BLASTED ROCK STORAGE

BLASTED ROCK STORAGE

PRIMARY CRUSHER

44

SECONDARY CRUSHER SECONDARY CRUSHER

55

TERTIARY TERTIARYCRUSHER CRUSHER

66

PROCESSED AGGREGATE STORAGE PROCESSED AGGREGATE STORAGE

7

7

2

2

PRIMARY CRUSHER

1

1

4a

4a

3

4

WEIGH-STATION

3

4

WEIGH-STATION

5

5

6

7

6

7


WHERE THE AGRICULTURAL SPILLWAY MEETS THE DIGESTIVE DAM

STUDY MODELS


UNO TOMOAKI ARCHITECTURE OFFICE Architectural Intern Nagoya, Japan February - August, 2013

Uno Tomoaki Architecture Office is a five-person architecture and construction management firm in Nagoya, Japan focused primarily on residential projects. I worked with the team on tasks ranging from drafting and model building to construction management and component fabrication, on a total of five residences. Working 80 hours per week allowed me to spend a considerable amount of time both on the job site and in the office. This lead to an intimate understanding of many of our projects and their respective construction processes.

Key Terms: Cultural Investigations Model Making Construction Material Knowledge


1:20 MODEL, HOSHINO HOUSE


1:20 MODEL, KOJIMA HOUSE


隣地間知擁壁

隣地建物 2階建

8.0

7.0

6.0

5.0

4.0

3.0

2.0

1.0

0.5

手摺 隣地建物なし 7.0

U

A

A'

A

A' 6.0

道路

線 4号 山第道路 一ツ 1号 線 市道条1項 中心 42

D

5.0

4.0

3.0

2.0

1.0

0.5

側溝

隣地建物 2階建

側溝

隣地建物 3階建

カーブミラー ガードレール

2F平面図

A-A' 断面図

西 立面図

1F平面図

北 立面図

\MODEL OF THE KOJIMA HOUSE, A STEEL RESIDENCE COMPLETED IN JULY 2013. I TRANSLATED CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS INTO DRAWINGS SCALED TO STANDARD WOOD SIZES, DESIGNED MODEL-SPECIFIC DETAILS, AND BUILT THE MODEL. ABOVE, LEFT: SIMPLIFIED VERSION OF A DRAWING SET AND STUDY MODEL CREATED FOR THE HITOTSUYAMA HOUSE FROM UNOSAN’S SKETCHES AND SITE SURVEY DATA. THIS MODEL WAS CRUCIAL FOR DESIGN DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURAL PROBLEMSOLVING, AND OVERALL PROJECT EXPLANATION. STUDY MODEL

HITOTSUYAMA HOUSE


BROTHERS STUDIO Co-Founder, Designer, Fabricator London, Canada May - November, 2012

Brothers Studio was a small, temporary design and fabrication firm that I co-founded with Mackenzie Ludlow in order to better understand materials, fabrication methods, client relationships, design implications, and the inner workings of a functioning small business. We operated for 7 months before closing down shop to focus on school and work. I was responsible for all aspects of the business, including design, fabrication, marketing, finances, and administration. We were accepted in to the University of Waterloo’s Enterprise Co-Op program, which “offers inspired, innovative, entrepreneurial uWaterloo students an amazing way to start their own business”. We also received a $3000 grant from the Ontario government through their Summer Works program to help with startup costs.

Key Terms: Entrepreneurship Self-Initiated Learning


TOP LEFT: DESK, WITH ASH SURFACE, STEEL STRUCTURE, HAND STITCHED LEATHER TROUGH, AND REMOVABLE LEAF ABOVE: TABLES, WITH MAPLE FROM A MAPLE SYRUP FARM AND SPIGOT HOLES (PRODUCED BY TAPPING THE TREE) FILLED WITH PEWTER. END TABLES HAVE HAND STITCHED LEATHER SHELF.


THANK YOU WWW.ALEXBODKIN.COM ABODKIN@GMAIL.COM


Alex Bodkin Architecture Portfolio 2014 (old)