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alexandra boese

landscape architecture portfolio


oogle.com/drive/my-drive

ALEXANDRA BOESE skills software

MLA candidate

Perspective Rendering, Graphic Layout, Progect Management, Planting, Landscape Maintenance, Management, Training, Research, Record Keeping, Coursework in Upland and Wetland Restoration, including seed mix design and ecological restoration planning Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop AutoCAD, Microsoft Word, Excel, Rhino, ArcGIS, Zotero

education

Second year candidate, U of M Masters of Landscape Architecture BA Studio Art, Hamline University

volunteer

The Buzz, Students for Design Activism, Wildlife Rehabilitation, Girl Scouts River Valleys, Destination Imagination coach, JJ Hill Running Club coach

experience

Research Assistant / Professor Kristine Miller December 2017-present Collect and analyze data, Attend community meetings, Find and manage citations, Assist with research as needed

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Teaching Assistant / Professor Karen Lutskey September 2017- December 2017 Assisted with classroom instruction, grading, record keeping and other miscellaneous projects, Tutored students Phillips Gardens / Gardener May 2017- August 2017 Planted and maintained gardens, developed knowledge of Midwestern plants, native plant species, and micro climates in planting design, developed outreach materials Cafe Latte / Pastry Department Manager March 2005- September 2016 Managed pastry department production, maintained spreadsheets and schedules, planned and executed heavy production days and holidays, hired and trained new employees, predicted monthly production by synthesizing sales data

contact

email boese044@umn.edu

phone 612-272-5865

address 1351 Sherburne Ave Saint Paul, MN 55104


Diagramming Ecology: blue karner butterfly life-cycle........................................................... 1

Alluvial Energy Garden: black dog generating plant burnsville, mn ............................ 3

Sediment and Steel................................................................................................................ 5-7

Atlas Cement Site Restoration...................................................................................... 9-10


Blue Karner Butterfly Habitat:

Diagramming Deep Ecology

Karner Blue Butterfly Range and Habitat Remaining Karner Blue Range

Wildfires maintain open prairie spaces for Lupinus perennis and other prairie plants

Wild Lupine recovers quickly from fire due to it’s deep root system

Some species of ants protect Karner Blue larva from predation in exchange for a sweet secretion the larva produces

Lupinnus perennis, is the sole food source for Karner Blue larva

Adult Karner Blues feed on the nectar of a variety of prairie flowers including Dotted Liatrus and Yellow Cone flower

Karner Blue eggs overwinter in leaf litter near Lupine plants, snow cover is very important to their survival

Ali Boese

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Alluvial Energy Garden:

Black Dog Generating Plant Burnsville, Minnesota Water leaves the cooling system of Excel’s Black Dog Generating plant an alowable 13 degrees warmer than the temperature of Black Dog Lake. Temperatures even two degrees warmer have been shown to have a detrimental effect on aquatic organisms. The Alluvial Energy Garden is designed to cool water leaving the plant’s cooling pond through passive shadiing, spreading and convection methods. In addition, it will create a unique experience for visitors to engage with a micro-climate created by warm water flowing through the passive cooling system. Riverbank grapes, native to the riparian corridor of the Minnesota river, will shade and cool the garden in the summer months when the need is greatest.

Alluvial Energy Garden: summer view

Flow Direction

Water Temperature Gradient

Black Dog Lake Context, Burnsville MN

Minnesota river, Excel cooling ponds, Black Dog Lake

Plan veiw, summer

Water movement, Water temperature index

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Sediment and Steel:

US Steel Superfund site

Duluth Minnesota

GROUP: Yan Sun, Weican Zuo, Isaac Tapp, Ali Boese

Urban yet Not-Urban, Industrial memory is almost the only infrastructure left of US Steel’s Duluth plant. Heavily impacted by years of industrial processes, the creek bed and delta contain 1.3 million cubic yards of sediment with high levels of PAH’s and other contaminants. Previous remediation plans called for capping contaminants on site, including sub-aqueous capping. As an alternative to capping PAH contaminated soils; this proposal would use fungal mycelium to clean contaminated sediment. Phasing to allow for the optimal conditions for PAH degredation creates a green recreational corridor along the formerly degraded US Steel creek.

Mycoremediation process, sediment and inoculated material layering (Ali Boese)

Site Plan and Material flow, US Steel Creek (Yan Sun, Isaac Tapp, Ali Boese)

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Sediment and Steel:

US Steel Superfund site

Duluth Minnesota

GROUP: Yan Sun, Weican Zuo, Isaac Tapp, Ali Boese

Plan: Yan Sun

Landform rebuilding process: remediated soils returning to site

Erosion control lake section with trails

Overlook from Morgan Park and trail on US Steel side

Sheltered bay: reconstucted wetland Landscape intervention sections: Ali Boese

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Sediment and Steel:

US Steel Superfund site

Duluth Minnesota

GROUP: Yan Sun, Weican Zuo, Isaac Tapp, Ali Boese Sediment layering

Trail grate assembly

De-watering pad

PAH breakdown chemical breakdown

Sediment trap mushroom

Constructed wetland

1/4”braided steel railing

Overflow collection

fruiting body

4” shredded wood mulch

4x: 6” x 1/2” galvanized anchors

gravel bed impermeable liner sediment settling and collection area

hand rail welded to base plate assembly grating welded to 2”x 1/4” steel crossrib 4’ on center

innoculated burlap mycelium “roots”

galvanized washers and insulating gaskets contaminated sediment 2’ maximum depth

flow

impermeable liner

collected water reused for mycelium irrigation

sedges, rushes and cattails

chemical breakdown Poly Aromatic Hydrocarbons

gravel

Ore Wall Trail

Wetland Trapping De-watering Runoff

Geotube De-watering

DE-WATERING AREA

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

•Dredged sediment pumped to Geotubes •Polymer flocculates prevent most contaminates from flowing out into wetland

MYCOREMEDIATION AREA

• Mycelium managed for ideal shade and moisture conditions •Careful monitoring of PAH and other contaminates at regular intervals

•Collects and retains water from Geotubes •Pretreatment area retains fine sediment to be remediated • Future green corridor through planned Industrial development

REMEDIATION TIMELINE

YEAR1 De-watering

De-watering

Remediation

20,000 Yd

Testing winter

Mycoremediation process diagram (Ali Boese)

YEAR 2 De-watering

De-watering

20,000 Yd spring

summer

20,000 Yd

20,000 Yd fall

winter

De-watering Cultivating Mycelium in dredged sediment

Mycelium

Cultivating Mycelium in dredged sediment

Mycelium

Sediment Moving

Mycelium Breaking Down Contaminants

Sediment Spreading, Layering With Mycelium

spring

20,000 Yd summer

20,000 Yd fall

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Atlas Cement SAtlas ite Cement Restoration:

Gary New Duluth, Duluth Minnesota

Atlas Cement company site underwent remediation for PAH contamination in 2005 but has remained largely unvegetated due to compacted soils with high Ph levels. These acidic conditions are detrimental to US Steel Creek, a tributary of the St. Louis River that runs through the site, making it a priotiy for vegetative TIMELINE restoration efforts.

DOW:

Alexandra Boese LA 5576 Final Presentation December 18, 2017

FALL 1ST YEAR

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Acquire permit from MPCA Collect desired seed from site and similar creek surrounds within 5 miles of site along the St. Louis River Remove invasive vegetation Amend soil PH with compost and lime Harrow meadow area and roll to smooth soil Sow cover crop of Oats Sow forb and cold season grass seed

EST:

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US Steel Creek

SPRING 2ND YEAR

Site context map

Historic photo showing piles of slag material to be used in the cement making process

Plant bare root trees and shrubs along riparian corridor in forested area SITE ATLASand CEMENT COMPANY Cut and treat invasive woody vegetation Use woody debris to stabilize eroded areas of creek bank Cut dogwood from surrounding area and root along eroded areas of creek bank Sow warm Atlas seasonCement grass seedSite Gary New Duluth,Plug Minnesota planting from nearby areas, especially along eroded and less vegetated areas

ATLAS CEMENT COMPANY SITE

Gary New Duluth, Duluth MN

CONCEPT PLAN PROJECT GOALS

St. Louis River

US Steel Creek

vegetative growth Remove invasive vegetation Restore vegetation Improve functional hydrology Increase habitat value for wildlife

Amend soil PH to support native vegetative growth Restore vegetation Improve biodiversity of vegetation Improve functional hydrology

FALL 2ND YEAR

MESIC FOREST MEADOW: Amend soil PH to support native vegetative

Atlas Cement

TIMELINE

growth the St. Louis River Estuary SITE CONTEXT: 1mile from Remove invasive vegetation

FALL 1ST YEAR Mixed Boreal Forest

Restore vegetation Improve biodiversity of vegetation Increase habitat value for wildlife

SPRING 3RD YEAR Inspect and assess creek stabilization areas Inspect for invasive plant growth Manage invasives in meadow area with proscribed burning Manage woody invasives with cut and spot treatment with herbicide

SUMMER 3RD YEAR

Inspect and assess creek stabilization areas Inspect for invasive plant growth Manage invasives with mowing and spot treatment with herbicides Assess project failures and practice adaptive management 100’

Landscape intervention sections (Ali Boese)

Amend soil Ph to support vegetative growth Restore vegetation by zone Improve vegetative diversity Improve functional hydrology

EPHEMERAL WETLAND: Amend soil Ph to support

Inspect and assess creek stabilization areas Assess growth of seeded areas Collect seed for overseeding less vegetated areas

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St. Louis River

Ephemeral Wetland

Mesic Forest Meadow

SUMMER 2ND YEAR

Inspect and assess creek stabilization areas Assess growth of seeded areas Collect seed for overseeding less vegetated areas Manage invasives in meadow with mowing

Concept Plan

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Increase vegetative species diversity Remove invasive vegetation MIXED BOREAL FOREST: Create buffer along riparian corridor Increase species diversity Remove invasive vegetation Create buffer along riparian corridor Improve functional hydrology

Creek Edge

Prevent erosion CREEK EDGE:

Acquire permit from MPCA Collect desired seed from site and similar creek surrounds within 5 miles of site along the St. Louis River Remove invasive vegetation Amend soil PH with compost and lime Harrow meadow area and roll to smooth soil Sow cover crop of Oats Sow forb and cold season grass seed

SPRING 2ND YEAR Plant bare root trees and shrubs along riparian corridor and in forested area Cut and treat invasive woody vegetation Use woody debris to stabilize eroded areas of creek bank Cut dogwood from surrounding area and root along eroded areas of creek bank Sow warm season grass seed Plug planting from nearby areas, especially along eroded and less vegetated areas

Remove invasive vegetationSUMMER 2ND YEAR Improve vegetative diversity Inspect andR assess creek stabilization areas estoration timeline Assess growth of seeded areas Improve functional hydrology Collect seed for overseeding less vegetated areas

Prevent erosion Remove invasive vegetation Improve biodiversity of vegetation Improve functional hydrology

Details: Seed collection, Planting, Erosion control FALL 2ND YEAR measures, Maintenance measures Inspect and assess creek stabilization areas Assess growth of seeded areas Collect seed for overseeding less vegetated areas Manage invasives in meadow with mowing

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Atlas Cement Site Restoration:

Gary New Duluth, Duluth Minnesota

P lanting S trategy

Ephemeral Wetland

Plants to introduce: Edge of Ephemeral Wetland: Yellow Sedge, Bluejoint grass, Nodding Smartweed, Strawberry Blite, River Bullrush, Swamp aster, Tufted Loostrife, Jewelweed, Bottle GentianPlants to introduce:: Emergent Canada Rush, River Bullrush, Dark Green Bullrush, Broadleaf Arrowhead, Iris Versicolor, Water Plantain, Sweetflag, Marsh Marigold

Creek Edge

Plants to introduce: Creek Edge: Nannyberry, Red Osier Dogwood, Bluejoint grass, Nodding Smartweed, Swamp aster, Tufted Loostrife, Jewelweed, Bottle Gentian-Plants to introduce:: Emergent Canada Rush, River Bullrush, Dark Green Bullrush, Broadleaf Arrowhead, Iris Versicolor, Water Plantain, Sweetflag, Marsh Marigold

Mesic Forest Meadow

Plants to introduce: Edge of Mesic Forest Meadow Nannyberry, Red Baneberry, Pennsylvania Sedge, Bracken Fern, Goldthread, Wild Red Raspberry, Big Leaf Aster, Mountain Mint Plants to introduce: Mesic Forest Meadow: Ontario Aster, Fowl Manna Grass, Little Bluestem, Grassleafed Goldenrod, Goldthread, Woodland Strawberry, Nerveless Woodland Sedge

Mixed Boreal Forest

Plants to introduce: Mixed woodland area understory Red Baneberry, ,Goldthread, Woodland Strawberry, Pennsylvania Sedge, Big leaf Aster, Virgin’s Bower, Winterberry Plants to introduce: Mesic Forest Meadow: Red Maple, Yellow Birch, Hackberry, Nannyberry, Black Chokeberry, Nannyberry, Beaked Hazelnut

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THANK YOU

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Landscape Architechture Portfolio, Alexandra Boese  
Landscape Architechture Portfolio, Alexandra Boese  
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