SHINE UK Magazine Spring 2018

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THE MAGAZINE ABOUT WOMEN’S SUCCESS

Spring 2018

TOP FEMALE

LEADERS

TE C H

WE MEET THE BEST AND GET THEIR SUCCESS ADVICE

GODDESSES

100 years of

OPRAH & CO

VOTING WHAT HAVE WE GAINED?

which women are leading the way

How Female Stars are Taking a Stand

20 1 8 Y E AR O F

THE WO MA N WE DECL ARE THAT THIS YEAR IMPORTANT CHANGES MUST AND WILL HAPPEN FOR FEMALE EXECUTIVES


UK CONTENTS SPRING 2018

ON THE COVER

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20 BANK OF ENGLAND

Venetia Bell tells us her success strategies.

52 IT HAPPENED IN NOVEMBER

What some of the top female executives discussed behind closed doors. We reveal what they really believe are the top issues for women and how to resolve them.

01 2018 IS THE YEAR OF THE WOMAN Why we have declared that THIS is the year that things must and will happen for female executives.

84 100 YEARS OF VOTING

When you see what we have achieved in the last century for women and our rights, you will be amazed. But, you will also note how far we still have to go.

FEATURE 08 TOP FEMALE LEADERS

04 FIRST INTERVIEW OR PIECE OF THEATRE?

Gail McManus looks at how getting a job is like winning Wimbledon, you have to win every round.

We meet the best and get their success advice. From different industries, these inspiring women tell their story and predict the future, giving us an insight into their key career strategies.

62 OPRAH & CO

How leading ladies of tinsel town have taken a stand and created a unique sisterhood. We look at how they aim to make lasting changes.

66 TECH GODDESSES

Innovators, disruptors and protectors – we interview some of the most dynamic techies in town and share their vision of the industry and the women within it.

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54 EXCEED AND LEAD

We invite you to join our brand, new group of women that are changing their lives and the world.

58 BRAIN FOOD

How to use nutrition to power up your mind and change your body.

80 JUDGING A BOOK AND ITS COVER

How the personalised book industry just got even better.

88 GUT INSTINCT

Separated at birth – how your gut is your second brain and what to do to live long and prosper.


FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to our next issue of SHINEUK Magazine Dear Readers

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e are on a crusade this year to make 2018 The Year of The Woman! And we hope that you join us in this venture. With all of the media coverage about women over the last six months, plus the diversity issues being discussed daily, we want to add our positive spin, so please take a look at our Exceed X Lead feature and the opportunity that we have created for you within it. It is the SHINEPhilosophy that women have a strong, authentic voice and make personal development a priority. We also believe in supporting each other, collaborating and sharing our knowledge and experiences. I have had the privilege of coaching and mentoring women for over 20 years, and in that time I have come to understand the issues that we all face in our careers and personal lives. I now realise that the best solution is the pursuit of continual growth and the creation of a real sisterhood. This is what SHINEUK is dedicating the year to with the goal of solving challenges and making change happen. We have SHINE Week happening in June, we have SHINECasts audio interviews and SHINETalks with special guests, experts and transformational information coming soon. We also will be making our SHINEGuides available to you which cover major topics and common challenges. We are creating all this so that women allow themselves to SHINE. We need to take charge, be bold and give ourselves a lot more credit. It is time to let go of fear and embrace our power, both as individuals and as a collective. 2018 is OUR time to Exceed and Lead! Join in!

Alex

ALEXANDRA WATSON CRE ATOR OF THE SUCCESSFUL MIND ME THOD

Alexandra Watson is a leading personal development expert, coach and mentor, a best-selling author and keynote speaker.

This magazine’s design and layout is done by our secret weapon...

ALEXANDRA WATSON Editor-in-Chief Follow me on Twitter @happinesscoach S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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FIRST INTERVIEW

or piece of theatre? BY GAIL MCMANUS

Getting a job is not the same as doing the job. In fact sometimes the two things don’t even seem related. How many times have you come across someone at work and thought ‘How did they get this job?’ Well the reason is exactly that – they were great at getting the job, just not quite so good at doing it.

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Getting a job is a bit like winning Wimbledon – you have to win every round – so if you don’t get invited for an interview – it doesn’t mean you were turned down for the job – it means you were turned down for the first interview. And if you don’t get invited back after the first interview it doesn’t mean you didn’t get the job – it means you didn’t get invited to the second interview. And so on.

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o let’s assume your fabulously prepared CV got you the invite to the first round interview. (Make no mistake about it – the only job a CV has to do is get you invited for an interview – it’s not an autobiography, it’s a piece of packaging – the label that gets you picked off the shelf.) So now how do you approach the first interview? Remember, your objective is not to get the job – your objective is to get invited to the next round. Keep this in mind. This is about showing that you are someone that the interview team wants to work with. Someone who will fit into their organisation and has the same mind-set, values and ethics. And vitally importantly – someone that wants the job. That may sound silly to you – but one of the simplest ways

to stand out in the first interview is to be enthusiastic about the company you are interviewing with.

So how do you do this? Let’s go back to the beginning – is this an interview or a piece of theatre? In my view it is a piece of theatre. You need to look the part and act the part. Let’s deal with looking the part first. This is important. Wear appropriate interview attire. Just accept that you wouldn’t wear a party dress to a funeral or beach wear to work. There is no point in railing against convention if you want to get invited to the second interview. Frankly, you can wear what you like

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when you get the job – but if you don’t get the job in the first place, you won’t have that option. Dress appropriately for the industry that you are going to work in. What would they expect from you?

So now how do you act the part? Well most first interviews follow pretty much the same three question format. • What do you know about us / why are you interested in working for us? • Tell us about yourself? • Why do you want to work in our industry? It is imperative that you prepare and practice your answers to these questions. No self-respecting actor would go on the stage without rehearsing – and you should rehearse. Why would you not prepare for a one hour interview that could literally change the course of your life? It is that serious! Competition for every job is huge. And there are no second chances. Just like Wimbledon – if you lose a round, you’re out of the game. Getting a job is a brutal process. So do everything you can to stack the odds in your favour.

What do you know about us /why are you interested on working for us?

However they phrase this question they want to know that you have done your homework and thought about why you want to work for them. It is also important to realise that they aren’t really interested in why you want to work for them – they really want to know why they should employ you – they’re just too polite to ask the question this way round. So you should answer the real question – Why should they employ you? And do this in the context of what you know about their organisation. Show you have read their website, bring in common touch points and draw parallels between what they do and your skills and knowledge. Show them that you are half way up the learning curve already and that you are genuinely enthusiastic about their aims and ambitions.

Tell us about yourself or talk us through your background / CV?

There will always be some sort of question that asks you to run through your CV. This is an art in itself, as again it helps if you understand what they are really asking. What they are really saying is tell us about yourself as we haven’t read the CV properly, there are some things we’d like to know but don’t want to ask and we need to know if other people like working with you and rate you. Break your spiel down into three parts. • Tell them briefly about your early life, any personal stuff and your education. • Use your first experiences of work to tick off the skills boxes you need to do the job • Finally use your most recent experiences to show what you can add to their business. Let’s just focus on that last section a bit more. What do I mean – well in the first two parts you can say “I did this” and “I did that” – but in this part you should describe some of the projects you have worked on or activities that you are responsible for, providing evidence of your skills and experience. Even better if you can show that you have been selected for special projects or rewarded for good work. And you should use language that mirrors the organisation that is interviewing you. I will give you an example from my own industry which is private equity. To be successful in getting a job in private equity it is important to think like someone who is buying a business. Therefore the language you would use reflects a buyer’s outlook rather than a seller’s outlook. So you might say something like “fascinating business so long as the oil price

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doesn’t drop any further” where as someone who is more used to selling might say “great business that is just going to go from strength to strength”. You need to think about the language and business perspective that the organisation you are interviewing with adopts and reflect this back. You will know when this bit is going well as the interviewer will become really engaged talking about your projects (rather than talking about you). When this happens you are definitely more than halfway there.

Why do you want to work in our industry?

This is a summing up for both you and them, and your answer here should be couched in terms of what they get when they hire you. Steer right away from clichéd answers like it’s a good next step for my career and come up with a highly personalised response that no one else could give. It should be a succinct summary of the first two questions put together in a way that the interviewer can almost repeat word for word when they go back and make their report. Something along the lines of “I really want to work in this industry as the focus on XYZ,

really suits my skill set and I think that in combination with my enthusiasm for ABC and my determined working style, we’ll both benefit.” Design it yourself, make it your own – just remember it’s the last thing you will say and is likely to be the first thing they remember.

So in summary, think through every step of the first interview, channel your inner actor and enjoy your hour on stage. S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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2018 TOP FEM

We posed some essential questions to each leader to find out what their experience has ta

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MALE LEADERS

aught them, and how they view the corporate world for women both now and in the future.

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2018 TOP FEMALE LEADERS Recent studies have revealed something that many savvy women have known all along: women are good for business. With more companies looking to create diverse boardrooms, women are proving to deliver tangible and intangible advantages. Despite this evidence, many women find themselves struggling to cement their roles as leaders while managing the social complexities of the workplace.

More role models are needed, more support among women is needed, and more female success stories are needed too. So what are the stories behind the success? What is their advice? SHINEUK not only interviewed 17 of the brightest and best, we got them all together in one room to discuss the most pressing issues around today.

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S T E P H A N Y VA N WILLIGENBURG Senior Industry Head, Google UK

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"In 2018 thinking you need to do something different can be a distraction"

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on’t let distractions take hold of you but be clear about the challenges and opportunities. Use research and practice rather than reinventing the wheel. Do what you do well with your team and your customers – it can be a bit of a ride, there will be risks, but as long as you know where you are going you should put all your energy into it. Be in it for the long run, know that sticking to the basics is sensible and set up success beyond 2018. There is plenty of dialogue at Google about diversity lead by the superiors which are mainly men. The pressure we face as women also comes from ourselves, we don’t always have to step up like a man, instead speak up, standout be known for something by your peers. You can train yourself to do this, so don’t hide in a corner, be present, be proud

because you do add value. Success can be different things, but one thing is for sure, it will never happen in a vacuum. I have grown within Google and my leadership is about being present, learning from my peers, encouraging everyone to help each other and know who to turn to, to source the answer themselves rather than just coming to me – championing the journey of the solution rather than handing over the answers. The adoption of certain technology is easy but the implementing and influencing people is hard. So it is important to have the right people on the ground to make the hard happen. This year there is a real need for data scientists to translate the very complex into business decisions for our customers. Even if they are not

advertising understanding data will improve their website numbers. I have huge ambitions for the future – I am a true entrepreneur at heart and I know that growth means being curious and not being afraid to fail. Be ok with feedback, be good at communicating and helping and supporting others. Overall, enthusiasm, tenacity and remaining positive and open-minded will lead you to success.

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GINA MILLER

Founder SCM Direct – Crusader

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M AG A Z I N E


A WOMAN WHO CLEARLY CARES AND IS PREPARED TO GO ALL OUT TO MAKE CHANGE HAPPEN. A CRUSADER WHOSE ACTIONS OUTWEIGH HER CONCERNS ABOUT WHAT PEOPLE MAY THINK OF HER. GINA IS A TRUE FEMALE ROLE MODEL.

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e are going to be in a very interesting position this year which may see women suffering from a backlash as misogynistic men feel their backs are to the wall. The new-found boldness of women to speak up sweeping across all sectors in society - business, culture, politics - could have unintended negative consequences if bandwagons are hitched and irresponsible but tempting generalisations are embraced. Whilst it is scandalous that as we celebrate 100 years of the Suffragette Movement, women are still having to fight for equality in so many spheres. We must not forget our integrity, dignity and grace. We must be better and act in a measured manner so revelations don’t add to the hysteria. Fundamentally, it has been about an abuse of power and bullying, it is not about us changing, but cultures, society and power changing. We must strive for fairness, equality and access, not superiority. Be both strong and fair. Womanising the corporate and political world hasn’t really happened. And it is not just a female fight – equality sees no colour, gender, ethnicity, disability or social background. We must speak up for anyone that is vulnerable. We should lead by example, by rolling our sleeves up and making things happen. Leadership includes leading by example, inspiring positive behaviours, ending the drip, drip of discrimination that becomes damaging and the permissive cultures that engulf organisations - not sitting behind a glass wall worrying about if you are liked or about what people think about you. My workplace is like a family – where everyone has a part to play, where we all have a stake in success and a right to be heard. I like level playing fields where we are judged by our abilities, not other people’s biases. Where we have flexibility to accommodate people’s lives. Rigidity won’t get the best out of people and I certainlydo not want my staff thinking that their value is based on how long they are at their desk or on their

computer. And success is by no means just about money or profit. I’m not interested in how much we can squeeze, exploit or extract from clients. Our value to society is part of our success and is central to our principles and values. The old ‘would I sell this service or product to my grandmother’ test. Being a leader is about the decisions you make, about the behaviour you display and the behaviour you inspire in others. You may solicit juicy nicknames, be called brash, gobby, a bitch, a She Devil – take them all as badges of honour. Like it or not 2018 has rumblings of this being the year for a genderquake. What do I mean by that?...A year in which we experience a radical alteration in the relationship between the sexes, resulting from women finding their voice, socially, economically and politically.

"My workplace is like a family – where everyone has a part to play, where we all have a stake in success and a right to be heard. I like level playing fields where we are judged by our abilities, not other people’s biases. Where we have flexibility to accommodate people’s lives".

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JESSICA LEIGH JONES Engineering Leader & Astrophysicist

ow would you advise someone to stay ahead of the game?

The world is changing politically, technologically and culturally. People are speaking out, creative start-ups are defying conformance, the established landscape of influence is crumbling and social media is becoming a fair-game platform for facilitating mass change. We are living in a time of great opportunity and exciting uncertainty but we must not become complacent or stand still, for the world will not wait for us. It’s coming. There is only really one decision to make, do you want to create the change or be changed in the process? Are you a driver or a passenger?

What pressures remain for women when it comes to succeeding in the corporate world?

I’ve never perceived the lack of women in senior roles or technical roles as a barrier to my own career progression. However, I would admit that being the only female around the table can sometimes feel like being a lone ranger. For corporates who have low numbers of women, it is often expected that you will fit into a particular mould, cast by the values and legacy of a majority-male leadership team. Occasionally I have experienced a conflict with these values. I once read that life is only 10% what you experience and 90% how you react to it. I do whole-heartedly buy into this. What I’ve learnt over my career is that you can see this conflict as a barrier, or you can use it to your advantage. In every setback there is an opportunity, not only to adapt your approach and overcome, but to blaze the trail for the many ambitious and talented people who will follow. Embrace your differences and use them as a catalyst to progressing your organisation.

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How do you approach leadership development for yourself and your colleagues?

Nobody is a finished article; leadership development works most effectively when it’s timely. Depending on where you are and what challenges you are facing will highlight what your development needs are. These must be evaluated continuously and acted upon as early as possible to ensure that healthy habits and practices are formed. People learn from error and from dealing with unfamiliar and challenging situations so it’s important to allow these scenarios to play out in a safe environment, such as within your team. I maintain a dynamic model of my team, identifying strengths, weakness and most importantly potential, of individuals and as a collective. I map this across to our vision, the key deliverables we are aiming for and the values we strive to exude.

What is your main focus and ultimate goal for the next year?

I have a vision for a completely fluid educational system promoting lifelong learning, where people can enter and exit at any level to suit their development needs at that time. A large part of this system will be facilitated by the next generation of Apprenticeships, forming the bridge between academic schooling and real-world application.

What challenges do you expect for the industry this year?

Manufacturing is about to enter a fourth industrial revolution driven by Big Data and the Internet of Things. Henry Ford once said “Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants so long as it is black”. Since then, the industry has accepted that the most profitable and successful way to make things is by mass manufacture. Enter Mass Customisation – The next generation of manufacturing driven by a rising consumer demand for highly personalised, often unique goods. Dependent on flexible automation and end-to-end supply chain connectivity, the desire to make any product, at any time, in singular quantities whilst still achieving a worthwhile profit is likely to test the innovation stamina of even the most successful manufacturers. Whilst the technological advancements required to achieve this are no mean feat, the real challenge will be migrating ageold cultures to a new post-Fordian way of thinking. This will require strong but supportive leadership and a clear vision for the future.

What is your performance philosophy? (maintaining high levels consistently)

You have to be intrinsically motivated, and you achieve that by doing what you love doing most. Assuming you were absurdly rich and didn’t need to earn a living, what would you be doing with your time each day? If you can do that same thing and get paid for it, you’ve achieved intrinsic motivation, and the by-product of that is consistently high performance. If you’re not doing the thing that drives you, focus on what you need to do to get there; that in itself will give you the motivation you’re looking for to achieve great things.

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I am honoured to have been recently elected as the Vice Chair of an approval panel for Manufacturing and Engineering related apprenticeships in the UK. But more than this, there should be opportunities for bright young people to contribute to solving problems that actually affect the community in which they live. It is my mission for 2018 to establish an organisation that facilitates these kinds of opportunities, linking together organisations and institutions with local schools and universities to build relationships, mutual understanding and work-readiness.

What do you think are the essential traits of growth for individuals and teams? I take an ‘AAA’ approach to recruitment; Attitude, Aptitude, Ambition.


First and foremost is Attitude, because ultimately you have to work with this person on a day to day basis. Research suggests that the two things you look for in a colleague are whether you can trust them, followed by whether they are competent at their job. I use a similar philosophy. I assess characteristics like work ethic, ability to work within a team, and general fit with organisational and team values. These are all pretty standard things but you should never underestimate the importance of

languages they can write? Of course not, I just care that they have the aptitude to learn and adapt to the demands of the job. Finally I try to assess their Ambition. To build a team of A-players you need to locate people with ambition. Although, not the kind of cold ambition that drives people to trample over their peers to get to the top. I look for ambition that will propel the team and the organisation forward. Someone who really cares about their work and is dead set on seeing their ideas

Jessica being awarded the Freedom of the City of London by the Chamberlain at Guildhall, May 2017

getting this right. Human beings are vibrant bundles of emotion and you get the best out of your team when the personalities balance and complement each other. Just one pirate in your team can sabotage the climate and have a damaging impact on your team’s results. Many interviews these days are competency based, but at least in my line of work, it is difficult to conduct such an interview and make it meaningful. We are engineers, architects of the future, and no one really knows what the future looks like. It would be short-sighted of me to hire someone based on experience or competence. Instead I prefer to measure Aptitude. Does this person have the ability to learn what I need them to in order to progress our agenda, often independently? Are they creative, forward thinking, do they challenge the status quo? Of course I’d like them to have the foundational building blocks, in our case software programming skills, but do I care what

make it from a concept to reality. This kind of ambition is very inspiring for teammates, and more often than not encourages the whole team to grow together.

What personality trait or skill do you think tops the list when it comes to creating success?

Resilience. Aim for success, but be prepared to fail and use it as a learning opportunity. Take time to reflect, introduce measures to prevent the same failure from happening twice and bounce back. Create a culture with your team that values failure and accepts it as part of the development process. Operate in a mindset of high risk – high return. Not everything will work but remember you can never truly be successful until you’ve experienced what it is like to fail.

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V E N ETIA B ELL 20

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VENETIA PROVIDES SUPPORT ACROSS ALL ARE A S OF THE BANK’S OPER ATIONS , INCLUDING TECHNOLOGY, FINANCE , HR AND INFORMATION SECURIT Y. SHE HA S BEEN CLOSELY INVOLVED IN THE BANK’S WORK A SSESSING DEVELOPMENTS IN, AND THE IMPLIC ATIONS OF, FINANCIAL TECHNOLOGIES. "The game is always changing and this is true right now in the financial services industry. It is essential you understand the world around you so as to see how you can possibly get ahead of the game. Women are less likely to put themselves forward than men, I know because I have looked at role descriptions and not thought I was ready. Part of the pressure we feel as women is the pressure we put on ourselves as well as self-doubt. If you have a plan, the plan can always change, but you need a plan. I also plan my development as a leader rather than leave it to chance. This year, I’ve been fortunate enough to be a participant in the Mentoring Foundation’s Future Women leaders Programme, which has significantly stimulated my development as a leader. For my team, I’m committed to carving out time for opportunities for development, and to help them make that happen. With the uncertain times ahead we need to focus on making the most of the people we have, helping them reach their potential so they can do their job. Focus should also be on balance and wellbeing so people can perform at a high level over a long period of time. Performance as a whole depends on one’s resilience. In high-pressured jobs you need to protect the time you have to exercise, have family time and anything you love doing besides work that gives you energy and stamina to do the things you need to do. I find if you enjoy each moment as it comes, be in the moment and focus then your energy and direction won’t tail off. The Bank has a new strategic plan, looking at transforming how we communicate and work. I’m heavily involved in this, particularly leading work that will ensure our people are focused on work that makes the biggest contribution to the Bank’s mission. For growth to happen you need to be clear about where you are going, where you are now and then where you want to be, then figure out the steps forward. Teams need to be a great mix of people and as a leader you need to empower them to deliver. Know your weakest area and make it a strength. Overall you need drive. To succeed you need to be able to try really hard, pick yourself up perhaps more than once and give it another go. Take chances and you will get there".

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ELIZABETH HYDE

I

m a Solicitor-Advocate and was recently promoted to Principal Associate, which is a senior position just below Partner level. My role involves defending organisations being investigated and prosecuted for health and safety and corporate manslaughter offences. I also provide health and safety compliance and risk management advice. Alongside a Partner, I directly manage a team of lawyers in our Leeds office and supervise a wider number across our national team. My role involves business development, the supervision of day to day work and coaching and mentoring the team. Our health and safety team has been ranked at number one in the legal directories for over ten years.

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How would you advise someone to stay ahead of the game in 2018? The legal profession is evolving at a very fast pace; like many professions we are now in an era of social media, rapidly developing new technologies and a multi-generational workforce. In my view it is critical that lawyers challenge themselves and their teams to stay ahead of the game by developing new products, services and technologies to provide better and more cost effective solutions to their clients. I am proud to work for Eversheds Sutherland which is renowned for its progressive attitude and has been acclaimed by the Financial Times for its innovative approach to providing legal solutions for major global corporate clients.

Taking a longer term view, law firms also need to work hard at attracting and retaining the brightest and most talented lawyers from the new generation entering the market in order to ensure the future pipeline. This means better understanding of the new generation of lawyers who are seeking, amongst other things, flexibility and agile working. Joining a diverse workforce will be taken as read by these young lawyers, and so those at senior management levels need to properly support gender and ethnic diversity along with social mobility.

Annual appraisal feedback has included: ‘delivers first class leadership’, ‘very approachable’, ‘fantastic role model for women’, ‘brilliant lawyer’, ‘excellent supervisor’, ‘calm’, ‘extremely courteous under pressure’, ‘strong motivator’, ‘excels at client service’ and ‘there is a general sense amongst the team that we would all do any amount of work for her, at any personal cost because she goes that ‘extra mile’ for us. She puts significant time and effort into the careers of others. She always looks for opportunities that will help me build on my skills/experience’.

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What pressures remain for women when it comes to succeeding in the corporate world?

What challenges do you expect for the industry this year?

Most law firms now recognise that diversity is good for business. Nonetheless, research suggests that women still face a number of challenges in the corporate world including bias. Such bias may include people’s perceptions of good leadership being associated with male characteristics through to unconscious bias, which can result in those interviewing applicants appointing those who are similar to themselves – this of course poses a problem when you are faced with a large proportion of one sex at management level. In addition, women tend to take the lead on childcare which often makes it very difficult to sustain a job that requires responding to urgent requests from clients, long distance travel or to put in the long hours required to reach partnership; there is a sense that only those women who have a partner who works flexible hours or women who have substantial help from other family members can really progress to a senior position. It is for many of these reasons that so many women leave the profession just as they should be about to embark on the partnership route. Eversheds Sutherland recognises these issues and has been truly exceptional in taking steps to ensure a more gender diverse workforce and is leading the way in supporting women who wish to work flexibly. The range of different initiatives which have been put into place by the firm are making a real difference. I took a career break from work to spend time with my two young children a few years ago. At the time, it felt like a very bold move to put my career on hold. Since returning to work I have been promoted to Principle Associate and reached the final 10 in London’s Women in the City Future Leader Awards something which is very humbling and is due to the support and backing of Eversheds Sutherland.

Brexit is without doubt going to have a large impact upon many parts of the legal profession as it is still unknown how the law may change in many areas. It is a very interesting time for all lawyers; the challenge is being able to predict the changes that may be introduced in order to provide companies with the best commercial advice. Other challenges which Eversheds Sutherland has already embraced include the need to offer alternative billing models and alternative legal service delivery models to clients along with addressing the needs of the new generation entering the workforce as I discussed earlier.

How do you approach leadership development for yourself and your colleagues? As a firm we embrace a coaching and mentoring approach at all levels of the business which works really well. Promotions are all based on ability, merit, performance and business need. Leadership and innovation are at the heart of Eversheds Sutherland’s culture and it provides the firm with a critical competitive edge. I work with a fantastic team of lawyers and have learnt a substantial amount from the partners in my team and in the wider firm about what makes a great leader. In turn, I actively encourage junior lawyers in my team to think about their own career development, how to develop business in the areas that particularly interest them and how to develop their own leadership style.

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What is your performance philosophy? (maintaining high levels consistently) Work hard, play hard. It is really important to me that both myself and my team provide an excellent client service. I want to ensure that at the end of every job each client feels that our lawyers have done a tremendous job and gone that extra mile and ultimately that they have achieved the best outcome. It is also important that the team has fun and enjoys coming to work each day; that way we can really give the client 110%.


What is your main focus and ultimate goal for the next year? We are specialists in successfully defending PLCs and large corporates when they are investigated by the HSE and police following serious workplace health and safety incidents. As a team we also pro-actively help clients ensure health and safety compliance through carrying out high level reviews of their health and safety management systems in order to reduce the risk of them suffering from an incident; I intend to focus on the continued delivery of this service over the coming year as it is making a real difference in reducing the number of workplace accidents.

What do you think are the essential traits of growth for individuals and teams? I would say that having a very strong work ethic, having good judgement, being trustworthy, listening to the views of others and having the ability to come up with great ideas are essential traits. In addition, having a diverse team is key, not only in terms of having a mix of men and women but also in terms of personality and skillset.

What personality trait or skill do you think tops the list when it comes to creating success? There are too many to choose from! Aside from having great ideas, being humble is an important personality trait; to me good leaders do not make a lot of noise, they are not arrogant but instead look after their team and make their team look good.

Brexit is without doubt going to have a large impact upon many parts of the legal profession as it is still unknown how the law may change in many areas. It is a very interesting time for all lawyers; the challenge is being able to predict the changes that may be introduced in order to provide companies with the best commercial advice. S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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RACHEL BARTON

Managing Director leading Accenture Strategy’s Advanced Customer Strategy business in the UK, Europe and Latin America

Rachel advises business leaders on how they can reinvent themselves for the digital age and drive profitable growth. What do business leaders need to do to get ahead this year? Business leaders in every industry need to pay close attention to the huge disruption that’s happening across the market due to the rapid evolution and adoption of new technologies and constantly changing customer behaviours. Existing business models can become redundant overnight if a savvy disruptor finds a better way to serve your customers. Leaders need to be alert to change, open-minded, seek new ways to create value for customers and take action.

What does leadership mean to you? Leadership is about setting a vision, galvanising a team and being adaptive to change. In these disruptive times, leadership is also about personal growth and the recognition that nothing stays the same, so it’s important to constantly seek out opportunities to learn. I look at my life and career holistically and think through how I want to grow and develop as a person across the two. What I want to learn changes over time so I regularly ‘check in with myself’ and course correct. It’s very important to me that I make authentic choices that align with my values and keep me feeling excited about where I’m going and I regularly seek feedback that helps me address the areas I need to focus on. I know I can’t be a successful leader without the support of my team. I like to understand how my colleagues tick and what matters to them so I can nurture that but also provide structured interventions that help them be the very best they can be.

Do you have a mantra? My mantra is that there is no time to rest on your laurels. Reaching a career peak is down to hard work and a bit of luck, but operating at the top of your game over an entire

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career is a completely different ball game. Things are also moving at such a pace that re-invention is key to maintaining high levels of performance – spotting the next wave to ride, being open to change and able to constantly tackle the new and ambiguous is a very different mindset to adopt. Self-belief is critical but so is self-care. It’s very easy to burn out if you’re working 80 hours and feel like life is a treadmill. Take time to nourish your body and your soul otherwise you just can’t play the long game.

What drives you? I am excited by possibility. I love solving problems, driving change and most importantly feeling like I’m part of a team of people who all share a common goal.

What is your one piece of advice? I always come back to the Darwin quote…’it’s not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most adaptable to change’….with imagination and courage, we can do anything!

"Collaboration is key this year, bringing together people rather than pulling things apart - and with imagination and courage anything is possible"


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Hayley Johnson Chief Operating Officer, Epos Now People have asked me how I have achieved what I have in a short space of time, but I think if you want to, it is easy to get out there in the digital market. I believe it is about getting rid of distractions and moving faster and quicker leveraging the right technology in your life.

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o me it is not about being male or female, it is about working hard. I did have a female boss who was powerful which sheltered me somewhat from what is very topical today, which has too much focus on 'women in business' as a label. We need to be careful not to overdo hiring women to reach quotas so that it doesn’t take away the credit for being able to do the job. There are challenges for women and we need to work on the schools so girls know there is a good career in technology and change the perception that girls are good for some roles and boys others. Success has a lot to do with being emotionally savvy especially with your teams and how to respond in the right way. You should have a good grasp of how you feel about yourself, the world and the future. Learning how to communicate with your team on an emotional level gets so much more out of them. Each member responds in different ways and so it is best to adapt to their emotional state – the same is true for your customers too.

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The biggest challenge is how you move quickly enough. The technology industry is getting bigger and better. Putting technology in people’s hands is hugely exciting, but we have to stay grounded and not get distracted by a host of temptations and carried away trying to be the master of everything. Customers and people have to come first. Performance at a high level, especially at senior level completely depends on having the right people. If you get that right, performance follows. One bad hire can ruin your chances and so building a great team is important. My main goal is mental and physical fitness. I want to prioritise this over everything so I can add more value. There is a constant pressure to skip the gym or eat poorly so I am on a programme that ensures I stay on track at the gym, because it directly affects the way I manage work and what I can give back. You need balls of steel to succeed today because you need to fight hard and never give up. You also need to be able to develop people, show humility, be honest and be curious. You cannot succeed on your own so surround yourself with great people.


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‘IF WE WANT TO GROW, WE NEED TO GIVE OURSELVES PERMISSION TO FAIL.’ 30

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HANNAH COTTON Assistant Manager, Transport for London

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er core role is to define and implement optimal crossbusiness processes to ensure efficient enforcement operations in surface transport. She is passionate about equality and investment in people and the impact this has on productivity. She demonstrates this by supporting TfLs school outreach programme, encouraging pupils towards STEM and a career in transport. She also supports gender and disability staff network groups, paying forward the benefits she received as a Rising Star and Future Leader award winner. She is persistant and dynamic with strong analytical, performance and change management skills which enables her to excel in defining and delivering focus led actions. Passionate about equality, mental health and education, she views each as complementary catalysts for long term change. How would you advise someone to stay ahead of the game in 2018? I think it is vital to know your strengths. For too long I have been looking over my shoulder and trying to improve what I am not so good at. I would advise anyone to just let go of all that negativity and focus instead on what you’re good at. It has totally transformed my career and life outside of work too. But it doesn’t stop there. You also need to be able to sell those strengths. This has changed the way I approach things and within 6 months I had nailed down my daily work which gave my confidence a huge boost and impressed my seniors. I have had to overcome a lot in my life which has helped me to be compassionate, emotionally intelligent and good with people, but more recently I have become less tolerant of nonsense, of office politics and disrespectful behaviour. I think it is ok to make a stand, not people please, and cause a fuss if you need to get things done. I am very aware of the excuse button we all use when we don’t want to do something that’s outside of our comfort zone. It’s important though to practice resilient behaviour, approaching those difficult or boring tasks

with gusto so that you can stretch yourself and feel proud. It may feel wrong at the time but afterwards it feels great. People need to be more accepting of and ready for change. We should see it as an opportunity to add value and a way of coming together instead of resisting it. We need to make ourselves, our company and our industry future-proof. The key to leadership is living as the leader you want to be and knowing what those characteristics and skills are. For me, leadership needs good communication, honest communication. We need to talk about things openly and directly. We need to get to the point and stop holding back. Communication with yourself comes first. Self-awareness is such a powerful concept because it is a constant and insightful reflection process that can lead you in the right direction. Additionally, we need to be great listeners. Really hear what people are trying to say instead of reacting straight away. So when you have heard them speak, think carefully before you speak so that you can contemplate every detail and then make your move. Good leaders also share the successes and empower others. Leadership is not greedy, it’s the opposite, it is giving and open and willing to learn. Overall, as women we need to break the mould. We need to forge our own path ahead and stop waiting to be asked. We need to ask for more recognition, more important work and rewards. We want status and senior roles but they are not handed to us, we need to show who we are and be confident and proud of that.

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Sarah Abrahams

Head of Growth Finance – Grant Thornton UK LLP

Sarah sits on the Advisory Committee of the EIS Association, is a mentor to women-led businesses through the City of London’s Entrepreneur Academy and was commended as “Best Rising Star in EIS” at the EISA Awards at the House of Lords.

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ach of us is 100% responsible for our own success in life and achieving our potential. There are lots of people in the world who are bright and talented and have confidence in their own abilities. To set yourself apart from the field you need to be clear about what it is you want, understand and priortise the things that are important to you and, most importantly, you have to work hard and put in the hours to get where you want to go. Working in the world of finance, I often find myself the only woman in the room, so my philosophy is to embrace what makes me different. A future-proof workforce is diverse, full of different types of people with different ideas. It’s what is required to shape a vibrant economy, where people and business can thrive. My own experiences with the clients and other businesses I meet has demonstrated that many value diversity in the teams they work with, and many even make decisions about where they take their business based on this. My team has stretching targets to be a profitable part of the company. Our aim is to continue to grow and enter in to new territories whilst maintaining the team connections that keep us on track. As a leader it’s important for me that I inspire my team to feel valued and trusted, whilst also making a meaningful contribution. The success of any team doesn’t depend on one person, but the contributions of everyone, so I look for ways to stretch people and

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"I value an environme people genuinely liste the input and suggest – because that’s how w best solution"


ent where en and respect tions of others we get to the

give them opportunities that push them out of their comfort zone. Everyone is already working incredibly hard, so asking them to set stretch goals means they have to give even more – which requires a level of understanding and flexibility from leaders. Maintaining high levels of performance requires self-assessment, embracing honest feedback, no matter how challenging, and believing in your own capabilities. I value an environment where people genuinely listen and respect the input and suggestions of others – because that’s how we get to the best solution. Testing ideas, finding out what works, and then building it is fundamental to Grant Thornton’s shared enterprise model. Sharing ideas, taking responsibility for bringing them to life and ultimately, sharing the reward. For any young person looking to embark on a career in finance, or in fact any career, my advice would be to decide what you want and go for it. Be resilient. Things might not always work out exactly how you planned, but often that will open up new opportunities and you’ll never learn more than when you are challenged. Knowing your strengths will help you understand the difference that you can make. That way you can be confident in your own value, regardless of your age or gender.

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Amy Lawson Kettle Foods International Sales Manager

How would you advise someone to stay ahead of the game in 2018? Think about what will differentiate yourself from your peers, for example; getting involved in a new project to gain a new experience or insight, developing a particular skill set or developing your network.The best advice I was given was to write down what you want to achieve both professionally and personally in the year ahead. Really think about what goals are within your control and the steps that need to be taken towards achieving them. Having a plan of action visible and close to hand helps to remind yourself what you are going after. When someone is working hard at a frenetic pace, it becomes so easy to be distracted from what you were trying to achieve in the first place.

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What pressures remain for women when it comes to succeeding in the corporate world? From my experience at Kettle Foods, I am extremely lucky to work with positive, strong and contemporary female role models – both within the internal team and with our partners in international markets. These are women who have built successful, professional careers within the corporate world in conjunction with their personal lives. I think that one of the biggest pressures for those working in the corporate world is how to achieve that equilibrium between professional and personal. An example of this is considering when it is the ‘right’ time is to be considering a family whilst being able to maintain the desired career pathways. The need to challenge stereotyping is now more prominent than ever with the evolving dynamic of family life. A number of my colleagues have taken really creative and innovative decisions in pursuing these goals of a balanced lifestyle.

How do you approach leadership development for yourself and colleagues? To me, the importance of leadership is in creating the right environment and the right culture for you and the team to flourish. In order to do this there has to been an element of thinking about how you are going to lead yourself in the first instance. The next step is recognising the individual talents that exist within the team and how these can be utilised. This way of working helps to establish what is important to people which in turn helps you to shape and individualise their development. Members of our team are often working away individually in different countries helping to develop the KETTLE® brand, coping with all the challenges that international working entails. We are always actively communicating with each other to share our projects, challenges and what we are trying to achieve. This positive culture allows us to offer candid thoughts and feedback to each other which also helps to bring new perspectives on our situations – as quite often someone has a solution that comes from sharing!


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What challenges do you expect for the industry this year? In International Sales particularly in Europe it is all about the ‘B’ word – Brexit! There are lots of questions and uncertainties as to what this means for business and ways of working. Now more than ever it is time to build and reinforce strong working relationships with our partners in the international market. This is to ensure we are considering all possible outcomes and taking a proactive stance What is your performance philosophy? (Maintaining high levels consistently) Listening, Ownership (taking responsibility) and Learning – LOL! This is a continuous cycle and as long as I continue to learn something new every day I know it has been a good day! What is your main focus and ultimate goal for next year? My main focus for 2018 is continuing to learn about International Sales and expanding the KETTLE® brand in Europe. And also to continue to build upon my previous sales experience. International perspectives vary greatly so getting comfortable with working in a very fluid environment with different ways of working, processes and expectations means there is a lot to learn! One of the most important things for me is developing strong and trusting relationships with our partners – this cannot be overemphasised! As such I really want to focus in on this for next year. What do you think are the essential traits of growth for individuals and teams? The freedom and ability to be creative and innovative with thinking and processes– and feeling like you have the autonomy to take some risk. If mistakes are made then having the opportunity

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to reflect and learn from them will be what creates new knowledge and growth. In the current challenging operating conditions the only way to keep ahead is to be working in an environment where trying something new is not only accepted but actively encouraged at individual, team and company level. What personality trait or skill do you think tops the list when it comes to creating success? For me it is honesty. This presents itself in a couple of different ways. First of all being honest with yourself about what is truly important to you when

setting goals. The second part of this is being honest with commitments – if you say you are going to do something (no matter how small) – whether phoning someone at a certain time or promising to do all you can to deliver a target – then ultimately you earn the trust from people around you. If people trust your honesty & commitment then I believe you are set for success.


The V

TE 100

Women in Business Summit

Organised by City & Financial Global Ltd, in partnership with the Government Equalities Office and the Women in Business Council

17th April 2018, London A not to be missed opportunity to hear from and network with senior decision-makers across the industry, including: • • • • • • • •

Government officials, executives involved in Centenary celebrations FTSE 100 Chairmen, Chief Executives and other Board Directors Female and male senior and middle management in FTSE 100 FTSE 350 Chairmen, Chief Executives and other Board Directors Female and male senior and middle management in FTSE 350 Chairmen, Chief Executives and senior female management in large private companies Heads of HR, Remuneration, Diversity and Inclusion Female business owners and entrepreneurs

Speakers include: • • •

Dr Helen Pankhurst, International Development, Women’s Rights Activist and Writer Dame Cilla Snowball DBE, Group Chairman and Chief Executive, AMV BBDO & Chair, The Women’s Business Council Elizabeth A. Vazquez, CEO and Co-Founder, WEConnect International Catherine McGuinness, Chairman, Policy and Resources Committee, City of London Corporation Janet Cooper OBE, Partner, Tapestry Shirley Cooper, Board Member and Treasurer, UN Women Gerry Walsh, FCIPS, Group CEO, Chartered institute of procurement and supply Amanda Pullinger, CEO, 100 Women in Finance Senior Representative, The Government Equalities Office

ADVERT • • • • • •

“If it is right for men to fight for their freedom, and God knows what the human race would be like today if men had not, since time began, fought for their freedom, then it is right for women to fight for their freedom and the freedom of the children they bear.”

Emmeline Pankhurst, 1858-1926

Find out more and join us on the day by visiting: www.cityandfinancialconferences.com/womeninbusiness S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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M E G A N CAY WOO D Megan is Chief Platform Officer, leading its design, development and the API strategy.

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he financial world is changing as European regulations create new opportunities, like PSD2 and Open Banking which came into force this month. It will change the way we operate, collaborate and innovate as we prepare for more changes as the year progresses. The pace of change in technology, particularly in financial technology, means models quickly become obsolete. If you are in business you need to be continually looking to disrupt your own products and services. Financial services is starting to pay attention as it's becoming increasingly easy for customers to discover, access and switch to new services, and as a result, you’re much more vulnerable to losing customers if you fail to stay competitive. The challenge for many traditional businesses is not only to adopt and move to new forms of technology, but also be able to bring in new business models that will disrupt existing revenue streams. It's only by taking a long term strategic view that you can identify these opportunities to change and stay competitive with an evolving marketplace. On an individual level this requires not only a long term view, but also focus. The pressures that exist day to day are often the ones we put on ourselves to try

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to do, and be everything, all the time. However, while there are many different opportunities to pursue, it's important to find that focus. It’s not just what you say yes to, it's also about the multitude of other things that you say no to. Having this focus and building balance into work and life is key to being effective, otherwise it's easy to become stressed and tired, and have everything suffer as a result. There are fewer women in senior managerial roles and pay is still not equal. It’s a complex problem due to a multitude of reasons. In sectors such as finance and technology, the disparity and male dominance is particularly evident. However, I am hopeful that as more women come into technology and finance (which we are seeing), and more female leaders become role models and mentors, that these diversity numbers will start to level out. Creating this equality and diversity will certainly require intentional action that we all need to work to support. In leadership, confidence is the key to success. You need to be willing to take on challenges and solve the problems that you identify. Many women discount themselves and don’t go for certain roles because they believe they don’t have enough experience. We need to encourage

each other and instil the confidence to push forward and assert ourselves in the things we want to achieve, and not limit ourselves based on our current experience or qualifications. Instead of asking ‘why me?’ ask ‘why not me?’ I break down my goals into key focus areas, and then translate those high level goals into micro weekly and daily goals. This enables me to focus on each step at a time while also maintaining a longterm strategic view of what I want to achieve. This way I'm able to focus on solving one problem at a time, and doing it well. This approach is just as important in personal life so that you can stay competitive, valuable and awesome. It’s a process and type of mental strategy - always striving to embrace a ‘growth mindset’ - learning and failure is just another way of doing that. Embracing a ‘growth mindset’ (as outlined by Dr. Carol Dweck from Stanford University) means believing that you can cultivate skills and abilities, and that failure is simply part of the learning process. Success is never linear, and it's only natural that mistakes will be made when trying to learn and do something new. By shifting your mindset and adopting a lean methodology to learn and fail quickly can give yourself the space to try new things and develop.


"Ultimately, the most important trait for success is grit. No matter who you are, where you are from, or how intelligent you are, it’s a gritty perseverance that is the key to success" S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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helen

BRAND

As one of the youngest Executive Directors in the IB's Equity Research team, Helen is a remarkable team leader. Shortlisted for the Women of the Future (WOF) Award, she is aiming for, and reaching, high levels of brilliance.

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Seeing the world with tunnel vision and getting stuck in the day-to-day is easy to do. We need to step back to gain a wider perspective. Helen believes in big-picture thinking, and she is applying this to staying ahead of trends, such as digitalization.

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istorically it’s been easier for men to get ahead – this needs to change, and it is, but diversity goes beyond men and women. Be inclusive of people from different backgrounds. Allow those who have traditionally been silenced to have a voice. An attitude of enablement, encouraging open sharing, and giving clear and strong direction is what creates successful leadership. Empowerment and engagement of those who work with me allows them to feel that they are part of something instead of just having a job. Overcoming various biases is perhaps one of the less tangible challenges we are facing in the financial industry, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t obstacles that are clear and defined. For example, new regulations are being implemented that change how clients pay for our services, meaning we have to come up with new solutions. Dealing with the challenges my role brings means careful planning, so it’s my philosophy to focus, organise and think ahead. Managing time effectively has to be a big part of this, or it’s easy to get stuck on menial tasks. Having a clear understanding of what clients want and delivering in a timely fashion is imperative. Keeping promises to clients is one of the most important aspects of the job, and this year I want to focus on maximizing client benefits, but my overall goal is to maximize the value of the franchise. To achieve any goal, you need to play to your strengths, but play to the strengths of others as well. Taking ownership of my career and being the one driving it is something I always try to keep in mind. It’s good to develop a thick skin so you can take the knocks, but be nice to people. And remember a good dose of humility every now and then – we never know everything.

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Dawn McCarthy Director of Central Operations and Technical UK at Rentokil Initial.

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o stay ahead of the game is pretty straight forward for me; you must have a clear plan ahead, along with absolute clarity. I find that being task orientated whilst keeping an eye on potential disruptors, serves me well. You must also, I believe, keep it relevant to your organisation because whatever you do must benefit the organisation. When it comes to people and getting their best performance you must walk them in a straight line so they know what they have to do, and play to their strengths, as everyone in my experience has at least one core strength. Look at who you have and how best you can utilise what they are good at, instead of constantly changing the team round. All they need is a clear direction, that’s the bottom line. As women the most pressure we face tends to be that pressure which we place on ourselves. We pressurise

ourselves to constantly deliver, not wanting to waste time talking about it, but to instead, just get on with it. I think everyone struggles with confidence to a degree, but this can be self-inflicted as we doubt our own ability. It’s important to recognise when this is happening and to deal with it - especially the higher up the ladder you go. We must help the younger women coming up the ranks, so they can channel any self-doubt they have to motivate and spur themselves on. Personal development is an individual thing because you need to be, and stay, selfmotivated. You have to want to improve and keep asking yourself, ‘what else can I do?’ I particularly love helping others because I have come through the ranks from admin to frontline technician to sales to where I am now, which means I have the experience to help others avoid making the same mistakes I did. My Dad once told me to

work harder than anyone else and understand how everything works. It has been such great advice for me. Now I try not to get downhearted if I don’t achieve everything I wanted to that day, and I focus on the core of what I am trying to do overall. If I get that right, then everything else will fall into place. Your goals have to be simple and everyone has to be on-board for them to be a success. Overall, I think the winning combination of consistent growth, along with resilience, is the key to success. The knocks can come frequently, so those who are able to understand what happened and how to bounce back, are the ones who do the best. To be super successful you cannot be afraid of hard work and dedication.

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HELEN CLARKE

Helen is a rising star at Accenture, leading the Global Change Capability Practice and driving change for one of Accenture’s large financial services clients Shining in the workplace

Organisations are doing more to change performance models that are geared to favour certain character traits. Success can be measured in a myriad of ways because organisations need a whole host of skills. While organisations can work to re-define its approach and remove a bias towards personality types, this may take time to embed in workplace culture. Ultimately, you should have confidence in your skills and focus on what you are great at. Not what you lack. I encourage everyone to work on having impact and showcasing those skills you know are great.

Developing future leaders

Technology is transforming our lives. It’s opening new opportunities in our lives at an unprecedented pace. It’s changing how we work, how organisations run and it’s having a profound effect in the wider economy and our consumer habits. Helen Clarke helps to transform businesses to grow in a digital future and has words of encouragement for anyone else wanting to keep ahead of the curve.

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Great leaders have a vision and set the goals high. But ultimately they support you in getting there. I find that the most effective method of personal development is on-the-job coaching. I focus most of my time on developing my team, and I feel that is my responsibility as a leader. I like to stretch and challenge my team, working closely with them to complete tasks and see their goals through. People rise to the challenge and are more motivated and engaged as a result.

Overcoming obstacles in industry

In the UK, the financial services industry will continue to navigate the uncertainties around the outcome of the Brexit negotiations. At the same time, technological disruption and start-ups will continue to challenge the growth strategies of traditional banks.


The main challenge will be to take what’s good about nimble, consumerfriendly fintechs and scale them to apply to larger financial services organisations, or to survive on their own.

My performance philosophy

You must find your balance. Or course it is different for everyone, but find out what drives your optimal performance and plan your work, life and exercise routines based on them. For me, a team can only be successful if the people within it understand what is expected of them as individuals and as a team. They must understand how their individual skills and personalities can contribute to collectively meet that goal. There are four components that I think are critical to getting to this point:

1. Know each other as individuals. It is critical that everyone in a team understands who their colleagues are as people, what the broader context of that person is and what is important to them - both in and outside of the workplace. 2. Recognise strengths and how gaps should be supported. 3. Trust. Building a level of common ground in a team is important to create a collegiate environment. Negative behaviours like blaming others should be stamped out to avoid trust being broken. 4. Clear core and stretch goals. A team needs to have a clear direction and know what success looks like.

Integrity is the key to success. Knowing yourself and what you bring to the table is the best way to succeed. Be true to who you are and stay genuine about your interests. You’ll find yourself involved in work that genuinely interests you, and you are more likely to be good at it. Be curious to learn more and apply it.

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Lucy Antrobus

Head of Strategic Growth, BT How would you advise someone to stay ahead of the game in 2018? Perception is reality – I hated that phrase for the first few years of my career, then tried embracing it and that’s when my career started developing at race pace rather than warm up pace. What pressures remain for women when it comes to succeeding in the corporate world? Women are perceived differently to men. Even other women perceive women differently than they do men. Therefore, you can’t just act like a man and expect the same things to happen as would happen if a man acted in that way. How do you approach leadership development for yourself and your colleagues? People do their best work when they’re happy. Happiness at work comes when people feel a sense of autonomy, purpose and mastery - whether they’re mastering something new or a master in the skills they’re applying in a new area. For myself, it’s about steering my role to be in areas where I feel these things, and away from areas where I don’t. For my team, it’s giving them the opportunities with the right amount of space yet support so they can have an environment where the trio is possible: autonomy, purpose and mastery.

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What challenges do you expect for the industry this year? For my work currently, it’s data. Aggregated and anonymised data can be used for the greater good but also used for no good. I’m on the side of believing it’s worth it for the good even if there’s risk involved and believe that GDPR is a great step to restricting the negative potential. Navigating our way through this provides great propositions for consumers.


What is your main focus and ultimate goal for the next year? Be better at things than I am now and be doing something I own that I’m proud of and can confidently say would not have happened if I wasn’t there! What do you think are the essential traits for growth for individuals and teams? Emotional intelligence: being able to read between the lines is critical - as is being able to work with others so that you get the best out of everyone as often as possible. Never say “That can’t be done”. Don’t start a sentence with “It’s hard because…” If you’ve got the emotional intelligence, and you can nail the attitude then its having absolute clarity and structure to your thinking. Having these means you can prioritise you and your team’s workload. This will give you time to stop and think. So many people try to run constantly and jump from one thing to the next. If they stopped and thought about their experiences and their work, they’d probably better identify what really needs doing and what is just nice to have - and therefore work far more efficiently and effectively.

Never say “That can’t be done”. Don’t start a sentence with “It’s hard because…”

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Rebecca Mahoney

"When it comes to leadership I always try and ascertain what motivates people, individually and as a team. It is important to also include your clients in this, then you have found the sweet spot, the alignment of all three".

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A consultant delivery manager at ThoughtWorks, Rebecca leads technical programmes of work for clients – driving business change through use of lean and agile principles. She enjoys developing individuals and coaching teams to scale impact, and has mentored women throughout her career. She has also served as a Trustee for charity Education Partnerships Africa and has worked across Africa and the UK. She says... Change is a constant and fast-paced so you have to get comfortable with it and accept that the goal is to learn. You must be able to adapt every day and know that it is not about ticking boxes. I have found that seeking the very best people and surrounding myself with them has helped me to push myself outside of the zone. Studies show that we make better decisions when we have bounced off different views, and so I have sought opinions to get a wide scope and perspective. Pressures come with how we approach what others expect of us. Unfortunately there is much talk about having it all, the Hollywood version of life! This depiction is unachievable and puts added pressure on us to try and be the best. Instead I believe it is important to figure out what is important for you in life, then from there figure out your goals and your wants. When it comes to leadership I always try and ascertain what motivates people, individually and as a team. It is important to also include your clients in this, then you have found the sweet spot, the alignment of all three.

We are facing certain challenges regarding the amount of data we use these days. The progress we make technology-wise means that we collect more insights, things change fast but who owns the data and what are the security issues? There is definitely a skills shortage issue in the tech industry around the world. This means there are plenty of opportunities but they are short on numbers, especially female. We are missing out on a huge amount of talent and so it begs the question, how are we going to improve this situation? Perhaps at school is a good time to teach girls about the industry, coding and a career in tech. When it comes to performance it is easy to be busy, but hard to be effective. The first thing is to have a strategy to filter out that noise and stay focused on your goal, vision and direction. Everyday think about two things you would like to achieve that can make a huge difference to how effective you are. To move forward this year we have to throw away the rule book, be revolutionary in our approach and do whatever it takes to make things happen.

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I LEAD BY EXAMPLE, T H I S I S I M P O R TA N T TO M E .

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R H O N D A RYA N M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R , H E A D O F E U RO P E , M I D D L E E A S T & A F R I C A AT P A V I L I O N A L T E R N AT I V E S G R O U P

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H E S E D AY S I T I S D I F F I C U L T T O K N O W W H AT ’ S C O M I N G F R O M

THE INVESTMENT PERSPECTIVE. SO IT IS C R I T I C A L T O S T AY F L E X I B L E A N D H A V E OPTIONS. EVERY YEAR IS DIFFERENT BUT I N 2 0 1 8 W H O K N O W S W H AT I S G O I N G T O HAPPEN IN THE GEO-POLITICAL ARENA? S O W E N E E D TO T H I N K O N O U R F E E T A N D T RY N OT TO G E T T H R OW N

OFF COURSE.

burn out. As I deal with multiple time zones and serving each client as best I can it is very challenging to perform at a high level constantly. I have found that utilizing the team to the best effect helps, which means I have to know everyone’s strengths and play to those. The team is not about having a superstar, it is playing it right so that we can all grow. The first part of my working life was in Japan and so their philosophy of playing to everyone’s strengths works for me because it builds a stronger team. To succeed you need determination and persistence. It is easy to give up when you come across challenges…life is not easy! Determination makes the difference. No matter what your circumstances are, keep going!"

"For women it is difficult to balance it all and not feel guilty! We feel guilty about everything, parenting, taking time off, taking time for ourselves…how do we not feel guilty?! Maybe we can have it all; a high flying career, a happy family whilst looking the part but you will need a lot of support, especially from your spouse. It is crucial to try and maintain a balance but at the same time to have the confidence to move forward in your career. You don’t need to be 100% qualified for the next role, you just need to be confident in your abilities. We are short of role models in this industry, so you just have to forge your own path and make yourself heard. I lead by example, this is important to me. Everyone has something to add and I see it as my role to harness and hone these ideas and put them to work. Throughout you must remain true to yourself and develop your own style, or a style that suits you. Then focus on motivating your team remembering that you are all in it together. The market is frothy and expensive at the moment and my clients are looking for advice to give them a good return, therefore, I have to look for investments for clients in the right place. So I am very mindful of the changes Brexit will bring and am keeping a close eye on it. I am on a phone or email almost 24/7 which makes is difficult at home some of the time and if you are not careful you can

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2018 TOP FEMALE LEADERS SUMMARY... On the 24th November 2017 we gathered together our top female leaders and asked them what they believed are the main issues for professional women today. From various industries and backgrounds, our leaders discussed, debated and divulged their ideas, challenges and concerns. > Here is just some of what was said; Women n eed to be empowere d more so they don’t succumb to limitation s like Imp oster Syndrom e.

How do we celebrate diversity of roles in IT and Tech?

age en man m o w o can How d alance… b e f li / k all? a wor have it y ll a e r we

How can we stop family planning impeding our career growth?

We need to engage men more in the diversity debate, because it is not over yet!

e few rol o o t e r en There a for wom s l e d o m ale few fem o o t d n a s. mentor

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How can women have equal roles and pay?

If we do make a stand we are often seen as bossy and domineering.

How do we change the customer’s perception of gender typical occupations?


> What do you think is possible for women within the next 5 years? It depends on what we choose to do to help ourselves and each other. If we do nothing but wait for others to make a move, then nothing will happen. >

> What has been the most effective change you have made to your mindset? Self-belief and resilience.

> What is the hardest part of success for you? Holding myself back when I should be pushing myself forward.

> Best advice you were ever given? Be yourself and never worry about what people think about you.

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S H I N E U K S P E C I A L F E AT U R E

EXCEED AND LEAD A dynamic, new forum for top female executives

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EXCEED AND LEAD

The EXL group meet regularly in-person, and online, to address the specific challenges professional women face today. We provide a unique and much-needed forum for emerging and existing women leaders to openly discuss, and actively resolve, challenges. The ultimate goal of EXL is to help talented, engaged career women find new solutions to their key challenges so that they may grow personally and professionally throughout their careers, and attain their highest levels of efficiency, engagement and productivity. EXL is a unique collective of top women and a leading edge personal development forum in one.

This is the year to step up and embrace being a female in your industry with gusto, assurance and ownership.

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Being a part of the EXL group means joining like-minded women to collaborate, network and powerfully charge your life. Experts, guest speakers and thought leaders will be regularly available to help you make the most of your talents, hopes and dreams.

To enquire about joining EXL you first have to be;

DEDICATED TO PERSONAL GROWTH INTERESTED IN SHARING AND NETWORKING ALREADY LEADING A TEAM LOOKING FOR SOLUTIONS TO DRIVE YOUR CAREER WANTING TO HELP OTHERS IN A BIG WAY

WE HELP YOU TO EXL, SO YOU CAN INSPIRE OTHERS TO DO THE SAME

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We make shifts, learn new solutions and develop strong relationships outside of our organisations and industries. We dive deep in to some of the most effective personal development growth strategies around today and make more progress than we ever thought possible.

HOW WE DO IT

We are looking for women who are willing to shine and help others do the same. We have a full programme of events lined up for the year designed to be exciting and progressive, but not overwhelming or too time consuming.

> Support, encouragement, skills

Expect; breakthroughs, being inspired and massive fulfilment.

> Influence and inspire others

If this speaks to you, then contact us for an application form at success@shineukmagazine.com

Exceed > Monthly events both live and virtual > Expert private and group personal development

Lead > Collaborate and share solutions, ideas and goals

> Lead the way in joining an independent, effective and life-enhancing forum for like-minded women

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Sharpen Your with Nutritio (and a few other lifestyle tips) By Merilyn Parker Armitage certified nautropath

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r Brain on

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ur understanding of the brain has dramatically increased in the last 5 to 10 years. In particular we now know that the brain is not the supreme controller as it was described for many years, but works in partnership with other vital organs - in particular the gut which is now being called the ‘second brain’. As a naturopath I see the body as a system of interconnecting parts. The cells talk to each other, as do the specialised cells of the organs, each doing their part to maintain our complete body system. We look at people’s symptoms in the light of this and look at the story across time - both a lifetime and across generations. So how can you ensure not only your brain funtions at its optimum level but also lays the foundation for generations to come? The brain uses a huge amount of energy compared with other parts of the body. (Gomez Pinilla 2010). In fact although the brain only represents 2% of body weight it consumes 20% of the energy produced by the body.

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So without an efficient conversion from food to energy we are likely to experience

• brain fog • memory problems • fatigue • lack of concentration • emotional issues such as depression or mood swings If you want to gain better clarity in your thinking, be able to enjoy greater happiness and sense of well being, solve problems more efficiently and have better memory recall and concentration then this is an important article for you. The brain gets its energy from a substance called glucose found largely in carbohydrates. These need to be complex carbohydrates - found in unrefined rice, and whole grains, which release energy more slowly and keep the brain stable. Refined grains on the other hand (found in white bread, rice and pasta and sugar and fructose) lead to instability in glucose levels which if allowed to continue unchecked can turn into Diabetes Type 2. We also need to cut out completely damaging transfats which contribute to the oxidation process in the cells leaving a toxic waste ‘ash’ behind. These are oils that have been cooked or tampered with, therefore altering its biochemical structure. They are found in manmade cakes and biscuits and margarines. The brain operates through a network of synapses and neurons (specialised cells throughout the body which are part of the nervous system) which can develop and reconstruct in different configurations as we grow up, learn and collect memories and information about the world. It is these connections and configurations which can change and develop over

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time. The more connnections we have the more we can access data rapidly and solve problems. Activities can help with this from before birth to - well who knows when. It is a myth that the brain will inevitably atrophy. In fact we are finding the reverse is true - the brain can develop until who knows what age.


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e can summarise with a list of foods that you need to include in your diet in order to help your brain (and gut) function well.

PRINCIPL E 1 SLEEP AND REST ARE VITAL. Neither is it just nutrition that is vital for brain health but also sleep and toxin removal/reduction. A brain that doesn’t get rest cannot do the cleansing and reorganisation that is required in order to process despite excellent nutrition. Additionally if we are stressed then this will impair these processes and add to the toxic overload already weighed down by chemicals and environmental toxicity. Meditation and mindfulness can also help us with these processes.

PRINCIPL E 2 REDUCE TOXICITY CAUSED BY ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS AND STRESS. It is well known that alcohol impairs brain function. We test for alcohol and drug levels in the blood, in situations such as driving or operating certain machinery where high levels of cognitive functioning and reaction time are required. Drugs attach to the endorphin receptors in cells hijacking our natural ‘feel good’ biochemistry so that we become dependent upon them. Leaving our brains unable to process without them.

PRINCIPL E 3 WATER IS AN ESSENTIAL NEED FOR THE BRAIN If we are dehydrated then the body will ensure that the brain at least is hydrated - removing water from other parts of the body. So it is essential to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day and not with meals since this will dilute the gastric juices and the body’s ability to digest food and nutrients to transport to the brain and all parts of the body.

FOR NON-VEGETARIANS Fish, turkey, lamb and eggs. NUTS In particular walnuts and cashew nuts, and not nuts cooked in fats. DARK GREEN VEGETABLES Brocolli, kale, spinach, rucola/ brussels sprouts, cabbage, courgettes, watercress OTHER VEGETABLES Onions, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, tomatoes, squash, cauliflower, avocados, SEEDS Sprouted alfalfa seeds, chia. PULSES Lentils - any red, puy or whatever. BEANS Red kidney beans, black beans. WHOLE GRAINS Brown rice, sprouted seed breads. SPICES Cinnamon, curcumin (turmeric). l ard wil the rew e im g e and his r thinking o try t If you d rity of a l c ort. f f e s mou th the r o w be enor l l in is we at bra ss that id of th r t e calmne g a can otion l ary you n, or em io s s e In summ r dep e your tigue or increas fog, fa sia and e n m a or rgy. swings, and ene vitality

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OPRAH & CO

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Dear Sisters, This is how the Letter of Solidarity begins on the Time’s Up campaign. It is a call to the sisterhood of a coming together, of being brave in the face of adversity and lending your voice to what needs to be a complete stop of all the injustices women endure.

“Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year, we became the story. But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace."

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prah's stature and eloquence recently added to this and the #MeToo campaign when she addressed the world using her acceptance of the Cecil B. DeMille Award on The Golden Globes stage. Despite the distracting call for her to run for the presidency afterwards, her words cut deep and gave extra gravitas to the movement.

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Oprah said...

“Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year, we became the story. But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends

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any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they’re in academia and engineering and medicine and science. They’re part of the world of tech

and politics and business. They’re our athletes in the Olympics and they’re our soldiers in the military…. …So I want all the girls watching here and now to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say “me too” again" Thank you.”


Throughout the night viewers tweeted about #TimesUp roughly 473,900 times. Another 178,500 tweets mentioned #WhyIWearBlack, while 174,300 mentioned the #MeToo movement. As women and men in the entertainment industry took to the red carpet dressed in black, Emma Watson explained why; “We’re wearing black in solidarity. It makes me really emotional actually, thinking about this movement that we’ve put together is across industries, it’s across communities, and it’s across spaces. It’s such a show that this issue doesn’t just affect women in Hollywood. The issue is affecting women everywhere, in every country around the world. It is global, it is systemic, it is structural, and we’re all joining together in that tonight to amplify this message.” “Having women in Hollywood shine a light on this issue and stand in solidarity with a whole range of activists is absolutely amazing, because what it does is says this is really important, you can’t look away anymore,” said Marai Larasi, Watson’s date and executive director of Imkaan, a black feminist organization in the United Kingdom. Director Ava Duvernay noted that while the red carpet blackout is an important first step, there’s much more to be done in fighting for women in the workplace. “It’s really simple. This is not an end-all, be-all, it’s not a solution to a very systemic problem, but I think it’s important for people like us who have the spotlight on us to turn that light on an issue that’s larger than patting ourselves

on the back,” she said. Following the success of the Golden Globes silent statement, stars opted to either hold or wear a white rose to the Grammys 2018, to show their support for the movement. The stunt was organised by music executives Meg Markins, of Roc Nation, and Karen Rait, of Interscope,

Geffen and A&M Records. The two women penned an open letter to music stars before the event. "We choose the white rose because historically it stands for hope, peace, sympathy and resistance," they wrote. "The world is listening. Wear a white rose."

About Time’s Up The initiative, supported by three hundred female Hollywood actors, agents, writers, directors, producers and entertainment executives – including Natalie Portman, Emma Stone and Reese Witherspoon contains a $13m legal defense fund to help women in less privileged professions protect themselves from sexual misconduct and the consequences that may arise from reporting it. Launched with an open letter signed by hundreds of women in show business, including Ashley Judd, Eva Longoria, America Ferrera, Rashida Jones and Kerry Washington, as well as powerful backroom Hollywood figures, including producer Shonda Rhimes, whose credits include Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal. “The struggle for women to break in, to rise up the ranks and to simply be heard and acknowledged in male-dominated workplaces must end; time’s up on this impenetrable monopoly” “If this group of women can’t fight for a model for other women who don’t have as much power and privilege, then who can?” Rhimes told the New York Times. Time’s Up is launched as a companion to the #MeToo movement that grew out of the spontaneous response to revelations about Hollywood’s “casting-couch” system of sexual predation and enduring gender-pay disparities. While attention has largely focused on show business and the media, Time’s Up seeks to include the plight of working-class women.

For ways to support the movement go to www.timesupnow.com S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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TECH

GODDESSES

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here are few female role models in this world, especially in Tech, so we decided to shine the light on a few of our own. The following looks at UK-based Tech Goddesses who are innovating, creating, collaborating and producing to enable a better future.

We asked them about their story and how they came to be where they are today. We also asked them what drives them, what they are passionate about and what they want to achieve. We also took a deep dive on what issues they believe face the industry and the women in it. All agree that there needs to be more women in tech, and so it is our intention that these women inspire you to take a fresh look at the opportunities this fast paced and exciting sector offers.

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Foundational technology for a wireless world. We interview Helen Attia – Head of Sales and Marketing at Chargifi

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hat is your specific role?

I’m responsible for business development across the company. The Chargifi solution is a foundational technology for wireless power in public places. Wireless charging has been released as a feature in the latest iPhones, Samsung have had wireless power for over three years and so we’re setting up the infrastructure globally, for the no cables-world that is coming! We’re working to set up public spaces - hotels, stadia, food and drink venues, corporate offices, travel hubs - with a convenient, wireless power solution for their customers. We work closely with partners who take our solution into their customer base too. One part of my role I’m enjoying a lot at the moment is building out our partner program - getting the right teams aligned with what we’re doing. One of our recent partners is ITI Network Services, a telecoms services and infrastructure specialist operating in traditional telco environments. They deploy Wi-Fi in public venues and are now setting up wireless charging as well.. What’s your background and journey to the role that you have today, focusing on the challenges and the decisions you’ve made to get where you are? Over the last twelve years of my career thus far, I’ve been lucky enough to gain a variety of experience - living and working outside of the UK, taking on roles right across an organisation and this was very much a conscious decision, to get as diverse a range of experience as

possible to determine what I enjoy, what I’m good at; where I can bring the most benefit to an organisation. I’ve had HR responsibilities, spent time in client success and account management roles, and more recently have been more focused on marketing and sales. . What are you passionate about, is there one thing that drives you? It’s all about the team. This is one of the key things I enjoy in growing the companies I work with, when you get to work with great people and you’re all driving in the same direction, working towards a common goal that excites everyone. I have really appreciated the opportunity to work with such a variety of people. For me it’s about relationships and communication and that’s actually what I love about sales. Where do you look to for a leadership and success structure? From a personal development perspective I think there’s a lot of great content out there on modern-day teams and leadership structures and I try to take advantage of that. Understanding though, that there isn’t just one way to do all of this has been an important lesson for me - realising that you can be more successful by being yourself, doing things your way, rather than trying to be someone else, or do it the way others do. I know in the early days of my career, I did think that there was a certain way of doing things and it probably slowed me down because I was forcing myself to operate in a way that wasn’t natural to me.

Helen Attia

Women in senior roles, what’s your view point on that? It’s a big, big subject. In the technology industry in particular there are very few female role models. Finding the freedom to be yourself can sometimes be difficult. This can be true for men too of course, not just women. It can be particularly hard for women because in general there are less women in senior positions in the corporate world and then when it comes to the technology industry, the numbers are just embarrassing, which ultimately means there are fewer examples of successful female role models. I’ve had a fantastic ride so far working in the technology space. It suits me very well even though I’ve never worked on the development side. At Chargifi we are passionate about the future that we’re creating - what we’re doing for consumers and businesses. Our company is a great one to work for, for women and men. I think sometimes when people think of technology they think of coding. There’s certainly a shortage of women coders, but it’s not only the development part of a technology organisation that suffers without greater diversity, I’d like

"There’s certainly a shortage of women coders, and it’s not only the development part of a technology organisation that suffers without greater diversity, I’d like to see more senior women in technology companies generally, working across the functions that tech and non tech organisations require, including sales and marketing" S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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to see more senior women in technology companies generally, working across the functions that tech and non tech organisations require, including sales and marketing. When the lack of women in technology is talked about, it’s somewhat detrimental to be only talking just about those very technical roles. So what can we do to improve that situation, what do you suggest the tech industry does to make it more attractive for women? The start-up scene is doing quite a bit and thinking out loud, that’s possibly why I have spent a fair bit of my career so far in this space. Organisations that are built from the ground up with younger, entrepreneurial minds tend to be looking for diverse teams. Although I’d liked to believe that the vast majority of us recognise that diversity drives performance in organisations. I’d

suggest that the tech industry places more emphasis on the opportunity it has to bring about real change - its what this space is all about and its attractive to most of us, working towards lasting change - rather than simply focusing on the detail of the technology itself. What is success to you? I’d say to me, success is being able to consistently achieve, hit targets, drive things forward. I’ve been able to adapt to change over the last twelve years and - because technology evolves so quickly - I have loved operating in this space and continue to be motivated by it. I would advise those at the start of their career or embarking on a new one, to try not to be anybody else, because you’re unlikely to be successful unless you’re being true to you.

"I’d like to give a shout out to the fab women working on the Chargifi team and our extended team - Kaja, Natalie, Juli, Sian, Shannon, Annabel and Emma"

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anoushka farouk

HEAD OF MARKETING EVERYLIFE TECHNOLOGIES

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"Healthcare Tech means a lot to me personally as both my parents were home care managers. Tied down with paperwork, our home life would have been so much easier today. The smartphone application also allows family members of those in care to have a complete view of what care has been delivered and allows them to stay connected" 72

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his gives them peace of mind, comfort and eliminates any worry. My role as Head of Marketing is to focus on the digital marketing arena, taking it to next level and making sure we utilize it fully, for maximum exposure. In the last nine years, my life has changed. I used to struggle with self confidence and self esteem, I studied the Arts initially and came into marketing later on, so I feel that I have started my career over again. I wanted to make up for lost time after changing direction and starting from the bottom rung. I picked up skills and remained teachable, getting what I needed to move on. I climbed up quickly, learning how to be in an office environment and growing my confidence as I went. Eventually I became a marketing manager at Samsung and then fell pregnant, so when I came back to work at Applied Technology, I needed more flexibility. As my career grew from strength to strength, it was great to be at the forefront of marketing technology, internet marketing and pay per click technologies – I had to know my stuff and build my skills. Attending trade shows and PR events helped to build my confidence further as I became more visible, and I began to realise that I wanted more ownership of the marketing strategy of the business. The next two years are going to be exciting times at everyLIFE. The NHS are on board with the idea and are making it a key agenda, so things are set to rise for us rapidly. When it comes to leadership the key for me is humility. I have always lead with respect for my team and try to learn from


“Security is important to me … I have put my heart into developing the marketing strategy of this company and I want to see it grow” them. After all, you have brought people on board to do a job and so supporting them, sharing knowledge and being approachable is the best way. There is far too much ego in the industry but the people I respect are ones who remain humble, full of knowledge and I can pick up the phone and talk to. Being distant doesn’t work. You must engage and it is important to involve yourself socially to show them who you are. It is about allowing people to grow and be the best they can be. I think being a woman of an ethnic minority, I am under immense pressure to prove myself. I cannot change people’s perceptions, only what is between my ears. I constantly have to work on believing that I am enough and I am grateful I have the self-belief when need it. Security is a big deal for me. I want to feel valued too because it is not about the pay packet, prestige or the size of the team. I have put my heart and soul into helping build this company and I want to see it grow, so I am sticking with it and persevering. My advice to anyone is to know that success is an inside job. Remain teachable, never be afraid to ask a question and be bold and speak out. This year for me is about performing better than before, challenging myself and pushing to be the best I can be.

About everyLIFE Technologies Launched in 2015, everyLIFE Technologies is rapidly transforming social care through its intelligent care management platform, The PASSsystem and smartphone application for care service users and their families, openPASS. Eliminating timeconsuming paperwork, and dramatically reducing the risk of medicines mismanagement through the real-time delivery and analysis of digital care notes, everyLIFE is driving up quality of care, while also delivering breakthrough efficiencies and service compliance.

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Imogen Bunyard CEO and Co-founder & Laura Bailey, Founder

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ADRE is our newest company in a string of highly innovative technology companies, including Zerado and Disberse; each one has had a different value proposition, but they have all shared a common culture of encouraging personal development and wider social impact. Qadre involves working on highly experimental projects that showcase blockchain technology across a number of sectors – it’s very exciting to break new ground technologically and work with governments, lawyers, and regulators to shape international policy change.

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"BEING ABLE TO SCULPT THE CULTURE OF YOUR OWN BUSINESS IS THE MOST FULFILLING THING YOU CAN DO AS A FOUNDER"

"We have both been involved in businesses with unpleasant cultures and were passionate about creating the right environment for our team - being able to sculpt the culture of your own business is the most fulfilling thing you can do as a founder. What we do as a company is very unique, so we need a hugely diverse team to deliver this vision; this can be difficult at times as this means incorporating multiple different working styles and perspectives, so we try to encourage collaboration and the sharing of knowledge across departments to prevent a divided culture. We founded Qadre with the vision of

bringing trust to the digital world through blockchain – essentially providing greater accountability and transparency to the internet – something that has huge implications in all sectors. We’ve worked with many industries and have found that they invariably work with outmoded technologies and processes, but the biggest barrier to innovating is not the technology or regulation, it is the internal cultural approach to improvement – meaning a huge portion of what we focus on is change management. Qadre has its own in-house developed blockchain technology, meaning we are able to tailor it to a number of different use-cases and

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showcase the value of the technology in a variety of examples. Anti-counterfeiting in pharmaceuticals is a huge international problem – the statistics are difficult to quantify due to the nature of the problem, but it is estimated that the annual market for counterfeit drugs is up to €200 billion and 1 million people die annually due to consuming these forged drugs. By creating a hardware chip that sticks to the physical pharmaceutical packet, we are able to assign each pack a unique digital identity which we trace down the supply chain, ensuring every time it passes to a new party they take accountability for the item; if the packet stops scanning, we then know that the item has been switched out or compromised, and therefore who was responsible. This will allow the end consumer to have the knowledge that they are safe and receiving the right treatment when they scan and consume the product. With solutions like this, we work closely with the regulators – understanding what they need from the industry, and look to create a technical solution that solves a real-world problem that can easily be avoided. While we are still at the start of our journey as a business, we believe our vision for the world is extremely relevant for all sectors – change is coming and you can embrace it or be outpaced by your competitors. Many organisations in recent years have been shocked by how start-ups have been able to outcompete the sector incumbents, but in this world of ever-changing innovation, you can only stay ahead by remaining agile, working in tandem with your regulators, and embracing the value and efficiency that new technologies can provide you".

About Imogen Imogen is the daughter of two entrepreneurs and has followed in their footsteps by co-founding a number of technology companies. She has always worked in the intersect between academia, public and private sector giants, and technology start-ups and has been fascinated by the opportunities afforded by their collaborating. But what strikes you about Imogen the most, is her warmth, passion for making a difference and her humility...all true traits of an inspirational person who, we feel, has only just started her journey – there is so much more to come.

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About Laura Laura spent the best part of a decade at HSBC in a number of roles, including in leverage finance and running the global CRM. Becoming frustrated about the pace of change and the limitations of processes, she had a boardroom epiphany that any future there wouldn’t hold the excitement she was looking for. She then moved into the world of fintech innovation and set up a number of blockchain companies where she could implement her own vision. Now a spokesperson for the British Blockchain Association, Laura loves working with the team at Qadre, despite the long hours, and is passionate about the opportunities that technology holds. Laura and Imogen met working on the first European large-scale blockchain project and being similarly minded, clicked immediately. Now they spend a lot of time together on business trips or in the office with their CavaChon puppy Nezzie and their famous prosecco-fridge. They trust each other implicitly, love their work, and are hugely passionate about helping empower the entrepreneurs of tomorrow.

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R o na Rut hen H e a d of O per ati o n s at Fin tec h star tu p Cu r ve From Israel, now living in London, Rona has been in Fintech and Payments for over 10 years. She loves the dynamic environment and enjoys her role as Head of Operations at Fintech startup Curve. Focusing on customer experience, fincrime, operational projects and processes, she has been helping to shape the world's first 'connected finance' platform. It's a smart Mastercard, with an even smarter app that allows you to load all your debit and credit cards into one place. Curve is on a mission to simplify the way we spend, see and save money. This also means a less crammed purse or wallet, more security, better control of our money and a platform to other financial services, ultimately simplifying our lives. 78

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‘It's an exciting time at Curve. We launched our product for consumers a couple of weeks ago and are getting great feedback! There are more features and improvements coming out soon and we continue to grow the team. Fintech is blooming, with so many companies working hard to add more value to customers.’ When it comes to asking about her key to success, Rona believes that success changes over time for people so it's not an easy question to answer. What was the key ten years ago is not necessarily what it is now. She says; ‘Today, it is about achievements, building a product


"There is not enough equality in Fintech yet, with not enough women moving up the ladder. Diversity is not just the right thing to do, it also impacts the bottom line and we are not as far on as some people think we are. I believe we still have quite a way to go" people love, and fighting through the day to day issues whilst trying to maintain a balance.’ Rona is mindful that problems should be viewed with a wider perspective, like asking yourself, 'will it matter a year from now?’ This she says, can work on a personal and business level. Being astute and highly organised, Rona focuses on what is the most important thing at that time in order to get things done. She believes that starting the day well with exercise helps set the tone and a feeling of accomplishment. She adds: ‘Running or Yoga... with two half marathons under my belt, I hope one

day to complete a full marathon.’ Rona thinks of her life as a never ending process. She is constantly looking for ways to grow both personally and professionally. Her focus point right now is building a great team and an open and supportive culture for them to thrive in. As a senior woman in FinTech, Rona says; ‘There is not enough equality in Fintech yet, with not enough women moving up the ladder. Diversity is not just the right thing to do, it also impacts the bottom line and we are not as far on as some people think we are. I believe we still have quite a way to go. Personally, I have never felt a significant impact on

my career for being a woman, but I am mindful of the differences around me, and I hope to be helpful in shaping a better workplace for other women.’

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Wonderbly, previously Lost My Name, is an award winning independent

technology and publishing business. Launched in 2012, Wonderbly has sold over 2.7 million books in over two hundred countries around the world. They combine the power of storytelling, design and technology, creating products that give you the power to make magical, meaningful connections with the children in your life.

We talk to Nic Wilkinson Former Head of PR

I wasn’t behind the idea, but I am very lucky to have been a part of it since the early days when they brought me in as a freelancer. Then low and behold four years later, I am here managing the campaign globally. This has been amazing to see from what was literally a pet project to now becoming this global phenomenon. We didn’t come up with anything that new, personalised books have been around for such a long time that they have always been a novelty, a gimmick. They were very much the same book for everyone with just a child’s name slapped in the same story. Our Founder and CEO Asi Sharabi, came up with the idea for this better concept after being given a personalised book for his daughter and being completely underwhelmed by it. We knew we could do something better with the format and make it magical, taking it to another level. In a collaboration with the Roald Dahl Estate their new Willy Wonka story takes the reader through a simplified version of the original using clever personalisation to add a touch of the unexpected. Each child's name is scrolled into oompa loompa rhymes and character plots. This is the most innovative project I’ve ever worked on and again it’s not just going to be Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, it’s going to be a completely different experience for a child. Each and every book will be unique. The technology available to us now just blows me away every time. Formerly Head of PR globally, her career began in traditional book publishing straight out of University. She made a gradual move to being Head of PR in children’s books via a stint in New York. At 28 years old she had a dream role in mind of being one of the biggest kid’s publishers when a curve ball struck that changed things dramatically, she became pregnant with her first child. She went back to work after having her first child with a gung ho approach that nothing would change.

Believing she would just go straight back in full time. Nic didn’t take the full year out and so quite soon afterwards was hit by how hard it is to juggle work and family: ‘I felt a lot of pressure when I had to leave meetings because my child was ill. It was such hard work. So, when we had daughter number two, I took quite a brave move to go freelance. It was probably the best decision I have ever made.

‘This is the most innovative project I’ve ever worked on and again it’s not just going to be Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, it’s going to be a completely different experience for a child. Each and every book will be unique. The technology available to us now just blows me away every time.

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I don’t know whether I would have taken the risk before having children. It’s the push I felt and you know, it has been great. I built up a small agency with a really good client list, and that’s when Wonderbly (then What’s My Name) came knocking at my door.’ The company then grew big quite fast during 2015 which led Nic to decide to go all in and join the company. What is Success for you? The best advice I was ever given was from my Dad who always encouraged me to go after what I wanted to do and never hold back. Because success to me is having everything in perspective. There are certain times when work demands more of you, but family is so important to me and having that work/ life balance is always something I am going to strive for.

are women. But we’ve acknowledged that, and I think it’s a real problem across the tech industry as a whole that isn’t going away any time soon. We all really need to look at company culture. This is something that we’re really focusing on right now. I believe because women are attracted by a positive inclusive company, culture and the industry does need to work harder at fostering this. Encouraging women into those roles You know traditionally there is a drive to get more women to code, and there’s some fantastic organisations out there who are offering access to learning. And you can see it, within Wonderbly as well, the traditional female roles like; creative, PR and HR are more dominant than female engineers for example - and this is what’s causing the imbalance. Have you ever had a really great female role model? Yes, I would say my female managers have all been a great role models to me. I feel like I now have a circle of real influential senior managers that I do still turn to from time to time, even though they’ve left or moved on. I think that’s really important because we all have moments of self-doubt, and being able to call on people that have inspired you in the past is so helpful and encouraging.

And you know I think the most successful people are the people that do take time to reward themselves. You need to always remind yourself of why you’re making the sacrifices you’re making. Otherwise, you will head towards burn out so, I would say, success is taking care of yourself and being able to have that outlet, whether it’s exercise, or just spending time with the family. I think success is also having a passion for what you do, and I think I’ve always had a passion for books. I have been in publishing a while, but now I am in the tech industry. I love the innovation, which excites me and motivates me. I am also proud that I am working for a company that my kids understand, and pride motivates me too. Inside Wonderbly At the moment we don’t have many females in senior management. We have a leadership team and 20% of that team

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So what does the future hold? More and more innovation, coming from a traditional background of books, they now have an opportunity to surprise and delight. It humbles me, almost on a daily basis, the level of innovation coming up. I can’t even begin to predict what will happen in two to three years’ time. Wonderbly have taken the child’s address and incorporated mapping technologies aswell. We’ve recently launched a book based on a child’s birth date, there is no end to the ways we’re looking at personalisation and how it can create a really great story within a story. I see that there’s very much this pooling of minds, and as more diversity comes into the tech industry I can only see that thriving.


“…More women than men are employed in the financial services sector, but female representation at senior levels has been historically low. Gender diversity across job grades and functions delivers benefits to firms, society and the wider economy… “ Rt Hon. Nicky Morgan MP, Chair of the HM Treasury Committee

Women in Finance Summit 2018 A One-Day Conference, 22nd March, London Come along and hear from senior decision-makers in the FS industry including: • Chairmen, Chief Executives and other Board Directors • Female and male senior and middle management • Chairmen, Chief Executives and senior female management in large private companies • Heads of HR, Remuneration, Diversity and Inclusion Speakers include: • Rt Hon Nicky Morgan MP, Chair, HM Treasury Committee • Joanna Place, Chief Operating Officer, Bank of England • Megan Butler, Executive Director of Supervision – Investment, Wholesale and Specialists, Financial Conduct Authority • Hilary Spencer, Director, The Government Equalities Office • Sarah Gisele Brookes Boddey, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, EMEA & APAC, Northern Trust • Senior Representative, UK Finance • Janet Cooper OBE, Partner, Tapestry • Maria-Angelica Latorre, Global Head-Channel Management, IPC Systems To find out more and book:

www.cityandfinancialconferences.com/womeninfinance2018


1918 - 2018

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100 YEARS OF VOTING WHAT HAVE WE GAINED? It is astonishing to look back one hundred years and see what those brave women did to win the right to vote. Against much adversity, prejudice and obstruction, a relatively small group of passionate women gave the rest of us a powerful and much needed legacy. But how far on have we come? Would the likes of Pankhurst and Fawcett be proud of what we have achieved since?

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MAJOR CHANGES, PARLIAMENTARY ACTS AND ORGANISATIONS HAVE DEVELOPED FOR WOMEN IN THE UK ALONE. SOME OF THESE INCLUDE; EQUAL PAY AND OTHER EMPLOYMENT ACTS, SEX DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACTS, ABORTION, HUMAN RIGHTS AND WOMEN’S AID ACTS.

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aws have been passed that provide concrete services required by women. Examples include healthcare legislation around abortion and contraception and welfare provision such as child benefits and maternity pay. Legislation has also provided an equal platform from which women can fight for their human rights. However, some of these battles are still being fought, whilst new significant ones appear almost daily online, and in the pages of our own home-grown media. Hillary Clinton’s US presidential campaigns and commentary on Theresa May’s leadership have shown that women with power are often mocked. Additionally, women in the public eye are subjected to higher rates of online abuse than men. Legislation alone is not going to be enough to ensure changes to women’s lives. Although these changes have enabled women to gain, for examples, the right to education, property rights, political representation, and access to contraceptives and abortion. So much so, things that were once unthinkable, such as a married woman divorcing her husband for adultery or a woman’s right to enter the professions, are now safeguarded by law. As a consequence women’s experience and attitudes towards women have changed dramatically. Here are a selection of civil society, academic, business and government reports and reviews on women’s and girls’ participation, power and leadership published in the UK recently: The Fawcett Society | Centre for Women and Democracy and the Counting Women In Coalition | London School of Economics Commission on Gender, Inequality and Power | Girlguiding | The Young Foundation | Women’s Equality Network Wales | Northumbria University | Lancaster, Roehampton and Bradford universities | University of Bristol | University of

Cambridge | Ulster University | YWCA Scotland | Scottish Women’s Convention | EHRC | House of Commons | Northern Ireland Assembly | Women’s Policy Group Northern Ireland | Equality Commission for Northern Ireland | Welsh Assembly | ERS Cymru | Engender | Women’s Business Council | The 30% Club | Virgin Money with HM Treasury | PWC | Ernst & Young | CIPD | Telefónica | Deloitte with Government Equalities Office We have taken huge strides forward across all areas from the top levels of government and the professions, women are changing perceptions about their roles and capabilities.

Most recently, the Women and Equalities Select Committee has been set up in the UK parliament to hear evidence from experts and women’s representatives and make recommendations to government. Similar focal points exist across the UK. Women from all backgrounds have

a voice, and create change through a vibrant energetic and independent women’s sector. Also through their professional organisations, trade unions and through their own businesses. However, there is plenty more hard work ahead as we need to make more progress with key rights and opportunities. These include the gender stereotypes, prejudice and violence against women - tackle these and we can strengthen civil society and encourage partnerships across government, civil and private sectors, so women will be able to contribute effectively and realise their full potential.

We have taken huge strides forward across all areas from the top levels of government and the professions, women are changing perceptions about their roles and capabilities. S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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WE HAVE TWO BRAINS, HERE IS THE FASCINATING STORY ABOUT HOW THIS HAPPENED AND HOW IT CAN MAKE YOU... FEEL HEALTHIER THAN EVER

SHINE speak to Synergy Purify Kit

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Everyone has heard “that gut feeling” “butterflies in the stomach”, “gut instinct” and the latest clinical research shows that those are not simply expressions but something that humanity knew for a long time

There is a direct link between our brain and our gut and it is not surprising since the two nervous systems were formed at the same time and from identical tissues during fetal development.

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he gut is not simply a part of your gastrointestinal tract but an extension of our nervous system - the enteric nervous system - our body’s second brain. And this second brain controls us more than you know. It influences our moods, feelings, emotions and dictates our everyday choices. This second brain works together with trillions of microbes and fungi that reside in our gut to digest and absorb energy and nutrition, produce hormones and vitamins, neutralise toxins and keep us vibrant and healthy. Everyone knows serotonin, the “happiness hormone”, but not many people know that the majority of serotonin is actually produced in the gut with the help of microbiome. It is just one of the examples that proves that our gut microbiome can directly influence our mood and behaviour. Indeed a healthy gut leads to a healthy mind! In order to support the gut biome we need to consume enough probiotic rich foods or high quality supplements and prebiotics to provide food for thriving and balanced microbiome. It goes without saying that we must look after your gut. The good news is that it is possible to improve your gut health with food and here are the main products that will feed your gut and your brain:

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CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES Broccoli, cauliflower, kale, brussel sprouts. Super foods that have it all in abundance: vitamins, minerals, fibre and phytochemicals.

YOGURT AND KEFIR Full of beneficial bacteria, a good source of protein, vitamins and bioavailable calcium. Choose unsweetened and full fat varieties. If you are intolerant of cows milk you can choose non-cow milk alternatives.

SAUERKRAUT, KIMCHI AND FERMENTED VEGETABLES Not only do these foods provide excellent probiotics through fermentation process, they also provide food for our friendly bacteria. Add some to your lunch-time salad or as a side dish for dinner and reap the benefits.

OILY FISH Omega-3 oils in fish are very good not just for your brain but also for your gut. Recent research showed that people with higher levels of Omega-3 in their blood also had greater variety of bacteria in their gut. Cold-water oily fish varieties are best: mackerel, sardines, wild salmon, herring. And if you have a choice try to go for wild caught rather than farmed fish.

KOMBUCHA It is a fizzy drink made from fermented tea with antioxidant properties. A double whammy - you get all the benefits of drinking tea plus the added benefit of probiotics.

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MISO A protein rich paste made from fermented soybean. It is rich in essential vitamins, minerals, gut friendly bacteria. Miso can be used in a variety of ways not just in soup. Make sure you buy organic non-gmo varieties.

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL A staple in the Mediterranean diet, cold pressed extra virgin olive oil in rich in polyphenols that act as antioxidants and are excellent for diverse gut microbiome, gut and brain health. It is always better to buy fresh olive oil harvested less than a year previously. The best olive oils are consumed within 6 months of harvesting.

CHICORY ROOT Substitute your midday coffee with a chicory root drink to reduce caffein consumption. Chicory root contain inulin that is a powerful prebiotic to feed friendly gut bacteria and has been known to have anti-inflammatory benefits.

CLEAN WATER Drinking enough water is important for our health. But you always need to pay attention to the quality of the water; filtered water is a preferred option. Tap water might contain chlorine and a number of other substances that could influence the microbiome.

So what happens if our gut microbiome is not balanced? Unfortunately in the case of unbalanced microbiome (dysbiosis) we invite inflammation and various chronic diseases including diabetes, obesity and some research suggested even some types of cancer. Synergy Worldwide’s scientists, researchers and medical doctors at

the Hughes Centre for Research and Innovation engineered proprietary solutions to optimise the balance of microbiome. Synergy’s Purify kit is comprised of patented products clinically tested to give your microbe the overhaul it needs to start clear and fuel good health.

For a free consultation about our fully supported gut health programmes please contact anna@nutri-vibe.com. To purchase the 21 day purify programme please go to synergypurifykit.com.

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