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THE MAGAZINE ABOUT WOMEN’S SUCCESS

2017

FORGING

WOMEN IN FINANCE?

THE PATH TO

GREATER

We cover this brilliant event from top to toe

DIVERSITY

A PANEL OF TOP WOMEN DISCUSS THE ANSWERS

WOMEN TO WATCH 2017

CELEBRATING SUCCESS

NICOLE KIDMAN talks Hollywood’s Diversity Scandal

ALIGNING YOUR PASSION WITH SKILL What are the key components to a successful career in the financial sector

...and much more!

t h e f u tu re i s

F EMAL E

We explore how women can make significant changes at work, in the world and within their own lives


UK CONTENTS SPRING 2017

p

ON THE COVER

62

Spotlight on Katy Director Financial Services and Organisation, PwC

36 EMILY COX

04 THE FUTURE IS FEMALE

32 KATY BENNET

We explore how women can make significant changes at work, in the world and within their own lives

Director of Public Affairs Virgin Money. Co-author of HM Treasury/ Virgin Money ‘Empowering Productivity – Harnessing the Power of Women in Financial Services’

38 FIONA FRY INTERVIEW

Fiona Fry Senior Partner in KPMG's Financial Services practice and a member of KPMG's UK Board

40 PERFORMANCE

FEATURE 12 FROM SIGNING A CHARTER TO CREATING A CULTURE SHIFT 08 WOMEN IN FINANCE CONFERENCE

We cover this brilliant event from top to toe hosted at Bloomberg London 2017

17 FORGING THE PATH TO GREATER DIVERSITY?

We hear from some of the event speakers on this incredible issue

18 CLAIRE COCKERTON CEO PLEXAL

A brief insight into a women who has the vision and ability to truly lead us into a brighter future.

A panel of top women discuss the answers

20 CREATING A FRAMEWORK FOR THE WOMEN’S TALENT STRATEGY

22 ALIGNING YOUR PASSION WITH SKILL

What are the key components to a successful career in the financial sector

62 HOLLYWOOD DIVERSITY

Nicole Kidman talks Hollywood's diversity scandal

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Kate Grussing MD - Sapphire Partners Anna Janczak Head of Diversity and Inclusion - Prudential Sarah Totham - Director General & Organisational Development, Group Human Resources Legal & General

28 CAROLANNE MINASHI INTERVIEW

We interview with Carolanne Minashi, Global Head of Diversity UBS

How to Keep Your Energy Up While You Conquer the World by Merilyn Parker Armitage MSc, MBA, Advanced Diploma in Nutrition.

46 WOMEN TO WATCH 2017 We wanted to highlight some of the amazing women out there, working hard and thoroughly shining within their industry.

56 L'OREAL - ALL WORTH IT

The Princes Trust and L’Oréal Paris announce new three year collaboration and ‘All Worth It’ programme.


FROM THE EDITOR Welcome to our next issue of SHINEUK Magazine

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e really dive deep on some of the most topical and controversial issues facing women today within the workplace and this is DIVERSITY. After attending a summit covering the latest news on the subject we wanted to share with you what we found. I think you will be encouraged and inspired about the future of that problem. In our new WOMEN TO WATCH special section, we look at some of the most incredible women in the UK who are making significant waves with their significant roles. Their stories will really touch you and motivate you to do, be, have and give more. I personally want to thank those who allowed us into their world and minds this issue which includes everyone featured within. Thank you for your time and incredible energy ladies! I have been so excited bringing this issue together purely because of who I got to connect with, meet and explore ideas with. And as a coach and mentor myself, I felt that the future, if more female, is definitely in safe hands. Enjoy this magazine and do look out for two SPECIAL INVITATIONS we have for you within. Oh, and if you do like it then please share it with friends and colleagues. Thank you!

Alex ALEXANDRA WATSON Editor-in-Chief Follow me on Twitter @happinesscoach

ALEXANDRA WATSON CRE ATOR OF THE SUCCESSFUL MIND ME THOD

Alexandra Watson is a leading personal development expert, coach and mentor, a best-selling author and keynote speaker.

alexandrawatson.com This magazine’s design and layout is done by our secret weapon...

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THE FUTURE IS

FEM ALEXANDRA WATSON takes a look at how we as women can make more of an impact in the world in a positive and poignant way.

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DON’T WORRY! I AM NOT ABOUT TO START A DEBATE ON FEMINISM, OR PUT DOWN MEN WITH A LOAD OF ‘GIRL POWER’ RHETORIC BECAUSE TO BE HONEST, NEITHER DO IT FOR ME. FOR WOMEN TO SUCCEED, WOMEN DON’T HAVE TO STAMP OUT MEN OR SEE MEN AS THE ENEMY. FOR MOST WOMEN, MUCH HAPPINESS IS TIED UP IN HAVING GREAT RELATIONSHIPS WITH MEN—FATHERS, HUSBANDS, BROTHERS, SONS, FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES.

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nstead I want to explore and expose ways in which we can, as a gender, perhaps improve our current course so that we can fulfil earnestly and authentically our potential. As a coach/mentor for women for the last 20 years, I have been in a privileged position to observe (and hopefully help) our development through the mid 90’s to the present day. When I say ‘development’ I am referring to the growth in self-awareness, the take-up of coaching as a tool for making progress and the explosion of women business owners. And I might mention here that as these changes have been happening, so have the traditional roles for men in some instances. Curious. I have seen women become more vocal about what they want (and don’t want) and gaining more clarity about what really makes them happy. And along with that the understanding that their happiness depends on them and no one else…although you still see women struggling with this. Women have begun organisations, groups, events and written material just for women bringing together the like-minded to create communities of support, experience and knowledge. Around the world and closer to home small and fundamental changes have been made to better our lives one way or another. We should be proud of this, of who we are now and who we will be in the future. However, I can’t help thinking that the struggles that we have as a gender are old ones…things that previous generations have also stumbled through and that is we have no idea, truly, no clue how good we really are. Honestly, believe me when I say I have coached and met thousands of women from all over the world and the one thing we all have in common is this complex. Forget pretence, putting on a show or egotistical behaviour. I am talking about DEEP DOWN, your darkest fear, your nagging voice.

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Women don’t think they are good enough unless…(you fill in the gap). If only we could get rid of the word ‘unless’ and understand that we are good enough in fact, more than enough. Now forgive me if this is not resonating with you, you are the exception that makes the rule – and if you don’t suffer from this then you are indeed the future. This is basically what I teach women. I teach (or more accurately, remind) them of who they are and what they are capable of. It never ceases to surprise and delight me that when they ‘get it’ and the penny drops, the enormity of the shift and transformation that happen right there and then. I have been trying to teach this to as many women as I can over the years through events, books, programmes, material, talks and this magazine – but of course I cannot reach everyone, because not everyone wants to be reached. We’re not always looking to change, we fear it because I sincerely believe Marianne Williamson (spiritual leader) when she says; ‘Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our Light, not our Darkness, that most frightens us.’ This is where the famous ‘comfort zone’ comes from…a place we create to keep everything as it is – to stop the boat from rocking or the new entering in, when what we need to give our energy to instead I to reconnect to a sense of our own power and disconnect with our fear, our self-inflicted paralysis. People who do achieve aren’t necessarily great doers; they’re people who are catalysts for things getting done. It’s the energy they put out there that counts and the ability to be fearless with it. Your energy has to be in the right place and be focused there. Now before we all bemoan the fact that as women we have many roles to play, I will, in true coaching style, say ‘that’s just an excuse’. Because, within

these pages are stories, snippets and advice from women who are fully connected to their power AND run successful homes too. Learn from others who are already where you wish to be and see how they are doing it. This year’s theme of International Women’s Day was ‘Be Bold’ and I interpret it this way… Be bold within and of yourself - start deep within because that’s where you access all the good stuff. THEN go bold ‘out there’ and show the world what you’re made of…no matter where you’re starting from and no matter what your challenges are. Please know that bold and strong as woman does not mean loud and brash. Again those are items of fear and compensating. Bold and strong can be quiet, kind, compassionate, humble, generous and nurturing – funnily enough the EXACT same natural characteristics women have!If you’re worried about the future, then you have to step into it now. In other words, take charge of it and set your goals higher. Worrying or opting out helps no one. The future being female is not about how we dominate, but how we begin to relish ourselves knowing that nothing we do or think or wish or make is necessary to establish our worth. Own it sister and then you can rule the world! Start now.


The future being female is not about how we dominate, but how we begin to relish ourselves knowing that nothing we do or think or wish or make is necessary to establish our worth. Own it sister and then you can rule the world! Start now.

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W

O

M E N

IN FINANCE CONFERENCE BLOOMBERG – 2017

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IN JANUARY SHINE MAGAZINE SUPPORTED THE WOMEN IN FINANCE CONFERENCE, RUN BY CITY AND FINANCIAL GLOBAL HOSTED AT BLOOMBERG, LONDON TO REPORT ON WHAT THE GREAT AND THE GOOD SEE AS THE ANSWER TO THE FINANCIAL SECTORS BIG ISSUE OF DIVERSITY.

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ON 8TH NOVEMBER HM TREASURY ANNOUNCED THAT 93 FIRMS ACROSS THE FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR HAVE NOW SIGNED THE WOMEN IN FINANCE CHARTER WHICH REFLECTS THE UK GOVERNMENT’S ASPIRATION TO SEE GENDER BALANCE – AT ALL LEVELS – ACROSS FINANCIAL SERVICES FIRMS.

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e wanted to see first-hand how this issue was being promoted and what practical improvements were being made to the situation from women in senior roles to the Millennial newcomers.

Helena Morrissey CBE Helena opened the event and continued throughout the morning to be the most eloquent, knowledgeable and brilliant host and moderator. Her stance was that we need real action and the ability to make the internal changes so women don’t think – or indeed are encouraged to think – that they have to ‘fit in to’ a man’s world. Helena is the non-executive chairman at Newton. In 2014 she was appointed Chair of the IA and in 2015 the UK’s Financial Services Trade and Investment Board. Founder of the now international 30% Club and Chair of Opportunity Now. Helena has also been named Fortune Magazine’s World’s 50 Greatest Leaders and in 2013 and 2014 voted as one of the 50 Most Influential People in Finance globally by Bloomberg Markets. She is Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants and also of the Society of Investment Professionals and Fellow of the London Business School. She was appointed CBE in 2012 and is married with nine children. Impressive and inspiring.

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Jayne-Anne Gadhia CEO, Virgin Money Women don’t like the culture within the financial services and the industry itself was not promoting itself to women and so we have ended up with one of the worst balance of men and women compared to most other industries. So the Charter is addressing this and other issues so we can focus on making diversity a more business, moral and economic issue rather than a cultural one. This too means preventing the push for diversity becoming an HR issue or one that suffers from unconscious bias. Training in this area can help a company become aware of its inner attitude, approach and behaviours when it comes to hiring female talent. ‘Some companies have made a conscious decision NOT to sign the Charter, I think we need to encourage each other for a different, better future. Get your company to act, hold it to making these necessary and results-driven changes. Doing so takes nothing away from men, it helps everyone – it multiplies instead of divides.’ What was important to note here was that Jayne-Anne felt that for those who have signed the Charter it will be much better for them to set their own specific targets for diversity using the Charter as a guideline. She said: 'This prevents us from trying to shape a company, it can create its own culture authentically.’ Finally she expressed that diversity is a human issue and not a size one, so every company can be involved and making a difference no matter how big or small they are.

“The stand out fact that kept coming up was companies with a higher level of senior women performed better than those with less at the top. So the argument for diversity becomes a business success one.”

Simon Kirby MP, Economic Secretary, HM Treasury Simon was our first Keynote speaker looking at what the UK Government’s strategy is for ensuring that the potential of women in the boardroom and in the senior management of financial services industry is being realised. His belief is that although we are admired by many other countries for our financial sector we still require innovation, expertise and experience to stay on top.

‘We have to make the most of our talent, therefore we need to see women at the top’

A certain amount of progress has been made in the last decade but most agreed throughout this whole event that it is not yet enough and what changes have been made have taken too long. Statistics show that only a mere 14% of Executive Committee roles are held by women in the UK and so big changes are needed now to raise this to 35% by 2021 and to see that grow to 50% in five years’ time. These are the numbers that the companies who have signed the Charter are holding themselves to and will be reporting regularly and with 100% transparency.

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One very interesting Speaker was Megan Butler of the FCA – this was because she introduced the audience to the concept of ‘Group Think’ when it comes to the issue of diversity. She explained that the industry suffers from conformity and auto-beliefs because of the male dominated roles of major decision makers within the city.

This is an issue because it can create an environment that makes more risky and controversial moves. So with a more balanced leadership work place among men and women it is less likely that a company will veer off the straight and narrow. In senior roles women tend to keep a company more honest. So her argument is that diversity also is a regulatory issue. And that in fact diversity makes the FCA better regulators.

Megan said that diversity progress should come from within the organisation and it is better that way. They themselves have a target of 45% of women in senior roles by 2020, and 50% by 2025 (their current rate is a strong 40%). ‘This was not by accident because we have made a cultural commitment which starts at the executive level because they move the dial and hold the dial for the rest of the organisation. We believe that doing this makes us more attractive to women employees.’ On the flip side the FCA have changed their women’s network to ‘Balance’ so it incorporates male members too for a 360 inclusion approach. ‘We have made all these changes and will continue to do so because we want to help other organisations reflect the society in which we interact’.

FROM SIGNING A CHARTER TO CREATING A CULTURE SHIFT T

he morning’s panel discussion moderated by Helena Morrissey CBE featured; Janet Thomas President of Women in Banking &

Finance, Huw Evans Director General, ABI, Diane CÔté, London Stock Exchange and Simon Lewis OBE, Chief Executive, AFME.

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THE CITY IS TRADITIONAL, IT HAS BEEN AROUND FOR 100S OF YEARS AND IF I HAD MORE RELEVANT AND TAILORED COACHING AND MENTORING EARLY IN MY CAREER IT WOULD HAVE MADE A VAST DIFFERENCE. WE MENTOR AND HAVE INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL SPONSORSHIP.’ Janet Thomas She stated that they felt optimistic about the moves being made to change things, however we do still have a long way to go. But the difference is that now people are paying attention and we have a baseline to work from. Hiring the talent and female talent is key. Diane added to this with how we must put the finger on why it is not happening within organisations. The Stock Exchange has ambitious targets that is a business lead issue NOT an HR one. The aim is to reach out to everyone to get a full buy-in of the issue and its solutions linking bonuses and strategy to it for a more complete impact. ‘Once we have hired the talent it then becomes an issue of retaining and promoting them, the problem or stigma in many business cultures is that if you promote a woman, you take a risk.’

This controversial mindset is something we need to move away from. We have a similar issue with pay within the industry and an association with the culture of long hours. This is not attractive to women. We want to make an impact NOW and a significant change within the next 10 years by creating momentum and a critical mass at the top level so it becomes the norm. The key to making this happen is to adapt and promote flexible hours and a culture that attracts both men and women.

‘PEOPLE WELCOME DIVERSITY UNTIL SOMEONE DISAGREES WITH THEM!’ Anonymous quote

Simon Lewis OBE Simon added that although we have come on leaps and bounds since the 1980’s more can be done of course. ‘It is the types of roles that bothers me more. For example HR, Marketing and Communications – the ‘soft’ roles seem to be where the women are at the senior level, so pipeline changes need to be made in the business management roles. It goes without saying that we need to monitor and measure the outcomes and hold ourselves accountable.’ He also added; ‘I think we have made ground in changing ideas about flexible working hours but we still have unconscious bias in areas like maternity leave thinking that women do not want to work as hard when

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they return. We need to move further ahead with a strong set of values, expectations and with greater transparency.’ Helena Morrissey also made the point raised of whether many senior decision makes could become bored of this issue thinking that we surely must have solved this by now…she said; ‘The way to counteract diversity fatigue is to keep it fresh and relevant and be clear about why the problem has not yet been fixed.’

‘THE WAY TO COUNTERACT DIVERSITY FATIGUE IS TO KEEP IT FRESH AND RELEVANT AND BE CLEAR ABOUT WHY THE PROBLEM HAS NOT YET BEEN FIXED.’ Helena Morrisey

Keynote:

PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO

EMPOWERING WOMEN IN FINANCE Amanda Pullinger CEO, 100 women in Finance

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WITH 15000 MEMBERS WORLDWIDE IN 21 LOCATIONS AMANDA LEADS A SMALL TEAM AND MANAGES OVER 350 VOLUNTEER PRACTITIONERS. SHE IS ALSO CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF THE HALO TRUST AND SERVES AS DIRECTOR ON THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY ALUMNI BOARD. SHE IS A MEMBER OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND A FELLOW OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS.

Why some of us Succeed in Male Dominated Organisations and Industries.

A

manda’s has been a positive experience but she knows that there are issues across the board that need to be addressed and that these issues are not just belonging to the organisations but to the women themselves. She explains; ‘Hewlett Packard’s recent study revealed that when it came to prospective jobs men applied even if they thought they only had 60% of the necessary skills listed, whereas women were only confident to apply when they had 100%. This is evidence that behind the scenes women still stick to the perceived guidelines which means they avoid jobs that they are not 100% qualified for.’

‘WOMEN DON’T PUT THEMSELVES FORWARD

Women need to take the lead more and show the younger generation that it IS possible, the trouble with this is that many of them don’t feel good enough to be held up as a good example or role model. Another issue is the lack of a peer network where we can share our experiences and collective knowledge so we can see clearly what works well. We need to be encouraged and pushed, that’s why a peer network is so important.

l Socia a on d nal an nisatio Orga ues... re Iss Cultu Amand

Her solutions include; • Overcoming negative stereotypes and perceptions

• Encourage interest in the many roles available

• Demystify the industry by making it clear we have chal lenging and rewarding roles for women.

ENOUGH – PERFECTIONISM IS THE NEMESIS OF PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’ Amanda Pullinger

Bravery and resilience over perfectionism is what Amanda regards as the solution for women seeking more senior roles. This combined with an environment which is more encouraging and supportive will make a difference. Because she believes hard work alone isn’t enough. In fact it can be detrimental to their careers because if they have their nose to the grind stone and are too immersed in work then they fail to take the time out for necessary relationship building.

Work Life Balance is overstated. Improving childcare is important but peer pressure for highly educated women NOT to work is a big problem. And so many of them opt out choosing instead to be a house wife. Additionally, women see the financial industry as unrewarding and not the obvious choice of career. Organisational culture change needs more than money throwing at the issue. The entire structure needs reviewing especially recruiting women at senior levels by seeking diverse candidates and not using old recruitment methods or old networking practices.

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T

he next Keynote speaker was the fascinating Dr Astrid Jaekel Partner, Oliver Wyman and Lead Author, Women in Financial Services 2016 – her main take away for us was that women start out as ambitious as men, but the level then drops around middle age,

therefore more women leave their roles. ‘It’s a Mid-Career Conflict where the costs of being at work, along with long hours and pay differences don’t out way the benefits anymore.’ The roles don’t always fulfil cultural expectations and with little support for spending time with the family and insufficient flexibility on working options, their ambition depletes and they take instead the path of least resistance. There is still the stigma of a senior role having a full time presence – women often find this a cultural expectation too far. The next speaker was Elin Hurvenes Founder and Chair of the Professional Boards Forum AS.

She believes we need a three level approach;

This went on to be quite a list which •

Political – where a clear leadership and ambition is essential

Corporate – get on the CEO bench via succession bench with P&L experience which is essential

• Personal Women must;

Work for the right company

Get the right experience

Ask for the promotion and put your hand up – be visible

Do the demanding roles

Don’t get stuck in the soft roles

Network

led us to think –

"What else must a woman remember to be and do in order to be successful? It seems the requirements are endless, the opportunities few and the pathway difficult. As a success mentor for women I believe the main solutions

Sponsor

come from within each person but

Mentor

it has to be an AUTHENTIC and an

Be more (or less) assertive

evolution, not a prescribed moulding of senior women of the future."

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FORGING THE PATH TO GREATER DIVERSITY With Moderator Mary Mcleod, Senior Client Partner Korn Ferry.

PANELLISTS WERE Ann Cairns President - International Markets, Mastercard Yasmine Chinwala - Partner, New Financial Sarah Morris - Group Chief People Officer, Aviva plc Kate Cheetham - Group General Counsel, Lloyds Banking Group Mary posed the question; ‘Can women ever have it all? When was the last time we asked a man that?!’ Ann has had an inspiring career with more than 20 years’ experience as a senior leader, having held management positions across Europe and the US. A champion of inclusion (digital, financial and gender), Ann is also a member of the World Food Programme investment committee and the AstraZeneca Board. Her straight forward advice was to ‘not be a lady in waiting and number 2 in your department for too long! Ask for that role, the worst that they can say is no!’ Sarah Morris, is an advocate for whole life balance, diversity and inclusion and is a keen horse woman (dressage). A non-executive director of Amnesty International, she believes that the two things that have helped her the most are building a strong network – because it is who knows you, and taking the jobs that no one else wants. Are male line managers the biggest issue when it comes to making progress in diversity? Are they afraid they will lose out if women step in?

Even though we are global leaders in the diversity issue, especially with the WIF Charter, I think we are up against one of the biggest blocks known to humans…good old fashioned Fear of Change.

‘WE NEED A CARROT AND STICK APPROACH TO BUILD A PLATFORM TO HELP MAKE PROGRESS FASTER – CHALLENGE OUR SUPPLY CHAIN TOO AND LET THEM KNOW WE ARE NOT GIVING UP ON THIS ISSUE.’ Sarah Morris

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Claire Cockerton CEO Plexal A brief insight into a women who has the vision and ability to truly lead us into a brighter future.

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laire Cockerton, a serial entrepreneur and industry leader in financial services, is co-founder and ambassador of Innovate Finance, a City of London and Canary Wharf Group-backed group promoting fintech start-ups. She is founder and chairwoman of Plexal, a firm delivering innovation strategy and product development programmes for large corporates. She also set the strategy and co-led the implementation of Level39, Europe’s largest technology accelerator dedicated to fintech, retail and smart city technologies. Claire is an active member of Women in Tech, Tech London Advocates and Women Shift Digital. “I grew up in the deep countryside of Canada, playing outdoors, building forts, inventing projects and designing my own day.

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My upbringing cultivated an independent nature, and an adventurous spirit. Whilst at University and needing to pay my way, it was this sense of independence and ambition that led me to start up a landscape gardening business. The fact that it focused on organic gardening and sustainable construction techniques gave my business a larger sense of purpose in its environmental sensitivity. In this first business, the most obvious challenge I faced was the fact that being a young woman in a construction business was unconventional and therefore challenging at times. I quickly realized that I did not fit the traditional mould of the CEO people expected: and therefore got used to being questioned or my experience and expertise undermined. I quickly got used to the look

of surprise on people’s face when they were introduced to me, as the boss. Personally, something I struggled with as a leader was learning how much of my unique personality I could imbue in my job. At the beginning I acted how I thought CEOs should act, how I had perceived others to. It took a while for me to build my self-confidence enough to bring my full self to my job. I believe that this is a major hurdle that women still have to overcome: the lack of confidence can inhibit our self-expression in our careers. Often, corporates don’t encourage the expression of more “female personality traits”. I have observed how male dominant corporate cultures have a hard time embracing or encouraging a female leader. These institutions can be threatened by female


confidence, I experienced performance management sessions designed to curb ambition and assertiveness. Because of this, it is so important as women to know that one cannot stand alone; we must seek mentors, sponsors, champions (both male and female) to support our professional development or entrepreneurial ambitions. Women and men can shine equally in any industry we choose. For women though, we have the challenge of facing subtle sexism almost every day in some very male dominated industries. A lot of women still experience undermining comments; such as being criticized for being “bossy” or “bitchy”.

On top of this, issues such as pay inequality and poor maternity/paternity leave make it more challenging for women to join and participate fully in the workplace over the course of their lives. Many companies are starting to be more conscious of embedded problems and actively looking at introducing solutions. At Plexal we actively support female leadership talent and provide special programmes for women. One of the best ways for women to show their talent and reach their potential is to build their own company, and step into a creative entrepreneurial CEO role. Now, more than ever women can design their own

careers. If your company is not supporting you, or your professional development, look outside of your current job, tap into your own passions or the gaps in the market that you wish were filled. In order for women to forge our own careers, it is vitally important that we have a strong sense of self. When mapping our professional ambitions, and building our own visions: we are only limited by our own imaginations. We must, then practice and apply this selfbelief, combining resources and dedication to reach our goals.

“Take care of yourself in the process, engage in a diverse set of activities that make you feel refreshed and resilient when faced with adversity. “ S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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CREATING A FRAM FOR THE WOMEN’S STRATEGY Moderated by Claire Cockerton, CEO, Plexal HER PANELLISTS WERE: Kate Grussing MD - Sapphire Partners Anna Janczak Head of Diversity and Inclusion - Prudential Sarah Totham - Director General & Organisational Development, Group Human Resources Legal & General

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MEWORK S TALENT

K

ate’s behind-the-scenes knowledge of the recruitment of women is inspiring and insightful. Her obvious passion for continual development, high standards and diversity is tireless and backed with an impressive resume. Marked as one of the 100 Women to Watch in Cranfield’s reports of 2012 and 2013 she has recently become a companion of the Chartered Management Institute, appointed Gender Equality Advisory Group at City University, London, board member of the Institute of Imagination and sits on two advisory boards for Rare Recruitment and the European Advisory Board of Tuck School of Business. She believes that financial security is the reason why women don’t move around so much. When it comes to noticing the difference between men and women within the recruitment world Kate muses over the evidence she sees every day, namely applicant’s CVs. There in black and white you can see how men and women differ. The languaging is the first thing to notice…men state that ‘I delivered such and such, and I achieved this and that’, whereas women say; ‘we delivered and we achieved’. That is a big difference to the ownership of success. Kate says; ‘Men’s CVs are also bolder and punchier and it doesn’t take them long to dust it off and get it sent to me, women however have a milder approach and it takes them weeks to get their CV updated and sent over!’ Is this because men are more strategic and looking for bigger and better opportunities more readily than women? One of my favourite quotes of this discussion came from Kate when she said; ‘Do your homework, that’s what senior women do.’ Apparently one of the first 3 questions that men ask about an appointment is the pay but women hardly ever get to that question. She adds; ‘Don’t be put off going for a job, own your career. If you need coaching to help you get yourself out there then get it!’ Anna backed this call-to-action for women by stating that really everyone should be hired on their merit alone. It is about what you can contribute, but you have to show this clearly. Sarah has been instrumental in introducing and leading the 50/50 by 2020 gender diversity programme at Legal & General and brought up the issue of how subtle unconscious bias can be. This means training is not enough and that the inner culture needs to be open enough so that people can flag it up when they see it happening around them.

‘WE NEED TO BE POSITIVE DISRUPTORS OF THE SYSTEM BECAUSE IT IS THE PASSIONATE ONES, THE DISRUPTORS, ON THE INSIDE THAT HELP AND MAKE CHANGE HAPPEN.’ Sarah Totham L&G

The Tiara Syndrome expertly explained by Melanie Richards Partner, KPMG; ‘If you stick your head down and work really hard, don’t expect people to notice you!’

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FINAL PANEL DISCUSSION OF THE CONFERENCE

ALIGNING YOUR PASSION WITH SKILL What are the key components to a successful career in the financial sector Moderated by Vivienne Artz MD, Citigroup (see our full interview with her within this section)

PANELLISTS: Carolanne Minashi - MD & Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, UBS (see our full interview with her within this section) Susanne Chishti - CEO & Founder, FINTECH Circle Heather Jackson - Founder & Chair, An Inspirational Journey, Boards Trustee, Employers Network for Equality & Inclusion Laura Bailey - CEO & Co-founder, Zerado; Women in FINTECH 2016 Powerlist

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HEATHER HAD EIGHT COMPONENTS IN RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION AND THEY WERE;

Laura too had some very helpful steps, and these were; • Know your purpose and WHY you are doing something

Culture Change:- What are YOU going to do to help with this? Don’t sit back, be a part of the change. Control of Career:- Recognise that YOU are in control of the direction and what happens is down to you, no one else. Confidence & Self-belief:- Believe in yourself and if you don’t have it that belief then how can you expect it in others? I think we can lose confidence along the way so keep an eye on your levels throughout your career.

either, your relationship building has to be internal before it is external if you like your company and want to grow within it. Collaboration:- Success needs collaboration and you must give back too with a cross-section of mentoring and volunteering in projects outside of your sector. Expand your reach and your involvement.

Capabilities & Skills:- Take charge of this instead of waiting to be told or guided. Be clear about what skills you have and lead with them. Value your skills or lose them.

Choice:- Women have a choice now. We’re no longer Joan of Arc and have to make sacrifices! The bottle of wine is half full! Let others put cement in your wellies, not you!

Contacts & Networks:- It’s no longer just nice to have a good network, it is essential! It is not just for afterhours

Change:- I am not looking at MY abilities to help with Diversity issues, I am looking at yours!

Final Though ts

• Know what is going to make you happy • Know what motivates and inspires you • Do your best, whatever you do and you decide what your best is • Surround yourself with positive people • Get out of your comfort zone often • Drive forward what YOU are passionate about Sarah made a heartfelt call to action when she said; ‘How can we explain to our mums and daughters that not much has changed? How can we answer the questions of; Why don’t we deserve the same pay? Why don’t we deserve the same power?’ We have not broken the glass ceiling yet, Vivienne added; ‘From old, many businesses were built to suit those who worked there and ran them, this is why we need to rebuild businesses to reflect more accurately who works there now.’

It was a fascinating event with brilliant speakers and felt like an official handover of the diversity issue for the younger women to take up and run with...a kind of ‘now you’re up to speed with this issue, what are you going to do about it?’ The big take away for us was that as women we have to stand up and stand out more and I know, as a coach for women for over 20 years, this is something we often struggle to do. We are multifaceted and multitalented – if only we knew it. Be sassy, be a disruptor, or if that is not your bag, be strategic (and no, this is NOT a negative thing!). Create for yourself a big wide world, be open to change, in fact drive change and see what you are truly capable of.

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VIVIENNE ARTZ Vivienne Artz Citi Managing Director and General Counsel for Intellectual Property – A True champion for Women WOMEN IN FINANCE INTERVIEW

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RECENTLY NAMED AS THE NEW PRESIDENT FOR WOMEN IN BANKING AND FINANCE VIVIENNE WILL LEAD THE UK-WIDE NETWORKING AND DEVELOPMENT ORGANISATION FROM APRIL 2017, TAKING OVER FROM CURRENT PRESIDENT, JANET THOMAS A former WIBF Champion for Women award winner, Vivienne also chairs the AFME Data Protection Working Group, the International Regulatory Strategy Group Data Working Group and is an active participant of the Data Working Group at the BBA, as well as a Steering Committee member for the Technology Discussion Group. She has recently been appointed to the IAPP European Advisory Board having also served as a co-chair of the IAPP Knowledge Net for the UK, a co-chair of the UK Citi Women Network, chair of the Legal Diversity Council for EMEA, and is currently a Citi Women Community Ambassador. When we spoke to Vivienne she is a woman who has all the markings of a brilliant leader with a high intellect and clear sense of what needs to be done. She encourages us to realise our potential and break through the glass ceiling ignoring the noise and red herrings along the way. She firmly believes that having a support network is the essential platform from which you can stride forward.

ON CAREER ‘I take pride in my career but know that in order to be successful long term, you must maintain your values and sense of pride in what you do. When you love your job you are more driven and can do more with it but you still need resilience. This is because it will help you when you are knocked back, or are the only woman in the room, or have a bad boss. Resilience becomes your defence mechanism.’ Vivienne sees that younger women want things more quickly and says, ‘I am aware that what worked for me was a different environment then and so I try and put myself in their shoes. But to make a good leader you must engender trust so people feel that they want to follow you. Have integrity along with a powerful vision too and lead from there. Leadership does not mean being loud, or being centre of attention. In fact being the steady, quiet voice can also make an impact and make you a strong leader. Be yourself and be confident in that.’

“These are challenging times for our industry. We are in an age of uncertainty where people are looking for strong leadership”

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ON DIVERSITY “The world and the sector are uneasy. It makes it even more important for women and members, corporate or individual, to be able to turn to each other for advice and to share good practice. It is important also that we are careful not to slip backwards and that we are always moving in a positive way.” Vivienne notes that the Gender Agenda is important but can be swept away by other changes happening within the world and within industry. So we must keep to the fact that diversity makes business sense and should continue to be an economic argument. “We have three generations of women in the workforce now, so there has to be proper changes and improvements.”

ON BALANCE She believes that here needs to be a balance in life because we cannot run on empty, making work our only focus. A support network is essential for success whether you are in a middle or senior role as this is an essential key to being happy at work and give your best. You have to have positive home support too so you can make the most of your career and enjoy it.


rachel curtis

Chief Customer Officer Cambridge and Counties Bank SHINE wanted to touch base with one of the smaller banks for their opinion, here’s what board member Rachel Curtis told us;

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ambridge & Counties Bank are a niche specialist bank for small to medium enterprises (SMEs) within the UK and Rachel has over 20 years’ experience in Financial Services, having started her career on the counter in a branch of the Halifax Building Society as it was then. The majority of her career was undertaken at Alliance & Leicester and then latterly Santander, holding senior management positions in the areas of customer services, deposit management and marketing. Rachel was part of the original team that developed the Cambridge & Counties Bank proposition and launched it to market in 2012. Rachel championscustomer experience within the Bank and is responsible for the liabilities side of their balance sheet, raising deposits from UK SMEs and also heads up the marketing function within the company C&C Bank are banking specialists for small to medium enterprises(SMEs) within the UK. “Previously I have been pretty sceptical about women’s events having been to ones that on the outside looked good and indeed were informative, but then had handbags for sale! One I went to even sold pots and pans afterwards! Can you imagine going to a conference for

men and then having garden sheds for sale or car parts?!” But we’re both glad to report (Rachel and SHINE) that the Women in Finance event was a far cry from this and 100% focused on the issues at hand. “Diversity is an interesting issue and one that I take very seriously. For me it is about hiring well and fairly because you should opt for the person who is right for the job on every occasion – it shouldn’t be about anything else. Similarly it shouldn’t be about women succeeding at the cost of men – it is about bringing together a strong team. This has proven to be the magic formula again and again. When I joined the Board at C&C Bank I did face the odd comment about me being the ‘token female’ – this doesn’t help your confidence or self-belief at all which is something I have struggled with. I even laughed when my boss first mentioned a position on the board as I didn’t think I was capable. What helped was a 9 month programme of coaching and a management course at Ashridge where I sat in a room of CEOs and CFOs and could see that I was just as capable as them, sometimes even more so. I guess I had to see it to believe it. From this experience I have learnt that you must know what your raw talent is and harness that, make it your own USP. I have also gleaned that whilst there are barriers to our success as women, some of those barriers we actually put there ourselves. Sometimes it doesn’t matter if we have a clear career path, we will hold ourselves back telling ourselves we are not ready yet and we keep ourselves from showing people what we are truly capable of. One thing I think can really help is having a mentor - I was lucky to have an encouraging and supportive boss, but this is not always true for everyone.”

Within CC Bank: We have signed up to the Charter and are looking to deliver unconscious bias training to all staff. We are also looking at other initiatives such as getting to 50% of those shortlisted for jobs to be women. It’s about skill set first though and if we had two completely identical candidates we may take the female to improve our diversity, but we wouldn’t choose a less capable female over a more capable male.

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C ARO LA N N E A M IN A SH I SHINE interview with Carolanne Minashi, Global Head of Diversity UBS.

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fter 29 years at Citi Carolanne specialise in talent management, employee relations and leadership development. She volunteers for the Pilotlight Charity, supports the 30% Club and is married with four children. Diversity is her particular passion. Having spent all her career at Citi, in February 2016 she joined UBS as their Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion and hasn’t looked back. Her experience in these two Global Banks has given her a particular perspective on what works and what doesn’t in large organisations trying to focus on improving their gender balance. Her approach is rooted in the business case that more inclusive cultures are fundamentally more innovative, better places to work and will provide a better service to clients. Carolanne offers her top 10 very practical solutions to help women drive ahead and get the changes and results they want;


‘SU C C ESS FOR ME I S A BOUT STILL BEING HERE. I STARTED MY C AR EER AT19 YEA RS OLD A ND HAVE WORKED ON EVERY RUNG O F T HE CO RPORATE LA DDER UP THROUGH THE RANKS’ Drive and Execution

Sponsoring and Mentoring

These are crucial for making progress. Being able to deliver is what senior women are experts at.

Great things happen when you participate in either of these two.

Ambition and Career Articulation

It surprising how little networking women do. Perhaps we are too busy doing the job and fail to realise that networking is a key part of our career success. Men seem to need little encouragement in this area and are always proactively looking for networking opportunities. So make expanding your network and keeping it alive a priority.

Many women tend to think that if they were good enough or ready for that bigger role, somebody would be tapping them on the shoulder and putting them forward. This rarely happens so be vocal and visible about your skills and readiness.

“If you don’t say what you want then people assume you don’t want it!” Be a Great People Manager The two differentiators are; • Be a people builder and create an environment where people want to work for you • Be good at tough conversations, issues and situations, it can be a real differentiator as so few people are

Navigate the Jump

From specialist to generalist. People tend to get promoted for being technical experts and for women that can be like our armour –we become expersts on our particular topic. But eventually you are going to get promoted to a level where you are not an expert on everything that you are responsible for and that can be a derailer as it requires a shift in leadership style.

Feedback x 3 Women need more feedback. A recent study I read showed that 80% of women don’t get constructive/challenging feedback in performance review meetings versus 23% of men. And 30% of women don’t get feedback after an interview. Getting more feedback is really critical in helping people to move ahead. Ask your key stakeholders for feedback – specifically what you could be doing that would create even more impact.

Network

Authenticity There is something very compelling when people can be authentically themselves – let the mask slip every now and again. None of us are perfect and leaders who can show a bit of vulnerability actually build followership rather than reduce it. Colour outside the lines (a bit!) Women can miss out on job and promotion opportunities because they take role requirements too literally – unless we are 90% qualified for a role we think it would be a waste of time to apply. I would challenge everyone to think a bit more creatively, there is rarely a completely perfect fit candidate for a role and by withdrawing from the race at the start line you will never know what could have been.

S UCCESS TO ME IS CREATING S USTAINABLE CHANGE When I hit the pillow at night I want to be sure that I did the day with integrity. You need tenacity to succeed, I have a mental check-list every day when I ask myself the question 'Did I win today or did I lose', so often I feel like I lost a bit but you have to keep going. . Also, beware of the naysayers and those who don’t support your agenda because they will try and hold you back, when I look back, some of the best things I achieved were the loneliest in the initial phase – you have to have cast iron belief in what you are shooting for and slowly people will come round. The kind of change we are trying to create is multi-faceted and multi-year, but we are going to get there. At UBS we have been able to create a genuine strategic focus on the agenda that starts with our Group CEO. We have a focus on on fixing 'the system' and not 'fixing the women' and we are beginning to see real results. Its an exciting place to be.

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AT SHINE WE INTERVIEWED HUW EVANS THE DIRECTOR GENERAL OF ABI, AND GAINED AN INSIGHT INTO HIS VERY REALISTIC APPROACH TO THE INSURANCE AND SAVINGS BUSINESS SECTOR.

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e need a decent reality check on how things actually are so we need a lot less talking and a lot more doing!’ This is my introduction to ABI’s Director General Huw Evans a man used to having a lot of responsibility and has a very realistic approach to any issue. He is right of course, we can be all too keen and satisfied with discussions and call to actions rather than putting in the graft ourselves and making the changes we want to see. From a background that includes journalism and politics with an Oxford degree in Modern History, Huw’s no-nonsense approach is refreshing as it is pragmatic on important subjects like diversity, parents returning to work and millennials being attracted to the insurance industry. He says; ‘There is no silver bullet as each topic has varied and unique needs. I believe we need to create a best-practice environment to get clear on what works then it will be easier for us to tackle these issues.’ Also we need more senior leaders to send cultural signals that a balanced life is indeed important and broaden the perspective of others through their behaviour too.’

So this means Huw values and backs a more flexible working life, one which includes the possibility to work from home on occasion. ‘We need to lead from the top on so many levels because for many of our issues we are only just making progress. Take the pay gap situation, for example, by all accounts the statistics state that this will not even out until 2050! I don’t think we should be in a hurry to pat ourselves on the back for improving these types of situations when we have allowed them to happen.’ So what has been the success story for Huw? How has he been able to arrive where he is today and sustain his level of influence and integrity? ‘I take an enormous pride in what I do and I try and build upon what I achieve by maintaining a healthy level of self-criticism. I do encourage celebrating successes but also try to be reflective and never complacent. We should always make the most of any opportunity we are given. I know in my career I have been lucky too, but I have learnt from my mistakes and had a lot of support and encouragement from very early on.’ Huw’s insight into making big changes happen includes setting tougher goals with a greater sense of urgency while having a buy-in from the top down. ‘I always look to delivering lasting and sustainable improvements and hire good people to carry this forward for me. The financial sector can make substantial and essential changes faster and quicker if we all work on creating a nurturing environment.’

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WE NEED NEED A A WE DECENT REALITY REALITY DECENT CHECK ON ON CHECK HOW THINGS THINGS HOW ACTUALLY ARE ARE ACTUALLY SO WE WE NEED NEED SO A LOT LOT LESS LESS A TALKING AND AND TALKING A LOT LOT MORE MORE A DOING! DOING!


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Spotlight on Katy Bennett Director Financial Services and Organisation, PwC

WE TALKED TO KATY, SOMEONE WHO IS AT THE FRONT LINE WHEN IT COMES TO HELPING AND ADVISING COMPANIES ON A RANGE OF HR AND PEOPLE ISSUES, ESPECIALLY DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION, PAY AND THE PEOPLE IMPACT OF REGULATION.

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Over the last year, Katy has developed PwC’s approach to helping financial services clients tackle the specific challenges around diversity issues and defining and reaching their goals. Today sees Katy advising clients on HM Treasury’s Women in Finance Charter, so we wanted her take on the issues discussed at WIF and what it’s like being in the trenches day to day with firms across banking, asset management and insurance.

Here’s what she said: “I believe diversity is about getting the most out of people because the inclusion of different skills and experience is the best way to achieve success. It's a hugely important issue and I am passionate about the subject but realise we still have a long way to go. It is a good time to be looking at the issues because because the Government is increasingly focused on it via gender pay concerns. This April in the UK, every company with over 250 employees will have to publish their gender pay details and, as a result, their gender pay gaps. So when these become known and are more visible to everyone, the diversity issue will well and truly be under the spotlight. Hopefully this will lead to more women seeking senior roles, bigger and better opportunities and confidence to ask for more. I believe younger women will look at the figures and use them to choose which organisations to work for. Equally they may also be put off entering any industry which has a history of poor pay for women. This then develops into a reputational issue. Organisations are open to the risk of losing face unless they are also seen to be trying to improve diversity within their business. There is no one-size-fitsall solution for diversity - all organisations are different, therefore their individual issues are not always the same. Some industries have trouble recruiting any women at all, while others have an issue with promoting the women they have into senior roles. So unfortunately there is no magic bullet when it comes to solutions, instead I look at each company individually and clarify what their main issue is before I make recommendations. The changes don’t always have to be big ones. Sometimes they can be subtle, but whatever we put in place needs to be measured and grounded in data to see if it really is their main challenge or whether it goes deeper. This isn’t an easy task and it isn’t always immediately clear what the solution will be. Corporations are complicated entities with many moving parts that could contribute to the problem in some way. Of course any changes must come with a top to toe cultural change commitment which is often very difficult to do. Added to that is the omnipresence of unconscious bias which is impossible to eradicate completely because of human nature. Besides training, we need to ensure there are measures which remind, or nudge,

companies to progress in this area – it is this constant awareness and consideration and every moving part that bring about the changes, but of course it will take time. The attitude towards the Women in Finance Charter has been positive, especially with so many large firms joining and making a commitment to change. Diversity is a sensitive topic so when you commit to the Charter you are opening yourself up to potential criticism, which leads me to believe that those who have signed up must really care about the subject and want to make real improvements. That doesn't mean that those firms who have not yet signed up do not take the issue seriously, it may just be they are concentrating on other business issues at the moment. We will see a point in the near future when corporations view diversity as a business issue and give it the support it needs beyond the powers of their HR departments.”

"I believe diversity is really about getting the most out of people because the inclusion of different skills and experience is the best way to success"

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Think what life is really about and what path you should take. Wai Au is a non-executive director on several regulated boards. She has a clear view on what success really means for her.

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ven though Wai has over 20 years executive experience in commercial and retail insurance lines, corporate and retail banking, life and pensions, and management consultancy you will find it very difficult to find her on-line. Wai tells us that she deliberately avoids the limelight. But we would like to change that. Her experience, knowledge, attitude and insights in the industry make her an ideal role model. “I often get asked; ‘why don’t you have more top executive roles in your portfolio?’ I know that I am unusual in my approach and yes, I would like more success, but on my terms. By that I mean that my values are important to me, and I stick to them. I do get criticised by some for not being more visible or not having a more public profile, but the truth is that I do make myself available to those who need me, whether it is assisting at the executive level or mentoring those coming through the ranks. I have recently been coaching some Millennials, which I enjoyed immensely. “I often need to summon up courage in order to make challenges. I am known for being straight talking and cutting through the ‘waffle’. I need to look issues in the eye and call them for what they are in order to better understand them and to explore whether or not this is an important issue for the organisation. Surprisingly, on boards some never say what really concerns them. Unfortunately my approach has made me unpopular with some, and no doubt sometimes this is deserved. I know that I don’t always get it right, but I try. I believe that Boards should be about people who voice their concerns and not those content to simply tick boxes. My aim is be as honest with yourself, to work as hard as I can, and to be prepared to opt out of a culture if it doesn’t work for me.”

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SUCCESS... ’I believe success in life is about knowing and being who you are. It’s about having values and convictions; it’s about knowing what you believe in and being true to it; importantly it is not about constantly worrying about what your profile looks like to anyone else. Success in business is pursued through honest hard work – unfortunately we have to accept that this doesn’t always work. The younger you are the more you should take time out to just think. Think what life is really about and what path you should take. Whatever you decided, do your best and work hard. Success in my mind is doing a good job, even when you are not recognised or appreciated. By some people’s measures I have not been as successful as I could have been. But I have got on with the job in hand, even though at times I’ve made mistakes I have always worked hard, been honest, spoken up and have always been true to myself.

"My aim is be as honest with yourself, to work as hard as I can, and to be prepared to opt out of a culture if it doesn’t work for me."


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“In financial services, what gets measured, gets done” Emily Cox Director of Public Affairs Virgin Money. Co-author of HM Treasury/Virgin Money ‘Empowering Productivity – Harnessing the Power of Women in Financial Services’ Emily Cox has been heavily involved in the Gadhia review and has also set up an internal network at Virgin Money called the Gender Agenda Network to raise awareness of gender equality within the organisation and create better networking opportunities. “In 2015 Jayne-Anne Gadhia the CEO of Virgin Money was asked by the Economic Secretary to the Treasury to conduct a review into the representation of senior women in financial services. Virgin Money was an interesting choice as we’re not part of the establishment.” “Importantly, we gave it a national voice because two thirds of the jobs in financial services are outside of the M25. We also made the process democratic by inviting more than 3,200 men and women in mid-tier management to contribute – including Virgin Group colleagues who brought insight from a totally different perspective. Finally, we consulted on our direction of travel by sharing our findings as we went along, rather than just waiting until the end. We are now seen as thought-leaders on gender diversity” Emily agrees that linking bonuses into gender equality targets will be the biggest challenge for financial services firms to engage with but, as she says, that’s a language this industry understands. “In financial services, what gets measured, gets done,” she says. “The feeling was that gender equality should be treated like any other business problem – you set a strategy, you establish targets, you make someone accountable, and then you incentivise the right behaviour.”

to me; ‘your sound perfect for the role but are you married and how old are you?’ She then went on to mentioned that if I was interested in the role then I must make a commitment to the company that I would not have a baby for the next five years in order for her to put me forward. Overall though, I find that there is very little overt discrimination but attitudes do exist and things can be shut down pretty quickly internally if people don’t find it useful to them. What focuses the mind is becoming the mother of a daughter and having junior women looking at me – this pushes me more into doing the right thing, speaking up and being even more resilient. We have an obligation to employees to make sure everyone can make a contribution no matter how they do it and this means taking a step back sometimes and checking for unconscious bias. Disruption People in their 20s don’t want targets and quotas, they want to prove themselves and get there on their own merit. But in their early 30s this changes and this is where you see equality drop off and so the middle management tier becomes 25% women and 75% men. Having targets directed in this area would be a good thing. Then the 50-60 year olds believe that quotas are the only way to make a difference, so the problem definitely lies in the middle. I am pleased with the response so far to the charter and hope that the media expose those who haven’t signed up and applaud those who have. The question must be asked that if you haven’t signed up, why not? On a Personal Note; For me success in life is about making a real contribution to something very worthwhile. Take chances when you can, not being afraid of taking a risk no and again. There is no such thing as a bad experience because there is always something we can learn.

Why are you passionate about this? We get everywhere in life on our own merit especially in the education system. But I remember the first time it struck me that this was not necessarily the case for women at work when a recruitment agent said

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FIONA FRY

Fiona Fry is a senior Partner in KPMG's Financial Services practice and a member of KPMG's UK Board.

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he originally trained as a chartered accountant with Peat Marwick Mitchell & Co, then worked in insolvency at Arthur, Young, McLelland Moores & Co and Corporate Finance at Ernst & Young. She has also worked at the London Stock Exchange. Fiona has been involved in consumer related regulation for over 25 years, including a role as Head of Investigations at IMRO and then the FSA, before joining KPMG as a Partner in 1999. During her time as a regulator, Fiona led many reviews and investigations. She led IMRO's work on the pensions transfer issue and the investigation into the Morgan Grenfell/Peter Young issue. Fiona leads KPMG's Financial Sector Centre of Excellence and, since taking up Partnership at KPMG, she has played an integral part in

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KPMG's Retail Financial Services work. She headed up KPMG's approach to Treating Customers Fairly (TCF), leading two of the biggest TCF transformations in the insurance sector. She also led KPMG's Retail Distribution Review work until the end of 2010. Over her time at KPMG, Fiona has led numerous reviews of miss-selling and related controls issues in banks, insurers and fund managers, including many section 166 reports. Fiona speaks regularly on such matters, including for the BBA and ABI. Speaking about her recent appointment to head the Centre of Excellence, Fiona believes she has very large shoes to fill. ‘I am doing something women often don’t do because I am coming in as a leader rather than a deep

technical expert. I am very enthusiastic about it and want to make it work. Besides the people in the group are lovely and I want to support them and be a good leader. There have been 2 or 3 moments in my career when I have been given the opportunity to do something which is a massive challenge and have taken it every time. I have been very lucky in those moments to have great bosses who have let me get on with it and have my back. This has enabled me to get over the Imposter Syndrome. You need people to have faith in you and have no doubts that you are capable. I had this and it transformed my life and made my confidence flow.' A Woman’s Problem? 'Diversity is clearly a problem if you look at the numbers specific organisations have.


In some places it can appear we have the right trajectory, but many still don’t. It has become one the biggest issues for women, because if we can’t even get them on to boards then there is no diversity at all. It’s not just about gender either. All groups need to be represented, we need diversity in backgrounds too. Women are great at looking for and solving problems because they have had different life experiences and boards miss out if they don’t have this. What we bring to the table is important. We have different ways of viewing a situation, and have a different way of looking at how an organisation works. Typically women are more sympathetic too. Men can be generalists. Having women in senior roles sends a message throughout the organisation that women matter and

It is interesting that when hiring women naturally look more broadly over the talent pool, while it is easy for men to reach for the person they know well and feel comfortable with, which is often another man.

encourages women into the pipeline. Women will do very well if they allow themselves to. What they need is encouragement and empathy. I have personally mentored some from graduate through to partner, this is very rewarding as I have a true interest in them throughout their career. Women are naturally nurturing and we should be proud of this. I believe there are many styles of leadership and women make strong delegators that don’t micromanage. We build trust and always rise to the challenge. I think the trouble is that so many are waiting for the chance to lead yet lack the opportunity. Women have to work harder at being more direct when dealing with people, usually we try to please people which is our nurturing side. We have to be direct without losing our leadership style. It is interesting that when hiring women naturally look more broadly over the talent pool, while it is easy for men to reach for the person they know well and feel comfortable with, which is often another man. Attracting good people is all about the brand you have, the team you already have and the leadership style. The best advertisement for your organisation is people being enthusiastic about working there and encouraging others to join. When it comes to retaining top talent, the thing I do that keeps people is to be 100% honest, all the time. You can’t always promote people, sometimes there are not ready. I don’t believe in keeping people dangling as to whether they are going to be promoted or not. I think this is dishonest and lazy. I tell them honestly and how they can improve their work so that next time they will have a better shot at it. I take time to talk it through on how they can promote themselves within the company better. It is important to spend time with people to get the best out of them. The organisations that get it right take the time to nurture people continually, making it part of their process creates a confident working environment because they know the company has their back. Also I push people hard to find opportunities for themselves and to stop depending on others to get them up the ladder. It is a supportive approach with the right coaching at the right time. I think women should just take the opportunity and go for it. If you have a good boss who is a good leader this will be easier. But if you don’t, and I have had a few shocking ones along the way, then you just have to get on with it and stick with it. There is no substitute for working hard.

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PERFOR

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RMANCE

How to Keep Your Energy Up While You Conquer the World Merilyn Parker Armitage MSc, MBA, Advanced Diploma in Nutrition.

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es, we professional women expend a great deal of energy having to process many complex tasks in our brains and often having to expend much just physically getting to various business meetings and events. Many of us drive ourselves outside of work as well - busting a gut to attend family events and also ourselves often doing outside curricular sports and social events maybe even entertaining.

Is this not elite performance?

So how do you treat your body as an ĂŠlite performer?

Our body has been designed with a self-healing mechanism built in, believe it or not, and this needs to be activated and maintained. In order to help remember the key points, we use eleven principles necessary to keeping fit and healthy. These are the 11 Steps to Radiant Wellness.

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1

HEALING SELF

First up is HYDRATION. All high performing athletes and dancers ensure that they are hydrated. If you are stressed or rushing around first of all you heat up and you sweat and lose fluid. Your brain in particular needs water in order to function with optimum performance. So keep a bottle of water by you and try to take in about 8 glasses of water a day.

It can take up to two years to rehydrate your body if you are suffering from dehydration so keep this up. Don’t listen to people who say it is dangerous to take in too much water. This is true, however too much is an awful lot and most people on the go are seriously dehydrated in the first place so it is extremely difficult to overdo this. Don’t wait until you are thirsty either. That’s another myth. It is too late when you feel thirsty and the body will start to enjoy your intake of water. In fact it won’t be long before you are literally ‘glugging’ up the water each time.

Oh yes and don’t do what I did when I was doing a lot of running and taking part in half and full marathons and that was drinking a lot of so-called ‘performance’ drinks. I actually found that I was pre-diabetic and if I had carried on like this I would have ended up with diabetes type 2. Interestingly enough this can also help our weight since the body often substitutes the hunger reflex for thirst leading to snacking and weight gain.

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2 ELIMINATION We all know that certain substances are not good for us. In my twenties we were less aware or maybe concerned about nutrition as we are now. I was seen as quite radical when I cut out E number substances from my food and threw away anything that had an E number on it. I also found that I was actually addicted to snacks containing monosodium glutamate in which was one of the key substances helping to create a poor environment in my body, leading to inflammation which in my case led to very serious arthritis. I also learned that the hormones that arise from stress - cortisol and adrenalin can trigger serious inflammatory conditions in our body. However that was only the basic and not at all what we now support élite performers with. My own performance deteriorated with my massively long commutes by rail and air and my health improved dramatically after I stopped doing this. Now performance depends upon a complete lifestyle review and if our performance deteriorates and we find ourselves in pain or lacking energy then each individual has to explore each factor in a complex life situation. Additionally the elimination of the sugary performance drinks and other sugary foods helped me gain more energy and get out of the pre-diabetic state. Sometimes the deterioration in energy can be slow and really quite difficult to detect


My performance and clarity of thinking have improved massively by cutting out dairy and substituting almond milk (which is divine in coffee) and radically if not nearly totally cutting out wheat products. I cannot eliminate wine and cut down from many instant coffees to no more than one cup of organic ground coffee a day, if that. I love it, so would never cut these out entirely but I do enjoy the occasional cup of good coffee with whipped up almond milk. I don’t drink spirits or sodas but if you do I would strongly urge you not to. As far as alcohol generally red wine contains resveratrol which is an excellent anti-oxidant and will help you keep healthy, fit and energetic with a clear brain. Every now and again I will also take a piece of high cacao chocolate (85% plus) and again this has been shown to contain anti-oxidants and keep our body fit - it does not mean splurging on the whole bar however! All things in moderation.

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ASPIRATIONS Also ask yourself are aspirations in line with what you feel you were put on this earth to do. I think my energy increase and performance has a lot to do with the fact that I am now doing what I felt I was put here to do and have wanted to do since the age of 10. What happened in between has been fun but I do believe that my health suffered as a consequence of the misalignment.

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ACTION For me my energy and performance transformed when I built in regular yoga classes and practice and meditation. So what movement gives you joy - it doesn’t have to be hitting the gym or pounding the streets swimming, dancing, yoga and walking can be equally as good and especially if you have a family and everyone can join in.

LIGHT We are beings of light - our trillions of cells all need light for our systems to work well. I was considered very strange when I insisted on talking a walk at lunch times round the building to get fresh air and daylight, however that is often when I got my best ideas and for many of us in our business world it is our ideas that are our currency. At the very least it can help you get a clear head and regain clarity of thinking. It is no surprise that performance actually increased in the insurance company after a gym had been installed with pretty high usage rates. Not only that but employee engagement improved as well. So if we pay attention to eliminating toxins from our cells and increase our intake of Omega 3 oils, all of which allow our bodies to operate more effectively as the photovoltaic cells that they are. Many health conditions ensue from a lack of light including serious emotional conditions such as depression.

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6

EAT ORGANIC and fresh vegetables and proteins. It may be more expensive, but you will save in the longer term through less use of over the counter medicines and food waste. I budgeted by only using the contents of my weekly organic food box.

INSPIRATION What gets you going? What inspires you? Having things which excite you in your life help your momentum and motivation - this in turn gives us our natural opiates - endorphins which help us feel good and this in return eliminates cravings and addictions.

7 NUTRITION

I DO ADD SALT. We are beings of salt and water. However I only ever use organic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt which all contain the many trace minerals that we need. I DO SWEETEN FOOD but use dates, honey, agave syrup, Sweet Freedom which is a natural fruit syrup and stevia. These all have a lower glycemic index and don’t spike our blood sugar level.

COOK FROM SCRATCH using fresh ingredients. There are many recipes that you can do quickly - stir fry for example and involve the whole family in helping to prepare and chop the vegetables. MAKE YOUR FREEZER YOUR BEST FRIEND. I prepared larger amounts at the weekends, planned the week’s menus and then froze dishes. That way I knew I and the other family members were able to help themselves and invariably it just meant getting out the containers in the morning ready for them to heat up later when they got home. Sometimes I will make a batch of tomato puree to put in REMEMBER TO CHEW YOUR FOOD thoroughly. It is really worth while having communal family meals and taking time to talk, chew, laugh and eat together.

This is obviously a huge subject. However let me give you some straight forward principles. Just remember that each individual is different so what might work for one person might not be right for you.

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MANY PEOPLE HAVE A REALLY LIMITED RANGE OF TYPES OF FOOD. In particular increase the colours of your food - different colours of berry, orange vegetables like sweet potatoes and carrots, many different green vegetables. I have learned to experiment with different grains and seeds such as amaranth and quinoa. I regularly now use beans such as black beans (these are one of the most nutritious foods on the planet) and using recipes from all over the world. I include seaweed, miso to add flavour.

I DON’T SNACK OR EAT BISCUITS in between. If I do I might eat an apple or some carrot batons and will encourage the children to do so as well. I SAID THAT I HAVE CUT OUT WHEAT, but I do eat spaghetti - but it’s made from different grains such as spelt and rice. You can buy this in organic food stores. BREAKFASTS CAN BE A BIT OF A PROBLEM FOR PEOPLE I find - especially those of us who don’t eat wheat! I organise around one dish where I soak mixed dried fruit, seeds and nuts with chia seeds in almond milk (I have cut out dairy milk and only drink almond milk) before I have my shower. This recipe also includes buckwheat, cacao nibs, and cinnamon. I grate in an apple or pair to this as well. This is a slow release energy meal and good at increasing enzymes and reducing inflammation. This could be made in a big batch for a family. I also add variety by doing green smoothies for breakfast and in the winter a congee - a porridge like dish made from brown rice, millet and quinoa often with dried nuts and seeds that is slow cooked the evening before and then put in a wide top thermos flask to further cook overnight and hey presto it’s ready in the morning. Porridge is good as well - especially mixed with some fruit. Sometimes I have an egg and spinach.


DO SUPPLEMENT - especially pay attention by taking a top of the range multi-vitamin. But remember women past the menopause should not take iron in their supplement. Pay more attention to magnesium than calcium - our diets are very deficient in magnesium and we need this to absorb calcium. Also pay attention to B vitamins - these are vital for our emotional stability and well-being and can help us withstand stress more effectively. Also pay attention to anti-oxidants and consultant a nutritionist who can help you with Recommended Daily Amounts. However remember that the research for these figures was done in the 1950’s and today our farming techniques have led to further depletion of vital vitamins and minerals so it is extremely difficult to overdose on any of these vital ingredients

IF YOU HAVE A DEHYDRATOR you can make your own mango chips and put those in lunch boxes. The children can help prepare them, or dehydrated kale massaged with Tahini, lemon juice and olive oil. These can replace crisps. I ALWAYS MAKE MY OWN GUACAMOLE and hummus and ring the changes with carrot hummus and roast squash hummus. Take my word for it they only take a few minutes and if you juice and you have a dehydrator you can make your own crackers to dip into them. FISH IS SO QUICK AND EASY TO COOK and is delicious with a green vegetable like beans or broccoli and a salad.

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special F E AT U R E

wome n to watc h 2017

C E L E B R AT I N G S U C C E S S

We wanted to highlight some of the AMAZING women out there, working hard and thoroughly SHINING within their industry. Girls, we applaud YOU!

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and still made partner. The key to making this happen is of course hard work, but also making it work for both herself, the company and her clients. If you also would like to work this way so that you can keep a better work life balance then her advice is to build a case for it working, have support at home to help you make it work and to be flexible at all times. ‘If you want something, then you need to really sell it.’

"I am all about the rules"

On Success; Jacqui’s success for her has been about being a good lawyer, making partner and working part-time and so lead a balanced life.

J acq u i H at f i e l d PA R T N E R R E E D S M I T H

Our Poster Girl for Having it all ‘I am all about the rules’ Jacqui heads up the financial services regulatory practice within the Financial Industry Group. She has over 20 years’ experience of providing regulatory advice across the broad spectrum of the financial services regulated community. Her clients range from asset managers, brokers, banks, fund managers, fund platforms, payment service providers, e-money issuers, FinTech companies, exchanges and corporate finance boutiques. Jacqui advises clients based both within the UK and overseas, including the EU and US. Highly academic Jacqui came across the financial sector and realised they had rules galore. Being a part of this meant she could take her skills as a lawyer and help clients strategically and commercially too. Keeping a wide breadth of work is important to her as opposed to specialising in any one area because it means she can cover so many different areas. And where she is now gives her the further advantage of working with Fin Tech organisations as well but also covers so many different areas that she has to really know her way around ‘This has given me lots of flexibility and allows me to go where my interest takes me.’ One of the things that stands out most about Jacqui is the fact she work part-time

C l a i re Ph illisk irk D I G I TA L S A L E S C H A N N E L M A N AG E R O2

Our Self Starter Star

to be a lawyer starting out by helping her friend in a construction business. She always though had a natural interest in technology and eventually began selling legal packages to small businesses. This was a success but she was drawn more and more to technology and had a big hit by introducing a CRM IT system into a bank. Next came a time for reflection – Claire had a big decision to make. She loved selling and loved problem solving and being creative with technology. She had a keen interest in technology and wanted to explore what was new and this is where Telefonica came into view by helping their customers grow through the use of technology. Success to me is learning something about new software every day, even if it is a small detail. Also if I hit my targets then I really feel I am helping people and my team. This to me is very fulfilling. The work involved in success is having rituals that include maintaining relationships and growing my network. I make sure I put in the effort and never sit back – it constantly has to be nurtured. You must be selling your clients the right thing, so that it is effective. You have to have sincere intentions.

‘Put yourself forward and be you!’ Claire Philliskirk is a digital consultant at O2 (Telefonica UK), a telecommunications provider that has moved toward helping businesses along in their digital journey. Claire has never missed a sales target and was recently named the 2016 Best Woman in Technology Sales Europe at Women in Sales Awards. After pushing herself trough A levels, then a law degree she followed her dream

"Put yourself forward and be you!"

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Coming from a very male dominated environment she found it very competitive; ‘Even with things like the hours you worked…you had to be seen to be working the longest. I fell into this stereotype and it wasn’t the firm putting pressure on me, I was doing it myself. This work ethic came from my parents who taught me to get on with it no matter what, therefore I link hard work to success.’ With two small children Kaley has to be very strict about her working hours but has found that working 9 to 5 then at home on Fridays is going well for everyone. She confesses that it would be better if she could be at work from 8 till 8 but is adamant about keeping a balance and she feels that it is important for women to see this is how it can be.

"I always believe we can get there, without necessarily knowing how. We have to be prepared to take risks because we can always learn from failure."

K aley C ros sth wa i te PA R T N E R B D O L L P

Our Big Picture Thinker ‘I always believe we can get there, without necessarily knowing how. We have to be prepared to take risks because we can always learn from failure.’ Kaley is a partner in the fraud and investigations team and she has been conducting investigations for the last 20 years, acting also as Secretary to the Companies Act investigation in the collapse of MG Rover and related companies. Kaley has a regulatory background having spent 18 months on secondment to Companies Investigations Branch at the DTI, being appointed several times as an Inspector to investigate insider dealing. She has liaised with and worked alongside government and regulatory bodies including the SFO, FSA, Ministry of Justice and various police forces. Kaley has led investigations in many sectors including pharmaceuticals and healthcare, construction, automotive, media, shipping and logistics. From being just 20 years old Kaley knew she wanted to have a senior role, so she jumped right in and tried her best to get there. For her there was no Plan B. Knowing what you want from an early age does gives you direction and drive and after switching from a law degree to accountancy, she saw those above her in senior roles and thought ‘I can do that!’ ‘I know there was an element of being in the right place at the right time, but you just have to believe in yourself. You are brilliant!’ Kaley’s main challenges is that she didn’t really have any female role models, or very few. Neither did she know how to fit in her family life and found she had no one to talk to about it from her mid 20s to early 30s.

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Im o ge n Bu ny ard COO ZERADO

Our Tech Queen ‘Take a risk and build something’ Imogen Bunyard is the co-founder of Zerado – a boutique advisory firm focused on advising on and building revolutionary technologies. Imogen leads Zerado’s internal operations and stakeholder engagement, as well as managing its projects, products, and subsidiaries across a broad range of sectors. Her


‘Stay open to new, and possibly better, roles that could be more suited to you.’

Gurp re e t M a n k u P O L I C Y D I R E C TO R , B R I T I S H V E N T U R E C A P I T A L & P R I V AT E E Q U I T Y A S S O C I AT I O N

Our build success into everyday activities girl ‘Stay open to new, and possibly better, roles that could be more suited to you.’ Gurpreet Manku is the BVCA’s Director of Policy responsible for leading the BVCA’s response to a wide range of issues and challenges facing the industry from a legal and regulatory perspective, both in the UK and Europe. She is also the executive liaison to the Private Equity Reporting Group, the body responsible for monitoring the industry’s compliance with the Walker Guidelines on Transparency and Disclosure. Before joining the BVCA she worked at Deloitte LLP

professional background lies in providing strategy, governance, agile management, and delivery of innovative technology engagements for large public and private institutions. Imogen is passionate about using technology to unite disengaged ecosystems, reduce inefficiencies in industry and everyday life, and improve standards of living for both leading and emerging markets. Imogen additionally advises a number of charities and international entrepreneurs on their digital and operational strategy. “I love the way technology can solve such a range of problems. Humanitarian aid is a perfect example of a sector that is riddled by corruption and operational inefficiencies. By bringing in cryptographic solutions, not only can we track every penny from donation to spend, we can infinitely reduce operational costs so a much greater percentage reaches the beneficiary.” Imogen works with clients to help them to understand what they’re actually trying to achieve with a process - it’s about going back to fundamentals and making what you do more logical, agile, and efficient. She adds; “By optimising our basic functions, we can produce much better and cheaper outcomes for our clients – bringing entire sectors leaping years forwards in innovation – just by simplifying them internally.” In her career, Imogen has had inspirational female senior role models and bosses who she says were “great achievers and barrier breakers” in a male-dominated industry. She adds; “Now I love surprising people myself. I am a millennial, so when I meet older men

(for 10 years) and specialised in advising private equity funds and their managers. Gurpreet studied at the London School of Economics and is a Chartered Accountant and member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England & Wales. ‘Not that long ago I was on a certain career path, now I am in a very different role that has required that I take a step in a different direction. I love it and have now been doing this for four years. Sometimes your career may take some twists and turns, so stay open. I personally went from a very large company to a smaller one. I found I have now have opportunity to make more of an impact.’ Gurpreet started in a technical role working on regulatory changes and transparency projects. Over time her role kept growing into a broader policy role. She is chair of the company’s women in venture capital and private equity series and is also looking at the number of women in the industry and the level of women in senior roles, making it a board level priority. Her definition of success is being happy with her career choice and making it work. She says; ‘You have to be fully engaged in your role and it has to be fulfilling and mentally challenging so that you can stretch and build your skills.’ Gurpreet also loves working with people early on in their careers. She finds sharing perspectives and working through their career plans very interesting. She encourages those around her to plan ahead, but to know that you cannot plan for everything and to always look for success in every day activities.

in the boardroom, I like to flip their thinking from wondering if I’m someone’s PA to heralding me as an expert in my specialist field”. “Tech is a fantastic sector – you need no specific set of skills to work here. You’re always looking for a team with hugely diverse backgrounds and skills. Primarily it is about culture – developing your idea through hard work and determination, before seeing it become a reality that you can take to the world very quickly. You don’t always need extensive financial support or experience either. It is a swiftly changing industry with an emphasis on agility, failing fast, and having an open mind!’.

"Take a risk and build something"

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"‘Work hard and pay your dues, because nothing is handed to you on a plate’ Put yourself forward and be you!"

Predictions for 2017

There are so many factors that affect the financial markets but the prevailing theme seems to be volatility and uncertainty. Clients need the help and guidance of a good financial adviser now more than ever, and I look forward to supporting my clients through this year, in good times and through the challenges!

Defining Success

C ec i lia F u r n e r BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT M A N AG E R , M E T L I F E

Our most distinguished saleswomen of the year girl ‘Work hard and pay your dues, because nothing is handed to you on a plate’ Recently dubbed The Most Distinguished Sales Woman of the Year at WISA European Sales Awards, Cecilia stands behind good old hard work among other traditional elements as the key to lasting performance and success. She sees the financial services industry as a challenging yet rewarding environment and one that she loves being a part of. “I love sales and I love the day to day challenges. I think you have to love what you do and have a real enthusiasm for it in order to experience true success for yourself and your clients.” Having been in Financial Services for 16 years in total, five and half of those with Metlife, Cecilia accredits her continued success with becoming a real and valuable business partner to her clients as one of the most important parts of her work. The belief in relationship building and fully

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understanding the issues her clients have in a very uncertain, ever-changing industry and economic environment is her stand-out skill that she devotes her efforts to on a daily basis. She says; “A big part of my job is being able to really listen and fully understand my client’s situation so that I can formulate the best possible solution for them. In fact, I find this to be my favourite part, the incorporation of the consistent changes and developments within the industry and integrating into them in the solution itself. It is about staying curious and never stopping until you have the right answers.”

For me success is about the feeling you get of satisfaction when you have done something well. This is especially true when the situation before you has been very challenging and it has required personal development and growth in order to succeed. I find that very rewarding. This is something I am always teaching my young children in the hope that I inspire them to reach for what they want and know that it will take hard work and determination to get it. Nothing is just given to you, success requires your attention every day and your ability to reach for more even when it is tough.

Biggest Challenges so Far:

It’s got to be said that being in what is traditionally a male dominated industry has been my career’s biggest challenge. I am looking forward to the day when gender is no longer an issue and that whether someone is male or female is not even discussed.

Best Advice Given:

Right at the beginning of my career someone told me to be certain that change will happen and it will happen frequently. This has proved to be invaluable to me because nothing is more changeable than the financial services industry due to the ever-changing facets that influence it, like Governments and world economics.

wom e n to w atc h 2017


'Know what your priorities are and never lose sight of them.’

M ic h e l le C h a n c e PA R T N E R B O N D D I C K I N S O N -

Our ‘Ditch the Guilt’ Girl 'Know what your priorities are and never lose sight of them.’ Michelle knew from the age of 11 that she had a career choice of medicine or law. She just so happens to be squeamish, so law won. The only one from her state school to go into law, Michelle worked hard. She now specialises in employment and partnership law and acts for SME and PLC employers predominantly in the financial services, professional practices and media sectors and senior executives at boardroom level, celebrities and those in the media in complex and sensitive employment and partnership matters. ‘If you want a career in law, then I would urge you to think about what area you want to be in because some areas are very different and cannot support the flexibility needed to have a family as well.’ For Michelle employment law is the most interesting primarily because it is about people. The relationship with clients is what motivates Michelle, she is passionate about their business and all too often goes that extra mile for them. She adds; ‘It’s always worth it because you should never under-nurture a client.’

On Getting Ahead;

‘Behind every great women is a great man!’ Michelle advices that in order to have a great family life and a great career, you have to choose the right partner. Together you have to plan and be organised and share everything, all the chores. Flexibility is imperative as is the complete commitment to dropping guilt. ‘Ditch the guilt, it will hold you back. The more senior you become the easier it will be as the culture of presenteesim is changing. You can make it work, maintain the balance and integrate it effectively…but not with guilt hanging around your neck.’ She also advises us to be more strategic with our planning and look further ahead than our appraisals. Treat your career like a business plan working 3-5 years ahead. Additionally she adds; ‘Women don’t like conflict and we would rather bow out than take on a fight. People skills are very important for success, but so is being brave and owning your achievements.’

Lau ra Mo n iz de A ragao BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT D I R E C TO R E M E A , THOMSON ONLINE BENEFITS

Our ‘from treading the boards to boardroom awards girl As the curtain closed, I wondered whether my decision to move from the stage to sales was a crazy one.’ The Enterprise Team at Thomsons manage their larger, more complex accounts. Enterprise accounts include the likes of Cisco, Deutsche Bank, Facebook, Goldman Sachs, Google, IBM, Mercedes-Benz, BP, EY and numerous other well-known global organisations. Laura’s role is to build the enterprise account list across the EMEA region. This is achieved predominantly via new business development but also through existing client expansion schemes. In 2016 Laura won Best Woman in Software Sales. What is your day to day like? I have purely a hunting role and I am passionate about it. This feeling is easy when you first start but it is retaining it as time goes on that some find challenging. For me I have a ‘we’re in it together’ commitment with our clients so that they know we are an extension of their team. What has been challenging for you? Business acumen, learning the techniques – truly understanding the technology so I can wholeheartedly make accurate and well thought out recommendations.

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What are you really happy about? I am now in a place within my career that I can give back to others through coaching and mentoring. I can help rising stars which is really fulfilling. I have such a passion for growth and development. For me success is about a feeling of accomplishment, reaching my targets and getting great references. My motto is never be afraid to change the conversation, with yourself and with clients. So with yourself this is because you must be not be fearful of saying you’re not good at something. Likewise with clients you have to co-create the value and challenge them that it does deliver results.

What is your performance philosophy? It is ‘KEY’ – in other words; You have to have in-depth Knowledge, sales discipline and techniques and know them inside out and back to front. Emotional connection with your clients and genuinely care. And be Yourself.

"As the curtain closed, I wondered whether my decision to move from the stage to sales was a crazy one."

K ay le igh Bo tto m ley A S S O C I AT E B U S I N E S S M A N A G E R , P R O G R E S S I V E RECRUITMENT

Our Sales Through Service Girl ‘Make an impact and change lives’

"Make an impact and change lives"

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Kayleigh is a self-made superstar. 2016 saw her win the Best Woman Sales Manager Award and also been nominated for the Rising Star Awards Progressive Recruitment is a global leading specialist recruitment company, dedicated to providing staffing solutions to the engineering, IT and life sciences industries. From a large family, Kayleigh found due to financial commitments she had to drop out of University and take a job with Santander – she went from cashier to financial advisor in 3 months. She says; ‘My journey has been a challenging one and yet exciting. I particularly loved the challenge of taking an under-performing team in a brand that has been struggling for 2 years, to see if I could turn them around. The results so far have been that 2016 yielded 200% YOY growth.’ Kayleigh is wise beyond her years and believes that if you provide a full service to your clients, then the sales will come. ‘It’s all about adding value, making an impact whilst remaining authentic. I am never one to take the ‘salesy’ approach. I look at what the client really needs. I listen to them thoroughly and then try to create solutions for them.’ She believes we all need to have a good mentor, someone inspiring around us to help us make real progress. Also, diversity is absolutely necessary for true innovation and prides herself on having a truly diverse team. Success for Kayleigh is achieving what she set out to and having an emotional attachment to her goals. She adds: ‘You have got to give your career a purpose that is in alignment with your passions. Do what drives you. You don’t have to share this with anyone, but you must know what it is.’ This year sees Kayleigh going for her £1 million in sales target. We put money on that happening, no problem!


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INVITATION 10x Success for Teams! If you run a team and want better results SHINEUK Magazine run a workshop called 10x Success for Teams that focuses on improving a team’s impact and results by ten times. WHAT WE COVER: • Your team’s current situation and how this can be transformed by 10x or more • Your team’s mastery and method to make this happen • Your team’s most important focus for continual success

HOW IT WORKS: Our workshop is designed to easily slot into one of your regular team meetings and is personally conducted by our Editor-in-Chief, Alexandra Watson. This highly effective training compliments all cultures, goals and targets in any industry.

10x Success is about exploding your results, rather than incremental progress. Its like multiplying instead of adding

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As a subscriber to SHINEUK Magazine we invite you to have our special workshop at your premises during a team meeting. But we only have limited availability and so to apply for your team, please contact us at workshop@shinemagazineuk.co.uk S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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M AT T G O D DA R D i s o u r M AN to w a tch HEAD O F FIEL D SA L ES AT P EP SI CO HE H A S HI S E YE F I R MLY O N T H E F UTUR E A ND IS PA SSIONAT E A B O UT T E A M SUCCE SS

H OW D O YO U M OT IVATE TEAMS ?

For me there are two key components to keeping a team motivated. Firstly is clarity around a simple goal. Where are we all going, why are we are going there, and what gives us the belief we will get there. This then needs to be supported at an individual level. How will the individual contribute to achieving that goal, how will their strengths be maximised, and what will make them perform at their best for the duration. What makes everyone perform varies, so this can only be understood by having conversations with every member of the team. W H AT A R E YO U R MAIN S ALES P ERF O RMANC E IS S U ES A ND HOW D O YO U S O LVE THEM?

A lot of sales roles can appear repetitive, and whilst this may be good for building relationships, it can be challenge on motivation. If team members become demotivated, then performance will decline. To overcome this, team leaders look to find different ways of creating “sprints” – short bursts of focused activity which , provide a stimulus and energy to raise motivation. HOW D O YO U K N OW WHEN S O MEO NE IS GO ING TO GOOD AT S A LE S ?

Behaviour is key. Whilst selling is a skill, it can be learnt whereas behaviours are harder to come by. When looking for a great person for a selling role, I’m looking for someone who can demonstrate tenacity, focus, an unrelenting drive for results and a creative mind. W H AT Q UA LI T I E S MAKE A GREAT TEAM LEADER?

There are no easy answers to this, as it depends on the team, their motivations, challenges and the goal. However, regardless

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of specifics there are two key qualities. One is drive for results. If your team leader isn’t focused on the goal, team members will not be. The second is high emotional intelligence. The team leader needs to be able to understand their team, and be able to support their development needs and maximise their strengths W HAT ARE THE MAIN CHA LLENGES YOUR TEA M FACE IN TODAY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE?

Economic pressure means we all have to become more efficient, and more effective. Teams are therefore having to learn new skills are they utilize more digital tools, and bigger data. At the same time they are looking to make sure they are more efficient than ever to have the greatest impact possible. W HAT DOES A TEAM OR INDIVIDUA L NEED TO DO TO PERFORM AT A HIGH LEVEL CONSISTENCY?

Be focused on the goal, and constant course correct. Ploughing on in the wrong direction and then changing direction is inefficient and time consuming. Checking you are moving towards your goal little and often, and then altering your course will get you to your goal quickest and most efficiently. W HAT HAVE YOU NOTICED TO B E THE MOST SIGNIFIC AN T CHA NGES W ITHIN THE INDUSTRY SINCE YOU B EGA N?

It’s the arrival of data. There is more, it comes faster, and it’s harder to turn into genuine insights. Many sales professionals enjoy numbers and data, but as well as helping it can be a hindrance if we spend too long analysing, and then analysing our analysis! Ask yourself ‘What’ insight do I need? What data do I have to support that’ and then go sell.


W HAT DO YOU THINK THE FUTURE SUCCESS OF SALES WI L L DEPEND UPON SEVERAL YEA RS FROM NOW ?

A lot about selling is constantly evolving. However the core foundations don’t, selling will exist because people will need to buy something. Therefore, I believe that selling will continue to depend upon three core foundations in the future. (1) A Clear Vision – why am I selling this service or product. (2) Relationships – how do I build a strong one in minutes or over several years (3) Results – I want to win! W HO HA S INSPIRED YOU THROUGHOUT YOUR C A REER?

I have been lucky enough to work with some fantastic leaders. I also have been lucky to witness some shockers. I have been inspired to be like the former, and less like the latter, and believe it’s important to have both benchmarks. Also, I take inspiration from adventurers. As well as those who concur new mountains, and lead teams into the unknown, I think we can learn a lot from the people who run around the United Kingdom, or cycle the world. They are focused, they train, they believe and they achieve. W HAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST AT WORK?

le arn...

L EARN S OM E THI N G N E W E VE RY

The variety. I love the fact that everyone is different, so helping create a culture, building a vision, and supporting everyone understanding and believing in it. It’s not simple, and it in involves lots of people and everything is constantly changing – which makes it a never ending challenge. W HAT WOULD B E YOUR B EST TIP FOR SOMEONE STARTI N G OUT IN SALES?

Learn. Learn something new every day. If you didn’t learn something today, did you really push yourself hard enough? IF YOU KNEW YOU COULDN’T FA IL, W HAT WOULD YOU D O ?

Sail around the world.

DAY. IF YOU D I D N ’T LE A RN SOMETHING TODAY, D I D YOU R EALLY PU S H YOURSE LF HA RD EN OUGH?

inspire

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The Princes Trust and L’Oréal Paris announce new three year collaboration and ‘All Worth It’ programme to help 10,000 young people across the UK turn their self-doubt into self-worth

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Striking new campaign sees Dame Helen Mirren, Cheryl and 13 other inspirational ambassadors share their personal stories of overcoming low self confidence This month Dame Helen Mirren hosted the launch of a new, nationwide initiative from The Prince’s Trust and L’Oréal Paris to help 10,000 young people across the UK turn ‘selfdoubt’ into ‘self–worth’ in response to new research which says 1 in 3 young people in the UK do not believe in themselves. The event launched the three-year collaboration between The Prince’s Trust and L’Oréal Paris which will facilitate a new confidence training programme, delivered in 18 dedicated spaces in Prince’s Trust centres around the UK, and available online. During the event, Dame Helen and several other L’Oréal Paris ambassadors, including


Amena Khan, Jada Sezer and Marcus Butler, spent time speaking to and advising local young people about how they can boost - and harness - their own self-confidence.

SPEAKING AT THE EVENT, DAME HELEN SAID: “Self-confidence is a life-long battle, affecting people young and old. It’s for this reason that I am so happy to be here today. This partnership between L’Oréal Paris and The Prince’s Trust is a perfect marriage. The Prince’s Trust has a long history of helping young people, and I have been proud to support its work for many years. I also admire L’Oréal Paris for its constant work to re-look at and understand what beauty means.

“In my own experience, a sense of humour is essential to helping you through times of self-doubt or low confidence, as are your mates. Nowadays, I think social media is affecting people’s confidence, but we need to remember that the essence of being human has not changed. We need to hold on to that fact.”

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Did you know the biggest issue with landing your next big role is YOU!

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Magazine Courses For all our discussion about Diversity and the lack of women in senior roles, the biggest problem despite a company’s culture is our reluctance to bag these positions for ourselves. In a bid to ‘win friends and influence people’ we often fear (or put off) actually asking for the job and before we know it, it’s gone.

So how do we ensure we are seen as a serious candidate and ready for the position? I think we can all agree that as women we fail to blow our own trumpets sufficiently enough. Additionally, we have an innate ability to wait patiently for most things in life to come to us. Although you may think that being an impatient, noisy show off isn’t the type of behaviour that would work either, think again. A deep set confidence and a clear and dynamic approach is the stuff that makes dreams come true. Research shows that women are way behind men when it comes to pushing ahead, negotiating and asking for a promotion. If you want that role and the career of your dreams,

then your next, and possibly most important, move is to brush up on your inner skills. The training you need is on the specific knowledge that can increase your ability to make an impact, feel very confident and self-assured and know exactly what you want and how you are going to get it. All this along with the knowledge of resilience, authentic power and happiness. The key that opens up all this for you is what we call the ‘Inner Skills’. The mastering of yourself, your emotions, your thoughts and even your inner beliefs – all in the name of personal success and fulfilment. If you take the smallest of peeks into the life of anyone successful (famous or not), they will tell you that conquering inner skills was their greatest weapon against all their fears, lack of self-worth, lack of faith or trust in themselves and all kinds of inner and outer adversity. And, that it opened up their lives, their potential and overall ability to succeed. Try to focus on becoming good at these essential success skills too so that you can get to where you want to be without getting in your own way.

Need help with this?

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SHINEUK Courses

E E R F URSES CO

are designed to bring the women leaders of today and tomorrow fundamental information and support they need to succeed within their lives and careers. From the best mentors that have defined and inspired the entire personal development world to you. Here are the details of SHINE’s practical and effective FREE mini-course ‘ACCELERATE’, required reading for women wanting to step into a significant role in the not too distant future:

ACCELERATE The Career Success Course for Women Wanting More Senior Roles

Magazine Courses

ever has there been such an emphasis on how important it is for women to be in more senior roles. Beginning with the essential career success diagram, this wide-ranging resource offers a transformational insight for women in all types of industries and roles. Covering sophisticated topics that will change things for you quickly such as what surprising connections to make that has nothing to do with networking and also how to turn each action you make into a promotional opportunity.

Example content included in this course;

3 How to conquer confidence to make a real impact when and where it counts 3 Getting clear on your plans away from the noise and agendas of others

3 What personality skills will make all the difference

Access is free as a suscriber of SHINEUK Magazine. All you have to do is go here: http://bit.ly/shineaccelerate and sign up for our FREE career changing resource 02 60

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3 Balance – how NOT to Burnout 3 Full Disclosure - What else you will need along the way


" A M I R E A DY ? " Are you looking to secure a Senior Role or a Significant Promotion? Then take our quick quiz to see if you are on track…

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In meetings do you voice your opinion and influence others? • Always • Quite Often • Very Occasionally • No, not really

How confident do you feel about your ability to take on a significant role? • Very confident • Quite confident • Slightly confident • Not confident

Do the people that matter know who you are and what you are capable of? • Yes, they all do • Some of them do • A few do • No, not really

How good are you at negotiating or asking for a promotion? • Very good • Quite good • Quite poor • Hopeless

0-2 d’s

3-5 d’s

You are obviously doing pretty well but may have a few areas where you struggle. Not having full clarity about how to get what you want can take up a great deal of energy and time, especially if one of the areas is about how to move forward. Perhaps you need to spend some time on improving these areas within the next few days so you don’t sabotage the progress you have made so far. Good luck!

DONT FORGET

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In your opinion, how likely is it that you will get the next appropriate significant role available? • Highly likely • Quite likely • Not very likely • It would need a miracle

Do you know what is the most important thing to focus on now in order to be considered for that role? • Yes, absolutely • Almost sure • I need to ask someone to be sure • no, I don’t know

How do you feel about your career overall? • Excited and on track • Doing well enough • Worried that I should be further ahead by now • Exhausted and frustrated

Do you know what is the best next step you can take today to be more successful and happier at work? • Yes, and I am already doing it • I think I can work this out • I don’t have all the pieces together yet • No, not really

You may well be stuck where you are in your career or are costing along. Either way, you’re not about to light up the sky any day soon. Action is needed on those areas that you find difficult to do. Whether that’s standing out more, knowing what to spend your time on and so on. Look at how making small gains can build up into big wins and we suggest starting with whatever self-limiting belief is creating this lack of momentum.

6-8 d’s

Stop the press! We have just uncovered a career casualty! We think someone needs to take some drastic action to turn this bus around and fast. Without going into overwhelm, pick one of the above areas we discuss in the quiz and start working on it today. Set some very sharp goals to improve each area step by step. The sooner you dive in to this the better. Not knowing is fine, but not doing anything about it is not fine.

SHINE’s free and easy-access mini course ACCELERATE – grab it now to bring your scores up to scratch. S H I N E UK M AG A Z I N E

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Hollywood diversity Male film directors outweigh women 24:1

I

s Hollywood in denial, or just not paying attention? It seems that a lack of gender and racial diversity in this highly glamorous entity is lacking both behind AND in front of the camera. According to the latest report, the studios' top-grossing 100 movies from 2007 and 2016 were directed by predominantly middle aged white men. And of the 1000 films analysed, less than one in 24 directors over the decade were female, and across those 45 directing jobs only three females were black and three Asian. Nicole Kidman has taken aim at sexism in Hollywood, claiming the film industry does not represent an “even playing field” for women. Speaking at the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards in Los Angeles, the Oscar-winning Australian actor praised the organisation for its pioneering work supporting female actors and film-makers. “Obviously we need to create more opportunities; it’s not an even playing field,” said Kidman, who picked up the Crystal award for excellence in film at the ceremony. “We’re all working and banding together and trying to change that and that’s what’s needed. We also need to put cameras in little girls’ hands and get them to tell stories and increase their confidence so that they can feel powerful.” When industry leaders think director they think male, the report of the School of Journalism at the University of Southern California found, throwing a spotlight on the recent Oscars in the

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category of best director, all five contenders were male including Mel Gibson for Hacksaw Ridge and Damien Chazelle for La La Land. This year’s ceremony saw that only one woman had directed a movie up for an award and it was a horror film. There was only one Asian director of either gender that helmed a top-grossing thriller. And only one black director led an animated film.  The opportunities for women are also more restricted. Male directors work across seven decades from their twenties to the eighties while the work of women ranges from their thirties to their sixties. Women are also far more likely than their male colleagues to get one shot at directing a single lucrative movie money spinner.

80% of women only made one movie in the ten years studied compared to the 54.8 per cent for males. "In Hollywood, female directors are usually one and done," the study notes, adding: "The span of a females' careers is limited whereas for males it appears limitless." "Female directors and their work seem to hold little value", the report states, "while in contrast male directors, stories and audiences are seen as profit centres. . . . Very few women directors - if any - have been attached to large scale action or tent-pole films in the last decade." Only last month the annual Celluloid Ceiling Report from San Diego State University's Centre for the Study of Women in Television and Film, noted a drop for female representation in a range of production roles. Women made up only 17 per cent of all behind-the-scenes roles on the 250 highest-grossing films at the US box office in 2016, a two per cent drop from the previous year. One possible fix, the latest study suggests, is encouraging buyers, agents, and executives to make sure short lists for upcoming projects are at least 30 percent female. The relationship, too, between lead character and the director's gender or race should be uncoupled so that women can tell the stories that centre on male characters and ensure black directors tell stories that focus on white protagonists. A-list directors should use their clout to bolster female directors, and mentor them in the same way as male directors and financiers should use their clout to invest in movies which give under represented woman and ethnic groups early career opportunities. Otherwise neither storytelling nor storytellers would reflect the world audiences live in. "We can sit by as this continues for another decade or can act to ensure that equality and inclusion are the hallmark of entertainment in the years to come," the USC report ends. Best supporting Oscar winner Viola Davis says: "The problem is not with the Oscars. The problem is with the Hollywood movie making system. The problem is with the people who are in power, who have the

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yay or the nay vote. How many black films are being produced every year? How are they being distributed? The films that are being made, are the big-time producers out there thinking outside of the box in terms of how to cast the role. Can you cast a black woman in that role? Can you cast a black man in that role?" She continued, "The problem isn't even our pay...You could probably line up all the A-List black actresses out there and they probably don't make what one A-List white woman makes in one film. That's the problem. You can change the Academy, but if there are no black films being produced, what is there to vote for?" Feminist Keira Knightley decried the dearth of female stories in Hollywood: “Where are the female stories? Where are they?” The actress asks. “Where are the directors, where are the writers? It’s imbalanced, so given that we are half the cinema-going public, we are half the people who watch drama or watch anything else, where is that? I’m actually concerned over the lack of our voices being heard.”


“Where are the female stories? Where are they? Where are the directors, where are the writers? It’s imbalanced, so given that we are half the cinema-going public, we are half the people who watch drama or watch anything else, where is that? I’m actually concerned over the lack of our voices being heard.” KEIRA KNIGHTLEY

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SHINE UK Magazine - Spring 2017  

Our third edition of Alexandra Watson's magazine all about women's success