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HRYKIEWICZ PEJICIC TAYLOR YU YU

CHARRETTE REPORT CHARRETTE REPORT CHARRETTE REPORT


CONTENTS

SITE ANALYSIS

2 CHALLENGES 3 OPPORTUNITIES

CHARRETTE

5 TRANSIT & EXPERIENCE 6 KEVIN LYNCH 7 RESTRICTIONS 8-11 PRECEDENTS

CONCEPT

12-13 CIRCULATION & LAND USE 14 VISION 15 CONCEPT


SITE ANALYSIS 1


CHALLENGES Nestled near the core and heart of Preston the study site has a rich and lengthy heritage of heavy industry that was present throughout the 1900’s. This industrial presence is still very imminent in the present day and imbues cues of industrial architecture. The site is designated as a regeneration area in which most amenities are located outside the site boundaries. This creates an unpleasant industrial core that will need incentives to developers for remediation of contaminated lands.

The presence of large private industrial properties cause a lack of definition, prevent movement, threaten safety and prevent the majority of the land to properly utilized to serve the adjacent neighbourhoods. These areas include unmaintained greenery, a lack of vision and sightlines within the parks, inability to access certain spaces and a general lack of density to support any transit or substantial development within the area. These problems are also complicated with a poor connection to the King St. E intensification corridor and the general

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amenities that surround the site. As a result the use of automobiles is very prevalent because of the uncomfortable spaces that offer limited enclosure, distances, danger from large trucks and a lack of connectivity. This is also compounded by a lack of mixed uses in the primarily industrial and residential area that inhibits social sustainability. The pedestrian and residential experience is also majorly deteriorated by noise from the active rail and vibrations that result from heavy cargo. In some areas there are residential unites within the 30m active rail buffer outlined by city regulations. For these neighbourhoods the experience is extremely uncomfortable and results in a lack of sensible enjoyment of their properties as a result of the frequent nature of large locomotives. The lack of sidewalks in some areas and inadequate lighting that are far to high and spaced too far apart also detract from pedestrian movement. Lack of street furniture and a unifying theme cause the majority of streets to be largely unusable and majorly disorienting. A lack of density and only a few significant heritage buildings within the site boundary cause homogeneity in architectural diversity. The large industrial buildings also lack a pleasant form of industrial architecture that is compounded by a general lack of landmarks and pleasant views.


OPPORTUNITIES There is a major sense of historical significance throughout the area that is only strengthened by the community honor that exists because of the industrial history. The railways, station and industry itself offer a present and historic connection that can be used to create a sense of place and true identity. Furthermore some variations of elevation offer substantial vistas and panoramas that can be capitalized on in the development of place identity and general aesthetic. To combat the impacts of the industrial core the inclusion of density will offer more vision into public spaces the possibility of a diversity of uses and the establishment of a more sustainable transit corridor. Designated as regeneration site and situated in a growth corridor the site has the perfect incentive for development and intensification.

The established neighbourhoods hold a historic significance to the area and posses some heritage sites that can facilitate a strong connection to the past. Importantly, the industrial buildings themselves whether repurposed or not will offer a heavy historic and present heritage and spirit to the residents and visitors as they witness the past achievements of the area and the current workings of the present culture and industry. The vacant lots that these industrial buildings offer are attractive sites for intensification and the implementation

of creative infrastructure. Parcels could also be repurposed for other activities such also local community gardens. These strengths are compounded by a strong ecological presence within the area in the form of the tree canopy, various green spaces and an abundance of shrubbery. Ecological features also enhance and provide view corridors and provide framing for important buildings and landscape features. They also create serial vision and in connection a sense of exploration from the obstruction of peripheral views, the establishment of rhythm, and repetition. On the street the width of lanes is ideal for the addition of bike lanes as well as the addition of on street parking which can facilitate a relation between pedestrian and vehicular lanes of travel. These experiences can also be facilitated through the improved connection of amenities and the addition of pedestrian oriented light fixtures. The Preston site has many weaknesses, however for every weakness there is an equal or greater opportunity to create a thriving and successful urban village.

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CHARRETTE 4


TRANSIT&EXPERIENCE There are two major transit nodes around the site and are within a kilometer distance from each other. Although this should be improved there is a far greater concern as both nodes are situated to the east of the site. This means that any movement from the east to the west or vice versa is extremely limited and in need of further development. In the area of buffers around the railway there are some threats in the form of single detached residential housing within the buffer of the active rail. Consideration should be given to a solution to the noise and vibration these houses specifically are introduced to because of their position within this buffer.

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KEVIN LYNCH The most prominent feature within the area is the industrial core that is eminent throughout the majority of the site. This is compounded by an active and inactive railway corridor that runs through the core and the edges creates by fences and buildings within the core. Prominent landscape features include the dual parks and substantial greenery through the site. Two nodes are located in the south east corner that facilitate the major movement of both pedestrians and automobiles with the areas. This is connected to the major transit corridor of King St. E and surrounded by a multitude of landmark and important buildings and sites.

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RESTRICTIONS These restrictions were a fundamental basis for the main circulation design within the area. The concept has a foundational importance on the preservation of existing neighbourhoods and important monuments. Therefore the restrictions denote these important residential zones as areas of significance while also determining whether connections to improve permeability are possible within those areas. The areas with hatched inner boundaries denote areas that will not allow for increased permeability, however the remaining zones offer room for connections within them.

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PRECEDENTS When

experience in practical application is lacking, the observation, analysis, and synthesis

of existing successes and failures of similar endeavors must suffice.

The

precedent images

we have selected are from internationally celebrated public places and design projects from which we have gleaned insights that will inform our concept

Given that our site is spaces; we have identified

- in both broad principles

and in minor details.

populated with waning industrial sites and

under-utilized open

in our research many instances where these

buildings and their surrounding spaces can be transformed and re-programmed to foster environments for vibrant public use, and to exhibit architectural and cultural heritage.

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1

2 Gubei Pedestrian Promenade Shanghai, China

Gubei Pedestrian Promenade Shanghai, China (cont)

+Vehicular road rezoned to pedestrian-only park +700m in length; 60m average width +Completed 2009

+Flanked by 15 - 28 storey residential towers with two stories on the ground floor for commercial uses +Landscape features: architectural follies, sculpture, fountain, raised seating terrace, unique trees species

3 World’s Tallest Building Made From Shipping Containers Zurich, Switzerland

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Camden Lock London, Britain + Former timber yard converted to arts and crafts market in 1973 + 10% of stalls reserved for casual traders

+Assembly of 17 old shipping containers +26 meters (85 foot) +Environmentally conscious approach +It is a shop that sells only Eco-friendly products

Weekdays: £15 - £30 Weekends: £45 + Priority given to handmade, original and fair trade + Renting available additionally for shops & studios

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6 Mary Bartelme Park Chicago, U.S.

Mary Bartelme Park Chicago, U.S. (cont)

+ Former infirmary site in Chicago’s West Loop

+ Pavers are pollution-eating, permeable, self-cleaning + Stormwater directed through leach field

+ Industrial history; had groundwater contamination + Sculpted landforms serves as storage for excavated earth; imported clean soil buffers surface and rectified soils

+ Landscape features use recycled materials from old infirmary


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8 West 57th Street Bjarke Ingels Group New York, U.S.

West 57th Street Bjarke Ingels Group New York, U.S. (cont)

+Elegant landmark building with residential above ground floor cultural and commercial uses.

+Every unit accommodates natural

+LEED Gold certification

skyline

lighting

+Optimal views for residents of city

+Semi-private central courtyard additional to embedded terraces for green space

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Granville Island Vancouver, Canada

Ford Assembly Plant California, U.S.

+Infill project in which an industrial building on the port was convereted into a market +The exterior building retained the same form which it had 30 years prior to the redevelopement +The precedent shows the successful adaption of a large warehouse much like on our site

+Includes resturant and main event hall +Exquisite industrial architecture enfused with modern glazing in an extraordinary fusion +Can be applied to funtioning industrial buildings for social integration

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12 Nordic Pavillion Venice, Italy

Campus Restaurant Ditzingen, Germany

+Designed by Sverre Fehn +The introduction and integration of outdoor and indoor spaces +This developent is centered in a naturalized area where it functions as an outdoor lobby space

+Creation of a new typology to a factory campus +Fusion of office buildings and resturant in which one building mimics and integrates the other +Structure is low lying and integrated with the landscape


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14 Waste Landscape Paris, France

De Bomeohof Amsterdam, Netherlands

+Large-scale installations promoting pedestrian engagement of public spaces, consisting purely of recycled industrial material

+ Revitalized building in the heart of a cultural neighborhood +Reuse of old materials in architecture +Exhibition of industrial heritage

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Industrial Street Furniture

Creative Street Furniture

+Inspired street furniture hailing industrial and heritage elements

+Imaginative, playful seating design incorporating artificial water feature

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18 Gabriel’s Wharf London, UK

Rock Climbing Wall Duisburg, Germany

+Industrial facade painted on stage props for authentic heritage feeling

+Industrial space reclaimed for community activities

+Film company enlisted to create entire movie stage like feature

+ Maximizing use of weakness in large barrier through the facilitation of community involvement

+Programming of the space for social interaction and integration

+Programming and community design are crucial to a thriving urban village


CONCEPT The heavy industrial presence within our site offers an exquisite opportunity to preserve existing industrial uses for the present day exhibition of heritage throughout the site. Vacant buildings and those that establish unique industrial architecture, like the Canada Co. building, offer a perfect example of areas that can be redeveloped for intensification, mixed-use infrastructure, and amenities. Finally, the transition of these areas is facilitated in building similar to the FedEx building in which the connectivity of the site to the main core can be established through vistas, pathways and serial vision. These transitions will also involve careful height transitions between intensified areas and low density residential. The site has a general potential to create vibrant, sustainable and resilient areas through the facilitation of a major pedestrian network that allows the movement of residents and visitors throughout the site. The implementation of creative infrastructure and the establishment of a residential and commercial node will, with the correct programming, allow the community to truly unite under a shared heritage and culture in impressive urban areas. This village core will facilitate movement to and from the Preston core and enhance the experience of individuals in Cambridge. The further mixed-use intensification of

King St. will expand and improve the existing and designated commercial core of Preston. The naming of the site, establishment of historic podiums and extenuation of existing

and

proposed

landmarks

will

allow

pedestrians

and

residents

to

understand, experience and truly feel the heritage, culture and identity of the area.

The

major design goal of developing an existing site, as opposed to a greenfield

development, is the importance that should be given to the existing neighborhoods and principles within the area.

For

a truly successful development there must be

an integration of the existing to assure full cooperation and acceptance by the current residents and commercial vendors.

Furthermore,

the contamination on

the site within the industrial core increases the need for density to offset cleaning costs and creates a limited number of options for possible future implementations.

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CIRCULATION & L A N D U S E The major circulation of the site is confined to King St. E. and Bishop St. with smaller roads facilitating access within the residential neighbourhood and industrial core. Although there is an abundance of vertical access there is a limited supply of horizontal access that is confined to Duke St. As a result there is a fundamental need to develop a horizontal access through the site that will facilitate mainly if not solely pedestrian movement in a safe and walkable fashion. Therefore the circulation diagram proposes a green corridor along the existing inactive rail with pedestrian connection to major access points adjacent to the site. This circulation also proposes the removal of the dead end section of Union St. in favour of a pedestrian corridor to prevent congestion, blocks and to enhance the pedestrian experience.

This envisioned land use is a preliminary strategy that ensures a mix of uses and an availability of all uses throughout the site. All established residential neighbourhoods are still present as well as some of the industrial uses in the core of the site. The addition of mixed uses and the intensification of the core is facilitated by the reuse of industrial buildings and the adaption of empty parcels. The green corridor effectively links these uses and importantly is connected to every type of use. Importantly, the majority of mixed uses and density are situated along the king street intensification corridor in order to expand and improve the designated Preston commercial core.

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VISION “Our vision for Erbe Station is to incorporate the

principles of sustainable urbanism into a vibrant site that highlights the heritage of

Preston,

providing

cultural vitality that will improve the economic and social livability of the area for its residents and visitors.

Our

concept will integrate density

into a new dynamic landscape creating vistas along a re-purposed rail and industrial corridor that will lead to a destination for human interaction.�

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ERBE STATION This concept incorporates every diagram and fundamental knowledge of the site into a functioning urban village with a high level of character and heritage. The focal point of the design is the green corridor that facilitates the important pedestrian movement that is largely presently lacking. This feature is intersected by the town square that acts as the cultural and functional center of the development. This public space is connected with Otto Klotz Park and will facilitate the majority of the density within the site. Finally, the corridor terminates at Lawrence Park, which is flanked by residential, institutional and mixed-use amenities. The corridor also serves a secondary purpose. The corridor, from east to west, begins as the tradition and still functioning industrial core that it presently functions as. It then continues into the town square where the past industrial buildings have been repurposed and reinvented in a show of the change of time and the past history. The corridor continues out of the town square at which point it separates from the inactive rail that it ha been adjacent to the entire journey. This final substantial allusion is the significance of a new direction for Preston and Cambridge as a whole. Along this path will be situated podiums of different dates, much like a timeline, that tell the story of Preston to residents and visitors in order to complete a thorough facilitation for heritage significance.

ERBE UR• bay meaning heritage in German (noun)

JOHN ERB founder of Preston, Cambridge 15


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HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ HRYKIEWICZ

No. IMAGE SOURCES

http://landscapeurbanism.com/strategy/gubei-gold-street-2/

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http://www.environmentteam.com/2010/06/03/worlds-tallest-building-made-from-shipping-containers/

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http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/2c9fd056-741c-11df-87f5-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1bZIHhf4m http://landscapeurbanism.com/strategy/mary-bartelme-park-2/

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http://www.livegreenblog.com/sustainable-architecture/big-plans-unveiled-for-unique-manhattan-high-rise-6533/

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http://www.rethinkbartontiffany.ca/?p=148

http://archinect.com/forum/thread/93600/warehouse-industrial-building-precedents http://www.evolo.us/category/design/page/3/

TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR

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PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC PEJICIC

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http://www.archdaily.com/172437/de-borneohof-peter-geusebroek/deborneohof-amsterdam-de-borneohof-amsterdam-3/

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http://inspirationfeed.com/inspiration/industrial-inspiration/30-adventurous-public-bench-designs/

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http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/9004234.jpg

http://www.erih.net/nl/fotogalerij/duitsland/duisburg-landschapsparkduisburg-noord/print.html

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http://www.jessicagwolff.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Duisburg-Nord_climbing-wall.jpg

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PLAN 313 Vision Report  

This is a report of the Charrette and Vision stage of a PLAN 313 Community design seminar.

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