Percussion ensemble (2010)

Page 1

Percussion Ensemble

(for at least 3 players) (2010)

Alexander Hunter


Percussion
Ensemble
Performance
Note
 
 Percussion
Ensemble
for
eight
players
was
written
in
October
of
2010
in
Elgin,
 Illinois.
The
eight
performers
are
each
represented
in
the
score
by
a
letter
(A,
B,
 C,
etc.)
and
are
to
perform
without
a
full‐time,
independent
conductor.
The
 performers
are
to
setup
so
each
can
make
eye
contact
with,
and
see
the
hands
of
 every
other,
as
they
are
to
receive
cues
from
each
other
during
performance.
 Each
performer
is
to
read
from
the
score
during
performance.

 
 If
fewer
than
eight
musicians
are
available,
the
piece
may
be
performed
with
as
 few
as
three,
but
each
performance
must
include
at
least
one
pitched
percussion
 performer
(C,
D,
E)
and
one
non‐pitched,
non‐drum
performer
(A,
B,
G,
H).
In
the
 case
of
fewer
than
eight
musicians
being
present
only
those
events
which
 involved
those
present
are
to
be
played.
 
 The
pitches
chosen
are
based
on
the
overtone
series
of
‘F1’
(which
is
never
 heard),
with
a
preference
for
pitches
lower
in
the
series
and
more
consonant
 upper
harmonics.
The
pitches
used
in
the
keyboard
percussion
parts
were
 selected
from
the
list
below.

Percussion
Ensemble
was
written
using
‘moment
form’.
Each
event
is
numbered
 and
is
to
be
separated
from
events
before
and
after
by
relative
silence.
The
 ensemble
may
perform
any
number
of
events
in
any
order,
and
may
repeat
 events
(no
necessarily
consecutively)
up
to
five
times.
In
this
way
the
piece
could
 last
anywhere
from
ten
seconds
to
over
an
hour.
The
next
event
is
to
be
cued
 only
after
all
the
intentional
sounds
have
ceased
to
resonate,
and
a
brief
pause
–
 one
or
two
breaths
–
has
been
observed.
In
this
way
a
performance
in
a
large
hall
 may
be
significantly
longer
than
one
in
a
small
recital
room.
Preference
should,
 of
course,
be
given
to
more
resonant
performance
spaces,
but
the
piece
is


designed
to
accommodate
any
space.
Linear
spatial
relationships
within
each
 event
represent
time,
with
ten
seconds
per
event
being
the
upper
limit.

Pitches
 which
are
in‐line
vertically
are
to
be
sounded
simultaneously.
When
more
than
 one
performer
is
to
play
at
the
same
time
the
performer
nearer
the
top
of
the
 page
(‘A’
being
at
the
very
top)
will
be
responsible
for
cueing
that
part
of
the
 event.
Nothing
should
feel
rushed
–
the
overall
mood
should
be
one
of
relaxation
 and
observation.
 
 There
are
seven
different
noteheads
used,
each
indicating
a
different
method
of
 striking
or
exciting
an
object.
 
 •

Finger
tip

o ‘Heel’
of
the
hand
 X Brush
  Mallet
  Drum
stick,
chop
stick
or
stick
end
of
mallet
  Bow1
(S
–
drawn
slowly,
M
–
drawn
at
a
medium
pace,
F
–
drawn
quickly)
  Metal
beater
 
 Though
striking/exciting
methods
and
materials
will
differ
greatly
in
each
 performance
a
quiet
dynamic
is
to
be
maintained
throughout
–
no
one
sound
 being
louder
or
more
prominent
than
any
other.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 























































 1
The
relative
length
of
each
bowed
sound
is
to
be
decided
on
an
individual
basis

and
may
differ
from
event
to
event.
Simultaneous
bowed
sounds
of
the
same
 relative
length
from
different
instruments
need
not
be
identical.


A. Five
resonant
metals2
(ex.
almglocken3,
crotales,
chimes,
bells,
gongs,
 tam‐tams,
cymbals,
saucepans)

 B. Five
resonant
metals
(ex.
almglocken,
crotales,
chimes,
bells,
gongs,
tam‐ tams,
cymbals,
saucepans)
 C. Vibraphone
(without
motor)
–
with
mallet
and
bow
 D. Vibraphone
(without
motor)
–
with
mallet
and
bow
 E. Marimba
(with
‘A2’)

 F. Five
drums
of
any
size
(ex.
concert
bass
drum,
concert
toms,
multi‐tenor
 ‘marching’
drums,
floor
toms,
bongos)

 G. Five
pieces
of
resonant
glass
or
porcelain
(ex.
a
tea
set,
china
plates,
wine
 glasses,
glass
mixing
bowls)

 H. Five
pieces
of
non‐resonant
metal
(ex.
brake
drum,
dampened
cymbal,
 radiator,
drum
set
hardware,
a
lamp,
a
tuba)
 
 A
T
Hunter,
October
2010
–
Elgin,
IL

2
Choosing
all
five
(or
any
combination)
from
one
category
(ex.
saucepans)
is

acceptable,
as
long
as
the
sounds
the
instruments
produce
represent
a
relative
 variety.
 3
Almglocken,
crotales
and
other
pitched
percussion
should
be
selected
from
the
 above
mentioned
[sounding]
pitches.


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