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ALEXANDER H. FARLEY

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2014 Master of Architecture


// Studio Work M.Arch Thesis: Laborlandschaft, 2013

04

Shoaling Pier: High Density Housing, 2013

16

Ca’ Sublimata: Venetian Museum, 2012

22

++Cloud Garden++ Data Center, 2012

30

Plein Aire Laboratory: Lincoln Laboratory Addition, 2011

36

Boston Architectural College Annex, 2011

44

Forest For The Trees: Kenmore Station, 2011

48

// Scripting + Fabrication Unflat Pavilion, 2011

52

Forces Frozen, 2014

54

Bubble Wall, 2012

56

Recursions, 2012

58

Objectifications, 2012

59

Enneper Vase, 2013

60

Costa Vase, 2013

61

Radiolarian Bowl, 2013

62

Press-Fit Tray, 2011

63

// Professional Work Renderings, 2012 - 2013

68

Purple Residence Pavilion, 2011

70

Purple Residence Addition, 2012

72

ALEXANDER FARLEY

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ALEXANDER FARLEY


// Studio Work M.Arch Thesis: Laborlandschaft, 2013

04

Shoaling Pier: High Density Housing, 2013

16

Ca’ Sublimata: Venetian Museum, 2012

22

++Cloud Garden++ Data Center, 2012

30

Plein Aire Laboratory: Lincoln Laboratory Addition, 2011

36

Boston Architectural College Annex, 2011

44

Forest For The Trees: Kenmore Station, 2011

48

// Scripting + Fabrication // Professional Work

ALEXANDER FARLEY

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// LABORLANDSCHAFT STUDIO: MIT THESIS - ANDREW SCOTT SITE: SEAPORT DISTRICT, BOSTON FALL, 2013

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, GRASSHOPPER, 3DS MAX, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


This thesis proposes to redesign the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory typology by rethinking the composition of the laboratory module; the smallest functional sub-unit of the laboratory type. The design for this thesis applies contemporary corporate counterculture spatial organizational ideas onto the laboratory module. Central to these concepts is an architecture that is user-oriented and environmentally sensitive rather than managerially-oriented. The spatial organization seeks to flatten the managerial hierarchy by eliminating explicit office spaces. The laboratory is instead spatially divided according to affinity for behaviors and activities rather than strict programmatic designations. The laboratory module was initially conceived during World War II as a spatial system to accommodate inter-disciplinary research and development teams in an industrial laboratory setting. However, the spatial design of the module has become deterministically dictated by managerial control systems and calibrated by infrastructural service, rather than serving the environmental and social needs of the researchers. Contemporary laboratory architecture requires the same shift away from spaces organized for clerical work to fluid and open fields that have occurred in corporate architecture. However, architectural design cannot control occupant’s behaviors, but it can endorse a specific networked culture through the configuration of spaces. The use of common flexible spaces endorses and encourages social interaction. Likewise the form and figure of the laboratory establishes an environmental tone by allowing the research spaces to sit within an open field. This open field aspect allows for maximum daylighting and greater levels of visual and social interaction. Through a “plug and play� service infrastructure, the lab benches and fume hoods can behave more as setting and furniture rather than rigid spatial datums. Additionally, these spaces also provide for reconfigurability and easy upgradeability. By seeking to move away from standard laboratory spatial solutions and conventions the design takes the position that a laboratory field condition encourages new modes of scientific interaction and production. This laboratory functions as much as an intellectual play ground as it does a functional research laboratory. ALEXANDER FARLEY

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Landmass Change

FEMA Flood Zones

= 100 yr flood - no base elevation = 100 yr flood - with base elevation = 500 yr flood

Boston BioPharmaceutical + Academia Clustering

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Waterfront Access + Circulation


PUBLIC PIERS

A

PUBLIC PATH LAB MODULE - HEAVY HVAC LAB MODULE - MEDIUM HVAC LAB MODULE - LIGHT HVAC SERVICE CORE PUBLIC PHYSIC GARDEN

B

B

CAFETERIA ROOF TERRACE ATRIUM SCIENCE MUSEUM (1st FLOOR) GYM (2nd FLOOR) AUDITORIUM PUMP STATION (UNDERGROUND) ENTRANCE PROMENADE MEDICINAL ARBORETUM PARKING LOT

A

SERVICE ENTRANCE MAIN ENTRANCE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

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ROOF Bench services tap [gas, vacuum, electrical, data]

GLAZING Bench services manifold [gas, vacuum, electrical, data]

Configuration 1

Conditioned air

Lab bench plugs into sub-floor service manifold CLADDING

HVAC

Transformation Short Section

Lab bench can rotate about the service port

STRUCTURE

Second Floor - Lab

No Social or Visual Interaction

SERVICE CORES

Configuration 2

PLUG + PLAY LAB BENCH SERVICING

First Floor - Lab B

RECONFIGURABLE LAB SPACE Standard Laboratory Section

Short Section 3rd FLOOR

Second Floor - Lab Benches

2nd FLOOR

Second Floor - Lab

Visual Interaction Social Mixing

No Social or Visual Interaction

1st FLOOR

Mezzanine - Desk

First Floor - Lab Benches

BUILDING SYSTEMS

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Standard Laboratory Section

SECTIONAL PARTI

Social Laboratory Section

Visual Interaction

First Floor - Lab B


FIRST FLOOR [+5m]

SECOND FLOOR [+10m]

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1:50 STRUCTURE + SERVICE MODEL


1:200 SITE MODEL

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m/s

ENVIRON

15.00<= 13.50 12.00 10.50 9.00 7.50 6.00 4.50 3.00 1.50 <=0.00

Hourly Data: Wind Speed (m/s)

% m/s

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS SIMULATIONS

100.00<= 91.90

15.00<=

9.00

83.80 Wind-Rose Boston Logan IntL Arpt_MA_USA 75.70 1 JAN 1:00 - 31 DEC 24:00 67.60 Calm for 0.40% of the time = 35 hours. Each closed polyline shows frequency of 1.2%. = 102 hours. 59.50

7.50

51.40

6.00

43.30

4.50

35.20

3.00

27.10

1.50

<=19.00

13.50 12.00 10.50

<=0.00

Hourly Data: Relative Humidity (%)

Hourly Data: Wind Speed (m/s)

m/s

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS SIMULATIONS

15.00<=

Wind Rose Boston Logan International Airport January 1,1:00 am - December 31, 24:00 pm Calm for 0.40% of the time = 35 hours Each closed polyling shows frequency of 1.2% = 102 hours

12.00

%

C 32.00<=

100.00<=

9.00

Wind-Rose 91.90 Boston Logan IntL Arpt_MA_USA 83.80 1 JAN 1:00 - 31 DEC 24:00 Calm for 0.40% of the time = 35 hours. 75.70 Each closed polyline shows frequency of 1.2%. = 102 hours. 67.60

11.20

7.50

59.50

6.00

6.00

51.40

0.80

4.50

43.30

-4.40

3.00

35.20

-9.60

1.50

27.10

-14.80

<=0.00

<=19.00

13.50

10.50

Hourly Data: Wind Speed (m/s)

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ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS SIMULATIONS

Hourly Data: Relative Humidity (%)

ALEXANDER FARLEY %

26.80 21.60 16.40

<=-20.00

Hourly Data: Dry Bulb Temperature ( C)

Wind-Rose Boston Log 1 JAN 1:00 Calm for 0.4 Each closed


UDI = 57.11 %

Third Floor UDI = 57.11 %

Third Floor

UDI = 46.47 %

Second Floor UDI = 46.47 %

Second Floor

UDI = 62.82 % UDI = 62.82 %

UDI = 45.46 %

First Floor UDI = 45.46 %

First Floor

UDI = 4.07 % UDI = 4.07 %

UDI = 38.75 % UDI = 38.75 %

% Occupied Hours % Occupied Hours 0 17 33 50 67 83 100

USEFUL DAYLIGHT FROM ILLUMINATION SIMULATION USEFUL DAYLIGHT FROM ILLUMINATION SIMULATION Measurement from 0% to 100%, with the building occupied from 0

17 33

8am towith 6pmthe annually. 4 ambient 2m grid. 50 Measurement from 0% to 100%, building occupiedbounces. from Useful bounces. Daylight Illuminance (UDI) divides the working hours into 8am to 6pm annually. 4 ambient 2m grid. 67 three groups: lux (insufficient daylight), 100 lux < x < 2000 lux Useful Daylight Illuminance (UDI) divides<100 the working hours into 83 (useful daylight), and >2000 (too much three groups: <100 lux (insufficient daylight), 100 lux < lux x < 2000 lux daylight with potential heat gain issues) 100 (useful daylight), and >2000 lux (too much daylight with potential heat gain issues)

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3rd FLOOR PATIO + VIEW OF BOSTON HARBOR

1st FLOOR LABORATORY + VIEW OF OCEAN

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3rd FLOOR CAFETERIA + VIEW OF ORGANIC SYNTHESIS LAB

1st FLOOR SLIDING OFFICE PODS


CENTRAL ATRIUM + CONFERENCE ROOM

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// SHOALING PIER STUDIO: MIT - ANDREW SCOTT SITE: RINCON PARK, SAN FRANCISCO SPRING, 2013

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, PYTHON, GRASSHOPPER, 3DS MAX, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


Zoning

= Office space

= Light Industrial

= Community business

= Residential

= Pedestrian

Public Access

= Public transportation

= Park

Public Spaces

= Open spaces

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SITE PLAN

UNIT 1 - 3rd FLOOR DOUBLE BEDROOM

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UNIT 4 - 3rd FLOOR SINGLE BEDROOM

UNIT 7 - 4th FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM


UNIT 3rd FLOOR PLANS

SHORT SECTION

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1:50 UNIT MODEL + 1:200 SITE MODEL


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// CA’ SUBLIMATA STUDIO: MIT - MARIA SEGANTINI (C + S) SITE: PARCO SAN GIULIANO, VENICE, ITALY SPRING, 2012

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, PYTHON, GRASSHOPPER, 3DS MAX, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


NON-INTERACTIVE/SERVICE PROGRAM

AUDITORIUM

GALLERY

PIANO NOBILE

GALLERY

SALON

PORTEGO

GALLERY

PARTI

PORTEGO

INTERACTIVE/SERVED PROGRAM

PUBLIC SQUARE

FOOD PREPARATION

PROGRAMMING

BOAT RENTAL BOAT STORAGE

POTTERY

THEATER

PUBLIC

SQUARE

BUILDING

GALLERY

STUDIO

POTTERY GLASS GALLERY

ADMINISTRATION

STUDIO

STUDIO

WEB MUSEUM

LEVEL 2

STUDIO

MASKS

GALLERY

LEVEL 1

GALLERY

BOAT

CAFE

THEATER

THEATER

BOAT RENTAL

ENTRANCE LEVEL

GALLERY

LEVEL -1

LEVEL -2

GALLERY

GLASS MAKING

GALLERY

CAFE

The rising tides and eroding ground of the Veneto lagoon demands a strategy to connect with the mainland. A failure of many contemporary architectural designs in Venice is the paradoxical embrace of Venetian history and culture with contemporary design. In essence it must exist and notexist at the same time, a kind of sublimation between solid and void. This cultural center propses an adaptation of the Venetian palace typology with its long piano nobile and portego spaces pivoting around a piaza space that visually connects the center with the island of Venice to the West. The center is skinned with a louver system that offers environmental control as well allowing the building to simultaneously exist as a solid and void. ALEXANDER FARLEY

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SECTION A R

2

1

E

-1

-2

SECTION B

R

2

1

E

-1

-2

SECTION C R

2

1

E

-1

-2

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ALEXANDER FARLEY


SECTION D R

2

1

E

-1

-2

SECTION E

R

2

1

E

-1

-2

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LEVEL -1

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

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1:200 MODEL AND CONNECTION TO SITE

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VIEW OF VENICE FROM OUTDOOR SQUARE + CAFE

ARTIST LABS + ROOF COURTYARD

MAIN ENTRANCE + CENTRAL ATRIUM

DOCK + BOAT RENTAL

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ENTRANCE + OUTDOOR THEATER

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// ++ CLOUD GARDEN ++ STUDIO: MIT - SHEILA KENNEDY (KVA) SITE: MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA FALL, 2012

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, PYTHON, GRASSHOPPER, 3DS MAX, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


ENERGY GENERATION Granite City St. Cloud, MN

64 MW

Fuel type:

Sharco Becker, MN

2,400 MW

= Hydro Monticello Nuclear Monticello, MN

= Coal

600 MW

= Natural Gas

= Nuclear St. Croix Falls St. Croix Falls, WI

570 MW

RDF

Apple River Somerset, WI

2.9 MW

Riverside Minneapolis, MN

511 MW

Riverdale Somerset, WI

0.6 MW

Alan S. King Bayport, MN

588 MW High Bridge St. Paul, MN

570 MW

Hennepin Island Minneapolis, MN

Blue Lake

Black Dog

Shakopee, MN

Burnsville, MN

612 MW

538 MW

12 MW

South East

Inver Hills

U. Minnesota

? MW

Inver Grove, MN

3.6 MW Prairie Island Welsh, MN

1,100 MW

RDF Red Wing Red Wing, MN

200 MW

The neighborhoods of northwest Minneapolis have

MISSISSIPPI RIVER - RIVERBANK CHANGE

become separated from the natural amenities of the Mississippi River and the cultural programs available to the rest of the city. At the same time Minneapolis seeks both future-looking commercial

42nd Ave

opportunities and a brand identity that allows it to remain

= Deposition of silt on riverbank = Scouring of earth from riverbank

Canadian Pacific RR

relevant as a city. The siting of an architectural intervention that systemically integrates a data center with a botanical garden on the

Site

northwest bank of the Mississippi River and expands pedestrian infrastructure provides a means for the city to reconnect the northwestern neighborhoods with the river park system, create a Lowry Ave

cultural destination, and spur economic growth. Minneapolis is a city that has long used the river as an economic engine. However, this has resulted in a tension between the unavoidable impact of

Burlington Northern Sante Fe RR

industry on the land and the sacred relationship that Minnesotans have with nature. This design seeks to relieve the historic tension

Broadway Ave

between industry and nature through the integration of the botanical gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s climatic systems with the data centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructural

Plymouth Ave

systems out of which a larger ecology can emerge. The garden Northstar Commuter Rail

can become a media-rich environment warmed and enveloped

Hennepin Ave

in an inflatable system generated by the data center waste heat

3rd Ave

and the data center more efficiently regulate its environmental

Stone Arch Bridge HW 18

systems through the mass and biological features of the plants. Michael Maltzan Architecture, Inc.

Dam + Lock - 1967

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= Refuse-derived


ENTRANCE LEVEL

PROGRAMMATIC + STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION Inflatable manifold skin

Botanical garden

Inflatable manifold skin

Rigid structure + Service chases

Community gardens

Server racks

Cold water inlet

INFRASTRUCTURAL STRATEGY

Cold air and added humidity result in precipitation

Botanical gardens Community gardens

Heat rises off of servers to warms gardens + warmed water waters plants

Server racks Service / Cooling level

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Cold air from Mississippi River cools server racks


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SECTION A

Inflatable - Top Surface

Service Level

Botanical Garden Inflatable - Bottom Surface

Entrance Level + Community Gardens

Park Walkway

Cold Water Inlet

SECTION B

Inflatable - Top Surface

Service Level

Botanical Garden Inflatable - Bottom Surface

Entrance Level + Community Gardens

Park Walkway

Cold Water Inlet

SECTION C

Inflatable - Top Surface

Service Level

Botanical Garden Inflatable - Bottom Surface

Entrance Level + Community Gardens

Park Walkway

Cold Water Inlet

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INFLATABLE BOTANICAL GARDEN

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// PLEIN AIRE LABORATORY STUDIO: MIT - ANDREW SCOTT SITE: MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY, LEXINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS FALL, 2011

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, GRASSHOPPER, 3DS MAX, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


This project offers a major expansion to Lincoln Laboratory campus. The current campus is overcrowded and decentralized. This design seeks open the laboratory space and offer new spaces for cross-disciplinary collaboration within an environment maximized for human comfort. The laboratory is an environment that has traditionally acquiesced to the technical and infrastructural needs of the program. This ignores the importance of the human capital that the laboratory serves. It is the comfort of the scientists that leads to innovation. This laboratory proposes a return to the envelope as the source of light and air in order to best serve the researchers. The envelope provides a microclimate that elevates the comfort of the occupants while providing for efficient thermal control of clean room, production and assembly spaces. As an extension of this, the tectonic elements of the laboratory dissipate with each floor; all beneath a roof comprised of nimbular aerogel-insulated ETFE pillows. The result is that through a search for environmental comfort an inversion of indoor and outdoor space can occur.

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ENTRANCE LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

FOURTH LEVEL

FIFTH LEVEL

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PREVAILING WIND CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION

SECTION B

CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION

CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION

PREVAILING WIND CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION

CHIMNEY EFFECT NAT. VENTILATION VERTICALLY-MOUNTED AHUs

VERTICALLY-MOUNTED AHUs ENTHALPY WHEEL

ENTHALPY WHEEL

HEAT EXCHANGERS FRESH AIR INTAKE

FRESH AIR INTAKE

HEAT EXCHANGERS GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP

GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP

SECTION A GROUP PROJECT OFFICES

MICROSYSTEMS INTEGRATION CLASS 100

GROUP PROJECT OFFICES GROUP PROJECT OFFICES GROUP PROJECT OFFICES

MICROSYSTEMSINTEGRATION INTEGRATION MICROSYSTEMS CLASS 1000 100 CLASS

GROUP PROJECT GROUP PROJECT OFFICES OFFICES GROUP PROJECT OFFICES MICROFLUIDICS + BIOSENSORS LAB GROUP PROJECT OFFICES

MICROSYSTEMS INTEGRATION I&T CLASS 1000

SERVICE CHASE

I&T VERTICAL CHASE MICROFLUIDICS + BIOSENSORS LAB MACHINE SHOP SERVICE CHASE

VERTICAL CHASE MACHINE SHOP

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LINCOLN LABS - WEST LAB ADDITION - WALL DETAIL

ENVELOPE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

DETAIL SECTION

P

H G B D

A A. Aluminum cladding B. Steel curtain wall hanger C. Fiberglass insulation D. Tubular steel column E. Steel mounting flange F. Steel J-anchor G.Tensegrity roof tensioning cable H. ETFE foil I. Tubular steel column J. Tensegrity tubular steel tension rod K. ETFE pillow pressure-regulation hose L. ETFE pressure-regulation valve M. Bird guard N. Grate O. Aluminum gutter P. Granular aerogel insulation

C

E F

I

P

L

N K

O Y X W A. Low-iron insulating glass B. Aluminum window sill C. Oak window sill D. Medium-density concrete E. Gypsum drywall F. Oak floor baord G. Moisture barrier membrane H. Aluminum floor riser I. Floor finish J. Interior glazing K. Extruded aluminum framing L. Drop-ceiling hangers M. Drop ceiling O. Low-density conrete light shelf P. Awning Q. Spider-sytem tensioning cable R. Stainless steel aluminum cladding wall anchor S. Extruded polystyrene insulation T. Alucobond dry-seal aluminum cladding z-clip system U. Spider clip rod V. Spider clip depth-adjustment element W. Spider clip X. Silicone seal Y. Laminated float glass Z. Vertical spider system tensioning cable

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Q

Z

A J

U V

R S T

B C D E F G

H

I

M


VIEW OF CLEAN ROOMS FROM COLLABORATION SPACE

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1/16” = 1’ SITE MODEL


LABORATORY CENTRAL GALLERY + COLLABORATION SPACE

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// FOREST FOR THE TREES STUDIO: MIT - JOEL LAMERE SITE: KENMORE SQUARE, BOSTON SPRING, 2011

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, GRASSHOPPER, MAXWELL, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


DENDRIFORM CANTILEVER MORPHOLOGIES

15’

15 deg

10’

ROOF PLAN

7’

30 deg

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

EAST SECTION

NORTH SECTION

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// TRANSPARENT SCHOOL STUDIO: MIT - JOEL LAMERE SITE: KENMORE SQUARE, BOSTON SPRING, 2011

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, GRASSHOPPER, MAXWELL, V-RAY, THE ADOBE SUITE, AND PHYSICAL MODELLING WERE UTILIZED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER


An extension to the Boston Architectural College loacted in Kenmore Square, Boston. This design seeks transparency in materiality and organization as a means to create a dialogue and discourse with a public unfamiliar with the discipline of architecture. A clear interface between the public and the architecture students is created through a series of inter-digitated gallery / review spaces and observation platforms. A necessary sepparation between the students and the public is achieved through distinct circulation routes. The structural system derives from the embodiment of the tree; offering both strength and shelter while simulataneously allowing the flexible creation of spaces calibrated to programmatic need.

ORGANIZATION

ADMINISTRATION

PRINT / PLOT

COMPUTER LAB

STUDIO

WOOD SHOP

FAB LAB

THEORY

DESIGN

GALLERY

REVIEW

GALLERY

REVIEW

GALLERY

REVIEW

LIBRARY

CLASSROOMS

AUDITORIUM

LOBBY

GENERAL CIRCULATION

CAFE

PRIVATE CIRCULATION

PUBLIC CIRCULATION

MATERIALS

ORIGINAL SITE PLAN WITH SUBTERRANEAN STRUCTURE

MODIFIED SITE PLAN WITH SUBTERRANEAN STRUCTURE = SITE EXPANSION

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SECTION A

THIRD LEVEL

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CENTRAL GALLERY SPACE

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ALEXANDER FARLEY


// Studio Work // Scripting + Fabrication Unflat Pavilion, 2011

52

Forces Frozen, 2014

54

Bubble Wall, 2012

56

Recursions, 2012

58

Objectifications, 2012

59

Enneper Vase, 2013

60

Costa Vase, 2013

61

Radiolarian Bowl, 2013

62

Press-Fit Tray, 2011

63

// Professional Work

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// UNFLAT PAVILION DESIGNED BY PROF. NICK GELPI FOR MIT 150 SITE: MIT, CAMBRIDGE, MA SPRING, 2011

SPRING LOADED

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RIGID SLOT

RIGID SILL PLATE

SOLID PLATE

RHINOCEROS, MASTERCAM, + 3-AXIS CNC MILLING WERE USED THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THE PROJECT.


Exterior Panel

1.6 in 0.5 in

1.6 in 0.5 in

96 in

96 in

Interior Panel

48 in

48 in

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// FORCES FROZEN DESIGNED WITH JAMES COLEMAN + TYLER CRAIN SITE: KRESGE CHAPEL, MIT, CAMBRIDGE, MA WINTER, 2014

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

RHINOCEROS, MASTERCAM, + 3-AXIS CNC MILLING WERE USED THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THE PROJECT.


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// BUBBLE WALL DESIGNED WITH YANG-PING WANG + CHRIST MILLER STUDIO: MIT - EMERGENT MATERIALS WORKSHOP SPRING, 2012

Adaptation of the Cambridge Public Library doubleskinned facade to use a soap-foam insulation system.

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0 HRS 1 HRS

GLAZING

3 HRS

IRRIGATION SYSTEM

FILTER MEIDA TRAY

6 HRS SPONGE

RESEVOIR

12 HRS AIR COMPRESSOR

SOLUTION COMPOSITION TESTING

FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE DESIGN

FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE DOCUMENTATION ALEXANDER FARLEY

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// RECURSIONS

length = len(self.spiral_points) index = range(length)

STUDIO: MIT - DESIGNING NATURE - JUHONG PARK angle = 90 FALL, 2012 for i in index:

import rhinoscriptsyntax as rs import math ### Controller class class GoldenSpiral(): def __init__(self): self.NS = None self.phi = (math.sqrt(5)+1)/2 self.plane = rs.WorldXYPlane() # Negative angle for clockwise spiral self.angle = -90 origin = [0,0,0] self.origin = rs.AddPoint(origin) self.spiral_points = [] endPt = [1,0,0] self.endPt = rs.AddPoint(endPt) self.endPts = [] self.endPts.append(endPt) self.spiralArcList = [] KOCH CURVE

def makeSpiralPoints(self): endPt = self.endPt origin = self.origin for i in range(12): trans = rs.VectorSubtract(origin, endPt) scaled_trans = rs.VectorScale(trans, self.phi) origin = rs.CopyObject(endPt, scaled_trans) originCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(origin) points = [origin, endPt] tempID = rs.AddCurve(points) lineID = rs.RotateObject(tempID, origin, self.angle) temp_endPt = rs.CurveEndPoint(lineID) endPt = rs.AddPoint(temp_endPt) endPtCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(endPt) self.endPts.append(endPtCoord) rs.DeleteObject(tempID) params = [scaled_trans, originCoord] DIFFUSION-LIMITED AGGREGATION self.spiral_points.append(params)

58def makeSpiralArc(self): ALEXANDER FARLEY

plane = rs.MovePlane(self.plane, self.spiral_points[i][1]) rotated = rs.RotatePlane(plane, angle, plane.ZAxis) radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][0]) if (radius != 0): arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle) else: radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][1]) arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle) self.spiralArcList.append(arc) angle -= 90

def main(self): self.makeSpiralPoints() self.makeSpiralArc() self.NS = NautilusShell(self) self.NS.main() ### Model class class NautilusShell(): def __init__(self, NS): self.endPts = NS.endPts self.spiralArcList = NS.spiralArcList LINDENMAYER SYSTEM

self.midpointsList = [] self.quarterpointsList = [] self.crossSectionList = [] self.surfaceList = [] self.SP = None

def makeControlPoints(self): length = len(self.endPts) index = range(length) for i in index: if (i <=4): pts = [self.endPts[0], self.endPts[i]] lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3) else: pts = [self.endPts[(i - 4)], self.endPts[i]] lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3) points = rs.DivideCurve(lineID, 4) NAUTILUS SHELL tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[1]) points[1] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID) tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[2]) points[2] = self.moveControlMidPoint(tempID) tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[3])

points[3] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID) rs.DeleteObject(lineID) cross_section = rs.AddCurve(points, 3) self.crossSectionList.append(cross_section) def moveControlQuarterPoint(self, tempID): temp_qPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) temp_endPt = [temp_qPt[0], temp_qPt[1], (temp_qPt[2] - 0.23)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_qPt, temp_endPt) quarterPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans) return quarterPt def moveControlMidPoint(self, tempID): temp_mPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) temp_endPt = [temp_mPt[0], temp_mPt[1], (temp_mPt[2] - 0.313)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_mPt, temp_endPt) midPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans) return midPt def makeEdgeSurface(self): # The first four surfaces have to be handled uniquely # first surface curves0 = [self.spiralArcList[0], self.crossSectionList[1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves0) self.surfaceList.append(surface) length = len(self.spiralArcList) index = NOISE range(length) PERLIN HEIGHT FIELD # next three surfaces for i in index: if(i > 0 and i <=3): curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) self.surfaceList.append(surface) # all of the other surfaces else: curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.spiralArcList[i - 4], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) self.surfaceList.append(surface) length = len(self.surfaceList) #rs.JoinSurfaces(self.surfaceList) def main(self): self.makeControlPoints() self.makeEdgeSurface() self.SP = SurfacePattern(self) self.SP.main() SWALLOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEST ATTRACTOR

### View class class SurfacePattern(): def __init__(self, GS): PYTHON, RHINOCEROS,AND DIGITAL FABRICATION self.surfaceList = GS.surfaceList


// OBJECTIFICATIONS

length = len(self.spiral_points) index = range(length)

STUDIO: MIT - DESIGNING NATURE - JUHONG PARK angle = 90 FALL, 2012 for i in index:

plane = rs.MovePlane(self.plane, self.spiral_points[i][1]) rotated = rs.RotatePlane(plane, angle, plane.ZAxis) radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][0]) if (radius != 0): arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle) else: radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][1]) arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle)

import rhinoscriptsyntax as rs import math ### Controller class class GoldenSpiral(): def __init__(self): self.NS = None self.phi = (math.sqrt(5)+1)/2 self.plane = rs.WorldXYPlane() # Negative angle for clockwise spiral self.angle = -90 origin = [0,0,0] self.origin = rs.AddPoint(origin)

self.spiralArcList.append(arc) angle -= 90 def main(self): self.makeSpiralPoints() self.makeSpiralArc() self.NS = NautilusShell(self) self.NS.main()

self.spiral_points = [] endPt = [1,0,0] self.endPt = rs.AddPoint(endPt) self.endPts = [] self.endPts.append(endPt)

### Model class class NautilusShell(): def __init__(self, NS): self.endPts = NS.endPts self.spiralArcList = NS.spiralArcList

self.spiralArcList = [] def makeSpiralPoints(self): endPt = self.endPt origin = self.origin

self.midpointsList = [] self.quarterpointsList = []

for i in range(12): trans = rs.VectorSubtract(origin, endPt) scaled_trans = rs.VectorScale(trans, self.phi) origin = rs.CopyObject(endPt, scaled_trans) originCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(origin) points = [origin, endPt] tempID = rs.AddCurve(points) lineID = rs.RotateObject(tempID, origin, self.angle) temp_endPt = rs.CurveEndPoint(lineID) endPt = rs.AddPoint(temp_endPt) endPtCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(endPt) self.endPts.append(endPtCoord) rs.DeleteObject(tempID) params = [scaled_trans, CELLULAR AUTOMATAoriginCoord] self.spiral_points.append(params)

self.crossSectionList = [] self.surfaceList = [] self.SP = None def makeControlPoints(self): length = len(self.endPts) index = range(length) for i in index: if (i <=4): pts = [self.endPts[0], self.endPts[i]] lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3) else: pts = [self.endPts[(i - 4)], self.endPts[i]] lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3) points = rs.DivideCurve(lineID, 4)

DATA VISUALIZATION FLOCKING 1 tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[1]) (HURRICANE SANDY) points[1] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID)

def makeSpiralArc(self): PYTHON, RHINOCEROS,AND DIGITAL FABRICATION

tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[2]) points[2] = self.moveControlMidPoint(tempID) tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[3])

points[3] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID) rs.DeleteObject(lineID) cross_section = rs.AddCurve(points, 3) self.crossSectionList.append(cross_section) def moveControlQuarterPoint(self, tempID): temp_qPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) temp_endPt = [temp_qPt[0], temp_qPt[1], (temp_qPt[2] - 0.23)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_qPt, temp_endPt) quarterPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans) return quarterPt def moveControlMidPoint(self, tempID): temp_mPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) temp_endPt = [temp_mPt[0], temp_mPt[1], (temp_mPt[2] - 0.313)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_mPt, temp_endPt) midPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans) return midPt def makeEdgeSurface(self): # The first four surfaces have to be handled uniquely # first surface curves0 = [self.spiralArcList[0], self.crossSectionList[1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves0) self.surfaceList.append(surface) length = len(self.spiralArcList) index = range(length) # next three surfaces for i in index: if(i > 0 and i <=3): curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) self.surfaceList.append(surface) # all of the other surfaces else: curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.spiralArcList[i - 4], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) self.surfaceList.append(surface) length = len(self.surfaceList) #rs.JoinSurfaces(self.surfaceList) def main(self): self.makeControlPoints() self.makeEdgeSurface() self.SP = SurfacePattern(self) self.SP.main() FLOCKING 2

SWARMING

### View class class SurfacePattern(): def __init__(self, GS): self.surfaceList = GS.surfaceListALEXANDER FARLEY

59


// ENNEPER VASE FALL, 2013

60

ALEXANDER FARLEY

GRASSHOPPER, RHINOCEROS, DIGITAL FABRICATION, AND HAND FINISHED


// COSTA VASE FALL, 2013

Costa'a Costa'a Minimal Minimal Surface Surface Costa'a Costa'a Minimal Minimal Surface Surface Matthias Matthias Weber Weber Indiana Indiana University University Matthias Matthias Weber Weber http://www.indiana.edu/~minimal http://www.indiana.edu/~minimal Indiana Indiana University University

<< Own`Mesh` << Own`Mesh` http://www.indiana.edu/~minimal http://www.indiana.edu/~minimal << Own`Mesh` << Own`Mesh`

Weierstraß Weierstraß Representation Representation Weierstraß Weierstraß Representation Representation1

3 51 3 5 phi1w_ phi1w_ := 2 rho:=  2w rhoHypergeometric2F1  w Hypergeometric2F1 , , , ,w2 ; , , w2 ; 1 3 4 514 32 54 4 2 , , ,, w2,; , w2 ; phi1w_ phi1w_ := 2 rho:= 2 rho w Hypergeometric2F1  w Hypergeometric2F1 3 1 7 3 21 7 ,2 , 4 , w2  2 w ^ 1.5 2 w ^ Hypergeometric2F1 1.5  Hypergeometric2F1 4 , 2 , 44, w 4 2 4 4 2 4 phi2w_ phi2w_ := := 3 1 7 3 12 ;7 2 ; 2 w ^ 1.5 2 wÂ^Hypergeometric2F1 1.5  Hypergeometric2F1 3 rho 3 rho 4 , 2 , 4 4, ,w2 , 4 , w  phi2w_ := - := ; ; phi2w_ 3 3 3 rho 3 rho   GammaGamma 4 4 ; 3 ; rho = Nrho = N 3 Gamma 5 5 Gamma  4  2 Gamma 2 4Gamma 4 ; 4 ; rho = N rho = N 5 5 2 Gamma  2 Gamma rho 4 rho 4  Gz_ :=Gz_ := ; ; z z -rho z1 zzrho -+11 z + 1 ; Gz_ :=Gz_ := ; 1 1 z z -z1 zz-+11 z + 1 dhz_ := dhz_ := ; ; -1 1+ z2 -11+ z2 dhz_ := ; dhz_ := ; 1 + z2-1 1 + z2 -1 f1z_ :=f1z_ - phi1z := - phi1z - phi2z; - phi2z; 1 12 2 - phi2z; f1z_ :=f1z_ := -1 phi1z - phi2z; 1 phi1z 2 phi1z f2z_ :=f2z_ := 2 phi1z + phi2z; + phi2z; 1 12 2 + phi2z; f2z_ := 1  phi1z + phi2z; f2z_ := 1  phi1z 2 Log-1 f3z_ :=f3z_ := 2 Log-1 + z  1 + z; z  1 + z; 12 1 2 f3z_ := Log-1  1 + z; Log-1 + z  1 ++z z; f3z_ := fz_ := fz_ Ref1z, f2z, f3z; 2 f2z, f3z; 2 := Ref1z, nz_:= :=fz_ nz_ StereographicProjectionGz; StereographicProjectionGz; :=:=Ref1z, f2z, f3z; fz_ Ref1z, f2z, f3z; StereographicProjectionGz; nz_ :=nz_ StereographicProjectionGz; Version Version via := numerical via numerical integration, integration, not used not used

2 Version Version via numerical via numerical integration, integration, not used not used + z23 z + z3  1 z + z23- z + z3 Â rho -Â zrho -rho2 --rho 1 f0w_ := f0w_ Modulez, := Modulez, ReNIntegrateEvaluate ReNIntegrateEvaluate , , 2 , 3 , , z, 0,,w z, 0, w 3 Â32 32 2 2 Â rho z ++zz2z32 32 2 32 -rhoz22rho z ++zz2z3-rho -1 -1 z2 1+ z -11+ z 2 rho -1 -1  z ++z2z2rho  rhoz2 rho  z ++z-1 f0w_ := f0w_ Modulez, := Modulez, ReNIntegrateEvaluate ReNIntegrateEvaluate , , , , , z, 0, ,w z, 0, w 2 2 2 32 2 32 2 32 -1 2 32 + z -1 + z 2zrho 2 rho 2zrho -1 +zz-1  + z2 rho  -1 +zz-1  +z 

2

Parameterization Parameterization Parameterization Parameterization e =0.00000001; e =0.00000001; r1 = -3;* size of catenoidal end size* e =0.00000001; e =0.00000001; r2 = 4;* size of planar end * nr1 = 8;*number of r-lines for catenoidal ends* nr2 = 8;*number of r-lines for planar end* nt = 15;*number of t-lines for all ends * dm1 = RectangularDomainUnionNRanger1, 0, nr1, NRange0, r2, nr2, NRangee, Pi - e, nt; dm2 = MeshApply+Sqrt1 + E ^ Ò &, dm1;

fr1 = MeshPlot3Dfx + I y, nx + I y, x, y, dm2;

fr2 = MeshJoinfr1, MeshRotatefr1, StraightLine1, -1, 0, 0, 0, 0;

fr3 = MeshJoinfr2, MeshReflectfr2, Plane1, 0, 0, 0; fr4 = MeshJoinfr3, MeshReflectfr3, Plane0, 1, 0, 0; In[3]:=

Export"costa.eps", %, "EmbeddedFonts" Ø False Out[3]=

costa.eps

MATHEMATICA, PYTHON, RHINOCEROS, DIGITAL FABRICATION, AND HAND FINISHED

ALEXANDER FARLEY

61


// RADIOLARIAN BOWL FALL, 2013

62

ALEXANDER FARLEY

GRASSHOPPER, RHINOCEROS, DIGITAL DIGITAL GRASSHOPPER, RHINOCEROS, FABRICATION, AND HANDFINISHED FINISHED FABRICATION, AND HAND


// ENNEPER VASE STUDIO: MIT - COMPLETE FABRICATION WINTER, 2011

2

1

3

4

RHINOCEROS, PARTWORKS, + 3-AXIS CNC MILLING WERE USED THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THE PROJECT.

ALEXANDER FARLEY

63


// FLOCK OF FIREFLIES STUDIO: MIT - INDEPENDENT STUDY SPRING, 2013

Project to create a physical volumetric display system for the 3D modeling program Rhinoceros using Rhinoceros, Grasshopper/Firefly, Python, Arduino microcontroller, and 8x8x8 LED matrix.

64

ALEXANDER FARLEY


length = len(self.spiral_points) index = range(length)

### Controller class class GoldenSpiral(): def __init__(self): self.NS = None self.phi = (math.sqrt(5)+1)/2 self.plane = rs.WorldXYPlane() # Negative angle for clockwise spiral self.angle = -90 origin = [0,0,0] self.origin = rs.AddPoint(origin)

Send 64 bytes to self.spiralArcList.append(arc) arduino over USB

def main(self): self.makeSpiralPoints() self.makeSpiralArc() self.NS = NautilusShell(self) Arduino: receives self.NS.main()

Computer: generate 64 byte â&#x20AC;&#x153;framesâ&#x20AC;?

def makeSpiralPoints(self): endPt = self.endPt origin = self.origin

Serial communication 10101011

0 1 2

1

8x8x8 LED matrix for i in index: if (i <=4): Generate Data pts = [self.endPts[0], self.endPts[i]] lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3)

LED driver board

Grasshopper

lineID = rs.RotateObject(tempID, origin, self.angle) 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 temp_endPt = rs.CurveEndPoint(lineID) 0 0 endPt = rs.AddPoint(temp_endPt) 1 1 endPtCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(endPt) 2 2

6

7

0 0 1 2

3

3

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

self.endPts.append(endPtCoord) 5 rs.DeleteObject(tempID) 6

4

6

6

7

7

7

7

5

4

params = [scaled_trans, originCoord] No data loaded

Starting Position

self.spiral_points.append(params) def makeSpiralArc(self):

Graphical Display

def makeControlPoints(self): length = len(self.endPts) index = range(length)

origin = rs.CopyObject(endPt, scaled_trans) ghPython Firefly originCoord = rs.PointCoordinates(origin)

0

length = len(self.spiralArcList) index = range(length)

self.crossSectionList = [] self.surfaceList = [] self.SP = None

Vertex data list

Virtual Position

1

2

3

4

5

6

def moveControlMidPoint(self, tempID): 64x cathodes + 8x temp_mPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) anodes temp_endPt = [temp_mPt[0], temp_mPt[1], (temp_mPt[2] - 0.313)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_mPt, temp_endPt) midPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans)

def makeEdgeSurface(self):

self.midpointsList = [] self.quarterpointsList = []

for i in range(12): trans = rs.VectorSubtract(origin, endPt) scaled_trans = rs.VectorScale(trans, self.phi)

return quarterPt

# Theboard: first four surfaces have to be handled uniquely LED driver each LED matrix: display # powered first surface lights layer is by indi= [self.spiralArcList[0], self.crossSectionList[1]] vidualcurves0 transistors, LED surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves0) are turned on and off self.surfaceList.append(surface) using the STP16 chips

and clocks ont ### Model class class NautilusShell(): LED drvier board def __init__(self, NS): self.endPts = NS.endPts self.spiralArcList = NS.spiralArcList

self.spiralArcList = []

def moveControlQuarterPoint(self, tempID): temp_qPt = rs.PointCoordinates(tempID) temp_endPt = [temp_qPt[0], temp_qPt[1], (temp_qPt[2] - 0.23)] trans = rs.VectorSubtract(temp_qPt, temp_endPt) quarterPt = rs.MoveObject(tempID, trans)

return midPt

64 byte packets

endPt = [1,0,0] self.endPt = rs.AddPoint(endPt) self.endPts = [] self.endPts.append(endPt)

self.crossSectionList.append(cross_section)

Data, clock, and latch signals

angle -= 90

self.spiral_points = []

points = [origin, endPt] tempID = rs.AddCurve(points)

rs.DeleteObject(lineID) cross_section = rs.AddCurve(points, 3)

angle = 90 for i in index: plane = rs.MovePlane(self.plane, self.spiral_points[i][1]) rotated = rs.RotatePlane(plane, angle, plane.ZAxis) radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][0]) if (radius != 0): arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle) else: radius = math.fabs(self.spiral_points[i][0][1]) arc = rs.AddArc(rotated, radius, self.angle) rs.RotateObject(arc, self.spiral_points[i][1], self.angle)

import rhinoscriptsyntax as rs import math

Rhino vertex data

points[3] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID)

7

else: pts = [self.endPts[(i - 4)], self.endPts[i]] Arbitrary x,y,z point data lineID = rs.AddCurve(pts, 3)abstracted to correspond to 8 x 8 x8 space

points = rs.DivideCurve(lineID, 4)

tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[1]) Cube Position points[1] = self.moveControlQuarterPoint(tempID) tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[2]) points[2] = self.moveControlMidPoint(tempID) tempID = rs.AddPoint(points[3])

Fill 8x8x8 Array

# next three surfaces for i in index: if(i > 0 and i <=3): curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] LED Matrix surface = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) Display self.surfaceList.append(surface) # all of the other surfaces else: curves = [self.spiralArcList[i], self.spiralArcList[i - 4], self.crossSectionList[i], self.crossSectionList[i+1]] surface Generate = rs.AddEdgeSrf(curves) Send Chars 64 Chars over serial self.surfaceList.append(surface) length = len(self.surfaceList) #rs.JoinSurfaces(self.surfaceList)

Encode 8 x 8 x 8 array Feed abstracted datadef main(self): into 8 x 8 x 8 array and self.makeControlPoints() elements into 8 bit set array element to 1 chars resulting in a 64 to turn LED on. Each of self.makeEdgeSurface() byte frame the 512 array elements self.SP = SurfacePattern(self) corresponds to an LED self.SP.main() in the matrix

Send the 64 byte frame to the microcontroller board over the serial line

### View class class SurfacePattern(): def __init__(self, GS): self.surfaceList = GS.surfaceListALEXANDER FARLEY

65


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ALEXANDER FARLEY


// Studio Work // Scripting + Fabrication // Professional Work Renderings, 2012 - 2013

68

Purple Residence Pavilion, 2011

70

Purple Residence Addition, 2012

72

ALEXANDER FARLEY

67


FOR SASAKI ASSOCIATES - 2013

FOR SASAKI ASSOCIATES - 2013

FOR ELIZABETH FARLEY - GSD M.ARCH THESIS - 2012

FOR ELIZABETH FARLEY - GSD M.ARCH THESIS - 2012

68

ALEXANDER FARLEY


FOR ELIZABETH FARLEY - GSD M.ARCH THESIS - 2012

FOR ELIZABETH FARLEY - GSD M.ARCH THESIS - 2012

FOR ELIZABETH FARLEY - GSD M.ARCH THESIS - 2012

FOR THE PLANT CONNECTION - GREENHOUSE ADDITION - 2011

ALEXANDER FARLEY

69


// WYNDMOOR RESIDENCE GARDEN PAVILION CLIENTS: LESLIE AND THOMAS PURPLE SITE: WYNDMOOR, PA SUMMER, 2011 STANDARD POST-BEAM-RAFTER ASSEMBLY

This commission sought to create a vegetable garden enclosure that could protect the plants from backyard pests while maintaining the design language of the existing site. The pavilion employs traditional timber construction techniques and tectonic elements while remaining within a modest budget.

STANDARD POST-BEAM-RAFTER ASSEMBLY

CORNER POST-BEAM-RAFTER ASSEMBLY CORNER POST-BEAM-RAFTER ASSEMBLY

Rhinoceros and physical modeliing were used throughout the course of the project.

SCREW

CORNER ASSEMBLY CORNER ASSEMBLY SCREW

STANDARD STANDARD ASSEMBLY ASSEMBLY SCREW

1” CEDAR FACING

FENCING

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ALEXANDER FARLEY

1” x 1” CEDAR FACING

SCREW

FENCING

4” x 4” PRESSURE-TREATED

4” x 4” PRESSURE-TREATED

1” CEDAR FACING

1” CEDAR FACING


SIDE ELEVATION

FRONT ELEVATION 15’ 1-1/2”

4’ 10-1/2”

11’ 8-1/8” 45°

2’ 5-1/4”

8’ 2-1/4”

2’ 5-1/4”

45° 5’ 9-7/8”

5’ 9-7/8” 16’ 3-1/4”

1” x 10” x 6’

1” x 10” x 6’

16’ 3-1/4”

9-1/4” scarf or butt joint

2” x 10” x 10’

2” x 10” x 5’

9-1/4”

2” x 10” x 10’

8’

2” x 10” x 5’

scarf or butt joint

2” x 10” x 5’

2” x 10” x 5’

8’

7’ 2-3/4”

5’

5’

5’

5’

7’ 2-3/4”

5’

5’

5’

5’

15’ 6-1/2”

25’ 6”

SECTION

PLAN 15’ 1-1/4”

2-3/8”

45° 11’ 8-1/8” 2” x 10”

CEDAR

5’ 1” x 2” CEDAR

2” x 10” CEDAR

5’

15’ 6” 9-1/4”

COUNTER-SUNK

0.5” CARRIAGE BOLT

2” x 10” CEDAR

45° 5’

45°

1” CEDAR FACING 8’

7’ 2-3/4”

2” x 2” FENCING B/W FACING AND PT 4” x 4” PRESSURE-TREATED

The corner 2” x 10” s are 9’ 9-7/8” long COUNTER-SUNK

5’

5’

5’

5’

5’

0.5” CARRIAGE BOLT

GRADE POST HOLDER CONCRETE FOOTER

25’ 6”

ALEXANDER FARLEY

71


// WYNDMOOR RESIDENCE ADDITION CLIENTS: LESLIE AND THOMAS PURPLE SITE: WYNDMOOR, PA DESIGNED: WINTER, 2012 CONSTRUCTION: SPRING. 2014 This project sought to reactivate an unused storage room as the main location for daily activity. The existing space allows for a kitchen and central hearth. The south facing wall is pulled away from the house to allow for greater day-lighting and create a space for casual dining and food and linen storage.

AutoCAD, Revit, Rhinoceros, Maxwell, and physical modelling were used throughout the course of the project.

72

ALEXANDER FARLEY


23’ 8”

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

9’ 8’ 9” 18’ 9”

8’ 9”

4’ 4”

21’ 9”

12’

14’ 9”

21’ 8”

4’ 9”

14’ 8”

4’ 9”

12’ 9”

2’ 4”

3’ 9”

4’ 8”

4’ 4”

4’ 4”

4’ 8”

3’ 9”

4’ 6”

25’ 6”

ALEXANDER FARLEY

73


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ALEXANDER FARLEY

PURPLE ADDITION - INTERIOR KITCHEN VIEW

Alexander Farley MIT Architecture Portfolio  

Architectural design completed for 2014 M. Arch degree at MIT School of Architecture and Planning

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