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ALEXANDER HUSSEY PORTFOLIO

(MArch) Master of Architecture | Select works over the course of education and experience

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CONTENTS

PORTFOLIO PREFACE Introduction

Additional Documents

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BA ARCHITECTURE THIRD YEAR DISSERTATION Plymouth University 2016 Tutor: Dr Karen August

Part I Architectural Assistant - SRA Architects

To me, architecture is the embodiment of the human experience of space. I have always believed in putting people at the forefront of the building’s purpose to create environments to allow people and communities to grow. The ability to manipulate and shape natural, physical, economic and socially driven spaces to suit specific clients and their values has always fascinated me.

Porsche South London Automotive & Retail

MArch Architecture Part 2 - University of the West of England

Sociocracy: Union House Performance, Education & Exhibition

MArch Architecture Part 2 - University of the West of England

Old Magistrates’ Court - Arts / Performance Creative re-use of existing spaces

BA Architecture RIBA Part I - Plymouth University

Economic Resilience in Totnes (E.R.I.T) Masterplanning & Community Support Hub

This portfolio showcases a series of selected works from across my educational and professional experience.

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(https://issuu.com/alexander.hussey/docs/ba_architecture_year_3_dissertation)

Throughout my university work I have focussed on the socially driven environments, where the spaces are intended to help people grow through skill building, networking and respecting the contextual situation. During my professional experience, I was always intrigued by the differences in client agendas and how this would shape the final outcome. Having worked with a number of different automotive brands during my experience, it highlighted what companies focussed on within their ethos and how this shaped the design.

BA ARCHITECTURE THIRD YEAR BRIEFING DOCUMENT Plymouth University 2016 Tutor(s): Timothy Offer, Alejandro Veliz, Hayley Anderson

Alexander Hussey | alex.sgifford@hotmail.co.uk

(https://issuu.com/alexander.hussey/docs/briefing_document)

SELECTED PROJECTS 2015 - 2019


PROJECT FOREWORD

EXISTING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

Preface

Details

Currently within Totnes there is a large divide between affordable commodities and the provision of local produce. To accomplish the objective of the town becoming resilient and self sustaining, measures of affordable local produce and services to allow this to happen must be implemented.

Level: Third Year BA Architecture Part I University: Plymouth University Tutor(s): Timothy Offer, Alejandro Veliz, Hayley Anderson Year: 2015 - 2016 Project Length: 6 months Type: Education / Community Site Coordinates: 50°25’55.40”N, 3°40’56.09”W

The plan of action proposed for the site addresses the provision and control of local goods at an affordable price. This would lead to the replacement of the existing Morrisons supermarket on the proposed site in order to focus the agenda on the individual businesses that Totnes thrives on. This would also allow further expansion to take place. Public space will also be provided so as to attract recreational and shopping activity within the site. In response to the brief and the part I played within the masterplan agenda, a Food Business Incubator was proposed in order to respond to the corporate food businesses hold over the majority of the food expenditure in Totnes. This would then allow the development of up and coming food businesses and an emphasis on the local businesses for money to remain within the towns local economy.

Summer solstice sunrise

Winter solstice sunset

ECONOMIC RESILIENCE IN TOTNES (E.R.I.T) MASTERPLANNING & COMMUNITY SUPPORT HUB TOTNES, DEVON 2015 - 2016 1

Summer solstice sunset

Winter solstice sunrise

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Sun Path

Wind Speed & Direction

Flood Risk

Knowing the sun path in relation to the site will benefit in making use of natural light within our array of schemes, as well as using it efficiently across the site proposal. It is worth noting the changes in the level of light during the day in the seasons of winter and summer to gain an idea of how to make the best use of light throughout the year. This study could potentially make our whole proposal more sustainable in the use of artificial lighting during the day, as well as a locating glazing to naturally heat the proposed buildings.

Wind can be a detriment or an asset to the site’s dynamics. It can provide efficient cooling for spaces, but can also cause unwanted drafts within enclosed spaces. With this in mind, a study into both the direction and the speed of these winds can change the way in which the outcome operates when considering the positives and negatives of this natural occurrence. The majority of the wind comes from the South west and could potentially be harnessed in some, either for ventilation or for power production to provide sustainability to the site.

Due to its close proximity to the River Dart, the site is prone to the risk of flooding. In Totnes’s past, there have been recordings of a number of floods which have occurred. Along with the river potentially overflowing, the leat also serves as a danger zone in this context, spreading the area of influence of potential flooding even further. The site acts as a flood plain and is an important aspect to consider in how the proposal operates and protects itself from this potential threat.

Data source: SunCalc

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SITE MODIFICATIONS

SITE MASTERPLAN 12

Services & Accommodation

Masterplanning Consideration

Delivery & Vehicular Access

1 In maintaining the theme of economic resilience within the scheme, the overall proposal takes into consideration not only the connection between the commercial aspects of the town, but in physically connecting the site with the environment around it. The scheme does this to adapt three dimensionally as well as metaphysically. An example of this is in the opening up of the river side boundary to allow the public space to spill into the context.

Distribution, Production & Recycling

Food & Administration

In producing this space, and having analysed the site, the importance of the people’s access to the site remained a key feature within the design process. In respect to this, the majority of vehicular access has remained up towards the north of the site, so as to limit the disturbance to the people, of which the site is opened up to.

Accommodation & Production

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The way that the site has been adapted to tackle the limited access is to insert small entry points to the west side of the site, so as to only allow people to enter, as well as opening up the east side to allow the footpath to become part of the new dynamic. The vehicles are now kept, mostly, at the north end of the site so as to restrict disturbance across the rest of the site, focussing on pedestrian importance.

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Zoning Zoning areas of the site will start to communicate the intentionality of the programmes that are offered to the visitors. Aspects such as the services and accommodation zone, the south accommodation and the mill buildings in the food and administration zone have remained so as to make effective use of elements which have been considered as important functions. Analysing these zones also starts to form relationships and establish key structures.

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Links & Relations Having established the zones that create these key spaces, it is important to consider the influence that these buildings have on each other. This form of diagramming shows how the structures we propose start to influence each other, not just because of their proximity to one another, but also in the activities that they project.

1. Existing Services 2. Deliveries / Existing Services 3. Accommodation 4. Industry & Crafts 5. Distribution Centre 6. Food Business Incubator 7. Bakery 8. Historic Mill 9. Nursery

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10. Site Entrance 11. High Street 12. Existing Industry 13. Parking Facilities 14. Recycing / Upcycling 15. Formal Public Square 16. Accommodation / Live Work 17. Informal Courtyard 18. Existing Accommodation

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With the idea of resilience in mind, the existing mill buildings have remained to provide spaces that can serve to benefit the town further, with arguably the head of the site being offered to the Transition Town Totnes movement. This in turn emphasises the importance of the individuality of the town.

Key

Accessibility

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 12

Ground Level The floor of immediate public interface gives priority to the general public, providing a glimpse of both the areas of contrast, most notably between the market, located to the East of the scheme, and the business and education sector, located to the West of the scheme.

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Spaces on this floor will be provided in order to facilitate administration and to allow a convergence of ideas to occur, thus promoting community engagement and a social working environment.

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Key 9. Restaurant Dining 10. Restaurant Kitchen 11. Kitchen Storage 12. Transition Town Totnes Hub 13. Covered Courtyard Space 14. Lift Access 15. Market 16. Delivery and Access Point

As much of the town is composed of small scale businesses, this sector of the building will allow those who both wish to expand their existing food businesses and start their own ventures. Much of the main high street relies on the tourist industry and much of this centres around food. With this in mind, the proposal will aim to incubate these businesses and provide a platform within a considered masterplan.

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In the case of this proposal, the main pathway that runs through the site serves as the central passageway through the building that acts as an extension of the Totnes high street, giving users the option to enter at multiple points, reflecting the nature of the individual shops.

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The first floor lends itself to the rentable office spaces and admin that will serve to provide a business oriented foundation for the building.

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In understanding the site’s existing structures, the town’s specific characteristics and the community that thrives within it, the ground floor concept of the proposal was to take these elements and extend this notion whilst injecting the aspects that will strengthen the town’s economic resilience.

1. Central Passageway 2. Offices 3. Reception 4. Lecture Theatre 5. Demonstration Kitchen 6. Lab and Kitchen Storage Units 7. Food Test Lab 8. Toilets

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First Level

1. Walkway & Balcony 2. Gallery 3. Storage 4. Rentable Meeting Room 5. Study Space 6. Office Meeting 7. Toilets 8. Admin Offices 9. Archive 10. Incubator Offices 11. Additional Market Space

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NORTH FACING SECTION Cutting through the whole structure, the relation between the sectors of the environment hones in on the central passageway. Although providing a form of threshold between the two, the central space clearly defines the intentionality of the areas that form the environment. The left side of the section is designed to provide a series of contained spaces that resemble the incubation of the upcoming businesses and individuals. The market space situated to the right contrasts this notion by providing a light and open environment to both encourage the communal focus of the structure to fluctuate whilst being adaptable and changeable, in respect to the resilience of the town, still maintaining the identity of both the town and the building’s theme.

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KEY SECTION

KEY SECTION AXONOMETRIC STUDY Glass Canopy

Roof Structure:

Steel Beams

Slate / Damp Proof Membrane / Steel Joists / Decking / Steel Beams / Vapour Retardant / Solid Thermal Insulation / Internal Ceiling Finish

Multi Level Facade Structure:

Granite and Sandstone / Steel Frame / Solid Thermal Insulation / Concrete Masonry Unit / Plasterboard / Plaster

Proposal Development

Glass balcony barriers Steel Beam and Canopy Supports

This stage of the project called for the refinement and clarification of the ideas and motives behind the earlier decisions. In doing so, having studied a key section of the structure in order to test the material and environmental language, the motives both on an individual and masterplan basis would be engaged with fully. The final iteration of the key section shows how the development both of the detail and pragmatic studies give an indication to the dynamic of the environment. The second floor serves as an administrative core for the subsequent lower spaces, that of the incubator offices and the public ground floor areas.. The section gives an indication to a strong core that allows the light frame of the glass facade and canopy to almost rest atop of it. This indicates the spaces of transition and activity, providing a series of material thresholds within this example, emphasising this transition.

Interior Walling Structure:

Upper Floor Wall Structure:

Plasterboard / Steel Frame / Solid Thermal Insulation / Drywall / Plaster

Oak Siding Panels / Steel Clips / Exterior Gypsum Board / Steel Frame / Solid Thermal Insulation / Interior Gypsum Board / Concrete Masonry Unit / Drywall / Plaster

Intermediate Floor Structure:

Hardwood Floor Finish / Steel Purlins / Concrete Ceiling Layer

Ground Floor Interior Wall Structure: Plasterboard / Steel Frame / Solid Thermal Insulation / Internal Brick

Asphalt Site Pathway

Window Inserts

Oak Siding Panels

Ground Floor Exterior Wall Structure:

Ground Floor Structure:

Granite & Sandstone / Steel Frame / Solid Thermal Insulation / Concrete Masonry Unit / Plasterboard / Plaster Steel Foundations 9

Polised Concrete Screed / Sand Blinding / Concrete Hollowcore / Solid Thermal Insulation / Hardcore 10


HEAD, SILL & JAMB DETAIL

CANOPY SUPPORT BEAM JOINT DETAIL

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Key Detail

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As a key feature of the building, the glass canopy is supported by a series of steel support beams that form an integral part of the steel framework that runs throughout the entirety of the structure. The supports themselves penetrate through the oak skin and come to a junction between the supporting wall and the second level floor/ first floor ceiling. This then, via a series of steel plates bolted to the beam, embeds and fixes onto the concrete masonry units, along with the steel purlins and concrete ceiling of the floor plane, creating this junction that serves all structural planes.

As a key feature of the facade, the oak wooden siding provides a face that frames a series of windows that pin point the various internal elements. The sill and head, in the case of the detail, grasp the oak screen siding in order to further pull in the screen element into the interior language. The connection between these two components of this wall will provide further structural bonding to the oak skin, and how the penetrable aspects of the skin frame the window.

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Key 1. Concrete Masonry Unity (120mm) 2. Steel Header (100mm) 3. Exterior Gypsum Board (20mm) 4. Window Trim 5. Sash (95mm) 6. Oak Head and Siding Casing 7. Oak Screen Siding (30mm) 8. Glass Panel (20mm) 9. Window Apron 10. Oak Sill 11. Drywall (30mm) 12. Double Steel Plate 13. Interior Gypsum Board (20mm) 14. Insulation (120mm)

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Key 1. Oak Screen Siding (30mm) 2. Exterior Gypsum Board (20mm) 3. Insulation (120mm) 4. Interior Gypsum Board (20mm) 5. Hardwood Floor Finish (50mm) 6. Timber Batons (80mm) 7. Steel Purlins (100mm) 8. Reinforced Concrete Beam (100mm) 9. Steel Bolted Plate Fixing 10. Steel Support Beam (250mm) 11. Drywall (30mm) 12. Concrete Masonry Unit (120mm)

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PERSPECTIVE STUDIES

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PERSPECTIVE STUDIES

Atrium

Walkway

Market

Office

The proposal exhibits two main corridor pathways that provide an avenue for smoother transition within the two sectors of the building. Situated in the incubator space, this atrium space gives an indication as to the types of spaces that form the layers of the building. The use of recycled brickwork on the ground floor introduces the public to the notion of respect for history. Using a mixture of light and heavy materials, glass and steel, serves to create a modern intervention within a historical setting.

The public walkway was a key consideration since the start of the design process, to coincide with the circulation around the site that we proposed as a group. This area provides the public with an in between space separating the market space and the main incubator hub. The use of a wooden lamella facade aims to soften the coarse brickwork to reflect the modern intervention. The use of an angled glass roof provides a substantial amount of natural light into this space in order to create a soft and open environment.

One of the main aspects of the design was the implementation of a market space to reflect the monthly market that takes place in Totnes’ main square. The internal layout has been kept minimal in order to allow increased adaptability when businesses set up their stalls. The light and heavy combination of materials has carried forward into this sector of the building. This will continue the open atmosphere as per the existing market, whilst providing a covered environment to encourage further public engagement.

This study gives an indication as to the typical office space that would be provided for those wishing to grow their own business. Each office space will provide those inside with a view to the rest of the building, whether it is the incubator side or towards the market. This will serve as a constant reminder to the users of the types of spaces that can grow as a result of communal integration. These spaces will be located on the first and second floors to maintain public space on ground floor and for admin to remain separate. 14


PROJECT FOREWORD

PROJECT SITE

Preface

Details

Creative Youth Network, the client for this project, were developing the 24,000sq ft Old Magistrates Courts on the Bridewell site in central Bristol. The building will be renovated and turned into a creative enterprise hub for cutting-edge creative businesses with a focus on developing young talent and pathways into careers in creative industries for those facing barriers. The project will hold a range of multi-use spaces for business, incubation, training, rehearsals and events/performances.

Level: (MArch) Master of Architecture Year 1 University: University of the West of England Tutor(s): Sally Daniels, Ann De Graft-Johnson Year: First Year Project Length: 2 Months Type: Creative Re-use Site Coordinates: 51°27’25.47”N 2°35’35.03”W Site Evaluation

Creative Youth Network had received funding through Stage 1 of a Heritage Lottery grant to develop the project to a point ready for Stage 2 application. As part of the development of the project we formed a youth consultation group who were working with the project lead team and the designers to explore the possibilities around space design & usage, and partners/tenants in the building.

The Old Magistrates’ Court is situated near The Station, The Island and the Bristol YMCA, in the centre of Bristol. Upon primary inspection, this close connectivity to these spaces offers a direct language between both creative groups and the youth network already established by Creative Youth Network.

The description given to us was to come up with design ideas for an arts/performance venue for professional and emerging work. The design should be flexible enough to accommodate a range of art forms and performance styles, as well as multi-use space for conferences, courses, and informal sharing of early work. There should also be an informal shares space for meetings, socialising and hosting events/clients, ideally in the form of a café/bar.

There are two major entrances to the building, one that feeds off of Bridewell Street which serves as the Main Entrance and another that is located on Silver street, that can be accessed via the courtyard. The aforementioned courtyard is used regularly to host group events that stems off of The Station space where a variety of youth activities and workshops. With The Station in mind, the site has already seen the application of old space for new means. As the name suggests, The Station was the old Bristol Fire Station, which has now been re-purposed as a cafe, office and meeting space.

OLD MAGISTRATES’ COURT - ARTS / PERFORMANCE CREATIVE RE - USE OF EXISTING SPACE

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BRIDEWELL STREET, BRISTOL 2018 15

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PROPOSED PLAN

SECTIONAL STUDY Distilling Spaces After considering the spaces in plan, sections were produced in order to gain a sense of the vertical scales of the proposed environments. Our group was concerned with the ground floor level as this was where the client wanted the main performance spaces to be situated. Although this was the case, consideration for the basement floor level of the proposal has been accommodated within the section. These spaces would mainly be utilised for work spaces and functions that did not require much external light, such as photography and recording studios. Due to the number of existing skylights at ground floor, many of the spaces will be filled with natural light, creating a comfortable environment.

Spacial Presentation Following client comments, a floor plan of the proposed area was created. Fixtures were laid out depending on the uses of each room. We kept the presentation simple and easy to read so that it could be comfortably interpreted by viewers with limited architectural experience, e.g. Youth steering group, stakeholders.

Considerations Existing WC’s have remained so the plumbing services do not have to be relocated, saving construction costs. Many of the large event spaces are connected with opportunities for social interaction, whether through circulation, bars or foyer convening areas. This floor encourages this social inclusion via increased access and gathering spots. In contrast, the basement floor level that the other UWE group were assigned focussed on single activities that could be achieved with limited space and light levels, e.g. Quiet study, music recording and photography.

1:200 1. Front Entrance 2. Reception Foyer 3. Market Area 4. Female WC 5. Male WC

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6. 24hr Access Entry 7. Lift 8. Changing Room 9. WC 10. Main Performance Area

11. Bar 12. Admin & Ticket Office 13. Changing Room 14. Rehearsal Space 15. Male WC

16. Female WC 17. Service Entrance 18. Storage Space 19. Kitchen Storage 20. Kitchen

21. Cafe / Restaurant 22. Hireable Event Space 23. Small Function Room 24. WC 25. Shower & Locker Room

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KEY SPACE AXONOMETRIC STUDY Exploring build up Between the group, we each focussed on a key space within the building that we would explore via axonometric study. This would explore the notion of multifunctional and adaptable spaces. This took the form of a wooden framework system that could be built and installed by users. This framework could then be modulated to accommodate a series of storage spaces and fixable panels. Here the room can serve as both a music practice area, as well as a theatre rehearsal room. Here the acoustic absorption panels shown on the illustration could be replaced with a backdrop that would be fixed to the framework. Similarly, the ceiling panels could be adjusted to fix a series of lights and sound absorbing fixtures as easily as a stage curtain could be installed.

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PROJECT FOREWORD

SITE PLAN

Preface

Details

Masterplan

This project proposal would respond to an existing space that would be redeveloped and appropriated to encourage communal engagement and skill building.

Level: (MArch) Master of Architecture Year 1 University: University of the West of England Tutor(s): Sally Daniels Year: First Year Project Length: 5 Months Type: Performance, Education & Exhibition Site Coordinates: 51°27’15.77”N 2°35’30.57”W

As the site exhibits a multitude of levels, accessibility across the site has become an issue. To combat this, to the rear of the site, the area will be infilled to match the level of St Mary le Port church. This will then include the gradual incline of the site and the inclusion of exterior stairs. The combination of these will blur the boundary between the front and back of the building, thereby creating a multi access site.

The title ‘Sociocracy’ refers to the creation of social environments to serve as a productive foundation to organisations and individuals alike. For this project, I was asked to develop a proposal that considered the notion of creative reuse. Following on from the idea of creative environments from the Magistrates’ Court project, I decided to focus my programme on the theme of traditional music making. The ethics that will be crucial in providing and maintaining such a space include: - Communal engagement - Co-working - Co-habiting - Accessibility - Multi disciplinary - Sustainable - Forming and fortifying trusting relationships - A supportive foundation

With the improved level accessibility across the site, St Mary le Port church will receive a greater presence. Currently much of the ruins cannot be accessed as much of it is fenced off. Once the boundaries to the church have been removed and the proposed building has been adjusted to suit the change in levels, the church will become a part of the site, as opposed to it being constrained by the harsh boundary. In adapting the existing structure of the Norwich Union House, there is potential for extension to offer further engagement with its context. Considering the site levels, some of the site will have to be excavated, as well as infilled, so that additional elements can be matched to the existing structural levels.

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The forecourt will serve as the main entry point to the site, it will be redesigned with hard and soft landscaping. In consideration of the existing building levels, the exterior forecourt will be ramped down into the basement level to improve accessibility for users and provide a greater emphasis to the entry process.

This intervention would endeavour to project the image of the creativity of those who are in the music business along with those who wish to showcase their own work, develop their status and learn from others. It would also serve as a educational hub to teach people the idea of elements of traditional heritage and the influence the past has had on creative ventures.

Key

SOCIOCRACY: UNION HOUSE PERFORMANCE, EDUCATION & EXHIBITION CASTLE PARK, BRISTOL 2019 21

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1. Proposal 2. Forecourt Entrance 3. Delivery Access 4. Existing Pathways 5. Castle Park 6. St Mary Le Port Church 7. Lloyds Parking 8. Public Pathway 9. Landscaped Park Space 10. Drop Off Zones 11. Installed Crossing Point

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1:200 GROUND FLOOR PLAN

1:200 FIRST FLOOR PLAN St Mary Le Port Church Ruins

Storage

Reception

Delivery Access

Kitchen

Archive WC’s

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Cleaners

Stage

Ducts

Access Access Plant

Services

Ducts

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Luthier Workshop

Lounge

Atrium

WC’s

Luthier Workshop

Auditorium/ Performance Space

Study Area

Stage Storage

Sub Soil Area of Footprint

Equipment Storage

Luthier Workshop

WC’s r ane Cle Ducts

Material Storage

Luthier Workshop

Cafe/Bar

Instrument Store

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Sub Soil Area of Footprint

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Backstage

WC’s

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WC’s

Atrium Walkway

Bar/Lounge

Balcony Seating

Instrument Storage

Ducts

Storage Merchandise Vendor

Control Room

Ramped Entry

External Landscaping

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1:200 SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1:200 THIRD FLOOR PLAN

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WC’s

Viewing walkway Storage & Services

Recording Studio

Gallery

Control Room

Entrance WC’s

Storage

Practice Rooms

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1:100 AUDITORIUM SECTION A-A Performance In response to the idea of folk music as an avenue for communal engagement and traditional understanding, the auditorium will allow a multitude of functions to take place. This could take the form of music performances, ceilidhs, lectures and small theatre productions. This multi purpose approach allows the building to make more efficient use of its space, improving the sustainable qualities of the environment. The location of the auditorium in the east wing allows this area of the building to remain open for longer hours when evening performances are taking place. As a result, the proposal can focus on various activities without disruption.

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1:100 SOUTH FACING ELEVATION (1) Permeability This elevation illustrates the main entry point into the building. In order to convey a more welcoming external image, introducing more lightweight materials, such as timber lamella cladding and large glass faรงades, will soften the existing concrete frontage. This will also have potential to produce extended elements to provide less external dead space. The aim of this external manipulation will be to increase the permeability of the scheme to the public, opening up the existing historic elements.

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INTERNAL ATMOSPHERE

EXTERNAL ATMOSPHERE Front Entrance

Atrium The atrium area serves as a connecting space between the two branches of the proposal. It endeavours to continue the external conditions of the concrete facade within the building as it wraps into the core of the building. This connection is then further emphasised by the walkways that span across the two arms of the proposal, the existing sector and the new build. The existing glass front has also been reinstated and updated to allow a controlled amount of the midday sun to penetrate the space.

The south facing entrance has been designed to enable disabled access and able users to use the same space, rather than separating these areas via multiple entry points. The concrete has been carved out to form a ramp that leads into the basement level of the existing building, but has been formed to create the ground floor level of the building. This ramp will concentrate activity into the atrium space, not only highlighting the new build of the proposal, but also St Mary Le Port church. The spaces either side of the ramp have also been landscaped in order to further soften the existing facade of the existing building. It also attempts to further extend the green space of Castle park, providing a space that can start to draw people into the park who are entering from the south of the site.

Auditorium

Rear Entrance

For the auditorium, the use of the wooden batten acoustic wall panelling system has been a key focal point within the design process of the auditorium. Therefore the internal conditions of the auditorium lend themselves to a setting that can evoke the idea of tradition, not only through the music created within the space, but the traditional materials of the timber cladding. The auditorium uses heavy and light materials to create an open space, which was a key theme in the environmental considerations of the building..

The entrance situated to the north end of the site runs between the workshop area and St Mary Le Port Church, as a way of acknowledging the new with the old in one transition. The ramp runs alongside the building, providing a view into workshop areas below, granting the public an indication as to the activity that occurs on a creative level within the space. This then leads up to the atrium space with its transparent facade, providing a view into the building and out towards the canal.

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1:5 WALL TO ROOF DETAIL

1:10 EXISTING STRUCTURE TO AUDITORIUM DETAIL

Aluminium Parapet Flashing Tapered Rigid Insulation Water Control Membrane

= Existing

= New

Plywood Roof Membrane

215mm Deep Concrete Blockwork between Steel Columns Sheathing Board

Plasterboard Aluminium Standing Seam Roofing

Aluminium Guttering

150mm Wood Fibre Insulation Hardwood Timber Vertical Open Joint Cladding

Timber Flooring Concrete Screed

Timber Packing Piece

Plasterboard

Damp Proof Membrane R/M Board

Fixing Battens

Steel Beam

Damp Proof Membrane

Metal Deck

Vertical Timber Slats

Ceiling Battens Concrete Beam

Steel Structure

Ceiling Boarding Steel angle bolted into steel column and existing floor

Wood Fibre Insulation

Acoustic Absorption Layer between Timber Battens

215mm Deep Concrete Blockwork between Steel Columns

Sheathing Board

Plasterboard Acoustically Transparent Fabric

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Acoustic Absorption Layer between Timber Battens

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PROJECT FOREWORD

SITE PLAN

Preface

Details

For this project, the company was tasked with demolishing an existing Jaguar Land Rover showroom building in for SRA Architects to build a new Porsche showroom and workshop. This would be done in order to meet with the new Porsche brand standards, which had been provided to SRA Architects in advance of project commencement. The work included external site reconfiguration for vehicle parking, servicing, valeting and storage facilities.

Level: Part 1 Architectural Assistant Workplace: SRA Architects Associated Colleagues: Tony Riddle Project Length: 9 Months Type: Automotive Showroom & Workshop 2 Project Size: 3340m Project Budget: £5,400,000 Form of Appointment: Bespoke appointment Procurement Route: Design & Build Type of building contract: JCT contract with amendments Site Coordinates: 51°24’46.92”N 0° 7’17.12”E

The client for this project was Jardine Motors Group, one of the UK’s largest automotive retailers, who’s franchises include Audi, Ferrari, BMW and Porsche. I worked within a small internal design team that consisted of a Project Partner a Project Leader and a number of Architectural Assistants. I worked on this project from RIBA Stage 3 ‘Developed Design’ through to RIBA Stage 6 ‘Handover & Close Out). The work I carried out mainly consisting of Revit model updates, producing planning applications and attending a number of site visits to attend team meetings and address queries.

(ALL FOLLOWING IMAGES ARE COURTESY OF SRA ARCHITECTS)

The following pieces demonstrate a number of elements of the project that I assisted in producing, including the maintenance of up to date plans, sections and site studies. Along with this are a selection of photographs from the completed scheme showcasing the completed showroom, workshop and external elements.

PORSCHE SOUTH LONDON AUTOMOTIVE & RETAIL SIDCUP, LONDON 2017 - 2018 35

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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310

1

Vehicle charging loctions shown.  Wall mounted at 900mm above paving to centre W.G05.01

ED.15

W.G05.01

2 244

Kerbline to paved pedestrian walkway to showroom perimeter shown

M

A

5

2

M

A

4

3

2

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

136

ED.14

B

B

S.G31.04

G

G12 962 WC271

950

Sm Bay

04

Sm Bay

05

(Future)

06

07

08

09

10

E

Vehicle Charging

20

SVP

Heater

G13 Cleaner

G10 WC 950 271

18 17

16

15

Large Bay

14

Large Bay

13

HV Work Bay

12

SVP

Showroom columns Paint Finish refer M60/197

Ground Floor Plan 1 : 125

N 170391.027 E 547589.225

ED.04 60M

F01 Staff Room

1

1

246

243

General Notes

Structure Notes

Fixtures Key

Refer to drawing: ‐ 3252/100 for Material Schedule ‐ 3252/115 for Proposed Site Plan ‐ 3252/130+ for Elevations ‐ 3252/135+ for Sections ‐ 3252/140+ for Fire Strategy ‐ 3252/145+ for Decoration ‐ 3252/150+ for Floor Finishes ‐ 3252/155+ for Wall Types

Steelwork locations shown indicatively only. Refer to SE documents for all steel locations, contruction frames and pit details.

GF.01 : Kitchennette Joinery GF.02 : Parts Store Counter GF.03 : Trade Counter GF.04 : WS Control

F02 Male WCs & Shower

F25 Shr 2 F26 Shr 3

G

Heater

EW.F01.01

S Above ground workshop Ramps + cabinets by others Refer 3252/118 + specialist Subcontractor Drawings

D.F13.01 Heater

Heater

D.F05.01 D.F18.01 Heater F27 D.F02.01 D.F01.01 Lobby

EV

H

Recessed required for speciality equipment. Fitted by others. Refer 3252/118 + specialist Subcontractor Drawings

D.F28.01

W.F10.01

F03 Stair 1

900x1400

F

RWP

External Plant

Primary steel painted with intumescent paint to meet fire rating. Spec ref: M61/111

F18 Corridor 1

1

R ED.05 60M

Void over Workshop

135

ED.05

S

F05 Female WCs & Shower

Q

11 HV Repair Bay

EV

G09 WC

F24 Shr 1

D.F05.02

D.F19.01

Heater

G14 WC

G11 WC 273

19

MOT

Hoist

Lift

Bol

SVP

W.F20.01

F17 Oil, Tanks & Compressor

F06 Office

1500x1500 F04 Meeting Room

G16 Tech Wash

Heater

D.F17.01

F07 WC

F08 Store

Bol

G40 Workshop

F20 Corridor 3

F28 Comms Rm

200mm dia RWP

Access Ladder

D.F15.01

W.F11.03

Rainscreen Finish to Interior  to Align with Exterior Joints

Large Bay

W.F04.02

W.G21.01

03

W.F12.01

Stair 2

D.F02.03 D.F02.02

W.G08.01

G08 Fitting Lounge 2

(Future)

D.F12.01

F19 Corridor 2

FF.01

D.G08.01

G42 Corridor

02

Key Safe

G15 Stair 1

D.G15.01 D.G10.01 D.G11.01 D.G12.01

G01 Sales Desk

G17 WS Control

D.G42.01 D.G15.02

D.G09.01

W.G07.01D.G07.01

W.G05.01

G49 Tequipment

G07 Fitting Lounge 1

01

F15 Parts

4000

EW.01

Rooflight over

F09 Sales Admin

P

ED.07

G18 Lift

1500x1500

G44 Corridor 2

R

37

Heater

Video wall by others

Large Bay (Future)

D.F11.01

D.F07.01

Void over Showroom

ED.06

G19 Kitchenette

D.G16.02D.G17.02

Q ED.03

1

F10 PA Office

D

S.G41.01

S.G17.01

GF.01 G20 Sales Manager

W.G17.01

D.G20.01

SVP

D.G19.01

H

Heater

D.G17.01

G21 Warranty Booker Admin

W.G05.01

F

O

2000

D.G14.01

G02 Sales Desk

G22 Sales Den

Void over Direct Dialogue Bays

W.F11.01

G45 Hoist Licence Plate

F12 Accounts

D.F19.02

Heater

F11 Dealer Principle

200mm dia RWP

G39 Parts Delivery

D.G13.01

E

1

SWBD

F23 Winter Tyres F13 Archive/Store

EW.02

135

D.F08.01

Hydr. press Heater

G38 Parts Dept

N

2

D.F14.01

W.F06.01 D.F06.01

G23 Spare

D.G21.01

W.G22.01 D.G22.01

G28 Sales Desk

135

AdBlue Station

250

W.F12.02

D.F10.01

G35 Unit Repair

W.G37.01 D.G37.01Heater W.G38.01 D.G38.01

Offset fill

W.F11.02

EV

P

242

S.G43.01

2

W.F09.01

G25 Business Manager

Stair 2

G43 Trade Counter

SVP

1

W.F10.02

Workbench

S.G31.03

ED.09

G37 Parts Manager

SVP

G24 Service Manager

G36 Parts Admin

D.G32.01

Digital Assistant

1

G41 Tech Equipment

ED.10

D.G40.02

700

W.G31.01

G34 Tool Store

C

ED.08

Waste oil Waste Antifreeze

Special Tool Cabinet

F16 Controlled Parts

245

W.F04.01 D.F04.01 D.F09.01

2 125

D.G23.01 W.G23.01

Full Width MDF Over Lobby Painted RAL 9006

W.F09.02

D

D.G25.01 W.G25.01

D.G24.01

EW.G38.01 n/a

EW.G37.01 n/a

6001

W.G31.02 G31 Direct Dialogue

W.G24.01

Special Tool Cabinet

G32 Tyre Racking

G26 Hospitality Lounge

SVP

Special Tool Cabinet

1186

G48 Cafe

G27 Service Desks

1 229

Vehicle Charging

ED.11

ED.13 D.G27.01 W.G27.01

Wheel Display

Vehicle Charging

Bol

ED.12 D.G30.01

G47 Reception

G03 Sales Desk

O

Bulkhead dashed above

Bol Bol

W.G23.01

W.G05.01 ED.02

D.G29.01

Bulkhead dashed above

2 135

G04 Lobby

W.G04.01 D.G04.01

N

W.G04.02 ED.01

241

Bol

F14 Training Room

EW.03

Void over External

1

C

D.F15.03

244

D.G38.01

G30 Handover

Parts Counter

G29 Handover

D.G39.01

G46 Shop

W.G30.01

1

Refer to JD Garage Equipment for details of 'Services' 1 246

Porsche Centre ‐ South London Drawing title

Final Design Issue This drawing represents the last revision issued for construction under the building contract. The content of this drawing has not been verified

Proposed Ground Floor Plan

Drawing number & revision

3252/ 120

Drawn by

Checked by

A1 Scale

NS

TR

As indicated

13

A3 Scale

1

Amendments

Final Design Issue Date

11/12/2017 15:37:05

Status

Final Design Issue

First Floor Plan 1 : 125

38


SECTIONAL STUDIES

PROJECT PHOTOGRAPHS

1

1

2

3

4

1

241

136

136

136

136

244

1

2

60

3

4

5

15

6

7

8

63

9

10

11

12

?

7

Parapet Level

First Floor Plan

2400

2400

7700

3600

Proposed Ground Floor Plan 0 14250

Longitudinal Section AA

1

1 : 125

12

11

10

9

8

4

3

1

2

1

136

136

243

136

136

7

6

5

4

3

2

1 1

8

?

11

246

?

61

?

Parapet Level 7700

First Floor Plan 5700

3600

Proposed Ground Floor Plan 0

44

2

Longitudinal Section BB 1 : 125

Final Design Issue This drawing represents the last revision issued for construction under the building contract.

39

The content of this drawing has not been verified by site survey and consequently, there may be differences between the drawing and the completed building.

40


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