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CIVIC PRECINCT • PROJECT SUMMARY

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http://crosstowngreenway.ga

Aaron Meier & Alex Gaio 1


CONTENTS Introduction 1 Why a crosstown greenway in Ladner?

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Project goals 4 Overview 5 Proposed alignments 6 Alignment details 7 Initial feedback 8 North Alignment 9 Central Alignment 10 South Alignment 11 Alternative South Alignment

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Artists renderings 13 Who wrote this report?

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INTRODUCTION Ladner is a primarily residential community that lies South of the Fraser River and North of the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal that is separated in the middle by Highway 17A. It has very flat topography and a fantastic opportunity for accommodating for active transportation. Recently, Fraser Health, Vancouver Coastal Health, and the University of British Columbia released the results of the My Health My Community survey which found that there is a strong correlation between health and active transportation.

Image source: My Health My Community Survey Results

The survey also found that Delta is a community that sees lower than average walking, cycling, and transit use, has above average car use, is 33% more likely to be overweight or obese, and is 34% less likely to walk 30 or more minutes a day. In response to the low active transportation usage data reported in the My Health My Community Survey, there is an overwhelming opportunity for Delta to provide safer walking and cycling connectivity to promote healthier lifestyles for its residents. By investing in active transportation, according to Transport Canada: • People are healthier and more physically active • There is better air quality, fewer carbon emissions, and helps with municipal GHG emission reduction strategies • Infrastructure is cheaper to maintain and develop than any other form of transportation • There is improved well-being, social cohesion, community identity, and equality • Overall transportation networks are improved 1


WHY A CROSSTOWN GREENWAY IN LADNER? Ladner is a community that is designed around automobile dependency. By connecting East and West Ladner using a corridor that is already zoned for a recreational walking and cycling path, new connections can be made to local schools, municipal facilities, the commercial centre, and Ladner Village. A crosstown greenway would be an excellent pilot project to determine its suitability for Ladner.

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1 PHASE ď„‘ Development of Bicycle Route Reserve

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PROJECT GOALS  Implement Delta’s first cycling/pedestrian greenway  Test procurement and costs associated with the development of infrastructure  Add alternative modes of transportation to the area through a method that is as low-cost as possible  Monitor results through surveying community feedback to gauge future plans

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OVERVIEW The Corporation of Delta has indicated through its Official Community Plan and GIS mapping services, that an existing railway right-of-way in East Ladner be used for bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure. This right-of-way borders Highway 17A to the west, 64th Street to the East, Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) property to the south, and single-family residential development to the north. The right-of-way would provide more than sufficient space for a bicycle/ pedestrian corridor. Existing infrastructure includes a water supply main and sanitary sewer. The proposed route should include: • An asphalt pathway with a clear demarcation between oncoming cyclists and/or pedestrians. • Lighting to allow nighttime access as well as maintain visibility for CPTED purposes. • Bicycle service stations along the route • Art/History component • Environmental restoration/landscaping The City of Richmond recently completed a greenway along an existing railway right-of-way, adjacent to Railway Ave. It consists of an asphalt path, separated by a dividing line. Public art installations include Interurban tram schedules, from when the line was still in use. The timetables have been stencilled onto the asphalt. A similar concept could be implemented along the bicycle route.

Ideally, the infrastructure should be coordinated with the municipality to ensure minimal disturbances. The East Ladner OCP lists the western boundary of the site as a potential emergency access route. Any cycling infrastructure should take this into account.

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PROPOSED ALIGNMENTS The following alignments are outlined to provide a comparison of route options and do not reflect any actual plans for a bike route. They are purely shown for illustrative purposes to begin the conversation around exploring the feasibility of a East-West bike route through Ladner. The South alignment includes portions that are currently zoned for a shared-use pathway.

Shared-use path 6

Cycle Track


ALIGNMENT DETAILS NORTH

CENTRAL

SOUTH

SOUTH ALT

Shared-use Path

0%

0%

44%

25%

Cycle Track

0%

100%

5%

7%

Bike Lane

44%

0%

29%

49%

Sharrow

66%

0%

22%

19%

Distance

3.20 km

2.61 km

3.35 km

4.08 km

New Hwy 17A Crossing Req’d

New Parking Restrictions Req’d

Removes Drive Lane

Values are estimates.

Bike Lane

Sharrow 7


INITIAL FEEDBACK In order to gauge the desirability of a bike route in Ladner, we conducted an online survey to see what residents thought of the idea. The survey anonymously polled people for their transportation preferences and their home location.

86%

of respondents ranked the availability of safe walking and biking infrastucture 6 or higher out of 10 as a key factor in whether or not they choose to walk or bike.

of respondents ranked the availability of safe walking and biking infrastucture 6 or higher out of 10 as a key factor in whether or not they choose to walk or bike. availability of safe walking

86%

ed the ure 6 or higher out of 10 as a key not they choose to walk or bike.

37% male

78% 68% 23%

63% female

THERE IS A STRONG DEMAND FOR SAFER37% male WALKING 63% female AND BIKING INFRASTRUCTURE IN LADNER.

to use walking and biking for trips within Ladner.

68%

63% female

37% male

of respondents preferred to use walking and biking for trips within Ladner.

78% of respondents preferred

of respondents use driving as their primary mode right now.

of respondents use driving as their primary mode right now. of respondents walk or

23%

bike as their primary mode right now.

of respondents walk or bike as their primary mode right now.

Breakdown of desired modes

63% Bike 20% Car 2% Transit 15% Walking

63% Bike

8 20% Car


NORTH ALIGNMENT Ends at Ladner Trunk Rd

Begins at 64 St Continues west on Brodie Rd as sharrow Turns north on 60A St New crossing at Hwy 17A

Continues west on Cresent Dr and 52 Ave as sharrow Continues south on Central Ave as bike lane



   

 







9

  






CENTRAL ALIGNMENT Ends at Arthur Dr

Begins at 64 St

Continues west on Ladner Trunk Rd as cycle track



   

 







   

10 

 

  

 


SOUTH ALIGNMENT Ends at Ladner Trunk Rd

Continues west on 44 Ave as bike lane

Begins at 64 St

Continues west on former rail right-of-way as shareduse path Turns north at 57 St

Continues north on Arthur Dr as cycle track

 Crosses Ladner Centre and pedestrian bridge

Turns north at 52A St as sharrow, then shared-use   path, then sharrow again





 



   



 

 





 

 

 

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ALTERNATIVE SOUTH ALIGNMENT Turns north from shared-use pathway at 60B St as bike lane



Crosses Hwy 17A at existing pedestrian overpass

Continues west as shareduse pathway behind LLC

Turns south on Clarence Taylor Cres as bike lane

  Continues west on Mountain View Blvd as bike lane



Rejoins proposed South Alignment at 44 Ave







    12

 



  

 


ARTISTS RENDERINGS

Proposed shared-use pathway on former railway right-of-way in East Ladner

Proposed cycle track on Ladner Trunk Rd for Central Alignment

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WHO WROTE THIS REPORT? This is a report created by two twenty-something Ladnerites who are passionate about transportation. The inspiration for connecting Ladner came from our frustration for lack of safe cycling routes and an amazing opportunity for improvement because of the flat topography of Ladner. As Delta Secondary School grads, we were confused by the lack of transportation choices there were for students and wanted to explore the option of improving mobility.

Alex Gaio

Aaron Meier

Alex is an Urban and Regional Planning Student studying at Ryerson University who is interested in the nexus of transportation, public health, and sustainability. He grew up in South Delta and is an advocate for mobility choice. To learn more about Alex, or to connect with him, you can visit his website: http://alex.gaio.me.

Aaron Meier recently completed his studies at the British Columbia Instititute of Technology. He will become an architectural technologist in the hopes of pursuing his career in architecture. He is interested in civic issues and the urban environment. Also, as an avid history buff, he understands how changes can affect a community. To learn more about Aaron or to connect with him, you can visit his Twitter profile: http://twitter.com/ aaron_meier

This report was independently published and is not affiliated with the Corporation of Delta. It is published under a Creative Commons Share-alike license. You can find our more about the Creative Commons License used on this document by visiting this URL: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/. We would like to thank those who helped by contributing to the survey. 14


“A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. It’s where the rich use public transportation.” —Enrique Peñalosa

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Not affiliated with the Corporation of Delta.

Ladner Crosstown Greenway  

This is a draft document for a concept bike route in Ladner, BC.

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