Issuu on Google+

• ALEXANDRAMILLER

• landscape architecture undergraduate portfolio • Pennsylvania State University [2007-2012]


Name: Hometown: College: Degree: Minor: Focus:

Te c h n i c a l S k i l l s : Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Environmental Inquiry Planning Waterfront Design Urban Revitalization Alexandra Miller Sharon, Pennsylvania The Pennsylvania State University

Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign AutoCAD ArcGIS Google SketchUp Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel Microsoft PowerPoint


PLANNING Spring Creek Canyon Via dei Coronari The Landings

+regional +urban +community

- 5 - 9 - 13

SITE DESIGN B u f f a l o Va c a n t L o t s - 16 Love Canal - 18 Francisville Recreation Center - 21

+vacant lots +repurposing +planting

COMPETITIONS T h o r p P r i z e UPMC Shadyside Penn State Shenango Campus

- 24 - 26 - 29


REGIONALPLANNING

SPRING CREEK CANYON MASTER PLAN

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

The Spring Creek Canyon is an area of land that is known to many as a stand-out location for trout fishing, as well as a place to view nature and take in beautiful scenery. Due to the close proximity to Interstate 99 and U.S. Routes 220 and 322, it is an easily accessible area, just one attribute that makes it so desirable to stakeholders. One of the main reasons that people have chosen to live in the Spring Creek Watershed over the years has been agriculture. As such a major contributor to Centre County’s economy throughout history, agriculture and farmlands of the area provide a strong link between the area’s past and future. The overall task for this project was to thoroughly analyze and create a master plan for an area known as the Spring Creek Canyon. The suitability of the canyon for different activities, including fishing and agriculture, was determined by creating several maps in ArcGIS.

MY VISION:

By creating experiences that give visitors an opportunity to be active and also learn, the goal of this master plan is to create an educational area that people want to experience. In addition to trails along the creek for walking and biking, and the fishing areas in Spring Creek, this concept includes hiking through the wooded areas of land surrounding the creek. By juxtaposing recreation with conservation and agriculture, visitors to the site can be taught about both of these aspects. While the site will not force visitors there solely for recreation to partake in educational aspects, or vice versa, it is encouraged by their concurrence in the landscape.

5


SPRING CREEK CANYON MASTER PLAN Conserved areas: One large space that will be conserved is the orchard, which will continue to be utilized. By conserving these areas, the beauty of Spring Creek Canyon can continue to be displayed.

Agricultural areas: These areas are presently used and will continue to be used for agriculture.

LEGEND conserved areas

Riparian Buffers: Riparian buffers are important for good water quality. Some plants that will be used in these riparian buffers include Black Willow, Silver Maple, and the American Sycamore.

agricultural areas recreational fields hatchery riparian buffers on site vehicular circulation primary trails visitors centers major access route (US Route 220) Recreational fields: In addition to the walking trails throughout the site, there are two large open fields provided for recreation. There will be no assigned sport or activity for these areas but they will remain open to the public for whatever recreational activity is desired. Parking: There will be more parking provided at the Southern entrance to the site so that more of the orchard does not need to be harmed in order to create space for parking. There will, however, be a smaller parking lot at the Northern visitors center.

R E G I O N A L P L A N N I N G : F A L L 2 0 0 9 A D V I S O R S : T I M M U R T H A + N E I L K O R O S T O F F

Scale: 1� = 1500’

6


SPRING CREEK CANYON MASTER PLAN These maps were created using ArcGIS and the area that is outlined is the Spring Creek Watershed in Pennsylvania.

Bald Eagle Creek

E DG

n

ra

B

Ru

RI

ga n

nc

ek

h

lo ffa Bu

E

Lo

LD BA

GL EA

Sp

ollo

r

e

w"

M

"B

ig

Ho

ll o

"

C eda r R

! State College

ai

r

Statewide Importance 0

1

2

3

4 Miles

la b

Ca

bin

R

un

n g R un Roari

±

AGRICULTURAL SUITABILITY

Y

Legend

lb

S

Prime

T

N TA

un

Ga

Spring Creek Watershed Soils Not Prime

N

IT

Spring Creek Streams

S pring C re e k

Legend Rating for Agriculture

OU

N

ig

H

Run

C

"B

alo

w

ff Bu

ri n g

t h Gap Run

E SS TU

Y

M

O

U

Strahler Stream Order

IN TA N

1 2 3 4

±

Spring Creek Sub Basins

0

STRAHLER STREAM ORDER

R E G I O N A L P L A N N I N G : F A L L 2 0 0 9 A D V I S O R S : T I M M U R T H A + N E I L K O R O S T O F F

1

2

3

4 Miles

ELEVATION ANALYSIS

7


URBANPLANNING

VIA DEI CORONARI

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

In the Spring of 2011, my fourth year in the Landscape Architecture program, I was required to spend a semester in Rome. I studied at the Pantheon Institute and was able to gain a plethora of knowledge from being exposed to European culture that I otherwise would never have known. One of the main projects through the semester was to develop a master plan for an area of the city between Via dei Coronari and the Tiber River. Through the use of historical maps, I analyzed the spaces that make up this urban zone and made conclusions on the improvements that could be made. Since Rome is an ancient city, any changes that have been made tend to be minimal in order to preserve the character of the landscape. This can sometimes cause issues that were not previously there, and it becomes necessary to do even more to adapt.

MY VISION:

The main challenge in this project was to come up with a plan that makes noticeable improvements to the current state of the urban forms while keeping it minimal enough that the character of Rome is not lost. Bringing Rome to the 21st Century is a difficult task but not impossible. I had three main design guidelines while creating this master plan. The first is to extrude landscape elements and layers to reconnect the area to the river and its history. The next is to reintroduce and reestablish natural elements in the area through use of water features and introduced vegetation. The final is to remove most vehicular circulation and revert the area to pedestrian.

9


VIA DEI CORONARI ZONE 1 - RIVER OVERLOOK Creates an extended pedestrian zone along Lungotevere. Gives users a feeling of disconnection from the city and connection to the river. ZONE 2 - LUNGOTEVERE RIVER WALK PARK AND VIA GIUSEPPE ZANARDELLI PEDESTRIAN MALL Pedestrian mall implementation along Lungotevere and Via Giuseppe Zanardelli serve not only as areas of transport but areas of destination as well. The pedestrian mall on Via Giuseppe Zanardelli is lined with street trees to direct the user to the Palace of Justice building that is across the river. The strong axis between the two, emphasized by the street trees, draws the users’ eyes to the building across the river.

6 6 1 6

2 4

4

2

7 4

3 6

5

5

DESIGN GUIDELINES: -Extruding landscape elements and layers to reconnect the area to the river and to its history. -Reintroducing and reestablishing natural elements in the area through use of water features and new vegetation. -Removing most vehicular circulation and reverting to pedestrian.

U R B A N P L A N N I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 1 A D V I S O R : L U C A P E R A L T A

ZONE 3 - FOUNTAINS These adjacent spaces are all connected through the use of a water feature that runs throughout the different sites. These fountains connect to the site closest to the river, literally and figuratively connecting Via Coronari to the Tiber River. ZONE 4 - PARKING Parking in these specific zones will be restructured to be more efficient since, currently, any open space on the site is used as a parking space. ZONE 5 - TRAM EXTENSION An extension of the tram line will help to better connect the city of Rome and make it easier to get from one point to another. ZONE 6 - TUNNEL The tunnels are added as a way to free lungotevere and Via Giuseppe Zanardelli for the use of pedestrian malls. It also makes driving more convenient because there is less interaction with pedestrians. ZONE 7 - OUTDOOR CLASSROOM + GATHERING SPACE This area will serve as an amenity to both the adjacent school and the church across the parking lot.

10


VIA DEI CORONARI

Existing

Major Vehicular Circulation

Major vehicular traffic Parked cars

Open Space Morphology Open Space 1748 Based on Nolli map

Open Space 2011 Based on Google maps

Ponte Umberto I This was added to better connect the two sides of the river and add direct access to the Palace of Justice.

Proposed

Vehicular traffic Vehicular in tunnel Parked cars Bicycle Lane Tram line

Ponte Sant Angelo With the widening of Lungotevere, the piazza at the base of the trivium has been eliminated

Lower Level adjacent to Lungotevere

Via Coronari + Via di Panico

This area was created during the building of the wall to prevent the Tiber River from flooding. With the added elevation, this was the last space of the previous ground level and got leftover and now has a canyon feeling. As another space with an awkward shape and size, this is currently being used as a parking lot.

The removal of a building at this intersection has created an awkward open space that is only being used as a parking lot.

Piazza di San Simeone

Proposed Traffic Plans: One main objective that I wanted to complete with this plan was to use the roads more efficiently so that the area is not so congested. Through the implementation of an underground tunnel, a bicycle lane, and an extended tram line, the flow of traffic would be much smoother and traveling from one place to another would be a much simpler, less stressful process.

U R B A N P L A N N I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 1 L U C A P E R A LTA

Piazza Lancelotti The building that is currently here used to extend into the space but has been partially demolished. This creates an open space that is used as a parking lot but could be something much more useful to users of the site and, especially, residents of the apartment buildings surrounding the space.

A building was originally located in this spot, narrowing Via dei Coronari at this point. However, there is now just a small fountain in the space which creates a completely different experience at this point of Via dei Coronari than what was here historically.

11


COMMUNITYPLANNING

THE LANDINGS

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

During the third year in the Landscape Architecture program I received my first project with a real-life aspect to be included in it: zoning. This was a group project in which we developed a community from a piece of land in Centre County, Pennsylvania, just a few miles from the Penn State campus. Each group received different requirements for land use in the categories of open space, lot/building coverage, and roads. My group’s requirements were to plan a community comprised of 55% open space (including 10% nature preserve and 5% community garden), 35% lot/building coverage, and 10% roads. Also, we were required to utilize a cluster layout to save on infrastructure.

MY VISION:

The major challenge in this project was to plan a successful community while adhering to the zoning requirements of Ferguson Township. Our objective in this plan was to create a sustainable, mixed-use community while encouraging walkability and connectivity, promoting a sense of community through the use of public open space and adjacent land uses. Connectivity will be achieved via systematic use of bike and pedestrian trails that not only connect our individual neighborhoods with one another, but with the larger circulatory system of State College as well. Mixed use will be an important design element of the community including small markets and stores as well as community gardens, all of which will help to make this a self-sustaining, community oriented neighborhood.

13


THE LANDINGS

The organizing factor for the landings community is the centralized greenspace surrounded by the three sub-communities, each of which have their own defining character. Locating the greenspace at the heart of the community promotes sustainability and walkability, encouraging interaction between residents and an overall healthier environment. Each individual community is located near the perimeter of the site in order to minimize the amount of vehicular circulation within the community, also providing easy access from the existing road infrastructure. Community gardens and small shops, with increased on-site resources, also help the community to be somewhat self-sustaining and serve as an example for green communities of the future.

C O M M U N I T Y P L A N N I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 A D V I S O R S : S E A N B U R K H O L D E R , P E T E R A E S C H B A C H E R , C A R U B O W N S

14


THE LANDINGS Zoning Calculations: Student Housing: (R4)

Total Acreage: 5.16ac(bldgs) + 1.29ac(os) = 6.45ac Total Percentage of Lot Building Coverage (35%) =5.16/140 = 3.7%

Senior Homes: (R4)

Total Acreage: 3.09ac(bldgs) + .77ac(os) = 3.86ac Total Percentage of Lot Building Coverage (35%) =3.09/140 = 2.2%

Young Families: (R3 + R4)

Total Acreage: 6.88ac(bldgs) + 1.72ac(os) = 8.60ac Total Percentage of Lot Building Coverage (35%) =6.88/140 = 4.9% Townhomes Total Acreage: 4.93ac(bldgs) + 1ac(os) = 5.93ac Total Percentage of Lot Building Coverage (35%) =4.93/140 = 3.5% Total Percentage of Young Family Lot Bldg Coverage =3.5% + 4.9% = 8.4%

Families: (R2 + R4)

Total Percentage of Family Lot Building Coverage =7.9% + 7.4% + 2.6% = 17.9%

Total Residential % of Lot Building Coverage: 5.16 + 3.09 + 6.88 + 4.93 + 11 + 10.32 + 3.6 =44.98/140 =32%

C O M M U N I T Y P L A N N I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 A D V I S O R S : S E A N B U R K H O L D E R , P E T E R A E S C H B A C H E R , C A R U B O W N S

15


VA C A N T _ L O T D E S I G N

G R O U N D W O R K B U F FA L O

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

In the realm of urban vacancy and abandonment, urban planners are scrambling to establish policy changes that could help mitigate the issue. Tax abatements, land banks, and complex funding systems all exist as possible “fixes�, but the truth is, there is no singular solution in sight. While the wheels of policy turn slowly, an informed and proactive designer can have an immediate and dramatic effect within these urban landscapes. GROUNDWORK SITE: Situated within the heart of Buffalo and along its primary north-south street, the Groundworks study area encompasses a range of land uses, including neighborhood residential, commercial and institutional. Our project is to focus on a series of vacant residential properties located along Masten and Michigan Avenues.

MY VISION:

The main objective in this vacant lot design is to promote a sense of neighborhood connectivity. Bringing people together to care for a piece of land that, for so long, has been vacant and untouched is something that can serve as the roots to a larger movement to clean up the surrounding community. A community garden and orchard is something that will provide an amenity for the community in the form of food and also serve as a social gathering place. In addition, the main path going through the site serves as a cut through from Utica Street to Michigan Avenue or vice versa. Producing fresh fruit and vegetables on site provides users and residents of the area with an opportunity that they do not currently possess. The edges of this site are planted with meadow grasses to create a barrier between the orchard and garden plots and the surrounding city lots. The juxtaposition of the meadow and orchard landscapes also serves as a device to bring together two different spatial experiences into one.

16


GROUNDWORK BUFFALO

S I T E D E S I G N / V A C A N T L O T S : F A L L 2 0 1 0 A D V I S O R : S E A N B U R K H O L D E R

17


VA C A N T _ L O T D E S I G N

L O V E C A N A L R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

Love Canal is known as one of the most appalling environmental tragedies in American History. In 1978 it was discovered that chemicals were percolating through the soil to the surface because of rotting drum containers that were buried more than twenty years prior. When the chemicals began leaching to the surface, the residents of the area knew they were living in an area that would most certainly ensure their impending health problems, leading to death in many cases. Now, almost 30 years after these horrendous events, we were instructed to design a master plan for the area affected. We were to create an amenity to the area that is accessible and inviting while still remembering the tragedy that occurred here. Memorializing these events is a way to educate people to make sure that it never happens again. This project was a group project completed with two landscape architects in our fourth year of the Penn State Landscape Architecture program and three architects in the graduate program at the University of Buffalo. This posed a challenge as it was our first interdisciplinary project and much of the collaboration had to be done via phone, email, and skype.

MY VISION:

Our project title was “Illuminating Absence: History Revealed through Remnants of the Past.� Part of what is so powerful about visiting this site is seeing the open, vacant lots where houses and even a school once stood. Even more powerful are the remnants that still remain of the lives that were abandoned here all among the now overgrown lots. Therefore, our design strategy for most of the site was to utilize this strong feeling of absence and vacancy and enhance the emotion that it evokes. Our strategy was to break the site up into four sections. The northeast section is to be left as is, which gives the eerie feeling of vacancy on the site that is present from the houses being torn down and the natural growth taking over the area. The southeast section is an experiential, hands-on site that takes visitors through an emotional journey similar to what the families living here experienced. The central section is a portion of the site that is to be experienced visually. Since this area had the most contamination, users must experience this area through a building that serves as a bridge over the site. The final section, the furthest to the west, is a functional recreational site for the surrounding residents to utilize.

18


LOVE CANAL

The above photos depict the central installation on the site. This is a field of lights that is laid out in the footprint of the school that once stood here. These lights represent the sickness in the children who attended school here that was caused by the leaching chemicals. It serves as a memorial to these children and all who lived here so that visitors remember the tragedy that was the love canal.

S I T E D E S I G N / R E P U R P O S I N G : F A L L 2 0 1 0 A D V I S O R : S E A N B U R K H O L D E R

19


SITEREPURPOSING

F R A N C I S V I L L E R E C R E AT I O N C E N T E R

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

Philadelphia is a city with many under used and under-maintained parks and recreation centers. These have the opportunity to be a great amenity to the neighborhoods in which they are located if they receive the proper maintenance and care. However, in their current state, many are unsafe and unusable. This project focuses on recreation centers located in Jardel and Francisville. Throughout the semester, as a class, we researched different ways to make these sites more sustainable and better serve the residents of the surrounding neighborhoods. Research topics included: recycled materials, alternative energy generation, children’s play and environmental education, compost, and water design biotechnologies. We also did site analysis as a class and this was broken up into the following categories: climate analysis, surface and sub surface utilities, vegetation evaluation, pavement, wall, stair, and fence evaluation.

MY VISION:

The point where the street grids of Francisville and Philadelphia meet creates a triangle in the grid system and creates a neighborhood that appears to be different from the others, even if only from the aerial view. According to the Neighborhood Plan for Francisville, residents would like to create a neighborhood that is just as unique in culture and community as it is in its organizational system. Using this triangle as the basis for the concept of my design, programs and spaces were created that aid Francisville in its mission to become a single unified and unique community within the City of Philadelphia. Triangles are very rigid shapes and are often used for support and to stabilize. Using a shape that is so strong and durable is a great metaphor for what the neighborhood of Francisville can become.

We then had to choose one of the given recreation centers to redesign the site to make it safer and more sustainable, so that it can better serve the community than it currently is, all while staying within the allotted budget.

21


F R A N C I S V I L L E R E C R E AT I O N C E N T E R The paths and most of the spaces have been designed using the Philadelphia and Francisville grids as the main organizing elements. The intersection of these different spaces creates triangles, just like the larger grids, which relates to the concept of triangles coming together to form a stronger, more holistic figure. The western section of the site is used as a production area and includes community garden plots and orchards. The building on this site contains rest rooms, an indoor storage area for tools, and an indoor washing station. Recreation and play are the main programs on the eastern site and include baseball, basketball, swimming, playgrounds, a spray ground, and the pole playground. Education is focused on ecosystem education and education of natural processes and habitats since these opportunities are not readily available in cities. The different spaces that compose these educational opportunities are the forest demonstration ecosystem, the wetland/meadow boardwalk demonstration area, and the bioretention cell in the entrance plaza.

A

S I T E D E S I G N / R E P U R P O S I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 A D V I S O R : T I M B A I R D

22


F R A N C I S V I L L E R E C R E AT I O N C E N T E R CONCEPT STATEMENT In the same way that separate, smaller triangles can come together to support one another to create one larger triangle, the residents of Francisville can come together as a neighborhood and create an identity for the community when provided with the right amenities. Providing spaces within the park that allow for play, production, and education gives the park more diversity and a stronger identity than currently exists.

A’

S I T E D E S I G N / R E P U R P O S I N G : S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 A D V I S O R : T I M B A I R D

23


DESIGNCOMPETITION

THORP PRIZE

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

This design competition occurred during the semester spent in Rome, Italy. The goal is to design an installation in Rome that will serve as a representation of the 150th anniversary of the Unification of Italy. This competition was done in collaboration with two students in the architecture department also in their fourth year and studying abroad from Penn State. (The plan drawing was completed by a group member, photos were taken by another group member, and the perspectives were put together by me.)

MY VISION:

The light “candles� serve as both a guiding force and symbol. They define a promenade towards the culmination point which creates a stage and gathering point for unity events. They teach the history of the unification via dates and information etched on each candle. Each candle is symbolic of peace and hope, together, they are a symbol of the unification of Italy. These candles culminate in front of the Colosseum as one cohesive whole, creating a powerful backdrop for the celebration of Italian Unity.

24


C O M P E T I T I O N S : S P R I N G 2 0 1 1 A D V I S O R :S L U C A P E R A L T A

25


DESIGNCOMPETITION PROJECT OVERVIEW:

UPMC LIVING BARRIER

UPMC is one of the leading nonprofit health systems in the United States. By committing to an environmentally sustainable approach to healthcare, the leadership of UPMC has demonstrated higher standards for social responsibility. UPMC values the practice of sustainable landscaping at all hospital campuses. This competition presents a professional development opportunity for teams of three or four landscape architecture students at Chatham University and Penn State University to design living visual barriers.

MY VISION:

The form the wall takes mimics the city skyline. The double layers of the wall represent the various layers of structures that make up the skyline of Pittsburgh. The planting design for the wall shows both Pittsburgh and UPMC’s dedication to the environment and moving forward. This city was once an industrial center point that has since been making huge efforts in enhancing its community and environment. Pittsburgh is demonstrating that it will not be left behind with the sustainable movement. This design was intended to be implemented at the site of UPMC Shadyside, outside of the waiting room in order to screen the utilities such as air conditioning and heating ducts. The photos on this page show existing views and photos on the opposite page show the proposed views with the implementation of the green wall. Both of these perspectives were completed by me.

26


C O M P E T I T I O N : S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 A D V I S O R S : B A R R Y K E W + E L I Z A P E N N Y P A C K E R

27


DESIGNCOMPETITION

UNIVERSITY AS A CATALYST FOR SMALL CITIES PROJECT OVERVIEW:

In my final semester at Penn State I took a seminar titled Dynamic Campus/Dynamic City. Our major project for this class was to create a design competition about a campus located in a city. When everyone had created their competition, the class was to vote on three with which to move forward and actually submit designs for. My competition was chosen as one of these and these competitions ranged greatly in scale and location. They included Sharon, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Mumbai, India. This project posed a unique challenge that I had not yet faced in my academic career as it put me on the opposite side of a design competition from the one in which I usually was. Creating a design competition and setting guidelines for the design is the entirely opposite experience from responding to design prompts but one that was immensely interesting and rewarding.

MY VISION:

With today’s economic climate there are very few areas that are doing exceptionally well. Small cities, especially, are feeling the effects of the economy and trying to come up with ways to keep their head above water. However, partnering with successful institutions in the area can serve as a resource to help the city move forward. Pennsylvania State University has 19 commonwealth campuses in addition to its main campus at University Park. These campuses are set in a wide range of areas with many diverse land types and uses. One of these campuses, Penn State Shenango, is located in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Even though the campus is very small, it is considered to be Penn State’s only urban campus. This competition aims to bring designers forward to enhance the space that Penn State owns in downtown Sharon to liven and rejuvenate the area, a process that is already progressing due to recent renovations at the campus.

29


U N I V E R S I T Y A S A C ATA LY S T F O R S M A L L C I T I E S

ENVISION Come up with new ways to create a more holistic community between the Penn State Shenango campus and the City of Sharon. Articulate how these ideas will benefit both the University and the City.

Erie

approx 1 hr 30 min 85 miles

NY

RENEW ENVISION

RENEW

CONNECT

R E J U V E N AT E

Create a campus plan that is integrated into the city’s plan and their Beautification Plan as well as the University’s Master Plan for Penn State Shenango campus. Currently, a Sharon Beautification Committee is in place that is aiming to clean up the image of Downtown Sharon. Their current project is to sell hanging baskets to go along East State Street in downtown Sharon to liven the streetscape. If something as little as hanging flower baskets from street posts has the ability to transform the character and life of an area, imagine the possibilities that other, more lucrative design changes could make.

C O N N EC T

Cleveland

approx 1 hr 30 min 75 miles

Sharon

Youngstown

OH

approx 20 min 19 miles

PA

Aim to connect the campus to the city with integration of plans and literally through bike lanes, easier access, etc. It is especially important to connect the campus to Sharon General Hospital for easy access as this is where the University’s Nursing Program resides. Connections to river would be useful as it can serve as an amenity that provides a precedent for the rest of the downtown area in terms of how to treat the waterfront and make it more approachable.

Pittsburgh

approx 1 hr 20 min 72 miles

R E J U V E N AT E During the day the campus is lively but when classes are over for the day and the students and faculty head home, there is nothing happening in this area. This problem could be solved in a couple of different ways, and its up to the designer to come up with which would be the most appropriate. These can range from having extra-curricular programs with the students, to festivals, to the implementation of student housing in the area. Young student life is something that is necessary to rejuvenate this community and recreate a vibrant downtown area.

C O M P E T I T I O N : S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 A D V I S O R : R A Y G A S T I L

Morgantown

WV

I created this map to show the regional context of Sharon and the proximity to larger cities in the Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio area.

30


U N I V E R S I T Y A S A C ATA LY S T F O R S M A L L C I T I E S GOALS

1 2

3

Provide solutions for both the “site” and “context” scale.

As important as it is to focus on the campus, it is equally important to acknowledge how these campus alterations will affect the city itself.

Analyze area and determine best place for student housing to be located.

There are many vacant buildings in the downtown Sharon area that could be utilized for housing for the Penn State Shenango campus. Bringing students to live in the area will increase the sense of community and increase revenues for the downtown Sharon economy.

Program and design green spaces on campus that are currently just lawn areas.

By actually designing the spaces around campus, people are more likely to use them and spend time at campus outside of the classrooms instead of immediately returning home when class is over.

4

Adapt or alter the under utilized, excess parking lots on campus.

These solutions could range from replacing pavement with pervious pavement to taking out a parking lot all together to provide for more green space on campus. This map shows the Penn State Shenango Campus. Parking is highlighted in yellow, main campus area in red, green space is green, and maintenance buildings are blue.

5

Address the waterfront area adjacent to the Penn State Shenango property.

Creating a safe, inviting space next to the water is a huge opportunity. A successful design could be used as a precedent for the rest of the downtown area as a way to address this amenity that is available to many business owners.

6

Provide solutions for circulation to Nursing School (connections to current bikeway).

In a car, the journey from one campus to another is very easy and direct. However, if a student wants to bike or walk from one to another there needs to be a safer way to do so.

C O M P E T I T I O N : S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 A D V I S O R : R A Y G A S T I L

31


ALEXANDRAMILLER

BLA Landscape Architecture 724-813-6084 alex.christine.miller@gmail.com 310 Norris Avenue Sharon, Pennsylvania 16146


Alexandra Miller Undergraduate Portfolio