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Understanding natural and anthropogenic sources of heavy metals in the Athabasca River Dr. WILLIAM Shotyk

Dr. William Shotyk has studied environmental contamination in nearly every part of the northern hemisphere, and is now applying his expertise to the air, soils and waterways of Alberta. Using innovative techniques and a world class clean lab, his team is investigating heavy metals in the Lower Athabasca River and determining how much, in what form, and from which source they have originated. Bill prides himself on his ability to assemble highly effective, multidisciplinary research teams and is putting these teams to work in the new Soils, Water, Air, Manure and Plants (SWAMP) clean lab at the U of A.

Bill’s team is also: • Calculating background levels of dust deposition prior to industrialization to create a baseline from which we can monitor change • Distinguishing between locally-derived metals, primarily from mineral dust particles, and metals that have traveled long distances from sources such as incinerators, coal-fired power stations, or smelters • Studying moss and peat as archives of heavy metal deposition from natural and anthropogenic sources

By understanding natural chemical cycling and geology we can tease apart what concentrations of elements are naturally occurring and what portions come from human sources.

UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF OF ALBERTA, ALBERTA, FACULTY FACULTY OF OF AGRICULTURAL, AGRICULTURAL, LIFE LIFE & & ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES SCIENCES

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ACRRE - Building on Diverse Expertise  

The proposed Alberta Centre for Reclamation and Restoration Ecology – ACRRE – aims to build on the diverse expertise of University of Albert...