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ALENA SAVERA ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

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TABLE OF CONTENTS RESUME

4-5

PROJECTS

6-75

CACTUS PAVILION WILDFLOWER PAVILION BIKE BRIDGE GREEN CENTER URBAN STRATEGIES URBAN FAMILY HOUSING OBJECT ORIENTED ONTOLOGY NIGHT OWL LAMP

COMPETITIONS

76-83

MODEL BUILDING

84-89

DRAFING, DRAWING, ART

90-101

BARKITECTURE BRICK WALL

WALL SECTION DIGITAL FABRICATION WOOD JOINT

LIVE DRAWINGS ART PIECES HAND DRAWINGS TOOL DRAFTING HOUSE DRAFTING 2

6-13 14-23 24-29 30-39 40-47 48-59 60-67 68-75

76-79 80-83

86-87 88 89

92-93 94-97 98 99 100


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Alena Savera

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO EDUCATION 2012-2017

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

2008-2012

KELLER HIGH SCHOOL

MAJOR : ARCHITECTURE GPA : 3.78

RANK : 8/634 GPA : 104.5 AP SCHOLAR WITH DISTINCTION

WORK EXPERIENCE JUN 2014 AUG 2014

MAY 2013 AUG 2013

CONTACT + INFORMATION

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BIRTH

11 / 09 / 93

PHONE

817-657-8368

EMAIL

alena.savera@gmail.com

WILSON ASSOCIATES - INTERN

Performed RFI analysis + solution development Created rendered elevations + plans Developed spec book for clients Created CAD drawings - design development, construction docs, FF+E Created product schedules for hardware, plumbing, + accessories Created complete sets of design concept books to send to client Researched products, new technology, materials, + cost

OXLEY WILLIAMS THARP ARCHITECTS - INTERN

Edited and revised marketing products for website and print Photo-shopped images of building designs to present to clients Developed Excel spreadsheets for administration Created CAD construction documents

COMPETITIONS OCT 2014

BARKITECTURE - BEST IN SHOW

FEB 2014

BRICK TEAM WALL DESIGN- HONORABLE MENTION

Austin Doghouse design competition entry Project Manager of design + build team Raised funds for building material Featured in GoodHousekeeping.com Designed and built brick wall Allocated various bricks, limestone, + CMU


EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES PRESENT

UNDERGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT COUNCIL

PRESENT

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

PRESENT

UT SENATE OF COLLEGE COUNCILS

2013-PRES 2013-2014 2013-2014 2012-2014 2013-PRES

2013-PRES 2013-2014 2012-PRES 2013

2014-PRES 2013-2014 2013-2014 2013-2014 2012-2013

UASC UASC UASC UASC UASC

President Constitution Writer + Coordinator Elected Studio Representative Member Mentorship Program - Mentor

PR Director Jr. Officer - Treasurer Member 2012 - Present AIAS Chicago Forum attendee

School of Architecture Representative Multimedia + Press Committee Co-Chair Leadership Team Mentorship Program - Mentor Multimedia + Press At-Large Member

COMPUTER SKILLS Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Revit AutoCAD Rhino 5.0 SketchUp 3DS Max V-Ray Word Excel Powerpoint

PERSONAL SKILLS

Leadership Time Management Organization + Planning Public Speaking Drafting Model Making Sketching Drawing Graphic Design Presentation Preparation

PRESENT

TEXAS BLUEBONNETS : SPIRIT + SERVICE

Lead Designer : Branding, Apparel, Products PR + Advertising Committee Founding Member

+ + + + + + + + + +

2014

ALPHA PHI OMEGA SERVICE FRATERNITY

INTERESTS

2013-PRES 2013-2014 2013-2014

2014 2014

Elected Executive Policy Committee Member

ACHIEVEMENTS 2014-PRES 2013-PRES 2014-PRES 2013-PRES 2013-PRES 2013-PRES

Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors University Honors UT Sigma Alpha Lambda National Society of Collegiate Scholars UT Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society UT Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society

+ + + + + + + + + +

Graphic Design Photo Editing Collage Hand Drawing Fashion Design Management Math + Science Business Dance Fitness

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CACTUS PAVILION PROFESSOR

MICHAEL HARGENS

DURATION 3 WEEKS

SEMESTER DESIGN II SPRING 2013

DESCRIPTION

The LBJ Wildflower Center, home to native wildflowers, plants, and landscape, desire a contemporary outdoor pavilion that doubles as a succulent exhibition space and a resting stop. The succulent shelving structure is created from a series of modules that create a pattern wall. The modules were modified according to formal and environmental conditions of the wildflower center.

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map

CACTUS RESEARCH MAP The Coryphantha Cactus is a small to middle sized globose cactus. It is also known as the beehive cactus for its hexagonal tubercle pattern. Four Coryphantha species were studied: Coryphantha Pallida, Coryphantha Glassi, Coryphantha Sulcata, and Coryphantha Retusa. The conducted research is demonstrated in a map, looking at various growing conditions in the southwestern United States. James Corner, an architectural mapping expert, is known for his abstract representations of information. The Coryphantha Map utilizes techniques of Corner to demonstrate the impact of geography and climate on various Coryphantha species. TEMPERATURE The circles at the top of the map represent the average monthly temperature of the region where the Coryphantha Pallida grows. Coryphantha thrive in warm, dry climates.

ELEVATION Greyscale regions demonstrate elevation. Black is water. Low elevations are light grey, medium elevations are medium grey, and high elevations are dark grey.

AVERAGE HEIGHT Height is demonstated in the bottom-left corner of the map. Average heights vary for different species. The Pallida are the tallest Coryphantha species. Map chart measures height in inches.

RETUSA

SULCATA

8

GLASSI

PALLIDA

GROWTH REGION Each Coryphantha growth region is located in Red. Coryphantha plants tend to grow in low to medium elevations.


CACTUS DRAWING STUDY

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DEVELOPMENT OF MASSING CORYPHANTHA CACTI

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CONSTRUCTED TUBERCLE

TUBERCLE GEOMETRIES

UNDERLYING GEOMETRIES

FOLDING LINES

CUT LINES

FOLDED FORM

The Coryphantha Cactus was the inspiration of the pavilion massing. The system of the turbercle and spine had many underlaying geometries that developed into a guide for folding and cutting the form. After conducting a series of iterations, the final form was chosen for its interior spacial volumes and large facade to incorporate a pattern wall. The pattern wall was also inspired by the Coryphantha turbercles. These extruded trapezoidal forms each hold a succulent that can be viewed from the interior space.


SITE PLAN + PATTERN WALL

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PATTERN WALL

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PAVILION INTERIOR

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WILDFLOWER PAVILION PROFESSOR

MICHAEL HARGENS

DURATION 9 WEEKS

SEMESTER

DESIGN II SPRING 2013

DESCRIPTION

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center has one core mission: to educate the public of the importance of conserving native wildflowers, plants and landscapes. The Wildflower Pavilion aims to reinforce LBJ’s ideals of education and preservation by creating a space that can be used for classrooms, exhibits, and receptions. Built on the expanded trails of the new arboretum, the pavilion is submerged in the vast wild landscape. The building, influenced by light, wind, and water, utilizes sustainable features while capturing views of the beautiful landscape.

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PAVILION SITE

SITE INFORMATION

MASSING PROCESS DIAGRAMS

PAVILION SPACE

16PAVILION + SECONDARY

SOUTH WINDS

VIEW

NORTH WINDS

SOLAR MASSING

SOUTH WINDS

CIRCULATION

The site of the project is along the wild life trail of the Ladybird Johnson Wild Flower Center. Hundreds of trees are found along the sandy trail. The site of the pavilion is a 20 minute walk from the nearest building. In order to reduce the environemental impact of the structure, the pavilion was designed to utilize passive cooling and lighting features.


SITE PHOTOS + PERSPECTIVE SKETCH

MASSING CONCEPT The site for this project is intended to teach visitors about preserving the natural environment and its organic growth. In order to reinforce this concept, The structure emphasizes this idea of organicism and growth. These two volumetric forms demonstrate dynamic movement and growth. One houses the open pavilion, while the other houses the restrooms, kitchen, and storage.

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SECTION DIAGRAM

WIND, WATER, LIGHT The pavilion utilizes a series of cooling strategies for the hot Austin climate. The form creates a chimney effect that pulls air into the space and pushes the warm air out. The structure is oriented to gain the southerly winds. The Pavilion is located 3 feet below the ground line, creating a thermal cooling effect. The roof of the structure works as a shading device to both the indoor space and the outdoor patio. The roof 18 collects rainwater that is used for cooling and irrigation.


PAVILION PLAN COMPUTER LAB

SEATING.

PAVILION PATH

MEN’S RESTROOM WOMEN’S RESTROOM

KITCHEN

INDOOR SPACE

STORAGE OUTDOOR PATIO

TERRACED SEATING

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SITE SECTION

PATH + SUBMERSION The path into the pavilion crosses with the existing arboretum path, pulling visitors into the space. The descending pathway is lined with benches that create a resting point for visitors. Because the pavilion is 3 feet below the groundline, inhabitants feel submerged into the landscape, enhancing the experience of the natural setting. 20


SOUTH FACADE The indoor pavilion extends its space by opening up the sliding glass door system to create a large shaded outdoor space. The open facade captures the wide view of the natural landscape of the arboretum. These factors allow inhabitants to experience the beauty of the landscape with the comfort of shade and cooling systems. 21


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

22


AXON DIAGRAM

WATER MOVEMENT

NATURAL LIGHT

SLOPING ROOF The sloped roof has a series of benefits to the pavilion. Rain water is able to flow easily into a hidden gutter at the end of the roof and flow into an underground reservoir. The roof also directs cool air in and warm air out. The roof allows for natural light to enter through the high fenestration. Because it faces north, it never recieves direct sunglight, minimizing the amount of glare in the space. The north fenestration captures a unique view of the sky, while the southern fenestration creates wide views of the natural landscape.

WIND DIRECTION

CIRCULATION

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BIKE BRIDGE PROFESSOR JUDY BIRDSONG

DURATION TWO WEEKS

SEMESTER

DESIGN III FALL 2013

DESCRIPTION Bjarke Ingels is known for his unique form development processes, diagramatic representation of site conditions, and integration of public space into existing programs. The Bike Bridge was developed using the same techniques as the Bjarke Ingels projects. The Bike Bridge creates a rest station for bikers with bike racks and restrooms, while also developing a structure that creates a suspended pavilion over the road. This bridge meets ADA codes and creates a space that promotes safer circulation for pedestrians and bikers, as well as a unique public space with beautiful views to the Texas Capitol.

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ELEVATION + DIAGRAMS

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SITE PHOTOS + DIAGRAM

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SITE PHOTOS + DIAGRAM SOUTH CONGRESS AVE.

SITE OF BIKE PAVILION

BIKE RACKS

CHANGING ROOM

SUSPENDED PAVILION VIEW TO THE CAPITOL

PARKING LANES

RAMPS - ADA STANDARD

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GREEN EDUCATION COMMUNITY CENTER PROFESSOR JUDY BIRDSONG

DURATION

6 WEEKS

SEMESTER DESIGN III FALL 2013

DESCRIPTION Located on South Congress in Austin, the Austin Green Center serves as a community center that has a mission of educating families to develop a more sustainable lifestyle and promoting greener practices. The Austin Green Center is home to the Austin Energy Green Building offices. A central atrium lobby space is the center for all circulation and sustainability educational resources. The Green Center also houses a gallery, library, auditorium, ballrooms, and green roof to create a public center for the community. By inviting the community to the space, more people will be exposed to a more sustainable lifestyle.

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ENERGY CONSUMPTION RESEARCH Per Capita consumption of energy in the US is exceptionally high in comparison to competing first world countries. The highest amount of energy is being used to heat and power homes. Our energy consumption can only decrease if the US citizens take initiative. However, Americans are wasteful of energy because they believe it is too difficult to be sustainable or because they are uneducated about sustainable practices. It is clear from the research that the solution to energy use reduction is education. The mission of the Austin Green Center is to educate the community about how to live a greener life. Visitors have opportunities to learn about energy use reduction, recycling, composting, and other green living techniques. 32


CENTRAL CIRCULATION THROUGH ATRIUM TO BRING GREEN EDUCATION TO EVERYONE ENTERING THE BUILDING

STUDY MODELS

ELEVATED VIEWS TO GREENERY AND TREES TOWARDS EAST AND WEST TO EMPHASIZE GREEN EDUCATION

TREES ON BUILDING SITE REMAIN UNTOUCHED TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABILITY

NEIGHBORHOODS BEHIND THE GREEN CENTER HAVE ACCESS TO PARK SPACE WITH COMPOSTING AND PUBLIC GARDENING

PUBLIC GREEN SPACE ON TOP OF ROOF TO ATTRACT VISITORS AND TO PROVIDE INSULATION

PROGRAM MASSING

CENTRAL ATRIUM SPACE

GALLERY SPACE

LIBRARY

AUDITORIUM

OFFICE SPACE

READING ROOM

BALLROOMS

PASSIVE LIGHTING UTILIZED THROUGH MASSING AND USE OF TRANSPARENT WALLS THROUGHOUT GREEN CENTER

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D I

D

C

E

E

J

C

F

C

F

F

A

J

B

H

G

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A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

ATRIUM - EDUCATION CENTER GREEN CENTER LOBBY GALLERY LIBRARY BALLROOM OFFICES AUDITORIUM AUDITORIUM LOBBY READING ROOM STORAGE


SECTION PERSPECTIVE + PLANS

35


AXON + MODEL PHOTOS

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URBAN STRATEGIES PROFESSOR SARAH GAMBLE

DURATION 3 WEEKS

SEMESTER DESIGN IV SPRING 2014

DESCRIPTION South Lamar is a central transportation hub that is home to multiple neighborhoods and many housing complexes. The current state of this street is unsafe and unslightly for residents and visitors. Plan Radii utilizes a system that ensures all residents and visitors on South Lamar close proximity to transporation, food, and recreation. This system will increase the amount of energy efficient transportation methods while making the corridor safer and more desirable to inhabitants. The plan uses form codes in order to improve the development along the corridor and to increase the safety and walkability of the road.

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SOUTH LAMAR CONDITIONS SOUTH LAMAR CURRENT PROBLEMS - TRANSPORTATION -

BIKE : POOR BIKE WALKING : NARROW DRIVING : LITTLE PUBLIC TRANSIT :

LANES, NO RACKS SIDEWALKS, FEW CROSSWALKS PARKING, UNSAFE LANES VERY FEW STOPS, FAR DISTANCE

- COMMUNITY

- VERY LITTLE GREENSPACE + PARKS - LITTLE PERMEABILITY FOR NEIGHBORHOODS - DIVISION BETWEEN SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES

- SAFETY + APPEARANCE -

DOMINATED BY CONCRETE LOTS VERY FEW STREET LIGHTS NO MEDIAN IN STREET NO PROTECTED LEFT TURNS

SOLUTION : PLAN RADII -NODES : DEFINITION

- CENTERS FOR COMMUNITY AND TRANSPORTATION - ALWAYS WITHIN 1/2 MILE DISTANCE TO NODE - 4 TOTAL NODES ALONG SOUTH LAMAR

-TRANSPORTATION AT EACH NODE -

BUS STOP CONSOLIDATED PARKING BIKE RACK CROSSWALK

- COMMUNITY AT EACH NODE

- PUBLIC CENTERS - GARDENS, PARKS, OUTDOOR THEATERS

- SAFETY + APPEARANCE -

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WIDEN SIDEWALKS WIDEN AND DEVELOP BIKE LANES PLANT TREES IN MEDIAN AND AT EDGE OF SIDEWALK INSTALL MORE STREETLIGHTS


PLAN RADII : FORMAL CODES

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SOUTH LAMAR RADII PROPOSAL

BUILDING FORM CODES NO PERMANENT CONSTRUCTION 3 STORY MAXIMUM HEIGHT 5 STORY MAXIMUM HEIGHT 10 STORY MAXIMUM HEIGHT

NODES

SITES

1 MILE RADIUS 1 MILE RADIUS

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION

PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION

PROPOSED BUILDINGS

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45


PLAN RADII IMPLEMENTATION

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47


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URBAN FAMILY HOUSING PROFESSOR SARAH GAMBLE

DURATION 6 WEEKS

SEMESTER DESIGN IV SPRING 2014

DESCRIPTION

At the end of the South Lamar corridor is a proposed housing and community complex. The family oriented housing is complimented with family-friendly and safety-promoting programs, such as the existing church and preschool on the site. The proposed library creates a community center that provides easy access learning, computer and technology use, and activities for the residents of South Lamar. The buildings of the complex wrap around the site, demonstrating formal and conceptual ideas of safety and community. At the center of the complex is a park that utilizes a variety of programs that meet the needs of the residents and users of the complex. These components work together to create a complex that emphasizes safety and community while maintaining a dense, urban setting. 49


STUDY MASSING MODELS

FAMILY URBAN HOUSING Urban sprawl in Austin is rapidly increasing as the city grows. Families move from the city to the suburbs because they are more attractive to parents. However, it is important to keep families within the city. When the number of children decrease in a city, the quality of the schools in the city fall, causing many longterm negative impacts to the quality of life in the city. In order to mitigate urban sprawl, it is pertinant to make city life more appealing to parents. By studying suburban qualities and applying them to a dense, urban setting, families will be more likely to stay in the city. With more urban families in Austin, urban sprawl will dwindle and the quality of education and life within cities will improve.

URBAN PROBLEMS CRIME AND SAFETY PROBLEMS FOR KIDS

SUBURBAN TO URBAN SOLUTIONS IMPROVE SAFETY IN AND AROUND HOUSING COMPLEX

LACK OF NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY

DEVELOP SPATIAL QUALITIES THAT CREATE A NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY

UNSIGHTLY VIEWS AND ARRANGE COMPLEX INNAPROPRIATE IMA- TO HAVE VIEWS OF TREES AND GREENGERTY ERY LITTLE GREEN SPACE FOR KIDS TO RUN AND PLAY

ADD LARGE MULTI-FUNCTIONAL GREEN SPACE

LACK OF PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

CREATE MULTI-USE COMPLEX WITH A CHILD/FAMILY ORIENTED PROGRAMS

TOO LOUD : NOISY STREET BECAUSE OF TRAFFIC

REDUCE NOISE, PUSH COMPLEX BACK FROM NOISY STREET

MASSING PROCESS

SOUTH LAMAR

SOUTH LAMAR

EXISTING SITE: -CHURCH CHAPEL -CHURCH OFFICES -TREES -FAMILY FRIENDLY

HOUSING PROGRAM: -NEAR TREES -AWAY FROM STREET

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SOUTH LAMAR

LIBRARY PROGRAM: -CRIME PROTECTION -CHILDREN-FRIENDLY -COMMUNITY SPACE

SOUTH LAMAR

WRAPPING MASSING -CONNECTING LINES -WRAP PROTECTION -PARK AT CENTER -CHAPEL UNTOUCHED


R

H UT

A AM

L

READ

ING RO

OM

SO

CAFE

COMPUTER LAB

CHURCH OFFICE AND PRESCHOOL

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

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HOUSING UNITS

FAMILY HOUSING STRATEGIES

MATERIALS OF HOUSING

-

- COOL, CONCRETE PROTECTIVE SHELL - WARM, WOODEN INTERIOR OASIS

SINGLE LOADED UNITS 2 + 3 BEDROOM UNITS BALCONIES IN EACH UNIT WIDE CIRCULATION WALKWAYS ACT AS FRONT PORCH - LARGE COMMUNITY SPACES ON EACH FLOOR - EFFICIENT UNIT PLANS AND STRUCTURAL EFFICIENCY TO REDUCE COSTS 52

UNIT STUDY MODEL


FAMILY HOUSING

EXTEND SPACE WITH OPEN PLAN AND SLIDING DOORS

2 BEDROOM UNIT WITH PRIVATE BALCONY AND “FRONT PORCH”

OPEN PLAN : DINING, KITCHEN, LIVING

2 BEDROOMS IN UNIT. 1 MASTER BEDROOM. 1 BEDROOM FOR KIDS.

BATHROOMS AND STORAGE CONTAINED TO SAVE SPACE

HOUSING UNIT PLAN

WALK IN CLOSET, 2 HALF BATHS, + SHARED SHOWER

A. MASTER BEDROOM B. MASTER BEDROOM BALCONY

D.

C. WALK IN CLOSET

A. C.

G.

D. SHARED SHOWER

B.

E.

E. KITCHEN F. DINING ROOM EASY ACCESS TO BALCONY FOR PRIVATE OUTDOOR EATING

F.

I.

G. LIVING ROOM EASY ACCESS TO PUBLIC PORCH. CHAIRS CAN BE PULLED OUTSIDE. ENCOURAGES STRONG COMMUNITY. H. COMMUNITY DECK SPACE FOR COMMUNITY GATHERINGS + SPACE FOR CHILDREN TO PLAY. INCLUDES PRIVATE MEETING ROOM.

I.

HOUSING FLOOR PLAN I.

J.

H.

H.

I. CORRIDOR / PORCH PUBLIC SPACE FOR NEIGHBOR INTERACTION J. COMMUNITY LAUNDRY EACH FLOOR HAS A LAUNDRY ROOM EQUIPED WITH 5 WASHERS AND 5 DRYERS53


SECTION THROUGH SITE

LOT LINE RESTAURANT 54

6 FLOORS OF HOUSING


CHURCH CHAPEL COURTYARD TERRACING

CHURCH OFFICES AND CLASSROOMS 55


COURTYARD PLAN The courtyard has a difference of 16 feet in elevation. In order to accomidate for this drop, the courtyard was terraced. The terracing pattern emphasizes the theme of wrapping and community. Each terrace has a unique program. These terraces serve the library, housing, church, and South Lamar community. D. E.

A. LIBRARY READING DECK B. READING PARK WITH TREES C. PICNIC TABLE DECK

A.

B.

N. N.

F. J.

C. G.

D. COMMUNITY GARDEN E. GRASS PARK

H.

F. WATER FOUNTAIN G. TREE PARK H. WOODEN DECK I. PARK + PLAYGROUND J. TENNIS COURT K. BASKETBALL COURT L. LARGE POOL M. HOT TUB N. STAIRS + PATH 56

K.

M.

I. N.

L.


COURTYARD PERSPECTIVE

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LIBRARY

2ND FLOOR PLAN

F.

G.

C.

C.

1ST FLOOR PLAN

A. C.

F.

B. F.

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D.

E.

A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

LOBBY OFFICES BOOK STACKS CAFE MEDIA LAB READING ROOM BALCONY


LIBRARY ENTRANCE

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OBJECT ORIENTED ONTOLOGY PROFESSOR KORY BIEG

DURATION

12 WEEKS

SEMESTER

DESIGN V FALL 2O14

DESCRIPTION Object Oriented Ontology theorizes the relationship of objects and the difference between the identity of form and the perception of form. This theory drove the process of creating a form that is entirely independent of vernacular connotations of architecture. The form, digitally fabricated using 3DS Max, demonstrates the constraints that forms must encounter when they enter the real world, such as gravity, ground plane, and materiality. A second form is built onto form one, creating a form that challenges the principles of independence and dependence. A third form is constructed to relate to both forms one and two while explicitly demonstrating the architectural concept of structure and rationality and their relationships to dependent and independent forms.

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FORM ONE - ORGANIC GROWTH FORM CATALOGUE

FORMAL STUDIES WERE CONDUCTED THROUGH THE EXPLORATION OF 3DS MAX DIGITAL MODELING.

END RESULTS

THE TOP FORMS WERE CHOSEN AND ANALYZED FOR THEIR FORMAL QUALITIES AND FOR THEIR POTENTIAL TO BE FABRICATED.

FINAL FORM

THIS FORM WAS CHOSEN FOR ITS ORGANIC QUALITIES AND ITS VOLUMETRIC, SPATIAL QUALITIES CREATED FROM A PLANE ENVELOPING ITSELF.

FINAL FORM PROCESS

PLANE L: 78’ W: 78’

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TWIST AXIS Y 78.5

SHELL TWIST AXIS Y

SYMMETRY Y AXIS

ROTATION

FFD BOX PUSH PULL

FFD PUSH PULL


FABRICATION: STACKED CHIPBOARD ITERATIONS

2000 INDIVIDUAL PIECES GLUED

IN ORDER TO MAKE A MORE DYNAMIC FORM, A SERIES OF ITERATIONS WERE CONDUCTED

THE FINAL FORM WAS CHOSEN FOR ITS DYNAMIC MOVEMENT, ORGANIC QUALITIES, AND FORMAL ILLUSTION OF GROWTH.

FORM SLICES

63


FORM TWO - CELLULAR GROWTH In order to maintain the formal and conceptual language of Form 1, I continued the exploration of organic qualities, growth, and dynamic movement. The word “organic” has connotations of being loose in form and free of a rigid system. However, architecture is defined by its systematic patterns and extreme rationality. I wanted to develop a form that would utilize this dichotomy harmoniously. Cellular growth utilizes both systematic patterns and organic qualities. I studied the cellular growth and created a set of criteria that defined the formal qualities of the organic growth process. This iterative process resulted in a series of modules that tesselate over the surface of form 1, creating a skin that appears to emerge from the form.

CELLULAR GROWTH -INTERLOCKING FORMS -REPEATING FORMS -VARIABLE MODULES -ORGANIC FORM -POROSITY

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ITERATION 1

HAS SOME OF THE CELLULAR GROWTH QUALITIES. LACKS INTERLOCKING AND ORGANIC FORMS

ITERATION 2

UTILIZES ALL CELLULAR GROWTH QUALITIES.

MODULAR CELLS

3D PRINTED MODULES DEMONSTRATE QUALITIES OF CELLULAR GROWTH. MODULES ARE TESSELATED ON SURFACE OF FORM 1


MODULE PLANS + SECTIONS

MODULE PROCESS

PLANE

EXTRUDE

STRETCH

TWIST

E.P. INSET

SHELL + SMOOTH

DIAGRAMS + SECTION

SECTION

SECTION THROUGH CENTER OF FORM 1

CLOSE-UP

GRADIENT OF MODULE SIZE CREATES THE ILLUSTION OF GROWTH

LOCATION

VALLEYS - AXIS OF MODULES ON FORMS. TALLEST MODULES AT DEEPEST POINT TO SIMULATE GROWTH.

ARRANGEMENT

THE MODULES FOLLOW THE STRIDATIONS OF THE MODEL TO EMPHASIZE THE LINEARITY AND DYNAMIC MOVEMENT.

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FORM THREE - PARASITIC GROWTH Parasitic growth is the epitome of organicism. Its growth pattern is reactionary, rather than prescriptive. In contrast, structure is prescriptive, proactive, rational, and easily replicated. I wanted to explore the dichotomy between parasitic language and the structural construction process.

PARASITIC STRUCTURE PROCESS ONE ONE

TRIANGLE - SIMPLEST POLYGON

TWO TWO

TRIANGULATED STRUCTURAL GEOMETRIES THIN SEGMENTS - TRANSPARENCY

THREE THREE

STRUCTURAL GROWTH FROM MODULES 3 SEGMENTS PER MODULE FOR TRIANGULATION

FOUR FOUR

GROWTH AT CENTRAL AXIS 2 SHORT : TOWARDS AXIS 1 LONG : AWAY FROM AXIS

FIVE FIVE

INDIVIDUAL SEGMENTS CONNECTED STRUCTURAL STABILITY ORGANIC GROWTH DEVELOPS

SIX SIX

ADDITIONAL SEGMENTS FOR STRUCTURAL SUPPORT. FORM COMPLETELY SUSPENDED. CONNECTS ONLY AT MODULES.

ONE

66

TWO

THREE

FOUR

FIVE

SIX


GRADIENT Demonstrates the concept of time in growth. Gradient depicts fading age over time. Darkest sticks at points of new growth and fade as they grow.

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NIGHT OWL - LAMP DESIGN PROFESSOR KIETH SIMON

DURATION 4 WEEKS

SEMESTER

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS I

DESCRIPTION

Around campus, there are many locations of inadequate lighting. The worst of the locations is found at the Goldsmith Hall Courtyard. In order to improve the dismal lighting of the courtyard, our team studied the problems and developed a set of criteria and solutions. Our team designed and built our Lamp, called Night Owl. After completing the prototype, we conducted a series of calculations and conclusions of the lighting qualities and the success of the lamp.

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DESIGN INTENT

PROBLEM - COURTYARD

EXISTING LIGHTING

LIGHTING GOAL

At Goldsmith Hall, the courtyard is a prime location where students enjoy spending their time. Throughout the day, numerous students sit in the courtyard, performing tasks such as reading, sleeping, eating, talking with friends, or working in large groups. However, students rarely use the courtyard at night. This can be attributed to the dismal lighting qualities that cause the space to feel vacant, deserted, and uninviting.

The existing lighting in the courtyard is minimal. The space receives sporadic, indirect fluorescent lighting through the surrounding windows. In the loggia, there is one hanging incandescent light that brings a small amount of light into the space. The inadequate amount of light at night creates a foreboding mood. Students do not feel comfortable in this dimly lit space and cannot perform any sort of task in this lighting. No task lighting that would help students perform desired tasks is present. Overall, there is no cohesive strategy to illuminate the courtyard.

Our goal is to make the courtyard a space that students can use at night. The lights should illuminate a series of tasks that could be done at night in the courtyard, such as reading, eating, and walking. The lights should be movable and adjustable so that students can have the right amount of lighting for the variety of tasks that they are performing. The structure should be weather resistant and should not require a plug and outlet. The luminaire should also be sculptural so that during the day, they can remain standing throughout the courtyard and still maintain visual interest.

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DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS

DIGITAL PROTOTYPE

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

TYPE : FLOOR LAMP DIMENSTIONS : 1’6” x 1’6” x 3’4” WEIGHT : 13 LBS MATERIAL : 1/4” STAINED BIRCH HARDWOOD 1/8” FROSTED PLEXIGLASS

LIGHTING DESCRIPTION TYPE : INCANDESCENT VOLTAGE : 120 VOLTS COLOR : 3500 K BASE : FLAT, WOODEN BASE + SWITCHES EFFICACY : 16 LUMENS/WATT

ANNUAL ELECTRICAL COST

kW : .063 HOURS PER DAY : 11 kWh PER DAY : .693 $/kWh : 0.07 kWh/DAY X $/kWh X 365 DAYS : ANNUAL COST 0.693 X 0.07 X 365 : $17.71

EFFICACY STATEMENT Because incandescent bulbs are used, the efficacy is lower than alternative light sources. However, the warm color temperature was a critical aspect of the luminaire. Therefore, the efficacy was compromised in order to have a better quality of light.

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LAMP DESCRIPTION The Night Owl is the perfect lighting fixture for outdoor courtyards and for night owls that love to stay up late working or having fun. The lamp’s natural material and color palette works with all courtyard materials. The sculptural form allows the fixture to sit in the courtyard as a sculpture by day and a lamp at night. The lamp has a warm glow, transforming the courtyard from a dark, uninviting area to a space fit for production and recreation. The wooden rings and the frosted glass work to diffuse the light. At 3’4”, the height is perfect for illuminating seated tasks as well as for illuminating the ground for circulation. Because of the lamp’s lightweight materials and stable structure, the luminaire is portable, allowing users to illuminate various tasks at any location.

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The lamp has three lighting settings designed for a variety of functions within a courtyard. This allows for the user to customize their desired lighting, as well as saving energy by dimming or turning lights off when necessary. The low setting is designed to illuminate the path in order to create a safe and walkable environment at night. The medium setting is designed to illuminate an area for students to partake in recreational and social activities. The high setting is designed for activities that require higher quantities of light and contrast, such as reading.


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PHOTOMETRIC CHARTS

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PLANS, SECTIONS, ELEVATIONS

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1-2-3 HOUSE COMPETITION

BARKITECTURE AUSTIN

AWARD

BEST IN SHOW

TEAM MEMBERS ALENA SAVERA AUSTIN ABLON

DESCRIPTION The Barkitecture Austin doghouse design competition is a fundraiser presented by the Animal Lovers of Austin. During the competition day, the doghouse entrees are auctioned off, and all of the proceeds go towards helping abandoned and abused dogs find safe homes. Each year, many firms, companies, and students enter innovative doghouses. Our team represented the University of Texas School of Architecture. The purpose of our doghouse, 1-2-3 House, is to offer the dog a place to rest in the sun, in the shade, or in shadow. Simple 2�x2� plywood construction allows for easy and economically efficient construction. Southern orientation allows the dog to experience different lighting effects behind a wood screen while still allowing for views into the yard. A built in water bowl and spigot attach to a watering hose to allow for easy waterbowl fill-up. 77


BUILDING PROCESS

HOUSE CONCEPT

1-2-3 HOUSE OPEN PATIO ATTACHABLE HOSE WATER SPOUT WATER/FOOD BOWLS

INTERIOR SHADED ROOM INTEGRATED DOG BED

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WEATHER RESISTANT WOOD


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BRICK WALL COMPETITION

UTSOA BRICK WALL DESIGN COMPETITION

AWARD

HONORABLE MENTION

TEAM

ALENA SAVERA HATTIE SHERMAN DIANNA ATVARS DANIEL COTTE ZOE BROWN ANTONIO MEDINA KRISTIN ERICSON

DESCRIPTION The Brick Wall Design Competition gave the students of UTSOA experience in understanding the qualities of brick and masonry construction. Each team was allocated a maximum of 16 solid bricks, 65 cored bricks, 8 limestone bricks, and 8 CMU blocks. Each team had 6 hours to build the wall. Our team was interested in creating a porous brick wall that would appear lighter than a traditional heavy, robust brick wall. This wall would enclose outdoor semi-private areas. The direction of the bricks can be customized to allow or obstruct a passage for wind, light, and views. The wall was awarded Honorable Mention for its concept and strategic design.

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BUILDING PROCESS

BRICK WALL COMPONENTS

CMU : 6 UNITS RED CORED BRICKS : 65 UNITS GREY SOLID BRICKS : 16 UNITS LIMESTONE : 6 UNITS

POROUS BRICK WALL SYSTEM

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BRICK TEXTURE

PERSPECTIVE, PLAN, + ELEVATION

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MODEL BUILDING PROJECTS

WALL SECTION DIGITAL FABRICATION WOOD JOINT

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WALL SECTION WALL SECTION STUDY OF CATHEDRAL OF CHRIST THE LIGHT BY SOM. LASERCUT MUSEUM BOARD. SEALED WITH GESSO.

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DIGITAL FABRICATION DIGITAL MODELS CREATED IN RHINO. LASER CUTTING FILES PREPARED IN AUTOCAD. TOP ROW: 2 PLY WHITE MUSEUM BOARD. BOTTOM ROW: 4 PLY BLACK MUSEUM BOARD.

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WOOD JOINT ABSTRACT DIAGRAM OF CLASPING HANDS. TOP PIECE SLIDES OFF TO UNLOCK THE JOINT. WHEN THREE PIECES ARE OPENED, INTERIOR DETAILS ARE REVEALED.

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DRAWING, DRAFTING, + ART PROJECTS

LIVE MODEL SKETCHES VARIOUS SKETCHES + COLLAGE DRAWING + COLLAGE COLLECTION PLAN, SECTION, ELEVATION DRAFTING HAND CONTOUR STUDY TOOL DRAFTING

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LIVE DRAWING LIVE MODELS SKETCHING CLASS. LEFT: 3 MINUTE DRAWING. MIDDLE: 5 MINUTE DRAWING. RIGHT: 10 MINUTE DRAWING. CHARCOAL ON NEWSPRINT PAPER.

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PLACES + FACES LEFT: DRAWING OF METAL BUILDING FACADE. GRAPHITE ON BRISTOL PAPER. MIDDLE: TORN MAGAZINE PAPER COLLAGE RIGHT: GRAPHITE ON BRISTOL PAPER.

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PERCEPTION OF REALITY

REPRESENTATIONS OF THE OF SOCIETAL STANDARDS PERCEPTION OF SELF AND CIETY. ALL: GRAPHITE +

IMPACTS ON THE OF SOCOLLAGE

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HAND DRAWING STUDY IN THIS EXERCISE, THE PENCIL NEVER LIFTED OFF THE PAPER UNTIL THE DRAWING WAS COMPLETE. THE SKETCHES COULD NOT BE VIEWED WHILE THE PENCIL WAS ON THE PAGE.

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TOOL HAND DRAFTING HAND DRAFTED DRAWING OF CAN OPENER. GRAPHITE ON STRATHMORE.

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HOUSE CASE STUDY HAND DRAFTED PLANS, SECTIONS, AND ELEVATION OF THE BAHIA AZUL HOUSE. DIAGRAM OF THRESHOLD, CIRCULATION, AND VOLUMES.

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2014

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Alena Savera Architecture Portfolio  

The University of Texas School of Architecture UTSOA 2015

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