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2017 HUSKY ENDURO RANGE TESTED No.

OCTOBER 2016

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BREAKS COVER! 2017 YZ250F FLOGGED A DAY IN THE DUNES SWM’S BUDGET BIKES ADB TRAIL TESTED FRANKENSTEIN’S MONSTER KTM 950 TURNS NASTY NORTH STAR TRAILRIDE BIGGEST BUSH BASH IN OZ? JNR MX WORLD BEATERS LITTLE AUSSIE HEROES

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CONTENTS | OCTOBER 2016 the good oil

regulars

metal

features

016 2017 HONDA CRF450F

034 LETTERS

046 2017 HUSKY LAUNCH

090 NORTH STAR

HONDA MX WEAPON REBORN

YOUR CHANCE TO HAVE A SAY

ENDURO WEAPONS ADB TESTED

TRAILRIDE PACKS THEM IN

020 MOSS DRUG SCANDAL

039 CHAD REED

MOSS BROTHERS TEST POSITIVE

REED RIDES BLUE AGAIN

022 HAHN TO RACE IN OZ

040 JEMMA WILSON

AMERICAN GUN TO RACE AUSSIE SX SERIES

GLOBE TROTTER

024 TOWNLEY RETIRES

042 GEARED TO GO

MOTOCROSS LEGEND CALLS IT QUITS (AGAIN)

TASTY BITS FOR YOU AND YOUR DIRTBIKE

026 RHYTHM-X PRICE PURSE DOWN TO 20TH

054 2017 SUZUKI RM-Z450

100 TOUGHEST RIDERS

YELLOW MOTOCROSSER PUT TO THE TEST

THE MEN WHO MADE MOTOCROSS

060 2017 SWM RANGE SPEEDY WORKING MOTORCYCLES?

068 2017 YAMAHA YZ250F THE BLUE BULLET BACK WITH A VENGEANCE

074 KTM 950 EXC-F CHRIS BIRCH'S SUPER ENDURO PROJECT

028 WORLD JNR MX AUSSIES ON TOP OF THE WORLD IN RUSSIA

082 CHESTERFIELD YAMAHA HOGES TRAVELS BACK TO 1993

12 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

106 SHERRI JO WILKINS SJ TRAVELS THE OLD ROAD OF BONES


WORLD LAUNCH I 2017 HUSKY ENDUROS

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WORDS / M TCH LEES PHOTOS // SEBAS ROMERO

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BLONDES ARE MORE FUN!

M in: he D C Sh ck and XPl r fo k so ked up he t res nd aun hed the b ke pe fe t y 1 A mo e l gh wei ht cha s s imp oved ha dl ng 2 New o k w th n-mou d gr phi s 3 Gr ene y we ust d n t ee in Oz

The Swedes have had enhancement surgery and Mitch Lees can’t take his eyes off them

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046 2017 HUSKY RANGE TRAIL TEST | 2016 SWM RS300R & RS500R 1

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Id ntity WORDS / M TCH LEES PHOTOS / OLLY MALONE

ARE THE 2016 SWMS JUST REBRANDED HUSQVARNAS? YES. AND HERE’S WHY WE THINK THAT’S A GOOD THING 60

Ma n: M t h w ee i s t ro gh a cr ek on t e 500 1 hat s 00 n t 310 2 he r ar e d s aken are f by KYB 3 l mb ng hi s on t e 00 s e sy 4 ta da d sk dp a e su fic d

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060 SWM ENDURO BIKES F RST RIDE I 2017 YAMAHA YZ250F

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WORDS / MAT BOYD HOTOS // M TCH LEES

Smooth Operator Y Z 2 5 0 F

OLD WAR-HORSE MAT BOYD SHRUGS OFF FATHERHOOD TO TEST THE LATEST YAMAHA

SUBSCRIBE TO ADB AND RECEIVE 12 ISSUES FOR $67.95! THAT'S MORE THAN 40% OFF RRP Log on to www.magshop.com.au/ australasian-dirt-bike, or call 136 116

T

he YZ250F has proven time and t me aga n hat it has what it ta es o be a cla s eading m chine Fea ur ng a r ver e-head eng ne the YZ-F powered Je emy M rt n o c nsecut ve AMA 250 Pro Mo oc oss Ch mp onships n 2014 and 2015 wh le another YZ250F r der Cooper Webb took cons cut ve 250

Ma n: No dust o wor y about ur ng our est 1 ran case ooks he same but has b en h at t ea ed f r added s r ngth 2 Mu fler a pea s to be unch nged 3 B ydy do sn t m nd the w de fe l ng

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Superc oss We t i les n 2015 and 2016 For 2017 he YZ250F benefits f om a ange of changes uch as a new cy inder he d wh ch inc ease power n he mid to high rev range and improve acce er ti n The YZ F has a so had sh f ing tweaks and a smoo her clu ch as we l as ha dl ng and suspens on refinements and improv d brak ng

www ad m g c m au OCTOBER 2015 |

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068 2017 YZ250F RETRO TEST I 1992 CHESTERF ELD YAMAHA YZ250

SLEEPING BEAUTY WORDS / LEE HOGAN PHOTOS // MAX PETERS

It s 1993 and Mo ocross Ed tor Lee Hogan s in ng up or Austral a n the MXdN on a ac ory bike D um oll p ease

T

he e was someth ng spe ial about he ea ly 1990s sc ne n Europe Wi h produc ion bike ru es opera ing in Amer ca it was Europe that was acing fac ory bikes wi h no holds bar ed Ever thing f om cra y swinga ms to f ames th t d dn t even resemble the produc ion ones we e b ing raced in the Wo ld Mo ocro s Champion hips W th seeming y imi less budge s and ela ed ules it appea ed that th re was no end o he crea i e eng neer ng One of the lead ng utfits was

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the Cheste field Yam ha Team/ Rina di w th Vic or an Gary Benn at he he m f amaha s ra ing effo ts Dur ng his per od he eam won two world championsh ps w th Amer can r ders Donny Schmidt (250cc) and Bobby Mo re 125 c) in 1992 and 1994 espec ive y The 1992 Che terfie d Yamaha YZ250 wo st oke was ahead of its t me Wi h Ohl ns suspen ion front and rear a hand-made w ngarm and f ame a ong wi h an impress ve powerp ant the bi e had all ar as co ered With the in form Schm dt pi ot ng he bi e th y were almost des ined o c pture the crown

Ma n: Hog n s id ng ge r f om he 1993 Mot cr ss des Na io s w s u fo tu ate y st l in t e w sh

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082 CHESTERFIELD TRAILRIDE I NORTH STAR

whee ie but most ust ave t e camera he r best lue stee

This s what 1400 r de s and th ir camps tes ook li e r m the a r

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the back end 118 TRICKS OF THE TRADE

JOY RIDE

158 HERITAGE

YOUR PRODUCT BIBLE

HEADING BACK TO OCTOBER, 1986

142 KIDS’ CORNER

162 ON ANY SUNDAY

!

SLAMMING THREE IN THE UTE

120 HOW 2 PRO

TALE OF THE TAPE

North Star Trail Ride is a weekend of epic trailriding that draws a crowd of over 1400 riders from all walks of ife

READERS’ HALL OF FAME

DESCENDING STEEP HILLS

122 LONG TERMERS GOODBYE TO OUR FLEET

130 HOW 2 BASIC CUTTING DOWN HANDLEBARS

132 READER’S RIDE JUSTIN ALI'S RM-Z250

134 USED BIKE 1983-1986 HONDA XR350R

136 FACTORY RIDE

Thanks o Grant ar i an r m Goond w ndi He ic pt rs f r ta ing us up f r a i d s- ye v ew of No th Sta Tr il R de

WO DS & PHOTOS / OLLY MALONE

138 PRODUCT EVALUATIONS

144 KIDS’ CONFIDENTIAL DIRT TRACK PRODIGY MAX WHALE

148 KIDS' CANNON SILENT NIGHT WITH YCF50E

172 BUYERS’ GUIDE

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A PREVIEW OF WHAT’S COMING IN ADB

1

HISTORY I LEGENDS OF MOTOCROSS

WORDS // LEE HOGAN P OTOS / ADB ARCH VES

HIS CRASH ON THE CHAD’APULT JUMP AT MILLVILLE COULD HAVE BEEN CAREER ENDING

MX Ed tor Lee Hogan picks the toughest racers of a l time

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s a spo ts fan it s hard not o adm re tough comp ti ors Whe her it s a ootba ler who ta es a big hit and eeps go ng or a Tour De F ance r der cove ed n gra el rash c imb ng he A ps In mo ocross the e a e coun le s ex mpl s of courage and when a pa ti ular r der is produc ng hese k nds of ffo ts eve y weekend

SAM WARREN TAKES A BIG HIT

they devel p an ura f ndest uctab l ty MX fans know that he on y way these s ars w ll give in is if heir body fa ls Mental f i u e s never an op ion Many of these great ide s ha e gr ced he pages f ADB but t me and d stan e means that many have not raced again t ach o her We have coured our mass ve arch ves to ome up wi h a l st of he oughest m tocr ssers of all t me

Ma n: R ed ceme ted h s n me nt he oug es re ord b oks w en he r m un ed a er t is ma s ve c a h t Mi l i e 1 G nt r r pp ng Pe si w th p de 2 G l pe so ifi d he n w re d f p os 3 e sk was men a y to gh as we l 4 G nt r eads G ll

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AUSTRALIA CHAD REED Number 22 is known mong his c mpet to s s one of the toughest on the p anet He s able to ride th ough pa n and o ercome nju ies that would put most iders on the sid lin s Re d fini hed second in the Wor d 250cc Mot cross Champ onsh p in 2001 or Kawa aki befo e c ossing the A lan ic where he won AMA Supe cross Champion h ps in 2002 250 c) 2004 Open) nd 2008 (Open) n 2009 he won the AMA ou d or 450cc t tle for Suzuki H s crash on the Chad apu t jump at M l vi le cou d have be n ca eer nding but he got back n and fin shed the ace in t ue bad ass ty e! STEPHEN GALL The con umm te p ofes ional G ll a most s ngle handedly l f ed he evel of m tocr ss n Aus ra ia He a ways aid the ight hings on he mic ophone and wo e co la ed po o ops wh le othe s wou d wear -sh rts or je seys but was as fie ce as hey ome on a mo orcyc e W th four Mr Moto ross crowns and five Aust al an ch mpi nships Ga l was ju t elen le s on a

154 WHERE TO RIDE OAKLEIGH TRIALS CLUB 100 | OCTOBER 20

MARK THESE ON YOUR CALENDAR

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090 NORTH STAR RIDE

152 HOGAN’S HOTSHOT

156 WHAT’S ON

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FIND YOUR NEXT TRUSTY STEED

177 WHAT’S NEXT?

o th S ar has a knack f r a t act ng some of the bigg st crowds of any organ sed t ai r de n Aus ra ia Last year s r de was ooking to ecl pse 2000 iders but heavy ra n put pa d to hat This year condi ions were look ng good no ra n n s ght Wi h the al -c ear f om organ ser Je f Ni on Ed tor Mit h Lees and I oaded he ADB HiLux w th ever th ng you need for a we kend of camping and id ng – three bik s three cases of inn es three k log ams of meat and headed nor h The dr ve rom Sydney is a b g one can t deny hat A l up it ook us about eight hou s The landsc pe s s unning though F om the nd of the M1 Pa ific Moto way to Sing eton is gr at or p aying Guess the ma e and model of hat bu nt out ar Mi ch got five f om fi e his au o-cogn t ve ki ls are far gr ater than mine Then it was on o he New Eng and Highway wh ch s not go ng o win an awa d f r oad of he ye r any ime soon We s opped o p ck up M tch s b other A ex f om his place of work in Upper Ho ton and hen t was only two hou s o Nor h Star The c oser we got he more dir bikes we aw We know fr m peaking to local hop owners and serv ce sta ion opera ors hat he urround ng owns see a huge ncrease in bus ness n he days bef re and af er No th S ar and they count on t every year

di tb ke n a per od known or tough r ders JEFF LE SK The Fly ng F eckle c me from Per h WA and in a ime of bru al bikes that la ked a lot of tod y s refinements Le sky brought a smo th techn cal and flu d id ng st le to the port He looked too sm oth o be tough but had de erminat on o match the wor d s fierce t thle es ike S efan Ever s Af er w nning nume ous Aus ra ian championsh ps and Mr Motoc oss i les Le sk went on to become he fir t Aus ra ian to win a wor d r und be ore finish ng unner up n the 1989 W rld 500 c M toc oss Champion h p for Honda ANTHONY GUNTER Gunter was fond y known by the MX commun ty as Grunt b cause of his tou hn ss Wh le being a n ce b oke off the bike he was an abso ute mach ne on it Gun er man ged to sco e hree Mr Mo ocro s c owns and hree Aust al an championsh ps in he 70s dur ng an ext eme y c mpet t ve peri d that eatur d Gall Leisk revor Wi l ams and Ray V ndenberg

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www dbmag om au OCTOBER 20 6

100 TOUGHEST RIDERS

WIL RUPRECHT SHERCO HATTAH WEAPON

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

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101


EDITORIAL | MITCH LEES

MOTOCROSS IN THE

OLYMPICS? Every four years the Olympic Games lure me into a false sense of hope. The media circus that follows the Games cleverly manipulates the public into thinking our tiny nation can bring home more gold in the pool than the US, Russia, China and the rest of the world put together. And every four years I lap it up, and every Olympics since Sydney in 2000 I’ve been let down. Now, like a scorned lover who’s been lied to too many times, I’m finally over it. The Olympic Games are dead to me. Even more so since learning the Australian swim team received $27 million in government funding to bring home three gold medals, four silver and three bronze. That’s $2.7 million a medal. Hearing this is even harder to take when you consider Motorcycling Australia’s funding was cut in the last 12 months. No one can doubt the effort and commitment from our athletes, so it looks like something has to change at a coaching/management level. But that’s not for me to say. So far my favourite Olympic moment was when some Russian diplomat disarmed a would-be thief, after the said criminal waved a gun in his face. In self-defence, the Russian then just shot him dead. It sounded like something out of a Bourne movie and very Russian-esk. I mean, can you imagine John Howard disarming a man and busting a cap in his arse? The bloke could hardly bowl! All this Olympic talk did get me thinking though. Why are there no motorsports in the

N THE COVER s we went to print Honda evealed details of the 2017 RF450R, and we were homping at the bit to ride! hoto // Honda Australia

EDITORIAL Editor: Mitch Lees

Olympics? The 1900 Summer Olympics were the last time we saw any form of motorsport at the Olympics, with both cars and bikes taking part. However, they were deemed unofficial sports and not recognised by the International Olympic Committee. With sports like skateboarding and surfing set to be introduced in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics I say it’s about time we got our turn. I mean how can they deem skating an Olympic sport and where on earth do they plan on finding consistent surf near Tokyo? It could be argued that the Motocross of Nations is the equivalent of the Olympics, which is a thought that probably has a lot of merit, but it does not attract the attention the Olympics do, and that kind of attention is invaluable to our sport. So, what would it take to get motocross or even road racing across the line? An enduro format would be tough to run at an event like the Olympics but motocross would be perfect. I’m not an event organiser so I’ve got no bloody idea, but I assume it would have to come from an organisation like FIM or a promoter like Feld Motor Sports or Youthstream. A sport like motocross at the Olympics would not only be good for the dirtbike industry, but the Olympics as well. I’m sure there are plenty of petrol heads who couldn’t care less about the Olympics right now, but throw a motorsport into the mix and you’ve got a whole new crowd walking through the gates.

Sub-Editor: Wolter Kuiper Staff Writer: Dylan Ruddy Digital Editor: Olly Malone Designer: Brendon Wise MX Editor: Lee Hogan Enduro Editor: Geoff Braico Technical Editor: Mat Boyd Race & Fitness Editor: Stephen Gall European Correspondent: Jono Bentman US Correspondent: Steve Matthes Founder: Geoff Eldridge ADB Honour Roll: Tony Kirby, Paul Broomfield CONTRIBUTORS Simon Cudby, Josh Evans, Ben Grabham, Warren Jack, JP Media, Paul Malin, Dean Mellor, Max Peters, Matt Phillips, Simon Makker, Chad Reed, Stephen Tuff, Danny Wilkinson, Jemma Wilson PRODUCTION Production Manager: Ian Scott Advertising Co-ordinator: Sourita Phommaseng ADVERTISING Group Sales Manager: Brian Vegh 0401 712 942 brian.vegh@adbmag.com.au National Sales Manager: Dale Johnson 0403 743 587 dale.johnson@adbmag.com.au Qld Sales Manager: Todd Anderson 0409 630 733 todd@motormedia.com.au  Sales Manager: Luke Finn 0423 665 384 luke.finn@adbmag.com.au MANAGEMENT BIDEFORD BLACK PTY LTD Publisher: Matt O’Malley 0419 901 863 matthew@amcn.com.au Publisher: Jim Flynn 0449 801 899 jim@bidefordblack.com.au Financial Controller: Stuart Harle accounts@bidefordblack.com.au Accounts Assistants: Fiona Trickett and Eva English CONTACT ADB

Australasian Dirt Bike A: P.O. Box 2094, Oakleigh, Vic 3166 P: 0433 556 623 E: adbmag@adbmag.com.au ISSN: 1320-2103 SUBSCRIPTIONS* www.magshop.com.au/australasian-dirt-bike E: magshop@magshop.com.au Mail: Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney, NSW 2001 P: 136 116 (8am to 6pm EST Mon-Fri)

Motocross in the Olympics would mean another chance at bringing home a Medal for Australia

Published by Bideford Black Pty Ltd ABN 26 602 607 045, PO Box 20154, World Square, NSW 2002. The trademark Australasian Dirt Bike (ADB) is the property of Bideford Black Pty Ltd and is used under licence © 2016 All rights reserved. Printed by Blue Star Web, Unit 1, 83 Derby Street, Silverwater, NSW 2128. Material contained in ADB is protected under the Commonwealth Copyright Act 1968 and may not be reproduced in part or whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch, 54 Park St, Sydney, Ph: (02) 9282 8777. *$9.50 maximum and recommended retail price only. 

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Rider: Ken Roczen

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THE GOOD OIL | HOT OFF THE PRESS

HONDA GOES BALLISTIC ON CRF450R The biggest changes in 8 years!

TITANIUM TANK

NEW FRAME

SHORTY MUFFLERS

NEW SUBFRAME

LOWER CENTRE OF MASS

NEW ENGINE LIGHTER SWINGARM

16 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


log on to www.adbmag.com.au for all the latest news and updates

he Honda CRF450R has receiveed its first major overrhaaul in eight yearss th t e 2017 verssion featuring a new engine, fram me, suspen nsion and optional al electric start. Power has been iincreased by 11 per cent and d, according n to Hon nda, there’s stro ger tor st o e ri rightt through the rev rangg e seve ration alloy ra b be beam fram rreworked geometry, a lo r tre of mass and is fitt ith it entionallysprung Sh f n s spension, p in place p ooff la r s KYB r’ B ai air foork. Kerb weigh ght is unchangged e at 110 0.6 des e pite the a it n of a titta um fu f e tank to t help lower the centre of mass.

Honda Ausstralia brand and otorsports manager m Glyn n Gri fi hs spoke with ADB B directly a t y e ut t new mo l, w to h our shores late November. hit “ “With the arrivval of the new C CRF450R we want to stay number one in n the fo -stroke m motocross maarke ,” he said. “In 2015 w we weree the numb ber o four-strok M brand at 29 one 9 per cent, we w ld l like continue that d re for 2016/2017. O sale expectation foorr the 0 CRF450R would w m e than 1000 un unit .” les wo le w n’ n t get an early boost f om the latest model running in fr the Australian Supercross Championship, with race teams

r ed d to run the exxis e becausse of the latee arrival of th he 2017 model. Unfortunately, rtunately we w won’t ssee the CRF450RX – the crosss ccountry racing version, kee its way to Australia. “Itt nd the GN NCC [Grand National o Country] series in the US as such, does d not have lights, rn or otheer ADR gear,” Griffitths said. “It does have differeent suspen nsi , standard eleectric start, ssides e tand and different size (18-inch) rear wheeel. However, it was not m de to meet oour ADR rules a , if e import e to have recreational registration, which is only good for Victoria and Tasmania and which you can do with a CRF450R.”

110.6KG KERB WEIGHT

SHOWA 49MM FORK

TANK A titanium fuel tank replaces the plastic one and is 513g lighter.

FORK Coil spring front end bumps up weight but means consistent compression compared with air.

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

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THE GOOD OIL | HOT OFF THE PRESS

NOTABLE UPGRADES ENGINE “Achieving the holeshot without fail” was Honda’s goal. It’s obvious the engine was a primary focus of the engineers and looking at the figures they have delivered in spades. An 11 per cent increase in overall power and more torque than last year’s bike throughout the entire rev range – except just off idle, where the existing engine has the slightest advantage. The 0-10 metre start time has been reduced from 1.62sec to 1.53. That won’t mean much to amateur riders who struggle to nail consistent starts, but for an expert this can be the difference between a holeshot and being squeezed into the first corner mid-pack. Honda has achieved the increase through redesigning the CRF450R’s engine. Valve lift has been increased. New finger-follower rocker arms in the Unicam engine allow an increase in valve lift to better deliver fuel-air mixture, expel gasses and improve maximum revs. Combined with a new, straighter intake port that allows the mixture to flow unobstructed into the combustion chamber, Honda has increased the compression ratio from 12.5:1 to 13.5:1, enhancing the power across the rev range. Unlike the old Honda oil system which utilises seperate gearbox and engine oil, a new scavenging system distributes oil throughout the engine more efficiently. The system uses discharged oil to lubricate the clutch and transmission, which has reduced the weight of the oil system and the transmission oil volume. The twin mufflers have been retained but are now shorter and mounted further forward, closer to the motorcycle’s centre of mass. The standard engine map options are Standard, Smooth and Aggressive.

“ACHIEVING THE HOLESHOT WITHOUT FAIL” WAS THE GOAL SET BY HONDA

POWER INCREASE 11% overall power boost

SUSPENSION Honda has gone back to a “home-brand” Showa USD fork in place of the PSF2 air suspension produced by KYB, which is owned by Yamaha. With steel springs instead of air and the tube diameter up by 1mm the Showa fork is partly responsible for the bike not losing any weight overall despite drops in the engine and frame. “From our information, the design team liked the spring fork as a total package for the 2017 CRF450R,” Griffiths said. The shock is a new Showa unit bolted to a Prolink system (above).

18 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


log on to www.adbmag.com for all the latest news and updates

2017 HONDA CRF450R ENGINE Type Four-valve, single-cam Displacement 449cc Bore and stroke 96.0mm x 62.1mm Cooling Liquid Compression ratio 13.5:1 Fuel metering Keihin injection Tank capacity 6.3L Transmission Five-speed, constant mesh Clutch Wet, multi-plate, cable DIMENSIONS Wheelbase 1482mm Seat height 960mm Ground clearance 328mm Fuel capacity 6.3L Weight (wet) 110.6kg SUSPENSION Front Showa 49mm spring (305mm travel) Rear Showa monoshock BRAKES Front 260mm hydraulic wave Rear 240mm hydraulic wave RUNNING GEAR Handlebar Renthal Front tyre Dunlop MX3s 80/100-21 Rear tyre Dunlop MX3s 120/80-19 PRICE & CONTACTS RRP TBC Distributor Honda Australia Phone no 1300 146 632 Warranty NA

FRESH OUT

T SUBFRAME Extruded subframe is 20 per cent lighter.

FRAME Understanding that more power needs a more capable chassis, Honda has redesigned the CRF450R’s frame to lower the centre of mass and improve traction by increasing load on the rear tyre. Increased grip has been achieved by lowering the centre of mass to reduce front-end lift. This allows the rider to get more weight over the

rear tyre for starts without the front pawing the sky. The wheelbase has been reduced by 12mm. The frame weight has been reduced by 280g. The subframe is now extrusion moulded rather than fabricated and is 20 per cent lighter. The titanium tank is 513g lighter than 2016’s plastic one. It sits lower in the motorcycle to further lower the centre of mass.

he latest offering from French motor le manufacturer Sherco was revealed late July and with detailed information only made available recently we can see in detail what changes have been made for the 2017 two-stroke and four-stroke enduro range. The 250SE-R and 300SE-R two-strokes have new cylinder heads with reinforced mounting support. The 250SE-R also has a new combustion chamber for a more linear power delivery. These models also have a new balance crankshaft to reduce vibration, similar to KTM’s. A new V Force 4 reed block claims to increase low speed power and longer reed life while new carburettor settings aim to smooth the power delivery. The 250SER has a new piston for better efficiency and longer life. Changes to the 250SEF-R and 300SEF-R include new transmission gears, piston and fuel pump. The design of the 450SEF-R cylinder head has been modified for improved durability, reduced weight and simplified assembly. The entire range has a new look with fresh plastics and graphics. New larger capacity fuel tanks give the bikes more range. The 250cc and 300cc two-stroke have gone from 9.5-litres to 10.4-litres. The 250cc, 300cc and 450cc four-stoke models have gone from 8.5 litres to 9.7 litres. The frame geometry has been modified with the aim of providing better grip, and better steering. The rear suspension linkage

has been modified. The rear wheel e is nger and a new l d adjustment ring is fitted to the shock for easier adjustments. Factory dual-colour and dual compound grips are now fitted as standard equipment. Sherco as a brand is growing throughout the world. Sherco is now represented in 65 countries with over 850 dealers. In Australia the dealer network is steadily growing and adjusting it to suit the growing demands from riders who are drawn to Sherco. 2016 has been a great year for the French manufacturer with the success of Australia’s own Matthew Phillips dominating the Enduro World Championship on a Sherco 300SEF-R. Phillips is currently winning the E2 class and leads the GP class for the overall with just one weekend of racing left September 10/11. Locally, the Motul Pirelli Sherco Factory Team is proving quite successful with Wil Ruprecht winning the Australian Off-Road Championship (AORC) Under-19 class points chase with just two rounds remaining.

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

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THE GOOD OIL | HOT OFF THE PRESS

MOSS BROS TO FIGHT DRUG CHARGES Matt and Jake Moss will fight drug charges laid by the Australian Sports Anti-doping Authority (ASADA), they have announced separately on social media. In Jake’s statement, the former National Pump Monster Energy Kawasaki rider said he had allegedly tested positive to Ostarine. “I do not accept the results of the test and I am in the process of challenging those results through the appropriate processes,” Jake said in his statement released last month. Matt did not specify the drug he allegedly tested positive to. He told ADB that he was unable to comment because of the legal proceedings. “I will be fighting the charges and hope to be back racing as soon as I can. I want to race supercross this year.” The charges arise from

NO COMMENT The Moss brother’s lawyer, Angelo Venardos told ADB they could not comment further. “While Matt and Jake would like the opportunity to get their side of the story out there, it would be inappropriate at this stage.” We expect to hear exclusively from Matt and Jake in the near future – stay tuned.

random urine tests conducted on four riders at the MX Nationals round at Murray Bridge in SA. In a statement, Motorcycling Australia said: “MA can confirm that samples provided by both Jake Moss and Matt Moss have tested positive for Ostarine, a substance prohibited for use in sport by the World Anti-Doping Agency. “Both Jake and Matt Moss are now under investigation by ASADA, and have been provisionally suspended by Motorcycling Australia from any

activity in their sport until the matter is resolved as per ASADA’s guidelines. The other two riders tested at the same time, Dean Ferris and Nathan Crawford, had no adverse analytical findings.” Ostarine was developed to prevent and treat muscle wasting, as well as osteoporosis. It is referred to as a “performance enhancer” and is claimed to improve an individual’s endurance levels.

SPORTS CORNER ROCZEN, WEBB HOME RCH Racing Suzuki’s Ken Roczen has clinched the AMA Pro Motocross 450cc title with one round to go. Roczen increased his lead to 76 points over Kawasaki’s Eli Tomac. Yamaha’s Cooper Webb secured the 250cc championship at Budds Creek, Maryland, despite a 6-3 finish.

TRIALS TITLE The Australian Trials Championship is set for 24-25 September in Stanthorpe, Qld. The event will be on a private property. Riders can enter via www.nominate.com.au. Spectators can attend for a gold coin donation. The event is open to juniors, veterans, women, sidecars, classic and post-classic machines and camping will be available.

RAVE IN CHINA

IN THE SPOTLIGHT ADB: Are you denying the allegations? Brad Smith: Yes, we deny the allegations and will lodge our Evidence of Defense in court. ADB: What are the ramifications if found guilty? BS: I’m not allowed to comment or speculate on this. Our focus is on running the business and keeping our 35 employees and 50 dealerships across the country. ADB: What specific model are they talking about? BS: Allegedly 35 to 85 Café-Racers. ADB: Are owners of the allegedly rebirthed bikes at risk of losing them? BS: No consumer is affected and we would not let a consumer be affected. We are a family business with family-business values. We are an emerging brand competing against much larger competitors. We need our customers to love us, that’s how we have and will continue grow. ADB: Does this effect braaap or BS? BS: The allegations are against Brad Smith personally

BRAD SMITH ACCUSED OF REBIRTHING BIKES Braaap Motorcycles founder and chief executive Brad Smith has been accused by NSW Police of rebirthing bikes. The mainstream media have made a number of allegations which Smith has told ADB are simply not true. So here is what we know: Brad Smith has been accused of rebirthing between 35 and 85 motorcycles. While braaap Motorcycles plays some part in the case, all the charges are against Smith. According to the Crimes Act, rebirthing is the stripping of vehicle identification. Braaap is open for business as normal, delivering, registering and insuring motorcycles as usual. We sat down with Brad to talk about the allegations and the ramifications this might have on him and his business. “We can lodge our Evidence of Defense at the end of October,” he said. “We trust in the legal system

20 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

and will go through the process of clearing our name, so we won’t know anything more than you do until that date. “Until then it’s business as usual. It is intimidating and not something we ever expected to have to deal with when we started braaap 12 years ago. “I am so grateful to all the support we have received, its been awesome and we appreciate it.” The investigation involves a small number of braaap motorcycles, about 35-85 out of a total of 2000 motorcycles the company has sold this year. Smith represented Tasmania in the Young Australian of the Year awards in 2010, before being crowned Australian Young Entrepreneur of the year and International Young Entrepreneur of the year runner up in 2010 also. He is also a member of the advisory board to the Reserve Bank of Australia, of which he represents small business.

Thomas Ravenhorst has won the China International Motocross Invitational Cup. The 21-year-old privateer was fastest qualifier in MX2 before finishing second behind fellow Aussie Cooper Pozniak In Race One and first in Race Two, which gave him the overall.

BROOK SWEEPS Jarred Brook has cashed in on his US experience by winning three senior titles at the Australian Dirt Track championships at Barleigh Ranch, NSW. He took the Australian Pro 250, Under 19 and MX Open categories aboard his pair of KTMs. The achievement comes after Brook won three AMA Grand Championships and the AMA Dirt Track Horizon Award while touring the US in July.

JERRY NELSON INJURED Jessy Nelson is reported to have limited feeling from the waist down after crashing heavily at the AMA Pro Motocross round in Unadilla, New York. The 250cc rider went down hard in a tricky section and was slammed in the back by his KTM. Nelson was transported to hospital in Cooperstown and was under close watch.


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HAHN HEADS DOWN UNDER American supercrosser Wil Hahn is contesting the Australian Supercross Championship kicking off in Jimboomba, Qld, on 17 September. The 2013 American Eastern Regional 250 Supercross Champion, who competes for Kawasaki in the US, will ride for the National Pump Monster Energy Kawasaki Team alongside team regular Kade Mosig. “I’m excited to compete at new venues in another part of the world,” Hahn said. “I’ve been over to a few places in

PHILLIPS’ NOT IN ISDE Tasmanian Matt Phillips is skipping the International Six Days Enduro to have laser eye surgery. The Sherco rider is going under the knife to correct his vision after the last round of the Enduro World Championship and will not recover in time for the ISDE in Spain in October. There might be another reason, with Phillips suggesting he’s not interested after last year’s widespread cheating by other Senior Trophy teams. Phillips has been a regular competitor since making his debut at the 2011 ISDE in Finland, where he won a special stage on the first day. Since then he has been one of the top runners at every ISDE and has helped the Senior team achieve some impressive results, including second in 2012, fourth in 2013, sixth in 2014 and first last year.

Australia before and I’m really looking forward to combining my career with the travel and experience of a new country. “I jumped at the opportunity to ride with the National Pump Monster Energy Kawasaki Racing Team when Troy [Carroll] gave me a call and, honestly, I’m just thankful to have this chance of racing in the full series with the support of Kawasaki. It’s a really cool deal. “To be starting the series at Jimboomba and then be part of it all the way through to the Aus-X Open, it’s special for me.

This year’s team is Daniel Milner, Josh Strang, Daniel Sanders and Lachlan Stanford. Phillips plans to compete in the Australian Four-Day Enduro and Wildwood Rock Extreme in November and is looking forward to returning to Tasmania to catch up with family and friends after nine and a half months on the road in Europe.

22 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

There will be American guys on the line with me, as well as the top Australians, so the level of racing will be really high. “I will do most of my preparation here in the US, probably until the first week of September, and then I will head over to Australia and stay there the whole time. That allows me to combine my base settings with the great KX450F of the National Pump Monster Energy Kawasaki Racing Team.” Team manager Carroll said Hahn would make a positive addition. “We are very pleased to have Wil join National Pump Monster Energy Kawasaki Racing Team for the full Australian Supercross Championship season and know that he will be a great asset to the team. “From Jimboomba all the way through to the AUS-X Open, Wil will be a professional addition to the series and we look forward to working with him.”

REGISTRATIONS OPEN

The Snowy Ride is taking registrations for the 2016 event scheduled for Saturday, 5 November. Registration is $60 per rider and $60 per pillion. That includes an information pack, three-day NSW Parks sticker for your bike and an entry to a raffle for two Hondas. First prize is an Africa Twin, while the runner up wins a CB500X. The Snowy Ride runs in the Alpine region of NSW and has helped raise more than $6 million for the Steven Walter Children’s Cancer Foundation, a non-profit organisation funding cancer research. The event is a checkpoint-style ride. There is no starting location, with riders needing to pass through a number of checkpoints before finishing at Thredbo. To be eligible for the minor prize you must pass through three of the nine checkpoints. If you do not wish to compete you can take part in a mass ride from Bullocks Flat to Thredbo. Riders travel in convoy for the 16km to Thredbo.

I

STRY E ER

• Glen H aceway will host next year’s Motocross of Nations for the first time in the event’s 70-year history. It’s the first trip to the US since 2010 when Lakewood, Colorado, played host. • Max Nagl has extended his deal with Husqvarna to next year’s MXGP World Championship. The deal will see the German rider race a third consecutive season with Husqvarna Factory Racing. • The FIM has named France as the host for the 2017 ISDE with Brive-laGaillarde to be the location. The region has had a long association with enduro, having hosted rounds of the Enduro World Championship in Servières-leChâteau in 1994 and Uzerche in 2008, plus multiple European Enduro Championship rounds and the ISDE once already, in 2001. • Our ISDE Senior Trophy team has been awarded its long-awaited trophy at Rd 9/10 of the AORC. After an appeal, the win was awarded to the French, but that was subsequently overturned and the trophy is now Down Under. • Husqvarna has renewed its contract with extreme enduro ace Graham Jarvis for two years. The deal comes as no surprise given Jarvis’ domination this season, when he won Erzberg and Romanics back-to-back. • Jeffrey Herlings will continue to ride for KTM through the 2020 season. His new deal will see the Dutch rider jump up to MXGP next year, much to the relief of everyone in MX2.

To register for the Snowy Ride visit www.snowyride.org.au


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THE GOOD OIL | HOT OFF THE PRESS

TOWNLEY QUITS H Former MX2 World Champion Ben Townley has confirmed he is done with professional racing after a comeback season plagued with bad luck and injury. During a practice session at Mantova in Italy following the MXGP of Lombardia, Townley crashed and slammed into the handlebar of his Suzuki, lacerating his bowl. Following the injury the Kiwi stepped into a managerial role in Team Suzuki World MXGP team for the Czech and Belgium rounds of the title before heading home. “For me it was very hard to stand there at that podium today [at the Belgian MXGP

won by teammate Kevin Stribos], knowing I was never going to experience this ever again,” he told ADB in an exclusive interview. “I was really happy for Kevin and my team but, for me personally, standing

on the podium, that’s the moment that you sacrifice everything for. “I guess when you’re a racer you’re in a little bubble and you don’t really see it but as soon as you stop racing and you’re involved at this level [management], the past couple of weekends has been a real eye opener and I have enjoyed it.” Townley plans to stay in New Zealand, where he has established a partnership in a small distribution company with Troy Lee Designs. His family is his focus but he would love to see an MXGP round there. Look out for an in-depth interview in next issue.

AUSSIE ATTACK

REED AND WEBB Our very own Chad Reed and Cooper Webb will team up in a Yamaha Factory Racing team for the US supercross and motocross seasons. Webb will make his debut in the 450 class in both motocross and supercross while Reed will stick to supercross. Earlier in the year, Webb secured his second consecutive Western Region 250SX Championship and was leading the 250 class in the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship as we went to press. “I’m really excited to be joining the Yamaha Factory Racing team,” Webb said. “It’s a dream come true for me, especially to be able to stay with the brand where I started my professional career. Also, it’s going to be great to team up with Chad. “I met him a long time ago and, when I was growing up, he was always my favourite rider. So, to be teammates with a legend is awesome. It’s going to help me

tremendously to learn from him, and I can’t think of a better teammate to have as I move up to 450s full-time.” Reed had mixed results in his return to Yamaha in this year’s AMA Supercross Championship, including back-to-back seconds at rounds two and three before finishing fifth overall. “I’m excited to get back to work with the Yamaha guys,” Reed said. “This year was a great learning and rebuilding phase for me and for Yamaha going racing as a factory team again. We learned the bike and found our strengths and weaknesses. It’s a huge positive that we are able to use this time wisely to prepare for 2017, and the team and I are motivated to continue building. “I think Cooper brings a new level of energy to the team. Youth has that natural way of upping the enthusiasm. I like that energy, and I’m looking forward to having him as my teammate.”

24 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

The Australian Motocross of Nations team of Kirk Gibbs, Dean Ferris and Jed Beaton are set to take on the world’s best in Italy. It will be the first MXoN gig for Gibbs and Beaton but the third for Ferris, who fronted the starter in 2013 and 2015. Ferris has a solid reputation on the international stage, with a second overall at the 2013 MXoN in MX2, plus three race wins in that year’s world MX2 title. MXoN veteran Gary Benn will again be the manager and has confidence in the team. “We’re very happy with the team selected to represent Australia at this year’s MX of Nations. “Obviously Dean has had a lot of experience in Europe and representing his country, and both of the other boys are at the top of their game at the moment so they’re all very deserving of their selection,” Benn said. “…both Kirk and Dean have raced MXGPs so we feel that we have a very strong team for this year’s MXoN. The MXoN is always a different race because it’s a team event and you are forced to drop one of your worst results, so you need consistency – there’s not a lot of room for error. The way all three of the boys are riding at the moment, we’re confident we can achieve a positive result.” Former MXoN competitor Michael Byrne will support the team. As an experienced MXoN competitor he will contribute invaluable experience. The MXoN is slated for 24-25 September in Maggiora.

DUNCAN’S BIG RETURN

New Zealand's Courtney Duncan has returned to her winning ways, dominating round six of the Women’s Motocross World Championship. The event marked Duncan’s first race in two months after she hit a trackside photographer in Germany.

STRANG FULL GAS

Inverell’s Josh Strang claimed his third overall of the US Sprint Enduro championship at the Rock Crusher Farm Enduro. The Husqvarna rider crushed his competition, winning five of the six Special Tests. Strang sits second in the points with one round remaining.

ORANGE CRUSH

KTM leads all three senior classes into the final weekend of the Australian Off-Road Championship. Daniel Sanders extended his lead with back-to-back wins at rounds nine and 10 in Monkerai, NSW. Sanders leads E3 and holds a 34-point lead in the overall standings from E2 leader Tye Simmonds. Yamaha’s Chris Hollis is third overall while KTM’s Jack Simpson is leading E1 in his debut season. The final rounds are in Penshurst, Vic, on 10-11 September.

PRICE RACES BAJA TRUCK

Toby Price will race the Baja 1000. The five-time Finke Desert Race champion will race with Jesse Jones for the Geiser Brothers team in the Trophy Truck division after showing his speed on four wheels at Finke. Price placed second overall in a Geiser truck at Finke in the auto class and won the bike division. The KTM rider will make his Baja debut on 16 November.


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PRIZEMONEY BREAKDOWN RHYTHM SX1 First $20,000 Second $5000 Third $3000 Fourth $2000 Fifth $700

RHYTHM SX2 First $2500 Second $1500 Third $1000 Fourth $700 Fifth $400

SUPERCROSS SX1 First $10,000 Second $4000 Third $3000 Fourth $2000 Fifth $1500

RIVERS OF GOLD AT RHYTHM X Rhythm X has just released the breakdown of the $80,000 purse it is using to lure the best in Australia to battle it out at Tasmania’s Symmons Plains Raceway. With riders able to compete in both the rhythm comp and supercross on 19 November it means the stars have two chances to take home serious cash. The winner of the 450cc rhythm competition will take home a massive $20,000 and if they are in tune with the supercross track on the day they could pocket a further $10,000. With the gold running to 16th place in rhythm and 20th in supercross it means all riders can get excited. Top Australian riders have already committed to racing Rhythm X, with current Australian 26 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

Supercross Champion Dan Reardon (Yamaha) set to line up for both disciplines. Alongside him in the gate will be Kade Mosig (Kawasaki), Motocross of Nations team member Dean Ferris (Yamaha) and Honda rider Geran Stapleton. More top riders are sure to jump on board for what will be the largest dirt event purse of the year. “We really wanted to create this event for the riders, focusing on amazing tracks and great prize money,” Rhythm X directors Richard Stevenson and Matt Carey said. “It’s a great chance for riders at the end of the season to come down to beautiful Tasmania to race hard, enjoy the weekend and take home a great pay cheque.” In addition to the rhythm and

supercross action, organisers have included further entertainment to pack out the program for spectators of all ages. First up is a trials demonstration course that will be designed and set up by top Australian trials rider Chris Bayles. The obstacles will be like nothing seen before and if you enjoy watching the skills of these guys negotiate and control a bike then this will be exciting. If carnage is your scene then you will want to check out the endurocross demo course with its unique mountain peak. Fresh from laser eye surgery, Enduro World Championship rider Matt Phillips will be helping the Rhythm X team with the course to make sure it delivers thrills and spills all day.

SUPERCROSS SX2 First $2000 Second $1000 Third $900 Fourth $800 Fifth $700 Full riders' purse breakdown down to 20th available on rhythmxaction.com

Are you a rev head? Do you love loud, out-of-control contraptions? Then the tractor pull is what you are looking for. Rhythm X will have these fire-breathing machines on display and racing for the crowd and it’s something that must be seen to be believed. Love the classics? A great selection of dirtbikes from the ages will be on display, with a few vintage collections being brought out of garages for the crowd to admire and salivate over. The event is shaping up to be a spectacle and something that all dirtbike fans need to see to believe. You can reserve your spot in Tassie now, with tickets and information available at www. rhythmxaction.com.


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AUSSIES CONQUER THE WORLD Australia was the top team at the World Junior Motocross Championships, with solid performances from all riders Australia finished on top at the World Junior Motocross Championships in Olyonok, Russia. Our riders claimed the Trophy of Nations, edging out the host country and the Netherlands. It was the second time Australia has won the Trophy of Nations, the first being in 2009 at Taupo, New Zealand. In the 125cc class, Riley Dukes (Husqvarna) and Caleb Grothues (KTM) both finished top five, while Yamaha’s Cody Dyce finished eighth overall in his 28 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

WJMX debut. After qualifying third, Grothues took fourth in Race One with Dukes close behind and Dyce in tenth. Dukes swapped spots with Grothues in Race Two, with the Aussies putting in a better showing than the first race. Their lap times were closer to the pace of the top three as they got used to the conditions. Dyce also improved, finishing seventh. Belgium’s Jago Geerts was the victor in the race and took the overall with a 2-1 scorecard. Grothues’ fifth overall was

quite remarkable given the Queenslander’s recent bad luck. The 2012 65cc World Champion had two fingers amputated last year following a freak accident while racing in Europe. Fellow Aussies Dante Hyam (KTM) and Cody Chittick (KTM) featured in the 85cc class, with Hyam finishing fifth overall. There was no such luck for Chittick, who finished back in 26th overall. Hyam finished the two motos with a 6-6 result, while Chittick could only manage a 23-24.


GROTHUESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FIFTH PLACE OVERALL WAS QUITE REMARKABLE GIVEN THE QUEENSLANDERS JOURNEY

TROPHY OF NATIONS

Main: Despite his missing fingers, Caleb Grothues tears it up on Soviet soil Top left: The Aussie team was sizeable

The team prize takes into account the best result by each country in each class. In our case Dante Hyam's 85cc result and Riley Dukes' 125cc placings were enough to secure the trophy for Australia.

www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2016

| 29


THE GOOD OIL | HOT OFF THE PRESS Rene Hofer of Austria dominated the 85cc class, going 1-1. Australia did not compete in the 65cc class, which no longer carries world championship status. The class now only carries a European Open Cup title. The last 65cc world champion was Australia’s Jett Lawrence, who won in 2014. Lawrence was named to compete in this year’s 85cc class but was forced to withdraw. The 65cc victory went to Russian rider Kirill Vorobyev, who went 1-1. While there were no individual podiums for the Aussies, the consistency of Hyam (fifth) and Dukes (fourth) was enough to secure our team victory by just one point from the locals. With the world championships hitting Horsham, Vic in 2018, there will surely be a strong focus on our junior riders over the next two years. First step will be the Australian Junior Motocross Championships in Renmark, SA from 24 September to 1 October.

1

GLENN MACDONALD, TEAM MANAGER RILEY DUKES: “Riley went really, really well. He had a good lead up to the championship this year. He’s been very healthy and very fit.”

CALEB GROTHUES: “Caleb was in with a chance of being one of the highest Australian finishes, but he struggled with his starts a little bit. In practice he was within three seconds of the fast guys, but his starts hampered him a little in the races. With his injury though, it’s a pretty big effort.”

CODY DYCE:

THE LAST 65CC WORLD CHAMPION WAS AUSTRALIA’S JETT LAWRENCE WHO WON THE TITLE IN 2014

“We had some initial problems with Cody’s bike. It was one of David Philippaerts’ team bikes. Initially he just couldn’t run with the pack, which was quite unusual, given his results so far this year. We found that one of the power valves was broken so we had to hunt around for some parts and we got it up and running. Realistically, eighth is pretty good considering the level of competition.”

DANTE HYAM: Main: Dante Hyam holding it flat 1. Hyam, Dukes and MacDonald on the Trophy of Nations podium

THE LAST TIME Australia's first Trophy of Nations came in 2009 in Taupo, New Zealand. Jay Wilson won the 85cc title while Tye Simmonds placed second in 125 behind Eli Tomac. Dylan Long finished third in the 85cc class. You may have heard of them.

“Dante was a bit of an unknown to me in the lead up. He hadn’t competed in any of the junior championships domestically for two years. But watching him ride in the free practice, I noticed he is a very tall guy for his age, but most importantly he is super fit. He rode his own race and he rode smart and consistent. He was really good.”

CODY CHITTICK: “Cody is only 13 so he waas probably one of the younger guys in that capacity bracket [85cc]. He’s the current Australian 65cc Champion, but I think the heat in Russia really bothered him. I think he learnt a lot and I think that his results probably didn’t reflect his potential.”

THE CONDITIONS: "The biggest concern we had was that it was summer in Russia and we had some 40-degree days in the lead up. On the practice day we had something like 32-33 with 90% humidity. I think initially the boys struggled a bit, coming from cooler weather this time of year in Australia. The track was very steep and hilly with a very hardpack base. It was probably like nothing we’ve seen in Australia.”

30 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


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LETTERS

Write to us at: ADB Letters, PO Box 2094, Oakleii , c 31 om.au Email: adbmag@adb

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LETTER OF THE MONTH GOTCHA! Not sure if I’ve missed something but I was curious why Stephen ‘Tuffy’ Tuff would ride a Sherco at Finke when he is the Australian brand manager for SWM motorcycles. I quite like the look and price of the SWM enduros and would like to have seen how they go in a top desert race like Finke. All that aside, I was lucky to be on a fuel stop for the Port Augusta/ Whyalla boys at the 80km mark

TIME FOR AN UPGRADE I’ve been riding my Yamaha WR450F for about two years and it’s a great trailbike. I love the snappy throttle response and the power everywhere I ride. But the bike is very heavy leaning through corners and lifting it from ruts takes a lot of effort. I’m 16 but short for my age. I’m a decent rider and I was wondering about getting a YZ450F or YZ450FX. I read quite a lot about the YZ450Fs. I’ve read that on trailrides they can have too much power through tight sections but I like the power of 450s. The FX seems like it would be better suited for an experienced trailrider. What would you recommend? Hamish Williamson The Yamaha WR450F is a big, powerful bike, no doubt about that! 34 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

down to Finke and we had the time of our lives. Fantastic action all weekend, right through to the presentation night in Alice where I was lucky enough to shake Toby Price’s hand and congratulate him briefly for his efforts. He is a true gentleman who looks you straight in the eye and considering he must have had an excessive number of similar moments during the night, it’s a credit to his

We’ve got one on the ADB long-term test fleet at the moment and it’s a handful on singletrack but a lot of fun in the open stuff. The new WR450F is based on the YZ450F and it has an aggressive engine, the most aggressive on the market, and much more so than a previous generation WR450F like yours. It can, of course, be tamed down a little with the Yamaha Power Tuner. You mentioned the YZ450F or FX as a trailbike? The YZ450F is a lot of bike for the bush, especially if you’re a smaller bloke. It’ll wear you out faster and you might struggle, especially on long, difficult rides. The YZ450FX is a great enduro race bike and feels lighter to steer, but the WR450F is registerable and not as aggressive or stiff as the YZ450FX. If you can, take a 250F enduro bike and a two-stroke enduro bike for a test ride and see for yourself. You could be faster on a smaller, less powerful bike and you’ll have more fun.

tolerance for the public and down to earth nature. Very much hoping I’m there again next year. Andrew Brereton You are right, Tuffy was Sherco mounted at Finke and he is the SWM brand manager but his employer, Mojo Motorcycles in Melbourne, distributes both Sherco and SWM, so Tuffy covers both. We gave him a buzz to let him explain his allegiances: “I was officially on leave from work while

TYPICAL AUSSIES This was taken in Romania last year. Jarvis was a champ, saying “Typical Australians”. Justin Paterson

WHAT TO DO? I’m a long-term reader and love the mag! I bought a new WR450F in 2005. Over the years I have toyed with the idea of upgrading but, at the end of the day, can’t. This old steed has never let me down, even when drowned in the Glasshouse Mountains in a creek crossing

I was at Finke. While I do work for Mojo Motorcycles, who import both Sherco and SWM, the SWM RS300R and RS500R were not available at the time of the event. Secondly, I love the Sherco 300SEF-R and Powerhouse Motorcycles in Pakenham generously offered to loan me a bike to use at Finke so I gratefully accepted. They are a very passionate Sherco dealership that plugged a hole I couldn’t afford to fill (new bike).”

that was above the handlebar. Now that there are a few years on her, the clutch cable feels like it has rusted in the disengaged position, even after a thorough clean of the cable. My question is, are the aftermarket hydraulic clutches (that claim to be 30% lighter than a cable system) worth $400? And will it feel anything like a European hydraulic clutch? I don’t know anyone who has done this mod so I only have my mates’ European bikes to try. Peter Anderson Technical Editor Mat Boyd is a firm believer in hydraulic clutch kits like the ones by Magura that Husqvarna uses. Boydy installed a Magura kit on his Honda CRF450R long-term test bike in 2013 with good results. If you’re having trouble with your clutch cable then it could be worth going for an aftermarket hydraulic clutch.


INSTAGIRNAGMS RAMBL

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BMETTY24 Hi everyone. Letting you all know I am doing ok, and have been released out of hospital today after my crash during Moto 2 at Rd.9 Deschamult of @ cmrcmx I have 2 thumbs up, not because I feel good but because things are not too bad considering the crash. I have broken the lower eye socket bone and cheekbone in my face, have a really swollen arm and some aches and pains but that is it.  Absolutely bummed about the crash, made a bad rut decision which had a kicker, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it and endoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hard. 

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MXTVSHOW Not a bad day at the ofďŹ ce.@ryandungey @ aldon104

MISSJESSGARDINER Hard day in the ofďŹ ce today. Started off good with the holeshot and leading the way until everything went downhill. Got bogged two times which required another rider to help me lift it out. Head to toe in mud, it rained at the start, during the race and even managed to hail while we were out there. Just an insane day!

TRIUMPH Finance TRIUMPH Servicing Spares & Accessories

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SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL

THROU

If I ever browse Gumtree, eBay or Bikesales I last about three minutes. I am electronically illiterate and there is way too much info for my old brain to filter through the scams, wankers and con artists. How do I choose between the crazy cheap bike in Tassie, the unridden bike in Victoria or the rebirthed shinny bitsa from Sydney? The choices are too varied and rubbish too deep on the web so I switch it off. I head down to my local KTM dealer for a yarn and a look. I am an old salt and enjoy bike shops and workshops far more than websites. The bike shop is the biggest motorcycle toybox in town. I have bought a lot of my bikes from Jarrod and John at Future Sport, both new and used. I get all my riding and service gear from there. I told them years ago that I would buy my bikes and gear from them if we could always agree on a good deal. I have kept my side of the bargain and so have they. They know the value of local customers so they look after me. Not only do I get a good deal on machines, Jarrod has thrown me keys to some cool demo bikes like the KTM 990, a 450SXF, crazy, worked Hayabusa he traded, and a few others.

When the boys and I headed off for my bucks’ party weekend of trailriding, Jarrod lent me a spare shop bike to throw on the trailer (DR-Z400) just in case one of the boys had a mechanical failure. It was very nice of him and things like that are the action of a great dealer. Try that on eBay! Making connections on Facebook or LinkedIn is nowhere near as much fun as getting to know your local dealer. Having a good, honest relationship with your local bike shop has its advantages. Haggling and belly-aching over price is just a pain and rarely helpful. When buying second-hand from a dealer, if they know you are not going to come back belly-aching for warranty on brakepads and bullshitting about blinker globes they tend to sharpen their pencils. So, on this occasion, I told Jarrod and John I needed a $4000 registered bike for my mate in WA. Jarrod told me he had a good 2011 KTM 530 EXC he could do for $5000 with 12 months rego. He tells me to take it for the day and either bring it back tomorrow or drop $5000 in when I’m ready. No problem. So I decide you can get a lot of bike for 5k! This one is a stock 530 EXC with 12 months, bashplate, Barkbusters, good tyres, PowerParts seatcover and rear disc protector. Engine feels fresh and strong. Redmond

OFF OUR

ACE

Here’s a taste of the most popular items on our Facebook page. Be part of the ADB community and follow us at: facebook.com/adbmag

HILCLIMB MASTERS These blokes have mastered the hillclimb. Tarn Le Cornu: That was epicly Awesome!! 2:46 is a familiar feeling. Lol moments in that clip. Thanks for sharing Stewart Watson: Good to watch, having fun on the dirt bike, bring on Sunny Corner. Nicholas Dunnage: Been there often.

450 ENDURO SHOOTOUT SHOOTOUT: There isn’t a bad bike in the bunch – doesn’t mean you can’t pick a favourite! Scott Russell: What the hell is Honda doing?! I’ve had my 2008 CRF450X since new and I’m still waiting for an updated model! Mick Rainey: Sherco don’t be scared not every bike is orange. 300t Troy Tarrant: Yellow brigade all the way! Orinandmel Cox: Husky all the way

WAZZA’S ADVENTURE Found some blue sky near Nowra today to go riding with ADB’s longest-serving contributor, Warren ‘Wazza’ Jack. This legend might be in his 60s but still loves dirtbikes as much as he did when he first wrote for ADB in 1975! Simon Ford: Wandean Rd? Caroline Bradly: That’s cool, Wazza.  Warren Jack: You got my best side

36 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


Inspiring conidence and accompanying you on your journey to greatness.  All new WP AER 48mm forks  CNC Upper Triple Clamp  Magura Hydraulic Clutch  Carbon ibre subframe - strength & perfect weight distribution  Dunlop MX-3S Tyres  Traction Control on the 4-stroke models  Map switch on the 4-stroke models ures/beneits of the new 2017 range www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com

6

MONTHS WARRANTY PARTS & LABOUR

Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing Team

JASON ANDERSON The partnership between man and machine has its ultimate test on the motocross track. A sport of absolutes, it requires exceptional courage and determination to conquer the many challenges every rider will face. The progressive 2017 Husqvarna motocross range – an innovative balance between agility, power, usability and functional design.

Photo: Cudby S

BEYOND YOUR COMFORT ZONE


Jeremy Martin 2015 AMA MX CHAMP

Cooper Webb 2016 AMA SX CHAMP

Romain Febvre 2015 MXGP CHAMP

YZ250F

YZ250F

YZ450F


CHAD REED

BACK TO THE GRINDSTONE Ellie, the kids and I are now back in the US and settled home in Tampa after our time away. It was good to get back into a routine before Tate and Kiah went back to school and we even found time to adopt a new member to the Reed family, a black German shepherd named Luna. Being in Europe and Australia for the past two months was great, and allowed me to hit the reset button, but now it’s back to the grindstone to get ready for the US round of MXGP, the Monster Cup and AUS-X Open. These events are a really important part of my preparation for next year. I was away for quite a long time and, to be honest, I am excited to be getting back to work. This year’s supercross season was a great learning and rebuilding phase not only for myself but also for Yamaha going racing as

a factory team again. We learned a lot about the bike and identified our strengths and weaknesses. To come home and announce that I would continue with the Yamaha team was awesome. One of the best things is that we have a solid plan in place and we know the direction we are wanting to head. As a team, we are in a much better position than we were this time last year, which means we are able to use this time wisely to prepare for 2017. I am also really excited about having a teammate again. Cooper Webb will bring a new level of energy to the team. Youth has that natural way of upping the enthusiasm. I like that energy, and I’m looking forward to having him as my teammate. My contract is the same as this year.

I will do a full season of supercross and some selected MXGP events in Europe. At this stage, there are no plans to contest the outdoors (AMA Pro Motocross Championship). Unfortunately, I won’t be part of the des Nations team this year. With the funding for the team reduced due to money being reallocated to teams for the Rio Olympics, there is just not the budget available to MA so something had to give. While it is disappointing I have plenty on my plate to keep me busy. As a team, we have a lot of lead-up work to do and I will be working hard on my fitness levels to make sure I am at peak fitness. I have enjoyed being back at the test track and look forward to cutting some lap with my new teammate over the next month.

TO COME HOME AND ANNOUNCE THAT I WOULD CONTINUE WITH THE YAMAHA TEAM WAS AWESOME

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JEMMA WILSON

GLOBE TROTTER It’s been a couple of months since I’ve submitted a column. Actually … scrap that. I wrote one on the boat from Finland to Sweden that was meant to be in issue #443, but unfortunately I missed deadline and it never made it into print. Which means I’ve got so much to tell you all but where to begin? We flew over to Europe in mid-May to race the World Enduro Championship. After six rounds of tough competition I can succinctly wrap it all up in four points: 1. The Worlds are technically hard; 2. The Worlds are logistically hard; 3. The Worlds are financially hard; and 4. It’s hard to get the required support at the Worlds. My fiancé Jon and I were in Europe for just over seven weeks, and they went like this. We picked up our ‘race set up’ (van, a toolbox and new WR250F) in France and drove from the south, through Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia and then had a two-hour ferry ride to Finland. This was just shy of 3500km. Then I got a week and a half of amazing training with the wonderfully talented Steve Holcolme, under the watchful eye of five-time world enduro champ Petteri Silvan.   Then we walked 32km of special tests and raced the opening rounds in Finland, placing

fifth both days. We then got the boat to Sweden, walked 38km and raced in the rain and mud and I cried all day on the second day, to finish sixth on Saturday and my worst result ever, a tenth on Sunday. The only positive was my times, which would have placed me fifth on both days, I unfortunately struggled in one trail section every lap and lost time. A week of recovery followed, which consisted of hanging out at Pelle and Anne Granquist’s beautiful little red house on a lake. Jon and I had our 10th anniversary at a beach in Sweden before stopping off in Holland at an Aussie mate’s place, which included a little mountain bike riding. We continued on down to Spain to walk 21km of tests, (but it was all hills). I came away with two fourths before heading back to France to clean the van and bike and fly home. World Enduro excursion done. It was a whirlwind of good times and bad and after all that, I am sitting fifth. I would just like to make a quick thank you to everyone who chipped in on my Go Fund Me account, my local personal sponsors who paid for a nice chunk of expenses and to some wonderful friends and virtual strangers who have

dug deep to help make it happen. We’ve been back for only five weeks at the time of writing, and in that time I have driven the 4400km round trip to Hedley for rounds seven and eight of the Australian Off-Road Championship (AORC) before heading to Monkerai for rounds nine and 10. The AORC has gone well for me so far. We have two rounds to go and I have a nice lead in the women’s championship, having been beaten in only two rounds. Finally, we also managed to squeeze in our first Fox Womens Off-Road Campout. With the help of the lovely Renae from Fox Head Australia and Lyndon Heffernan of the Academy of Off Road Riding we put together a weekend of coaching and camping for an amazing group of ladies. This camp was to raise funds for me to get to this year’s ISDE in Spain, so thank you Renae, Fox, Heffo and all the girls who loaded up their bikes and came riding for the weekend! The season has been packed and we still have the last rounds of the AORC, A4DE and ISDE to go, so remember to keep up to date with it all on my social media. Instagram - jemyw and Facebook - Jemma Wilson

WE THEN GOT THE BOAT TO SWEDEN, WALKED 38KM AND RACED IN THE RAIN AND MUD AND I CRIED ALL DAY

40 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


FIAT DUCATO

MOVE WITH MORE GRUNT The Ducato is the most powerful FWD van in its class.* ÄH[JVTH\

*The Fiat Professional Ducato is the most powerful front wheel drive van in its class, with 3.0L Multijet 132kW/400Nm across the range. Maximum short wheelbase Fiat Ducato payload is 1,560kg and maximum capacity is 8m3. © Fiat Professional is a registered trademark of FCA Group Marketing S.p.A


FOX V2 HELMET, $349.95

WHEEL DEAL

If you’re after some quality bling for your bike, look no further than States MX. These Signature rims not only give your bike the factory look, but are also made with great care, with the aim of delivering a solid and high-performing wheel. The rims come in blue or black and are reasonably priced. FRONT (21”) $199.90, REAR (18” OR 19”) $199.90 Link International, linkint.com.au, (07) 3382 5000

FOX GOGGLES, $129.95

SHIFT 3LACK LABEL AIR GLOVES, $44.95

HEAD TO TOE FOX INSTINCT BOOTS, $649.95

FINER FILTERS

With products available for most models, Twin Air Oil Filters will have you covered next time you service your bike. Constructed from high-quality paper mesh using the latest production technology, the filters are great value. $9.95-$14.95 Cassons, cassons.com.au, (02) 8882 1900

42 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

HEAD TO TOE

The new 3Lack Label range from Shift has dropped with the slogan ‘We Are Wolves’. This is something to do with the brand’s desire to stand out, not its eating habits. The new 3lack Label Mainline gear oozes style and is designed to combine looks with functionality and performance. The jersey uses multi-panelled construction for increased mobility and a superior fit. The pants are intended to be light and breathable while maintaining durability. The set is designed for riders who want to be a little different, but still want unrivalled performance and functionality. JERSEY $59.95, PANTS $219.95 Monza Imports, monzaimports.com.au, (03) 8327 8899


BACK TO THE FUTURE YOU DENSE?

The MR2 Exo features the latest in shell design, with a four-piece, multi-density EPS liner. The helmet is designed to offer no compromise in safety, ventilation and comfort. MR2 is known for its bold and colourful graphics and the Exo is no exception. There are two designs available. The Contender graphics comes in two fluoro colours while the Factory comes in four colours including a matt finish black/silver version. Sizes XS to XXL are available. $169.95 McLeod Accessories, mcleodaccessories.com.au, (07) 3621 9000

01

LOOSE UNIT

A claimed 30-foot wireless range will allow you to say goodbye to your tangled web of cable with the Skullcandy Grind and a 12-hour battery life will keep you going all day. Simply chuck your mobile in your pocket and crank the tunes all day long.

02

01

GROUND CONTROL

Keep track of your training sessions, rides and more with the Suunto Spartan. With GPS functionality, navigation, heart rate monitor and support for over 80 sports, this is the perfect tool to help you reach the next level. The watch is dirt tough and water resistance, meaning there are no issues taking it out on the track or trail.

HOT PROSPECT

The Scott Prospect is a game-changer in dirtbike eyewear. The Prospect is designed to provide a wide field of vision and maximum protection. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a 50mm Works Film System available which will allow riders to maintain clear vision through the muddiest of motos. The goggles also have the Lense Lock Retention System. The Prospect is set to raise the bar in protection and vision. PRICE $129.95 OR $149.95 WITH FILM SYSTEM Ficeda Accessories,, ficeda.com.au

03

Back in pre-history, long before GoPro, Super 8 was all the rage when it came to documenting everyday life in moving pictures. Eight millimetre film was affordable and hugely popular with amateur filmmakers. Eventually film was replaced by digital video, but it is experiencing a resurgence and Kodak is set to release a new Super 8 camera complete with a digital monitor and integrated microphone. When these drop, go and grab one and start making some epic dirtbike movies. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the coolest kid in town.

04

HELLO POLY

The THH TX-15 helmet is made from polycarbonate with a removable and washable liner, new graphics, a back vent and lower air intake. The TX-15 is made with comfort, ventilation, style and safety in mind. The helmet is available in XS-2XL and comes in a number of shades, including matt black and Race Black/Fluoro Orange (above). $109.95 Cassons, cassons.com.au, (02) 8882 1900

EIGHT GOES DIGITAL

BOX OF TRICKS

This cool gadget could be just what the next Dana Brown is looking for. Basically, the Gnarbox allows you to wirelessly download and store all your video and photo files in the field. You can then edit the files on the go via your smartphone or tablet computer with no cables or laptops. Film your goofy mates in the bush, download, edit and embarrass them on Insta in minutes. Pretty cool, huh?

02

03

04

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STRAIGHT FLEXIN'

Prime Fit is all about your right to ride without restriction. Four way stretch fabric and ultra-flexible compression sleeves allow uncompromised movement on the bike. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t settle for racewear that holds you back, exercise your right to ride in comfort and style.


COOPER WEBB


WORLD LAUNCH I 2017 HUSKY ENDUROS

2

WORDS // MITCH LEES PHOTOS // SEBAS ROMERO

1

3

BLONDES ARE MORE FUN! The Swedes have had enhancement surgery and Mitch Lees canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take his eyes off them

46 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


Main: The DCC Shock and XPlor fork soaked up the tyres and launched the bike perfectly 1. A more lightweight chassis improved handling 2. New look with in-mould graphics 3. Greenery we just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see in Oz

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G

etting the chance to attend an overseas launch is a privilege, just ask Lee Hogan, Mat Boyd, Adam Riemann or Olly Malone, but while the idea is alluring, the reality does have its drawbacks. Basically, we jump on a 24-hour economy flight to somewhere in Europe and spend two days testing before another 24-hour flight

home. I’m over 186cm so the confines of a cattle-class seat make travelling 24 hours each way not as attractive as you might think. So, you can imagine the look on my face when Husqvarna marketing manager Brendan Drage sent through my itinerary and the flight was listed as Premium Economy. I’ve never travelled anything but Economy and with this job we do a lot of flying. I’ve never been upgraded and when I’m flying on my own dime, I stick to my socio-economic status,

CHASSIS

SHOCK

After solving subframe flex issues with carbon-fibre, Husky has been able to get the weight down.

DCC damper has an internal pressure balance and has lost 360g in the sauna.

FROM THE ’BAR

which is of course cattle class. I called Brendan to make sure there was no mistake. He simply remarked, “Nah mate, a premium trip for a premium brand!” I didn’t think about it again until we’d reached Gothenberg, Sweden, the location Husqvarna had chosen to launch the 2017 enduro range. Brendan had managed to squeeze in two days of recovery time before the launch dinner and bike testing. The word “premium” kept popping up, at

TE125/150

TE250

TE300

The TE125/150 will be specialorder-only for Australia. It’s no secret Aussies love big engines and dirtbikes are no different. At the launch, Husqvarna even pointed out that Australia has the global market share for the FE501. I’m also 100kg with gear on, so for me to test the little dinger on the sand track we were using would have been unfair. Some of the Euro midgets at the launch said it was a good thing.

The 250cc two-stroke is often touted as an overlooked but impressive smoker for enduro riding, across all brands. But, as a heavy rider, I can’t vouch for that. While the TE250 does feel lighter, that feeling is quickly lost when you find yourself a gear high and paddling out of a sandy corner as the bike bogs. On the Swedish sand, horsepower was king and the TE250 had me focusing on shifting gears, rather than blasting berms.

Every time I jump on a 300cc two-stroke I find myself wondering why these machines are developing a cult following. Is it because they keep winning popular events like Erzberg or Romaniacs or is it because they’re easy and cheap to work on? To me, it’s neither. I love the TE300 because it builds so much usable torque right off the bottom, and lets the rider idle the engine at a much slower speed than a four-stroke. In other words, you can go slower without stalling or needing to use the clutch, and this makes any bike easier to ride. The engine is the TE300’s strong point and the handlebar-mounted map switch let’s you chose how it performs. Plenty of top-end, a meaty bottom and the handling of a bullet train give the TE300 an edge in the sandy conditions.

48 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


all the bells and whistles you’d have to pay extra for on a KTM, only this year there’s even more fruit. But, there is a catch. While you might be getting a premium product when compared with the KTM, you are paying a premium price. The Husky enduro range is nearly $1000 more than the KTM enduros. But the question is, which is better value for money and do the extras improve the bike? We could have bored you with all the new

the hotel, dinner and even while touring the old Husky factory. Everything from the accommodation to the food, and even the entertainment and activities Husky planned for us were of premium quality, not to mention the flying. It wasn’t until I got a close look at the 2017 enduro range that I understood why Husqvarna went to so much effort to deliver a premium experience. The 2017 FE and TE range are a step above their KTM siblings. They come with

bits and pieces on the Huskies, and talked about how they work and if they work. But we’re all about value for money at ADB and if you’ve already read our 2017 KTM launch report, you’ll already know about the weight savings, significant engine changes, new suspension and chassis and a counter-balance shaft on the two-strokes to reduce vibration, so we wanted to focus on the differences between orange and white. Turn to the next page to find out.

MAGURA CLUTCH

2T STARTER The Mitsuba starter motor sits underneath and engages a cog on the alternator.

Switching to this brand may be just a marketing exercise for Husqvarna.

WP FORK The Xplor 48 is an open-cartridge design with a spring in each leg and split damping functions.

FE250

FE350

FE450

FE501

Normally sandy tracks are not a 250cc four-stroke’s playground but the FE250 seemed to have no problem keeping up with the bigger bikes, if you were prepared to forget top-end. With the map switched to the softer setting, which actually builds a stronger bottom-end while sacrificing some top-end, the FE250 could almost be ridden a gear tall. This is one example of how a map switch can improve the engine characteristics of a bike if conditions change while you are riding.

Just as KTM has done with the 350 EXC-F, Husqvarna has made the FE350 feel a little more aggressive and, in sand, this is not a bad thing. The FE350 wanted to be on the aggressive, or race map, as I’m calling it. If you are willing to carry speed through the corners and have the energy and fitness to hold on, then the FE350 will be the most rewarding. Its combination of weight and power made it the best handling bike and the most fun to ride.

Back in the July issue (#442) I raved about the KTM 450 EXC-F at the hardpack test venue. KTM made it more rideable by going less aggressive in the bottom-end than previous models, especially when on Map 2 and with Husky’s traction control engaged. Unfortunately, in sandy conditions, a more mellow bottomend meant an engine that struggled to be lugged through corners and along whooped-out straights. To ride this bike in the sandy conditions I found myself caught between revving it with the soft map or trying to carry momentum with the fast map. On a different track I think my impression would be completely different.

As was the case with the TE300 and FE350, it seems the slightly bigger capacity machines, within their respective capacity brackets, were the bike of choice in the Hattah-like conditions. The deep sand sapped power while the FE501 kept dishing it out. With the traction control engaged and the mapping switched to Map 1 (aggressive), I could carry a higher gear through the corners while staying on the ’pegs. Typically the FE501 would respond better to the soft map, but, in the deep sand, the big machine was better ridden with the aggressive map, but using higher gears. This 501 is so easy to ride, you can just select third gear and remove the gearlever.

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BATTERY Lighter lithium ion battery powers up the ECU and traction control system.

FRUIT BASKET PRELOAD ADJUSTER: Husqvarna has, thankfully, done away with the WP 4CS fork. It was no secret that riders all around the world were struggling with harshness in the mid-stroke on the four-chamber, and even the WP technicians present at the launch did not deny there was a problem. Husqvarna has switched to the same XPlor 48 fork that KTM is using, but the Husqvarna’s will come with the easy-to-use preload adjusters on top of the fork legs. They are the same ones KTM owners have to buy from the PowerParts catalogue. The adjusters offer six settings. Each leg has three, 0, 3, and 6, but you can set the preload to 4 or 5 by leaving the left leg on 6 and the right on 3, for example. By adjusting the preload you can change how high the fork sits in the stroke. I found that with the preload on both legs on 0, the fork was too soft and dived on the entrance to bumpy corners. After playing around for a while, I ended up with both adjusters on 3. To gauge the gap between 0 and 6, I flicked between the two without stopping at 3 and the difference is significant. With both preload adjusters on 6 I struggled to get the fork to stay in ruts as the wheel constantly wandered out of them. The XPlor 48 fork was just as impressive as it was on the KTM range and will take very little adjustment, if any, for most riders. MAP AND TRAC SWITCH: We talked a lot about this in the 2017 KTM EXC review, because just about every test bike was fitted with the optional switch and for good reason, it works! The difference between the maps is significant, but more noticeable on the smaller capacity bikes. While the two maps are at opposite ends of the spectrum, I never found myself wanting a third map somewhere in the middle. 50 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

The Austrian Husqvarnas have always had the map switch, but this year they also get a traction GOGGLE EYE The front numberplate control button, which is on the assembly has been same switchblock. As explained in changed and now the issue #442, the traction control headlight protrudes a fair way out from the plate. unit reacts to the data being fed to it from the ECU. It then retards the ignition very slightly when it notices a significant spike in revs. As dirtbike riders, when we hear “traction control” we run for the hills. Traction control is in your right hand. But this unit does not intervene in the way it does on an adventure bike. It’s smooth and goes mostly unnoticed. If you’re not concentrating on it, it will seem like it’s doing nothing, but switch it off and you’ll notice the subtle change. We look forward to testing this feature on a timed grass track circuit when the bikes land in Oz. WP DCC SHOCK: DCC stands for Dual Compression Control. All this means is that there’s now a pressure balance inside the shock which improves damping. The shock is 0.36kg lighter than the old one. The PDS system on KTMs has improved out of sight and the difference for a punter between PDS and Husky’s monoshock is miniscule. I’ve never felt the disadvantages of PDS (despite the suggestion that it can’t handle big hits, tuning is limited and that progressive damping is not as good as a linkage) and if it means one less thing to service, clean and break, I’m all for it. That being said the DCC shock worked flawlessly and there were no glaring issues raised by any tester, except one US journalist who struggled to gel with anything, probably even the colour.

SERVICE CALL The new crankshaft and big end bearings mean longer service intervals, which now stand at 135 hours.


PRELOAD ADJUSTER Preload adjusters on the fork have six different settings

FILTER

BREMBO BRAKES

TwinAir element fights for space with the electronics but is easy to remove for cleaning.

Rear caliper gets smaller piston which should reduce lockups. Pedal is longer.

HUSQVARNA HAS MADE THE FE350 FEEL A LITTLE MORE AGGRESSIVE AND, IN SAND, THIS IS NOT A BAD THING WHAT ELSE IS NEW? If you haven’t read the KTM review in issue #442, here’s a list of the differences between the previous Husky enduros and the 2017 ones. The latest white bikes are much more closely aligned with the motocross range. • Lighter lithium ion battery • WP XPlor 48 fork • WP DCC shock • Lighter subframe • New radiators • New, lighter fuel tank (10L on 2T, 8.5L on 4T) • ODI Lock-On grips • Airbox design • 24mm piston in rear brake caliper (was 26mm) • 10mm longer brake pedal • Self cleaning footpegs • More rigid, but lighter frame • BNGs and plastics • Reworked 4T cylinder head • New 4T crankshafts • Smaller, lighter, faster Keihin EMS • New 42mm Keihin throttle body • Updated header pipe and shorter muffler • New six-speed gearbox • Updated piston in 2T • New power-valve • New 38mm Mikuni TMX carburettor • New 2T exhaust • New electric starter on 2Ts

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HUSKY HERITAGE

CARBON COMPOSITE SUBFRAME

The press dinner was held at the original Husqvarna factory, which started making weapons in 1689. We were taken on a tour and shown the lineage of the Husqvarna brand and where it’s come from. Much like the media landscape today, Husqvarna was and still is organic, meaning it adapted with the times. For example, during war times Husky made weaponry, and when there was no war, it made things like stovetops, typewriters and, eventually, chainsaws and motorcycles. It has also supplied bikes to the Swedish military.

The only possible reason I can see for KTM not stealing the composite subframe from Husqvarna is because it does not work with the PDS rear-end. Husqvarna has run them since it’s been aligned with KTM, but they’ve always been heavier than the aluminium ones. For 2017, Husqvarna has introduced more carbon-fibre into the polyamide and managed to match the weight of Kato’s alloy structure. So why is it better? The composite subframe obviously improves rigidity, but it also allows a little bit of flex when taking big hits, improving traction. Being a composite the likelihood of having to replace the subframe if you cartwheel is reduced, because it’s more likely to snap back into place rather than just snap.

MAGURA CLUTCH For 2017, Husqvarna is running a Magura hydraulic clutch instead of the Brembo used on the Katos. Without testing them back-toback it’s hard to tell which is better, it may be just a marketing exercise but one thing’s for sure, hydraulic is much better than cable. The Magura is light, reliable and the reservoir is compact. I did feel it become a little vague at the end of a day riding sand, so it will be good to compare it with the Brembo when both bikes are in Oz.

MACHINED TRIPLE-CLAMP Unlike the KTMs, Husqvarna enduro models get black-anodised, CNC-machined tripleclamps with a 22mm offset. CNC machining makes the component stronger but not necessarily lighter than cast ones. Can you notice the difference? Unless you’re Graham Jarvis, probably not. But they look cool!

THIS 501 IS SO EASY TO RIDE, YOU CAN JUST SELECT THIRD GEAR AND REMOVE THE GEARLEVER

METZELER SIX DAYS EXTREME TYRES The Metzeler Six Days Extreme tyres have a slightly different pattern to the 2016s and are better than the Maxxis Maxx EnduPro on the KTMs. The Metzelers do a better job of finding traction, and we’ve managed to get more life out of them on test bikes.

TE300 Latest changes have moved this model even further ahead of the 250 as an allrounder.

BALANCE The balance shaft on the two-strokes should make like a lot easier for riders, with less arm-pump and blisters.

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MAP SWITCH Now traction control is in your left hand as well as in the right.


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FIRST RIDE I 2017 SUZUKI RM-Z450

Main: Lee comes in to land 1. Suzuki sticking with the air fork 2. Pirellis were fitted for the launch 3. Enough tents for a circus 4. Echo Valley was in primo condition

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THE

! RM-Z450, BUT FOR HOW MUCH LONGER?

T

he Suzuki RM-Z450 has a rich pedigree, with close to 170 race wins and 13 championships when you combine the AMA, MXGP and our own MX Nats. And those numbers are up there with the best! For 2017 the bike remains relatively unchanged other than a few cosmetic modifications but the bike has proven itself to be competitive against the newest bikes in the class. The rumour mill says we should see a major overhaul next year but these are just whispers at the moment. For now, it’s just more of the same, which is not such a bad thing. The current

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RM-Z450 has proven itself to be a stable, inspiring and punchy package that suits most riders. The picturesque Echo Valley track in Toowoomba, Qld, became a sea of yellow for the launch. There were team trucks, marquees and a huge number of RM-Z450s ready to go, along with Todd Waters and Luke Wilson to show us how it’s done. Suzuki put a lot of time and care into the launch of a relatively unchanged bike. But with the AMA Outdoor title all but wrapped up they have reason to celebrate. After I geared up I was allocated a bike for the day. A mechanic was assigned to me and I proceeded to set up the basic stuff, levers

and handlebar position. The fork pressures were set to standard and the shock adjusted to 40mm of static sag. I was all set to go for my warm-up laps around a freshly ripped and watered Echo Valley. My initial laps had me thinking about the bike and a couple of changes that I needed to make straight away to the suspension. I couldn’t help getting caught up in the nostalgia of riding a track that I had raced many times in the mid-’90s but hadn’t seen for over 15 years. The track has a similar layout to back then and it brought back plenty of good memories. After about 10 minutes of warming up and

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BAILEY COXON JBC Racing (MX Nationals)

helmet

SUPERLIGHT FIBRE COMPOSITE (ONLY 1095 grams) Moto National Accessories

Superlight fiber Composite


THE CHASSIS, COMBINED WITH THE ERGONOMICS AND SUSPENSION, MAKES THIS BIKE CUT AND DICE EVERY CORNER YOU COME ACROSS

1. Frame is due for a refresh 2. Hogan ran 42mm static sag 3. Yellow fenders go much faster

getting to know the track, I came back in to make a few changes. The weight bias was out for me with the fork being too soft and the rear too high. We put five pounds of air in the fork to raise the front a tad and increased static sag by 2mm. This completely changed how the bike settled for corners and reacted over the jumps. The bike was set up to my liking and ready to be put through its paces.

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GOOD STUFF SMOOTHNESS: As in recent years, the 2017 RM-Z450makes plenty of power right through the range but, more importantly, the RM-Z delivers it very smoothly. The RM-Z450 engine is an easy powerplant to ride, producing plenty of usable torque in every gear. You can hold the RM-Z450 in gear for longer than most 450s and becasue of this I found myself using second for most of the tighter turns. If you want more punch I suggest going up two teeth on the rear sprocket. Not only will this bring the gears closer together, but you will also be able to select third gear through more turns. The standard engine set up is very smooth and easy to ride for most riders. TURNING: The RM-Z450 has established a reputation for exceptional handling and with minimal changes to the 2017 model, this trait continues. The predictable chassis, combined with a dependable suspension package, make the RM-Z450 a basic point and shoot machine. The bike handles slippery flat turns, deep ruts and fluffy berms with ease thanks to an agile chassis. Just remember pumping too much air into the fork will turn this corner carver into a plank that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to turn.

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Main: This is a very stable platform 1. Todd Waters pulls the hotshot on Lee 2. Suzuki team personnel were unhappy about getting detention and refused to point the finger

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POWER ADJUSTABILITY: The bike comes with three ignition/fuel couplers including the standard one. I always test both the richer and leaner couplers and, once again, this year I settled on the leaner one. It really brings the motor to life. A lighter or less experienced rider may prefer the standard coupler and a full-blown mud day or sketchy hardpack may require the richer one to smooth the power out. Options are a great thing.

NOT SO GOOD

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FORK: Every person and their dog seems to have an opinion on air forks. Some love them and some hate them. But the fact remains that the Showa SFF-Air TAC is nearly 2kg lighter than a traditional spring/cartridge fork and has a truckload more adjustability. There have been issues with stiction when inner air seals deteriorate and the most common complaint is the fiddling around that you have to do with getting your air pressures right before each ride. There are positives and negatives to both sides. I have always found this fork to work well and I don’t particularly mind the extra couple of minutes it takes to

check pressures. CHASSIS: The alloy beam frame is due for a change. It is big and fairly rigid. If I was a betting man, I’d say that the next RM-Z450 will have meat shaved off it in certain areas. It is very accurate and does let you place the bike millimetre perfect but you need to take the time to set the suspension so you achieve a silky smooth ride on the track. The chassis still works well and is great for supercross. It is just slightly on the rigid side compared to some of its competitors.

SUMMARY For 2017, Suzuki only upgraded the look by adding black rims, replacing the black rear fender with a traditional yellow one, and mixing it up with black sideplates. Nevertheless, it’s still an excellent package, but changes to the chassis and fork, which we expect next year, would see the RM-Z450 receive a higher star rating. Diehard Suzuki fans will find the RM-Z450 to be more of the same as last year. It does a lot of things well, and nothing badly.

IF I WAS A BETTING MAN, I’D SAY THAT THE NEXT RM-Z450 WILL HAVE MEAT SHAVED OFF IN CERTAIN AREAS Suzuki RM-Z450 Engine Four-valve, DOHC Type 449cc Displacement 96mm x 62.1mm Bore × stroke Cooling Liquid 12.5:1 Compression ratio EFI Fuel metering Tank capacity 6.2L Transmission Five-speed, constant-mesh Wet multi-plate Clutch Dimensions 1495mm Wheelbase 955mm Seat height Ground clearance 325mm Weight (wet) 112kg Suspension Showa SFF-Air TAC 49mm fork Front Showa monoshock Rear Brakes Nissin 250mm wave Front Nissin 240mm wave Rear Running Gear Handlebar Renthal tapered Front Bridgestone M403 Rear Bridgestone M404 Price & Contacts $10,990 RRP suzukimotorcycles.com.au Website Phone number (03) 9931 0500 None Warranty STAR RATING

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MONSTER ENERGY FACTORY KAWASAKI

Distributed by Cassons Pty Ltd - AUSTRALIA P: +61(0)2 8882 1900 F: +61(0)2 8882 1999 E: enquiries@cassons.com.au W: www.cassons.com.au


TRAIL TEST | 2016 SWM RS300R & RS500R 1

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WORDS // MITCH LEES PHOTOS // OLLY MALONE

ARE THE 2016 SWMS JUST REBRANDED HUSQVARNAS? YES. AND HERE’S WHY WE THINK THAT’S A GOOD THING 60 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


Main: Mitch wheelies through a creek on the 500 1. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 300, not 310 2. The rear-end is taken care of by KYB 3. Climbing hills on the 500 is easy 4. Standard skidplate sufficed

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W

hen we Instagrammed the first picture of us testing SWM’s RS300R and RS500R enduros we got a bunch of armchair critics howling about them being rebadged Huskies. When we asked SWM brand manager Stephen Tuff what he thought of their response, he simply shrugged and said: “Yep, that’s right. And?” Tuffy explained that the SWM RS300R and RS500R are based on the 2009-2012 Husqvarna TE310 and TE510, with only a few small differences (see sidebar). But, what Tuffy kept repeating was that the SWMs are built around the more reliable 2009-2011 Husqvarna engine, before the factory got out

the scalpel and turned it into the X-Lite donk the following year. The rest of the running gear, like the Kayaba suspension, hydraulic clutch and Brembo brakes, are all top-notch and the same stuff found on the last Italianbuilt Husqvarnas. When Tuffy announced that the first shipment of SWM enduros had arrived, I was in two minds as to how we should approach the test. I mean, what’s the point in testing technology that we’d tested to death between 2009 and 2012? Then I began to think back to those tests and realised I couldn’t remember a thing, and I wrote half of them! On top of that, the demographic that SWM is targeting has changed since the bikes were Husqvarnas. When we rode the TE310 and TE510 they were marketed as race bikes, designed to compete with the likes of KTM, Yamaha, Beta and Sherco enduro bikes. SWM

is marketing these machines as trailbikes, distancing them from the enduro/race market. But how easy is it to convert a former racer into a reliable trailbike? And does it work?

DO THEY QUALIFY? It’s hard to remember what the TE range was like to ride, considering the last time we rode them was over five years ago. So comparing them with the SWMs is a difficult task, since dirtbikes have improved significantly and what we now consider average, might have been great in 2010. But, here we go. The RS300R uses the same single-cylinder, liquid-cooled engine that Husqvarna did five years ago, only this time around its electronic brain has been altered and the mapping tamed down. The RS300 engine feels slightly more trail-oriented than the TE310, with less top-end and more bottom. The engine

SWM IS MARKETING THESE MACHINES AS TRAILBIKES, DISTANCING THEM FROM THE ENDURO/RACE MARKET SPOT THE DIFFERENCE Differences between the 2010 TE310 and 2017 RS300R and the TE510 and RS500R:

RS300R

RS500R

• Ignition is by GET instead of Mikuni • New ECU mapping • Twin mufflers instead of single • Cush drive clutch • Chinese plastics • Wheels

• Ignition is by GET instead of Mikuni • New ECU mapping • Twin mufflers instead of single • Chinese plastics • Wheels

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1 produces bottom-end torque in any gear, but in a docile manner, and without the strength of a bigger bike. It felt like it had a heavy flywheel, chugging out of corners and idling lower than a Kardashian I.Q. But, without the punch the old TE310 had, SWM riders will need to be more active on the clutch, especially when a throttle blip is need to get over large obstacles. While the mapping would be the main culprit, I can’t help put shovel some of the blame onto the restrictive dual mufflers. The oval silencers look great but it does feel like they dull the responsiveness of the engine. That being said, for an intermediate trailrider this is perfect. The suspension on the RS300R is soft, possibly more so than the TE310 was. However, soft is good for trailriding. Both ends felt plush all the way through the stroke, but

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Main: They look identical to the Italian Huskies 1. Comfortable bend of the ’bar 2. 50-tooth rear sprocket on the 300 restricts top speed 3. Mikuni ignition bluntens the power 4. The choke comes in handy on cold mornings 5. The 500 had a 47-tooth rear sprocket 6. Dual pipes are a little restrictive

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NOT CHINESE The SWMs are not Chinese, they’re Italian. At the North Star Trailride we were often asked if they were from the east, but SWM confirms the only thing Chinese are the plastics.

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SWM RS300R Engine Single-cylinder, DOHC Type 297.6cc Displacement 83mm x 55mm Bore × stroke Cooling Liquid N/A Compression ratio Get ECU, Mikuni D42 Fuel metering Tank capacity 7.2L Six-speed Transmission hydraulic, wet multi-plate Clutch Dimensions 1495mm Wheelbase 963mm Seat height Ground clearance 250mm Weight (dry) 107kg Suspension Kayaba 50mm USD Front Kayaba monoshock Rear Brakes Brembo 260mm disc Front Brembo 240mm disc Rear Running Gear Handlebar N/A Front Pirelli Scorpion XC Rear Pirelli Scorpion XC Price & Contacts $8290 RRP swmmotorcycles.com.au Website Phone (03) 8362 1600 Warranty

Six months parts & labour

STAR RATING

WHEN JUMPING THE BIKE AND FLAT LANDING I WAS ABLE TO BOTTOM THE SHOCK Main: The 300 is a little undersprung for big jumps 1. Digital, but a little bulky speedo setup 2. The shock in the 500 felt much stiffer 3. Keep an eye on that oil!

offered very little in the way of firming up near the bottom of the stroke. When jumping the bike and flat landing I was able to bottom the shock, but it never felt dangerous or like it was going to rebound hard and spear me into the scrub. It just gave a loud clunk. As for general handling, the RS300R isn’t pretending to be a KTM Freeride. The handling and chassis fits somewhere between a Yamaha WR250F and Suzuki DR-Z400E. Standing up and guiding it through singletrack is just as easy as any race-bred enduro bike, just don’t expect to snap open the throttle and wheelie over a log just metres away. As for the RS500R, the engine feels like a sharper and more responsive Honda XR650R. It isn’t the odd German-designed TE511 engine we saw in the last Husqvarnas before the company was sold to KTM part-owner Pierer Industries. As a 100kg rider I much prefer this engine to the 300, with loads more

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IN THE KNOW ADB: The budget bike market is becoming more crowded, with European manufacturers popping up and the Chinese onslaught. What separates the SWM range from the rest and who are they designed for? Stephen Tuff: The RS300R and RS500R are targeted at anyone who would like to own a capable enduro bike for trailriding. These bikes are fitted with quality componentry and have trusted DNA from their Husqvarna cousins. The big news is the price. ADB: So does the RRP mean a cheap product? I’ve only ever had a positive experience with the Husqvarna brand (I had one as a long-termer in 2011/2012 and had no major dramas) but I know when they moved to the X-Lite engine it received some criticism. ST: The rec retail of the RS650R, RS300R and RS500R is common sense. Mr Macchi, who has been the driving force behind getting SWM off the ground, was the technical director at Husqvarna. He was able to secure the intellectual property from KTM, walk back into the manufacturing plant in Biandronno where he was formerly employed and begin production quickly. He knew the bikes, he knew the process and the parts were quickly made available to begin production because it had all been done before. There was minimal research and development required to produce these bikes and get the company off the ground. We expect the RS300R and RS500R to sell well. The price point is a big factor. Who doesn’t want to own a new bike? And when you can do it for $5000 or $6000 less than from another brand, it’s hard to look past. ADB: What’s the go with spare parts? Can parts from the 2010 Husqvarnas be used? ST: All of our spare parts are dispatched from the SWM factory. Some Husqvarna parts are compatible with the new models. The engine parts are essentially the same. The plastics, seat and tank are not compatible due to different mounting points. Parts are readily available from SWM Australia dealers. We are still in the process of building the dealer network but it is growing. You can see the dealer listing at www.swmmotorcycles. com.au. SWM Australia’s head office is in Melbourne, from where all bikes and spare parts are distributed. ADB: At this stage we’ve only seen a 650 adventure/ enduro machine and these two trailbikes. Does SWM have any plans to expand the range? ST: SWM plans to expand its range across motocross, enduro, adventure and road. We are already seeing road models which will arrive in Australia in the next few months. The Superdual adventure bike has created a storm over the internet and we expect that to sell in good numbers. There is a new competition-style cross country off-road bike and an MX bike in the works. Clearly SWM plans on working itself into the market in a serious way. ADB: For those of us who haven’t heard of SWM before, what is its history? ST: SWM did very well in the late ’70s and early ’80s. Aussie gun enduro riders like Murray Tainton raced SWMs and there are several passionate owners who still have SWM models from the ’80s that they continue to ride.

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power but it does idle in the basement like the smaller motor. The RS500R was the weapon of choice when climbing hills at our test venue in Braidwood, NSW. While the RS300R produces a healthy bottom-end, it doesn’t conjure up the same brute power the RS500R does. But remember, this isn’t a wheel-standing, arm-tearing brute, this is responsive XR650style power that required minimal concentration, throttle control and skill. The suspension on the RS500R is significantly firmer, putting up more of a fight against bottoming. This suited someone of my size better than the RS300R. Like all big dirtbikes, the RS500R could be lugged around in third gear without needing to bash the shifter when the trail tightened.

A TRUE TEST In order to really evaluate the SWMs’ ability as reliable trailbikes, we took both machines to the North Star Trailride (see p90) and completed a lap on each of the 90, 40 and 20km loops over two days. This equated to roughly 12 hours of riding. Conditions were hard on bikes, especially the Enchanted Forest, but after the weekend we were impressed with the SWM’s resolve. We had no mechanical dramas, except a loose fuel pump manifold that leaked fuel. We tightened the bolt and the fuel stopped leaking. While other bikes were boiling on the Mt Mitchell hillclimb, the SWMs had no such problems, despite needing to be skull dragged the last two metres when a fallen rider created a bottleneck near the summit. We crashed several times, bashed through the tight tree sections and managed nearly 150km/h on the open straights but when we rolled into our campsite on the Sunday we had nothing but awesome memories of both bikes and event.

THIS ISN’T A WHEEL-STANDING, ARMTEARING BRUTE, THIS IS DOCILE, HONDA XR650-STYLE POWER 1

SHARE HOLDER The Shineray Motorcycle Company, maker of the XY250GY sold here is a major shareholder in SWM.

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Main: Extreme style terrain is not out of its league 1. We never needed to use the hot start lever 2. Dual header pipes look trick 3. Still running a key unfortunately

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While handling on the 500 was not as sharp as the 300 and the bike took an extra few metres to pull up, it was still the easier, lazier bike of the two. Just as on the 300, the Brembo brakes, hydraulic clutch and electric leg were faultless. So, to answer the question of whether a factory can convert an old enduro racer into a trailbike, the answer is yes. The RS300R and RS500R feel like more docile versions of their ancestors and perfect for trailriding. The mapping transforms the old Husky 310 and 510 into rideable and reliable trailbikes (see sidebar). A soft suspension setup, especially on the RS300R, just accentuates the SWM’s trail readiness and, at a touch over $8000, they’re certainly worth considering next time you’re in the market for a serious trailbike.

SWM RS500R Engine Single-cylinder, DOHC Type 501cc Displacement 97mm x 67.8mm Bore × stroke Cooling Liquid N/A Compression ratio Fuel metering Get ECU, Mikuni D42 body Tank capacity 7.2L Transmission Six-speed, constant mesh hydraulic, wet multi-plate Clutch Dimensions 1495mm Wheelbase 963mm Seat height Ground clearance 250mm Weight (dry) 112kg Suspension Kayaba 50mm USD Front Kayaba monoshock Rear Brakes 260mm Brembo disc Front 240mm Brembo disc Rear Running Gear Handlebar N/A Front Pirelli Scorpion XC Rear Pirelli Scorpion XC Price & Contacts $8990 RRP swmmotorcycles.com.au Website Phone (03) 8362 1600 Six months parts & labour Warranty

STAR RATING


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FIRST RIDE I 2017 YAMAHA YZ250F

68 | OCTOBER 2015 www.adbmag.com.au


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mooth O erator Y Z 2 5 0 F

OLD WAR-HORSE MAT BOYD SHRUGS OFF FATHERHOOD TO TEST THE LATEST YAMAHA

Main: No dust to worry about during our test 1. Crankcase looks the same but has been heat treated for added strength 2. Muffler appears to be unchanged 3. Boydy doesn't mind the wide feeling

machine. Featuring a reverse-head engine, the YZ-F powered Jeremy Martin to consecutive AMA 250 Pro Motocross Championships in 2014 and 2015, while another YZ250F rider, Cooper Webb, took consecutive 250

, , which increase power in the mid to high-rev range and improve acceleration. The YZ-F has also had shifting tweaks and a smoother clutch as well as handling and suspension refinements and improved braking.

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BEEFED UP ENGINE With improvements to intake and exhaust efficiency, together with a slicker-shifting transmission and remapped ECU, the 2017 engine delivers an increase in performance and reliability. With its front inlet and rear-facing exhaust, the YZ250F’s head offers many advantages over a conventional design. These include increased intake and exhaust efficiency, as well as enhanced mass centralisation thanks to the use of a topmounted air filter and lower fuel tank. For increased airflow into the four-valve head, the intake port has been raised, and the intake valves’ diameter increased. Higher-lift intake and exhaust cams give stronger mid-range and top-end while stronger valve springs have been fitted to cope with the

THE YZ WILL FLOAT ACROSS JUST ABOUT ANY KIND OF ROUGH, WHOOPED OUT TERRAIN WITHOUT STEPPING OFF LINE

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increased lift. A nickel-chromium molybdenum steel conrod has been added to cope with the increased grunt. The intake trumpet has been shortened to reduce pumping losses and a wider throttle joint between the injector and port gives an increased cross sectional area of around five per cent. To achieve optimal intake/exhaust balance, the exhaust ports have been redesigned and the header has a fatter front section. This section also benefits from larger-radius bends for a much stronger exhaust pulse. A new ECU provides revised ignition timing and injection mapping. It also features a revised limiter that gives an improved over-rev. Riders can use the optional Yamaha Power Tuner to adjust the YZ250F’s characteristics. This device plugs into the bike without the


need for a laptop, and enables the rider or mechanic to fine tune the performance to suit the track conditions or the rider’s capabilities. In order to handle harsh motocross conditions, the YZ-F crankcase production process has been changed. While the exterior shape is identical, the aluminium diecast cases have been heat treated to give a 5 per cent increase in strength. There are wider teeth on the hardworking second and third drive gears. The shape of the dogs on first, third and fifth gears have been modified and these changes, together with a redesigned shift cam and modifications to the clutch push lever and axle design, give smoother and quicker shifting. A more rigid gearlever has been fitted to give a more positive shift feeling.

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ENGINE HIGHLIGHTS

STIFFER SKELETON

Higher efficiency cylinder head Revised intake and exhaust ports Larger intake valves Higher-lift camshafts Stiffer valve springs Stronger conrod Revised throttle joint Modified air cleaner joint design Bigger diameter header New ECU with revised map and rev limiter settings Stronger cases Redesigned clutch push lever Reshaped shift cam New gearlever

The chassis changes include a revised frame rigidity balance, together with a lower centre of gravity and refined suspension. Compared to the 2016 design, the 2017 frame is around 12mm wider in the area behind the swingarm pivot. The YZ250F features new front and upper engine mounts. By using 8mm thick steel for the two front brackets and 6mm for the upper brackets, the YZ250F’s frame delivers better overall rigidity. To achieve a riding position that suits a wider range of riders, the footrests have been lowered by 5mm. This also helps lower the centre of gravity. The closed-cartridge KYB fork features more rigid outer tubes and slightly reduced oil capacity. These changes are paired with new settings. For improved brake feel, the 245mm rear disc has been manufactured from

2017 YAMAHA YZ250F ENGINE Single-cylinder, four stroke Type Displacement 250cc Bore × stroke 77mm x 53.6mm Cooling Liquid 13.5:1 Compression ratio Fuel metering EFI Tank capacity 7.5 litres 5-speed Transmission Clutch Wet multi-plate DIMENSIONS 1475mm Wheelbase 965mm Seat height Ground clearance 330mm Weight (wet) 105kg SUSPENSION Fork KYB Telescopic fork, 310mm travel Shock KYB Linkage, 315mm travel BRAKES Hydraulic 270mm single disc Front Rear Hydraulic 245mm single disc RUNNING GEAR Handlebar Yamaha tapered Front Pirelli Scorpion MX Rear Pirelli Scorpion MX PRICE & CONTACTS $11099 RRP Website yamaha-motor.com.au Phone number (02) 9757 0011 None Warranty STAR RATING

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1. Outer fork tubes have thicker walls 2. KYB shock has new settings 3. Fuel pump is to right of shock 4. Extra graphics for visual appeal 5. Revised swingarm pivot area 6. That breather hose still looks naff 7. Header pipe bend is rounder www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2015

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the same heat-resistant steel as the 270mm front one. On the styling front, Yamaha has kept the black rims and added new graphics on the shrouds and fenders. CHASSIS HIGHLIGHTS Refined beam frame Higher-rigidity outer fork tubes Revised suspension settings Lower footrests New rear disc material Graphics

ON THE TRACK I say it every time I ride a Yamaha but, once you get used to the flat, wide feel of the bike, you will come to realise that it is the most stable production bike getting around the track. Many people refuse to give the YZ a chance because the wideness feels so foreign. If they would actually spend the time to get comfortable then they would realise the YZ will float across just about any kind of rough, whooped-out terrain without stepping off line. While still using coil springs rather than air, the fork remains my favourite production package. It is plush enough to be comfortable but progressive enough to handle jumps without being harsh. Hammering across whoops or bumps is a job made easy because the bike is so well balanced that it just keeps driving forward and never steps out of line. The only time you have to muscle the YZ is

when it comes to dragging the ’bar mid corner, because the YZ is so sturdy it needs to be muscled over harder when you want to crank a corner. Unfortunately, this is a trade-off you must make on a bike with such great straightline stability. The engine can be confusing because it produces so much torque. I often find myself trying to ride it like a 450 in tall gears torquing the bike around the track to be smoother. The engine can pull third through tight turns without bogging and having to clutch it to keep moving. Having all this torque, you could easily mistake it for an engine that won’t rev but that couldn’t be further from the truth. This powerplant will rev all the way to the moon and back without signing off or dropping any horsepower. It is an impressive engine with loads of power. The revised gearbox shifts very well and the clutch action is nice and smooth but it does get annoying to have to adjust the lever freeplay when the clutch gets warm and then again when it cools. I can’t wait ’til the Japanese realise a hydraulic clutch is better. We’ve heard people say the YZ250F is heavy to steer and tip into corners, but this could be a misinterpretation of the inertia the engine creates from producing so much torque. And that’s exactly what I liked most about the YZ250F. The engine produces so much torque that can be adjusted for a wide range of riders using the Power Tuner. The powerful engine will attract the hardcore racers while its rideability and predictable handling will make it soughtafter for clubman or enduro riders.

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1. Clutch keeps the cable industry alive 2. Yamaha doesn't use the KYB PSF2 air fork, even though it owns the company 3. Rear 245mm disc gives better feel

I OFTEN FIND MYSELF TRYING TO RIDE IT LIKE A 450, USE HIGHER GEARS AND TORQUE THE BIKE AROUND THE TRACK 72 | OCTOBER 2015 www.adbmag.com.au


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BIKE BUILD I KTM 950 EXC

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WORDS // OLLY MALONE PHOTOS // MITCH LEES

950 IS THE PERFECT PLAY BIKE FOR KIWI EXTREME ENDURO LEGEND CHRIS BIRCH

I

n my relatively short time as a dirtbike journalist I have never ridden a bike quite like the KTM 950 Super Enduro R that Chris Birch and Will Dangar have built. When the model was sold in Australia from 2006-2008 I never got the chance to ride one. My first and only experience was on the beast Chris and Will have created and, to sum it up, the thing is wild. Having that much power at your right hand housed in a

capable dirt frame with decent suspension is dangerously fun. It is an intimidating machine when you first see it. It was parked next to a KTM 250EXC-F when we pulled up at Chris and Will’s test facility and it’s fair to say it dwarfed the 250. The 950 V-Twin draws your eye because it looks like it was shoe-horned into the trellis frame. The seat is about 920mm high and I know that’s nothing outrageous when an EXC is 960mm but this thing weighs about 180kg, so 920 is plenty tall enough.

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HISTORY CLASS KTM manufactured the 950 Super Enduro R from 2006 to 2008 after it was unveiled at the EICMA Motor Show in Milan as a bike that was designed to tackle absolutely everything. They cost $17,995 new and are still going for big money because they are becoming rare and highly desirable. KTM factory riders including David Knight helped design and set it up. It used the 75-degree V-twin found in the 950 Adventure but with a much more capable chassis and narrower ergos. KTM was trying to create an enduro bike with the power of an adventure machine. Knight also handled some of the promo work by competing in the big-bike race at the 2006 Erzberg Rodeo. He blitzed the factory BMW HP2 Enduros to win and was 10 seconds quicker than teammate Cyril Despres. KTM later released a 950 Super Enduro R Erzberg Special, which featured custom graphics, Akrapovic exhaust, adjustable footpegs and handguards. Got luck getting hold of one of those.

THE 950 V-TWIN DRAWS YOUR EYE BECAUSE IT LOOKS LIKE IT’S BEEN SHOEHORNED INTO THE FRAME THE BUILD The donor bike was a 2006 KTM 950 Super Enduro. It had been crashed hard and needed a fair bit of work to get roadworthy, but it had low kilometres so Will and Chris snatched it up with the aim of turning it into a serious off-road enduro machine. First thing they did was strip the bike so the frame could be checked and resprayed KTM orange. Attention was then directed to the engine. They found inspiration for an exhaust system during their endless trolling of internet forums and YouTube build videos. The designed they wanted was a two-into-one and they had it custom made by CJ Designs in Mukwonago, Wisconsin. A

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CJ-shortened Remus silencer sits neatly below the stock sidecover. The stock filter and airbox were replaced with a Rottweiler filter and inlet manifold. The Rottweiler cuts loads of weight up high. It took a lot of work to get the system to fit but, once in, it simplified the maintenance process. The Super Enduro has a pair of Keihin constant-velocity CVRD 43mm carburettors that have been jetted to suit the intake and exhaust. Other engine changes included a fresh water pump, fuel pump and Facet inline petrol filter. The SE has a bulky front-end so the pair removed the stock headlight, instruments and front guard and fitted the light and fender from the 2014 KTM 500EXC. These

bits look much sleeker and lighten up the steering. They also added a Trail Tech digital speedo, temperature warning light and oil pressure light. The stock handlebar was replaced with a 996 Renthal Fatbar. Both Chris and Will like lower controls on their bikes and they found the 996 to be their preferred bend. To finish off the cockpit, a set of Jet Barkbusters was added. They admit the hardest part of the conversion was tidying up the rear-end. This included removing the blinkers, mudguard and grab handles. To reduce the bulky appearance, they removed the rear section of the ’guard but had to fill the resulting hole in the underseat area with 6mm hard


BASHPLATE Mad Dog Cycle Works in Sandpoint, Idaho, provide protection for the large oil tank.

ENGINE ROOM The boys did have to swap jets on the twin Keihin carburettors. Looks like fun.

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START IT UP AND THE DEAFENING SOUND OF THE UNPLUGGED V-TWIN MAKES IT HARD TO HEAR YOURSELF THINK

Don't get too close, this thing will bite children and junior testers

PROTECTION Rad Guard grill keeps nasties away from the single radiator. There's no downtube.

JOINT BILLING Chris Birch and Will Dangar share the credit on the sidepanel graphics.

FULL HOUSE Not much spare room under the seat despite the absence of ABS and EFI.

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PASSENGER Pillion footpeg mounts are still on the subframe if you want to scare someone.


plastic. The new set-up was finished off with an Acerbis LED taillight assembly. Stopping this 10-year old beast is no easy task. To make the job easier and bring it up to date, a set of Moto-Master rotors from the Netherlands were installed. The standardsized front disc improved braking significantly, according to Chris and Will. The stock suspension was too soft to handle the sort of serious hits a Kiwi extreme enduro rider dishes out, so it was reworked by the lads at Teknik in Penrith, NSW. Stiffer springs were installed and the result is a much more capable, enduro-like suspension package. The stock gearing was replaced with 16:45 sprockets. To finish the build, new plastics were bolted on and a custom graphics kit based on the 690 Enduro was applied.

LET’S RIDE

TWO INTO ONE CJ Designs cut and shut the stock pipes. No equal-length headers needed here.

SUSPENSION Teknik beefed up the spring and damping on the remote-reservoir WP shock.

Start it up and the deafening sound of the unplugged V-Twin makes it hard to hear yourself think thanks to the shortened Remus muffler. It’s lighter and less restrictive than the stocker, but a lot louder. Anyone who has ridden a KTM will feel at home with the cockpit set-up on the Super Enduro. Being the same bend that Will and

Chris fit to all their KTMs, the Renthal Fatbar is your standard tapered unit and the position feels pretty similar to an EXC – so is the footpeg location, which makes for a comfortable standing position. The position and shape of the seat means you sit in the bike rather than on it. Still, it’s a lot closer to an enduro bike than a KTM 950 Adventure. The fuel tank is high and wide but the bulk is necessary if you want to keep the thirsty V-twin running for more than a loop of your backyard. Because of the trellis frame, the cell looks bigger than its 13 litres – not exactly Simpson Desert volume but enough for what the Super Enduro was designed for, with more on offer from Safari Tanks. Gingerly letting out the clutch I don’t know what to expect. I think because of the intimidating size of the bike, compounded by the deafening exhaust, that once that clutch bites I will be a helpless passenger. This isn’t the case. It’s not as intimidating to ride as its appearance and raspy exhaust note have led me to believe. At slow speed there is no hiding its 180kg but the weight isn’t an issue when it gathers velocity. This can be a good or bad thing

WAVE ROTOR JTR imports the Moto-Master flame discs in the standard 300mm size from Holland.

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depending on your skill level. The power seems limitless and the 950 has a very hard time putting it to the ground on gravel roads. Even fourth gear will see the 140/80 rear tyre break traction with the subtlest crack of the throttle as the speedo hits triple digits. The combination of power, good brakes and capable suspension encourages you to go faster, lures you into a false sense of security and before you know it you’re midway through a corner going way too fast and heading for the trees. The Super Enduro is definitely at home on fire trails. Better riders will have no trouble pulling wheelies in any gear. Because of the mass it takes a lot of energy to navigate through tight singletrack and the slightest lapse in concentration will unleash all 950cc of DOHC, V-twin fury. It’s a big beast of a thing, with a lot of weight behind it, but huge amounts of power that makes it addictive fun. It’s definitely a fire trail weapon in the hands of the average rider, in the hands of someone like Birch, who’s run a 1190 in New Zealand's Race to the Sky, it’s a trials bike.

BIRCHY’S THOUGHTS

CHAINGUIDE TM Designworks plastic chainguide stops the big chain from going off the rails.

HANDGUARDS Chris and Will went for Barkbusters with Jet foils in white for a lighter look.

One of the things Will and I often talk about is “What would be your ultimate five bikes?” and for me the KTM 950 Super Enduro is always on that list. When Will saw this one online and going cheap he jumped at the chance and between us we worked out how to build it up as the ultimate hoon’s big trailbike. The best way to describe this bike is as a giant enduro – it’s a lot taller and a lot longer than a normal enduro and has a higher ride height than the adventure bikes. It is surprisingly agile and the way the ergonomics are it is possible to ride it more like a diet bike than an adventure bike. When I first rode it my initial reaction was “this is the bike that I’m going to hurt myself on”. There were several reasons for this reaction, the main one being it’s so much fun that it’s hard for me to keep my inner hoon under control. Compared to a big bike like a 990 or 1190, it’s way more capable off-road and with every sense in overdrive it’s not until things get really loose that you get a sudden reminder that it’s still a big, heavy bike. The suspension and ergonomics are very close to an EXC and basically that’s what this bike is, a giant, loud, crazy powerful 950 EXC. I can’t wait to spend more time on this bike and work out where it’s limits and my limits are. Plans for the bike at the moment are to finish dialling in the suspension and get the carburettion perfect. Then we’ll look at doing some videos with Motorcycle Adventure Dirtbike TV like we have done with the KTM 1190. Hopefully we will race it and I’d love to do some of the New Zealand Enduro Championship races on it as that would be a hell of a laugh.

BETTER RIDERS WILL HAVE NO TROUBLE PULLING WHEELIES IN ANY GEAR

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RETRO TEST I 1992 CHESTERFIELD YAMAHA YZ250

SLEEPING BEAUTY WORDS // LEE HOGAN PHOTOS // MAX PETERS

It’s 1993 and Motocross Editor Lee Hogan is lining up for Australia in the MXdN on a factory bike. Drum roll please here was something special about the early 1990s scene in Europe. With “production bike” rules operating in America it was Europe that was racing factory bikes with no holds barred. Everything from crazy swingarms to frames that didn’t even resemble the production ones were being raced in the World Motocross Championships. With seemingly limitless budgets and relaxed rules it appeared that there was no end to the creative engineering. One of the leading outfits was

T

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the Chesterfield Yamaha Team/ Rinaldi with Victorian Gary Benn at the helm of Yamaha’s racing efforts. During this period the team won two world championships with American riders Donny Schmidt (250cc) and Bobby Moore (125cc), in 1992 and 1994 respectively. The 1992 Chesterfield Yamaha YZ250 two-stroke was ahead of its time. With Ohlins suspension front and rear, a hand-made swingarm and frame along with an impressive powerplant, the bike had all areas covered. With the in-form Schmidt piloting the bike they were almost destined to capture the crown.


Main: Hogan's riding gear from the 1993 Motocross des Nations was, unfortunately, still in the wash

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TEAM RIDE The following year I was given the 250 slot in Australia’s Motocross Des Nations team and got to race Schmidt’s Yamaha at the Austrian event because he was out with injury. To this day, some 23 years later, that Yamaha was the biggest work of art I have ridden. The bike had many outstanding features but the quick-shifter really blew me away. It used a solenoid to cut the ignition while changing gear, which allowed you to change up under full load without touching the clutch. This feature is seen in road race bikes today but something we still don’t see in motocross. The opportunity to race Schmidt’s bike was huge and when the opportunity came recently to throw a leg over a replica of his championshipwinning bike I jumped at it. Complete with the same swingarm, frame, six-port cylinder and other factory parts, this weapon looks almost identical to the original.

LOCATION The Rosebud circuit in Vicco is sand, sand and more sand. And, in the middle of winter, you are likely to be carrying a jacket and umbrella. With a bit of moisture it was an absolutely perfect spot to bring the sleeping beauty back to life and put it through its paces. The white plastics would be hard to keep clean but that was not my problem.

PRISTINE From the moment I laid eyes on the gleaming machine I was hypnotised. It was almost like I had been teleported back in time. I hopped straight out of my car and walked over to where owner Max Macdermid was fitting some black frameguards and tipping in some ETS race fuel. There was so much trick stuff going on with this bike that I didn’t know where to look first. The magnesium clutch cover and billet brake pedal would stand out in an MX Nationals pit area. The retro graphics and seat cover really set the bike off and were matched up nicely with gold Excel rims. It was easy to see that this was someone’s pride and joy and I was truly honoured to be the one to put it through its paces. It was a wet and windy day and my first thought after firing up the Yamaha was to be kind to this machine in the conditions. I couldn’t live with myself if I went and grenaded this bike on its first day back at it. The track was deep and had plenty of puddles around the place. My first few laps consisted of missing puddles and making sure that the motor wasn’t running too lean for the conditions. After only a couple of corners I realised that the 23-year-old bike felt just as good as today’s 250cc two-strokes. The motor was purring while the chassis and suspension felt ultra smooth. The only thing that gave me a reality check was the brakes (or lack there of) and the clutch pull. But other than that I was so impressed with the initial warm up laps.

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HUBS - The cast magnesium hubs were light and strong.

MUFFLER - Arrow carbon-fibre as used by the factory team.


SHOCK - Ohlins, with external preload adjuster that you can work with a gloved hand.

RADIATORS - Oversized factory cores and a titanium waterpump take care of heat.

FORK - Upside down Ohlins with gold anti-friction coating and adjustable spring preload.

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ENGINE

SUSPENSION

The 1992 and 1993 Yamaha YZ250s were known as having very good engines. They didn’t have the bottom-end of the Kawasaki and didn’t have the peak power of a Honda CR250, but they did have an almost electric smoothness to them, with a competitive mid-range that made them one of the most impressive and easy to ride bikes of their time. The Rinaldi engine really brought the package to life but kept its smooth characteristics. The six-port cylinder in the Rinaldi kit helped to boost peak horsepower. The standard exhaust and muffler combination seemed to hold back the YZ from reaching its full potential but the factory cone pipe and Arrow carbon-fibre muffler combination breathed fire into our test bike while also adding a very tough note. The strongest attribute of this particular engine I would have to say would be the smooth power delivery right through the range. The Schmidt replica almost has a four-stroke feel to the power, minus the engine braking.

With Ohlins front and rear, the bike reacted really well around the tricky Rosebud circuit. The shock had all the bells and whistles, including an adjustment knob above the kickstarter that allows you to manually adjust the ride height and static sag in a matter of seconds – a feature that I have never seen on a motocross bike. Even the rebound adjuster had a ‘gripper’ knob which allowed me to slow the rebound in those early laps without a screwdriver. The action of the shock was superb and would hold its own against any of today’s 250cc two-strokes. The fork gave me a huge amount of adjustability but I did have to reach for the screwdriver if I was to adjust the high or low-speed compression damping along with the rebound. A 17mm spanner gave me the ability to adjust the ride height. Yes, that’s right, an adjustable-ride-height fork. Fortunately, I didn’t need to mess around with the fork as it handled spot-on for what I was after on the day.

This pipe works fantastic and complements the six-port Rinaldi cylinder to perfection SWINGARM - This handmade alloy component was designed to make the bike more stable at high speed.

TRICK BITS SWINGARM: The unbelievably trick, machined and handwelded bad boy on this YZ is what the factory team raced with in Europe. Unfortunately, the rules in Australia and the US meant that I wasn’t able to use one at the time. The chunky swingarm made the rear-end more stable in high-speed sections. CONE PIPE: Nothing looks quite as cool as a cone pipe when it is done properly. But, of course, factory cone pipes aren’t done for looks! The cool look is just a bonus. This pipe works fantastic and complements the six-port Rinaldi cylinder to perfection. BILLET BRAKE PEDAL: I was lucky enough to have one of these brake pedals on my 1993 Peter Jackson Yamaha and they are very cool. They are super light and almost impossible to bend. I know, because I tried to bend mine a few times accidentally. They would have cost an arm and a leg to mass-produce, hence why production ones are cast or extruded. CARBON-FIBRE AIRBOX: This is a rare sucker. The unit is light and very strong. Is it going to make the difference between getting first and second? I don’t think so, but when you walk up to this bike and have a close look it is something that will put a smile on your face. You’ll notice the swingarm, cone pipe and a bunch of other things before you notice the carbon airbox, but when you do you’ll be impressed. RARE METALS: When you have a real close look at this bike you’ll notice more exotic metals than on any other bike. No money was spared in this department. The titanium and magnesium nuts and bolts look fantastic and while they add to the bling factor, they also strip unwanted fat.

NUTS AND BOLTS - Why muck about with steel fasteners when you can use titanium and magnesium ones?

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CHASSIS

CONCLUSION

The chassis of this beast, particularly the plastics, is what makes this bike feel a tad bulky. The combination of the chassis and plastics almost make this bike feel bigger and heavier than today’s MX1 four-strokes. The stability is superb through the really fast sections of the track but you really need to tip this bike in hard for corners. You also get the feeling that this bike carries a lot of its weight higher than current machines. But when you consider the technological advances that our sport has seen in the meantime you start to appreciate how much of a weapon this bike was in its day.

It’s not every day you get to take a trip down memory lane so, when such an opportunity presents itself, it is best to grab it with both hands. I had such a fun time riding this work of art and re-living all the good and not so good features of factory bikes of the era. Thank you for the opportunity to ride your pride and joy Max, I had a blast!

The things that gave me a reality check were the brakes (or lack there of) and the clutch pull

HANDLEBAR- Skinny ’bar and quarterturn throttle are period correct but look kind of fragile despite the crossbrace.

MAX MACDERMID

ENGINE- Factory-spec six-port barrell by Rinaldi matched to Yamaha factory high-compression cylinder head.

LH Where did the motivation come from to restore something like this? MM Mate, I was just a huge fan of Donny Schmidt and also of that particular team. They were allowed to do so much cool stuff with those bikes and it all worked. They just looked like a piece of art! It has taken a long time to complete the job but it has been well worth it. LH Do you ever get to throw a leg over the bike yourself? MM Only up and down the road! (laughs). You know this bike gave me a heart attack, Hogie! True story! When I first put the bike together I couldn’t get it started and I thought, I’ll get you going you bugger! Next thing I know I’m waking up in hospital. I did eventually end up getting it started though. My son Mick, who runs Nine Two Decals out of Queensland, hopped on it occasionally for a race, which was good, and my good mate Daryl Hurley rode it at Classic Dirt. After that the big girl is getting put on display and that will be it from a riding perspective. LH Well, once again, congratulations on such an immaculate job of replicating such an iconic machine. MM Thanks, Hoges! Thanks for reviewing the bike and taking care of her for me.

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TRAILRIDE I NORTH STAR

We tried to encourage a W wheelie, but most just gave the camera their best blue steel

This is what 1400 riders and their campsites look like from the air

WORDS & PHOTOS // OLLY MALONE

North Star Trail Ride is a weekend of epic trailriding that draws a crowd of over 1400 riders from all walks of life 90 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


N JOY RIDE Thanks to Grant Carrigan from Goondiwindi Helicopters for taking us up for a bird's-eye view of North Star Trail Ride.

orth Star has a knack for attracting some of the biggest crowds of any organised trailride in Australia. Last year’s ride was looking to eclipse 2000 riders but heavy rain put paid to that. This year, conditions were looking good, no rain in sight. With the all-clear from organiser Jeff Nixon, Editor Mitch Lees and I loaded the ADB HiLux with everything you need for a weekend of camping and riding – three bikes, three cases of tinnies, three kilograms of meat, and headed north. The drive from Sydney is a big one, can’t deny that. All up it took us about eight hours. The landscape is stunning though. From the end of the M1 Pacific Motorway to Singleton is great for playing ‘Guess the make and model of that burnt-out car’. Mitch got five from five, his auto-cognitive skills are far greater than mine. Then it was onto the New England Highway, which is not going to win an award for road of the year any time soon. We stopped to pick up Mitch’s brother, Alex, from his place of work in Upper Horton and then it was only two hours to North Star. The closer we got the more dirtbikes we saw. We know from speaking to local shop owners and service station operators that the surrounding towns see a huge increase in business in the days before and after North Star and they count on it every year. www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2016

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, From wide open to tight singletrack the ride had it all

SWAGIN’ IT After the 750km drive we pulled into the campsite at North Star Showground at about 6pm. Setting up in the dark is never fun but Mitch and Alex had no problem, being experienced campers and having used their swags more than once. Alex had his swag, AKA the Taj Mahal, up within minutes, Mitch was not far behind. Me, well I was still taking the plastic wrapping off the poles by the time Mitch and Alex had cracked their first tinnies. The struggling didn’t end there, I was like Homer trying to build the BBQ Pit. Convoys continued to pour into the campsite until well after midnight. The vehicle of choice for most was without a doubt the trusty Toyota LandCruiser 70 Series Ute, V8 of course, and they had Alex salivating almost

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as much as when he sees a good Nissan Patrol. After a solid night’s sleep, despite the frog calls coming from the Editor’s porous swag, all three of us rose early and by 6.30am we had a bacon and egg roll in our stomachs and, after the rider’s briefing, we were on our way. It was a cold start, with frost covering our bikes. We set off before the crowd to make sure we found the best photo opportunities, of course, and headed out on the 80km loop. After 15 minutes our hands had defrosted and so had our seats and we tucked into some epic singletrack along the creek beds. No wonder they cancelled last year’s ride. Some of the best tracks in the area would have been under water! This year’s dry conditions did come at a cost but considering over 1400 bikes

were registered the dust wasn’t too bad. Linking the sections of singletrack were long straight tracks where the wheelie boys always put on a show. If there is one thing 450cc four-strokes are good for it’s wheelies and when you’re pointing a DSLR camera the rider’s way, it’s a guaranteed wheelie-a-thon. It was my fourth ride on the Yamaha WR450F long-termer and it came into its own on the fast North Star terrain. The thing has some go. Mitch and Alex were on a pair of SWMs – an RS300R and RS500R. The two Italian bikes attracted a lot of attention and a lot of questions – most common was “How do those things go?” Alex being a twice-a-year rider was loving the 300R, while Mitch was monstering past kids on 150s and 125s on his big 500,

giving them a little kick on the way through to let them know who’s boss. The one thing missing was a solid hill but in an area as flat as North Star they don’t have that many. That being said, Mt Mitchell didn’t disappoint. The North Star Trailride attracts all types of riders and after spending 30 minutes at the top capturing all the carnage this had become pretty clear. From blokes on new motocrossers and enduros to old XRs, RMs and everything in between, everyone was having a go with no regard for their own or their bike’s well-being. Working at ADB we spend a lot of time at events that put huge importance on having the latest and greatest. North Star confirmed what the majority of riders classify as important. The latest matching gear is low on the priority list, they make do


There’s no shortage of space at North Star, or Hondas!

Most bikes needed a splash of fuel at the pitstop on the 80km loop

They make do with what they have and don’t give two stuffs The clubhouse bar, where copious amounts of beer were consumed

Lunch of champions – Alex went for Creaming Soda to help with rehydration


THE SERIES the Dalby Moto Series, The North Star Trailride is part of h-eastern Queensland sout ss acro which features 18 rides 12,000 riders each year and northern NSW. It sees about than 1000. more with and there are several rides

The easy way 'round

Second attempt he came in tapped and bounced his way up using any fallen rider or bike as grip The only traffic jam North Star will see all year

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with what they have and don’t give two stuffs. They just want to have fun with their mates and have a good story to tell around the campfire. The Mt Mitchell climb was loose and rocky and you can’t see the top from the bottom so there is no way of knowing if a rider is stuck until you’re riding over them. Alex, Mitch and I had a good crack at it but came to a screeching halt to avoid smashing into a bloke parked across the one-bike-wide track. It was too late for Alex though, who tried to thread the needle past me but instead drove the footpeg of his SWM deep into the side of my leg – thanks, mate. We eventually got our bikes to the top and watched as rider after rider gave it everything they

had to get to the top. The best effort we saw was a bloke on a late ’70s/early ’80s Honda XL250 wearing Blundstones, jeans, a long sleeve shirt, welding gloves up to his elbows and an old motocross helmet. He was the toughest bloke there and simply didn’t give up. The first time he came in a little too gingerly and got about half way. Alex ran down to give him a hand but as he ripped his welding gloves off and pulled the bike out of Alex’s grasp the Honda rider said: “It’s all good mate, I’ve got this.” Second attempt he came in tapped and bounced his way up using fallen riders and bikes for grip. He almost got to the top before he stopped, but this time he managed to get going and wrestled the 30-year-old bike the

rest of the way. He was a true legend and a perfect example of someone making do with whatever they have. It turned out he was a bit of a gun in his day, which made sense given his obvious ability on a fairly basic trailbike.

CARNAGE GALORE While all this was happening on the hard section, people were hitting the deck left, right and centre on the easy way round. Little kids on two-stroke motocrossers were skipping out on the loose rocks and parents were scrambling to get their young ones going again. One kid in particular was having a tough time. After hitting the deck right at our feet he remounted and took off, with his feet off the ’pegs

and his YZ85 screaming as it revved close to detonation. He rode straight into a tree and down he went for a second time. This one took a little longer to recover from but after a couple minutes he was off again, feet still off the pegs hanging over the rear fender but this time he managed to stick to the 6m-wide, 4WD trail. North Star must be where rocks come to breed because the area produced the most per square metre in all of NSW, Queensland and probably all of Australia. The best section of rocks can be found in the Enchanted Forest. For months leading up North Star, Mitch and I would receive regular emails and phone calls from Jeff warning us about the ‘new and improved’ Enchanted Forest.

One wrong move and you crop it

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the "Turn 'er off, mate! We'll drag it to top!" Mitch and Alex rescue a boiled Honda and its rider on Mt Mitchell

Turns out Jeff took some advice from Vince Strang, Josh Strang’s old man, who said the track had been too fast and too open. So what did he do? Jeff extend the short and sweet Enchanted Forest to 6.5km of torture. Thanks, Vincenzo. Like any tough section you only appreciated it after you’d finished. I think some poor souls spent the night in there and might still be stuck, especially the kid on the Kawasaki I T-boned after he got in an awkward spot at the top of a rock ledge, giving me nowhere to go – sorry! Leaving the Enchanted Forest, I felt like Tom Hanks in Cast Away. The endless rocks disappeared and it was back to smooth(ish) singletrack that weaved its way through the fields. The 80km loop ended

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with the best section of singletrack we had ridden. Ten kilometres of fast flowing trail that dipped and dived in and out of creek beds with nice berms at each corner. One unlucky rider managed to flip his bike upside down, on a straight stretch. We didn’t think anything of it as we rode past because it looked like he was working on the thing but what we couldn’t see was the rider down on his haunches looking dazed. Before he had enough time to act like nothing happened 20 riders had stopped to check if he was okay. That’s the beauty of trailrides like North Star, everyone is willing to help out. The last section of singletrack satisfied all the speed freaks who didn’t get enough out on the open fire roads that linked each section and it had everyone

talking as we cruised through the showground back to our campsite. What a way to end the first day! As night fell we were still crunching dust between our teeth from our blast round the 80km loop. Every campsite had a fire going and the banter about the Enchanted Forest could be heard from campsite to campsite – I don’t think it saw many repeat customers the following day. The SWMs continued to attract attention from passers-by including our new mate Darryl from Moree who loved a good chat and our Carlton Drys. Despite the ruckus from the clubhouse bar, bikes being valve bounced most of the night and someone walking through our campfire screaming in the early hours, we were up at sparrow’s for more of North Star’s best.

ROLLING IN People continued to roll in early Sunday and the rider’s briefing had the area in front of the clubhouse bursting at the seams. Ride sponsors had donated some awesome prizes including a helmet, a couple of coolers and a new Honda CRF50F donated by Thomas Lee Motorcycles. The draw for the Honda created an awkward situation. After three redraws due to no one claiming the prize, a bloke put up his hand and claimed the bike that was obviously far too small for him. He made his way to the front high fiving anyone in his path but he’d misheard the badge number. “Fourteen hundred?” he yelled out. “No, thirteen hundred!” replied the announcer. All 1500 people erupted in laughter as the real winner, 12-year-old Harry


On the third attempt heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d obviously had enough, just launched his bike up the hill and ghostied it to the top The Mt Mitchell legend!

An epic section of singletrack through one of the local farms

Not as easy as it looks. This hill was steep, loose and full of fallen riders

BY THE NUMBERS North Star has a population of about 50 but over 2000 120 flood into the town for the ride. The event needs over people to keep things on track. This includes 60 sweep St riders, 20 pickup vehicles, three helicopters and 15 and Johns and NSW Ambulance staff with a first aid tent t constan in were ers Organis 4WD ambulances. r. communication by two-way radio thanks to a radio repeate

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in the Mt Mitchell claimed many victims 20 minutes we watched from the top

One of the best sections of the whole weekend! This went on for 7km

Coleman made his way to the front of the crowd. With an eight-hour drive that afternoon we decided to take the shorter 40km loop through the quarry. The quarry is a playground for riders looking to challenge themselves on the closest thing to a hill in the local area, it also was home to ADB Hill. ADB Hill had two lines. The shorter one went up the side while the expert line would have had a mountain goat struggling. Still, it didn’t deter local legend Tim Diamond Curry. Jeff offered $1000 to T.D.C. if he could get up in one go. First attempt was no good and on the second he almost lost his KTM 350EXC-F down the 15-metre drop to the bottom. On the third attempt he’d obviously had enough, just launched his bike up the hill and ghostied it to the top, taking out Alex, Mitch and I in the process. But he made it, and as far as we know was the only rider who did. The 40km loop included all the best parts of the 80km one and if it wasn’t for the drive back to Sydney ahead of us we would have refuelled and gone out for another lap. You couldn’t ask for much more of a weekend of riding, camping and banter. It’s a weekend trailride that has something for everyone, make sure you check it out next year!

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You couldn’t ask for much more of a weekend of riding, camping and banter

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Riders of all ages and skill levels are catered for at North Star. Inside the showground was a Pee Wee track for the smaller kids. A 6km loop on the outskirts of the showground was for novice riders on bigger bikes. It was closed to full-size bikes but adults could tag along to keep an eye on their youngsters.

For the big bikes there were 20km, 40km and 80km loops that linked up at the end for that primo section of singletrack. Riders looking for a challenge had the quarry, Enchanted Forest and Mt Mitchell. The quarry is an open riding area where riders can take on a number of short but steep climbs. All the hard sections had a bypass route so you didn’t have to take on the Enchanted Forest or Mt Mitchell if you didn’t want to.


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HISTORY I LEGENDS OF MOTOCROSS

HIS CRASH ON THE CHADâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;APULT JUMP AT MILLVILLE COULD HAVE BEEN CAREER ENDING

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WORDS // LEE HOGAN PHOTOS // ADB ARCHIVES

MX Editor Lee Hogan picks the toughest racers of all time

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s a sports fan it’s hard not to admire tough competitors. Whether it’s a footballer who takes a big hit and keeps going, or a Tour De France rider covered in gravel rash climbing the Alps. In motocross there are countless examples of courage and when a particular rider is producing these kinds of efforts every weekend

they develop an aura of indestructability. MX fans know that the only way these stars will give in is if their body fails. Mental failure is never an option. Many of these great riders have graced the pages of ADB but time and distance means that many have not raced against each other. We have scoured our massive archives to come up with a list of the toughest motocrossers of all time.

Main: Reed cemented his name int he toughest record books when he remounted after this massive crash at Millville. 1. Gunter repping Pepsi with pride 2. Gall personified the new breed of pros 3. Leisk was mentally tough as well 4. Gunter leads Gall

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AUSTRALIA CHAD REED Number 22 is known among his competitors as one of the toughest on the planet. He is able to ride through pain and overcome injuries that would put most riders on the sidelines. Reed finished second in the World 250cc Motocross Championship in 2001 for Kawasaki before crossing the Atlantic, where he won AMA Supercross Championships in 2002 (250cc), 2004 (Open) and 2008 (Open). In 2009 he won the AMA outdoor 450cc title for Suzuki. His crash on the Chad’apult jump at Millville could have been career ending but he got back on and finished the race, in true bad ass style! STEPHEN GALL The consummate professional, Gall almost single-handedly lifted the level of motocross in Australia. He always said the right things on the microphone and wore collared polo tops while others would wear t-shirts or jerseys, but was as fierce as they come on a motorcycle. With four Mr Motocross crowns and five Australian championships, Gall was just relentless on a

dirtbike in a period known for tough riders. JEFF LEISK The ‘Flying Freckle’ came from Perth, WA and in a time of brutal bikes that lacked a lot of today’s refinements, Leisky brought a smooth, technical and fluid riding style to the sport. He looked too smooth to be tough but had determination to match the world’s fiercest athletes, like Stefan Everts. After winning numerous Australian championships and Mr Motocross titles, Leisk went on to become the first Australian to win a world round, before finishing runner-up in the 1989 World 500cc Motocross Championship for Honda. ANTHONY GUNTER Gunter was fondly known by the MX community as ‘Grunt’ because of his toughness. While being a nice bloke off the bike, he was an absolute machine on it. Gunter managed to score three Mr Motocross crowns and three Australian championships in the ’70s during an extremely competitive period that featured Gall, Leisk, Trevor Williams and Ray Vandenberg.

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EUROPE JOEL SMETS: The big man from Belgium was truly a machine on a motocross bike. Smets won four world championships in the Open class and knew how to throw a big bike around, although he didn’t start racing until he was 17. Not one to look smooth and fluid on a bike, he was known to monster his machines around the track using strength rather than finesse. He also would not hesitate to bump competitors out of the way. STEFAN EVERTS: Born on 25 November, 1972, Everts came from an established MX family. The son of four-time world champion Harry Everts, Stefan was almost destined for greatness. But nobody could foresee the dominance that he would enjoy during his career. Everts won an unprecedented 10 world championships. His strength was all in his head, with an astonishing ability to push through pain helping him to his 101 GP wins, nearly double the total of his nearest rival, Smets with just over half on 57. DAVE THORPE The Brit was a force to be reckoned with in the 1980s. He managed to earn an impressive three world championships in 1985, 1986 and 1989, on board factory Honda CR500 two-strokes. Thorpey was as tough as nails, and a huge bloke who could have become a pro soccer player. He was a machine on the bike with a fanatical attitude towards training, along similar lines to Ricky Carmichael. Injuries limited his success but he now races in vintage motocross on a CR500 with blistering speed.

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THE FIERCELY DETERMINED RIDER WOULD GO ON TO WIN FOUR FIM TITLES DURING HIS CAREER 2

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HAKAN CARLQVIST Born in Stockholm, Carlqvist won the World 250cc Motocross Championship in 1979 as a member of the Husqvarna factory racing team. In 1980, he switched to Yamaha to contest the 500cc championship. He finished third in 1981 and 1982 before claiming the second of his two world championships, on a Yamaha. Despite being a very strong rider, Hakan remained smooth and fluid on the bike but could produce bursts of aggression when needed. His last grand prix victory was in Namur, Belgian, five years later. HEIKKI MIKKOLA Known as the Flying Finn, Mikkola was born in Mikkeli and became the first Finn to win a world championship. The fiercely determined rider would go on to win four FIM titles during his career, one was a 250 and the other three on 500s. During that time his determination never faltered and he was almost impossible to rattle. From 1972 until 1978, he placed top three each year, a remarkable feat. ROGER DE COSTER Known simply as ‘The Man’, De Coster was born in Belgium on 28 August, 1944. By the mid-’70s, Roger had established himself as the greatest motocrosser of all-time, with five world championships on 500cc Suzuki machines and 36 GPs. His style was smooth and calculated while his intense fitness training allowed him to charge through to the chequered flag harder than anyone. His knowledge of the sport was not limited to the track, as exemplified by his success as a team manager for Suzuki and, more recently, KTM in the United States.


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5 Main: Joel Smets smashed his away around a motocross track 1. Stefan Everts is running the Suzuki MXGP team this year 2. Carlqvist was one of Yamaha's greatest 3. Belgian spectators get close to DeCoster 4. Everts with one of the old works bikes 5. 'The Man' put thought into his riding

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AMERICA

Main: RC decimated all his competitors and made it look easy 1. RV was a natural successor to Carmichael 2. RJ generated lots of press coverage

THE TOP THREE 1

HAKAN CARLQVIST Carlqvist’s career combined with his tough nature on and off the bike makes him worthy of our top three. It is a ‘one off’ on the day of his retirement that has put him on the top of the list. During the Namur Grand Prix in 1988, Carlqvist stunned spectators by stopping just before the end of the moto for a swig of beer. He had a 50-second lead and went on to take the win and achieve legend status with the huge crowd. He might have a bit of trouble with fellow competitors and the FIM trying to do that these days. DANNY CHANDLER We don’t have any beer swilling yarns about Danny Chandler. Magoo inspired everyone he came across to give it a go, and to make sure they gave 100%. Fans loved him wherever he went, whether he was home in America, or battling the

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Europeans at the Motocross des Nations. Chandler will be remembered as an inspirational warrior on a motocross bike. His death, resulting from complications after his paralysing crash in Paris, should in no way damage his legendary status. CHAD REED He doesn’t just have an abundance of talent on a motorcycle, Reed is as tough as they come. It takes a certain breed of human being to race at 100% for 30 minutes plus two laps with a broken bone or a freshly reconnected shoulder. Who else would have a huge cartwheel in practice and be taken off to hospital, only to check themselves out a couple of hours later, catch a taxi to the stadium and race for 20 laps, ending up on the podium? We can all be proud knowing that our greatest Aussie rider also has a great big ticker, and a huge set of...!

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DANNY ‘MAGOO’ CHANDLER Quite possibly the hardest charging and most aggressive of American racers, Chandler began his career with Maico in 1979, but was poached by Honda soon after and really made his mark. In 1982 he dominated both the US 500cc Motocross Grand Prix and the Motocross Des Nations, clean sweeping both events. A huge crash at a Paris supercross left him paralysed and he died in 2010 from an illness related to his paralysis. Magoo attacked every track like he was at war. BOB ‘HURRICANE’ HANNAH Born on 26 September, 1956, in Lancaster, California, Hannah was an all-American hero. He was tough, gritty and never threw in the towel. Hannah won seven AMA motocross championships with Yamaha and Honda, and had 70 wins to his name in motocross and supercross until a rider by the name of Jeremy McGrath dethroned him in 1999. His style looked ragged but he had the strength to make the bike do what he wanted. RICKY CARMICHAEL You don’t get named the ‘greatest of all time’ for no reason. Ricky didn’t just win, he smashed the competition out of the park. Ricky won 16 AMA and world championships and underlined his toughness by logging perfect scores in the AMA outdoor series in 2002 and 2004. RC’s combination of determination and extreme fitness training is yet to be matched and it would take a brave person to predict that anyone will de-throne Carmichael as the GOAT. RYAN VILLOPOTO Following in the footsteps of Carmichael and, with similar coloured hair,

Villopoto could be mistaken for looking like RC out on the track, steering through turns with the back wheel. RV was born on 13 August, 1988, in Washington State and had a stellar junior career. With nine AMA championships including four straight in supercross and three in a row outdoors he will be remembered as one of the greatest. Similar to RC when the chips were down, RV was extremely focused on his work, and wouldn’t let injury or the competition distract him. ‘ROCKET’ REX STATEN Staten had a reputation as a bad dude. He never backed down and was not afraid to throw a punch or two. Rex won over 2000 races in a 30-year career that ended when he was 46. After winning the first AMA National moto he contested, at Hangtown, Rocket crashed in the first turn of Moto Two. He fixed his own damaged exhaust in the pits and put on a monumental charge to fall just short of the win from two laps down. He wasn’t averse to bumping other riders along the way. RICKY JOHNSON RJ was the poster boy of the 1980s American motocross scene and was equally as good at motocross as he was at supercross. Ricky won his first AMA championship in 1984 on a Yamaha but became a legend riding for the giant Honda US team during the latter part of the ’80s, when he and teammate David Bailey would regularly battle for wins. Bailey was a technically perfect rider who went on to coach, while RJ was happy to start a bump fest. Johnson was a part of the American ‘super team’ that dominated the Motocross Des Nations in 1986 at the famous Maggiora circuit in Italy with a clean sweep of all races.


ADV RIDE I AROUND THE WORLD PT 2

PART

2 WORDS // SHERRI JO WILKINS PHOTOS // WALTER COLEBATCH & SJW

BONES TO PICK

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Sherri Jo tackles the Road of Bones without knowing a thing about it

hile organising my world trip I came across Walter Colebatch, who kindly answered some of my planning questions. He often travels through Russia by motorcycle, so he asked if I would like to join him and a group of five riders. He told me a bit about the Old Road of Bones, made famous in Long Way Round, which was their goal. I agreed without really knowing what I was getting myself in to. I was up to my ears in planning to ride alone, so to know I would meet somebody along the way sounded great. And that’s all I based my decision on. I left Australia, rode through Japan, took a ferry to South Korea and made my way towards the North Korean border where we planned to meet. Finally, in Sokcho, I met Walter to take a ferry to Vladivostok. I was quickly told there was no group. Everyone had pulled out except Walter. That was a huge red flag! Was there something about the Road of Bones I should have known before I got there? Now I was the only sucker not smart enough to cancel. I told him I was happy to ride the easy Trans-Siberian Highway if he wanted to take his trip without me, the unskilled female. But he

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WALTER’S TIPS • Stand up • Keep your knees and elbows loose • Let the motorcycle move around below you • Momentum is your friend


PART

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LAST MONTH If you missed part one in issue #444 of Sherriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adventures, you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that Sherri has ridden all over the world and this is just the first of three of her wildest adventures. Next issue is a climb up a volcano in Chlie, and then a dangerous trip across the Amazon.

Main: Wilkins soon got good at river crossings 1. The still water was deceptively deep 2. Sherri Jo in the forest fire nightmare

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seemed keen and we decided to go as planned. I reminded him that I had minimal off-road experience and, to be honest, I was still struggling with the on-road riding! The KTM 690 Enduro was too tall for me and my gear very heavy. It had only been four weeks since I started my journey and I still wasn’t used to the bike. Bottom line was that I had zero confidence. He said: “Don’t worry about it, I can teach you.” Okay, what else could I do? I was already there. The first thing we did was change the street tyres to knobbies. Walter said we had 4000km of dirt roads ahead. I don’t recall him mentioning that the knobbies would help in sand, rivers and mud, but hey ... I didn’t ask. The one thing I did learn is that ignorance is bliss. We set off west from Magadan and it wasn’t long before the dirt roads began. I stopped in fear. Walter pulled up and gave me my first tips.

BIG BEARS I clearly remember all his advice because I was shaking in my boots because if I didn’t learn fast, nobody else could ride the bike out for me. I couldn’t just walk away if it got too hard. And there were lots of big bears in this part of the world. I picked up speed quickly and soon started enjoying riding on the nice, easy dirt/gravel roads, no problem. What was I nervous about? On our first night we set up camp with a small group of Russians having dinner outside at midnight. They invited us in and there was still plenty of light at that time in northern 108 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

Siberia. We had fresh fish from the river, and vodka … of course! The next day we diverted off the main track to find a gulag (Stalin-era prison camp) we’d been told about. I expected a standard dirt track, just narrower than the main road. But this one ended up being the biggest adventure motorcycle training course I could have asked for. It threw every scenario at us.

RIVER CROSSINGS I’d never ridden a motorcycle through still, deep water. I had seen it done, but surely Walter didn’t want me to do it? I was just getting used to the dirt roads. I saw Walter ride through easily, so I gave it a go. I went in too slow out of fear and stalled. Walter walked into the water and told me to keep the speed up and steady. He also told me to restart the bike immediately to avoid drowning it. The water came up to my knees as I sat on the KTM, so that was deep. The second “pond” I came to, I went in a bit fast, hit an underwater log and fell over. Oops! More advice. The third one, I succeeded. Then the fourth and fifth. It turned out we had nine of these deep-water crossings. I learned not to go too fast or too slow. Close my eyes and hope for the best. I was exhausted but I learned so much. The next “new experience” was river crossings. Moving water. Deep river stone. A new set of tips. I was truly surprised at what I could do and so lucky to be travelling with a man who was willing to teach me! I jumped ahead of the next creek and watched what Walter did. Easy peasy for him! Twenty years of


experience versus my two hours. But we are making progress... The river crossings diminished, thank goodness! I enjoyed my lessons, sort of, but I was ready to finish. Were we nearly there? The answer I got was no, we were about half way. My concentration was being pushed to the limit, but there was no stopping. When you are in the middle of nowhere, hanging around is not an option. It was 3pm before we reached the gulag and it was an eerie place. Not many people know about them and even less know where they are, because they are such a dark part of Russia’s past. Walter gave me a history lesson while we were there, but we didn’t stay long. I couldn’t believe it when he told me we had to ride out the same way. The gulags were a network of forced labor camps in remote and inhospitable locations like Siberia. At their peak, they held millions of political prisoners and intellectuals. Most went in and never came out. I managed to fall over a lot more on the way back from there. Yes, my riding skills had

improved, but exhaustion had taken over. We eventually returned to the main gravel road but a full days’ ride, over 400km, was still on the agenda. Holy smoke ... this guy was an over-achiever! The plan was to get to the start of the Old Road of Bones. We again rode until midnight. On the positive side, we could ride to all hours because it didn’t get completely dark this far north in summer. At Yagodnoye, we got to stop for the night. Walter tracked down a scarey looking hotel, for which I was most grateful. Dusty, dirty and exhausted, we locked the bikes up and dragged the bags in. I couldn’t really touch anything until I had a shower ... forget food. And then I passed out on the bed. Aaaahhh. The next day, the gravel road we were on was busy with trucks. It’s called the Road of Bones but it’s a new one that they can handle. We were going to ride the old one instead, now called the Old Summer Road. We finally reached the turn off, where Walter pulled over and said: “Now the hard part.” The Road of Bones name came from the prisoners who died building it. Rumour has it

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1. Anya and Anton were up early to say goodbye 2. Bridges leave a little to be desired in Siberia 3. Someone's been smoking 4. Walter takes his turn on one of the crossings 5. The 690's crankcase escaped damage 6. More fallen timber for Walter's X-Challenge

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Main: Architecture is rather basic, but it's all about the lifestyle 1. Another river crossing down 2. The bushfire adventure was gruelling 3. The latest in engineering

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I couldn’t really touch anything until I had a shower … forget food they were buried in the roadbed because the permafrost made digging graves for them impossible. Walter always rode well ahead of me on his BMW X-Challenge. At one stage, I remember looking at him and his silhouette on the forest track. I thought he looked good in the fog. Fog? It wasn’t fog, it was smoke! It was all pine around there, so the burning trees smelled nice but we started to come across fallen ones on the track. This meant we had to get off often to move a tree out of the way.

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WASH OUT

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Our first major challenge was a bad wash-out filled with fallen trees. Since Walter was such an experienced rider, I trusted him when he said we could get through it. I also knew that turning around wasn’t an option. We moved as many trees as we could but some of them were just too big. It took about two hours, but we got both motorcycles through. As we went deeper into the bushfire area, the trees were hot, with burning embers everywhere. Walter decided we could not move or ride the bikes over the fallen trees anymore. We had to find a way around. The landscape was still burning but it was mostly ash. He decided to give it a go, on my

bike (not his!) He said: “Your bike is lighter and I’ll have a better chance. If it works then I’ll take my bike the same way.” I thought the real reason was that if the Kato went up in flames, it would be my loss. It looked like a relatively easy diversion. A bit of a slope and lots of ash but not far. Once he rode into the ash, it quickly became a nightmare. Soft, fresh ash is far worse than fresh snow. Snow gets wet and gives you some grip. This ash was so light and fluffy that the bike had nothing to grip on. The rear tyre would just spin and spin. I’d push, choking in the spray of ash hitting my mouth and nose. Even with my faceshield down, it still got in! But we’d make tiny bits of progress. When we didn’t make progress, our only option was to lay the bike down, drag it a foot or so, pick it up and try again. Nope … Lay it down again, drag, pick it up, try again. Got it. It took us three-and-a-half hours to go around 50 feet. When we finally got my bike out, we nearly collapsed. Straight away Walter says: “I’m not taking my bike through that. We are going to have to drag it over the trees best we can.” This wasn’t ideal either, and it took every bit of strength we had to get the heavier BMW over the large tree trunks. The best part was that it took a lot less time. Once both bikes made it

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Main: Just like home, only greener 1. Tomtor is very proud of its record freeze 2. Vodka goes with everything, apparently 3. Walter does his best to dust the Kato engine

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We were surprised that the locals were waiting and had a house for us to sleep in through, we actually did collapse on the luggage ... momentarily. We needed to reload the bikes and keep going. The fallen trees came one after another. There were so many that it was hardly worth starting the bikes as we would have to turn them off again just to drag them over logs. We crossed a rocky creek. I made it through the water without falling over but hit a tree on the embankment. Walter finally decided to stop for the night.

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FROZEN VILLAGE

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The next morning was more of the same, until we started noticing less brown trees and more green ones. We eventually came to the only village on the Old Road of Bones, called Tomtor. This place is famous for being the coldest inhabited village in the world, with -71.2 degrees recorded, but the locals said that winter was usually a mild -40 to -50 degrees. We were surprised the locals were waiting for us and had a house for us to sleep in. How was this possible? A Russian friend of Walters had been watching our progress from my Spot Tracker, from which I regularly posted to my website. They could see we were getting close to Tomtor and alerted friends. Once in the house, a wonderful man came to the door offering us fresh vegetables. What a treat! After we ate, I collapsed on the bed and passed out. The hospitality and kindness of Russian people blew me away. The next morning I was well rested and felt unusually confident on the bike. Around 150km later, Walter told me we had a big water crossing ahead. Actually a large river, the largest on the trip.

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve watched Long Way Around, this was the river where they hired a truck to carry their bikes through. It was tough but not that tough. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible they had higher water when they went through. Once on the other side we made it to the main road again and a much-needed fuel stop. We were dangerously low on fuel, waterlogged and cold. The clouds let go and it rained for the next 450km. Hours later it was getting a bit dark. My body was shaking so severely that it was extremely difficult to stay upright. I was surprised to see a house in this remote forest. I stopped Walter and asked if we could stay there. I would never want to ask anybody such a thing, but I thought I was in trouble with possible hypothermia. Walter said it was only 80km to the next town, where he intended to meet a friend. I had to stop and he asked the home owners, who agreed to take me in. Walter went on and gave me instructions on where to meet him in the morning. I was up again at 6.45am, wanting to pack my bike and minimise the disruption to the family. I tried to be as quiet as possible, but Anton was awake. He prepared a large cup of tea (called chai in Russia) and a full bag of baklava. He refused to take no for an answer. I packed up the bike. Anton and partner Anya came outside to wish me well. I will never forget them. I rode the 80km to Khandyga with much more enthusiasm than I had the night before. I found Walter and his friend, who had travelled from France on a Suzuki DR650. It turned out they had slept in a cold building on the floor, so I shared my fresh baklava, but reluctantly.


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AUGUST 2016

DURO ALL EN S COME MODEL FREE WITH A ADE! Q U I KS H

KIDS ELECTRIC BIKES AVAILABLE SOON

WWW.GASGASAUSTRALIA.COM.AU


LTTB / TECH / HOW TOs / TOT / PROD EVALS / W2RIDE / HERITAGE / BUYERS’ GUIDE

THE BACK END

Tricks of the Trade 118

THREE BIKES IN A CREW-CAB UTE

How 2 Pro 120

DESCENDING VERY, VERY STEEP HILLS

Long Termers 122

FAREWELL TO OUR YZ250X & FC350

How 2 Basic 130

CUTTING DOWN HANDLEBARS

Reader’s Ride 132

JUSTIN’S 2006 SUZUKI RM-Z450

Used Bike 134

1983-1986 HONDA XR350R

116 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

Factory Ride 136

WIL RUPRECHT’S SHERCO 450SEF-R

Product Evaluations 138

ADB’S PRODUCT PRESSURE COOOKER

Kids’ Corner 142

SUZUKI RM85L VS KTM 85SX 19/16

Kids’ Confidential 144

DIRT TRACK STAR MAX WHALE

Kids’ Cannon 148

YCF ELECTRIC BIKE

Hogan’s Hotshot 152

SAM WARREN FROM LONGREACH, QLD

Where to Ride 154

OAKLEIGH TRIALS CLUB

What’s On 156

MARK THESE ON YOUR CALENDAR

Heritage 158

HEADING BACK TO OCTOBER, 1986

On Any Sunday 162

READERS’ HALL OF FAME

Buyers’ Guide 172

FIND YOUR NEXT TRUSTY STEED

What’s Next? 177

A PREVIEW OF WHAT’S COMING IN ADB


132 READER’S RIDE

How

138 PROD EVALS

DESC END I HILL NG VERY S TH , E SA VERY ST FE W EEP AY

to P ro

144 KIDS’ CONFIDENTIAL

162 ON ANY SUNDAY

154 WHERE TO RIDE

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 117


THE BACK END | TRICKS OF THE TRADE

WAR

In order to NING your crew-cabfit three bikes in ute you will ha to ensure bo ve th far to the ou outside bikes are as possible, but tside of the tub as angle the fronstill with enough room to t ensure the ouwheels outwards. Then tside tiedown are pulled do straps w inside ones ton more than the lean the two bikes outwar ds.

COST $0

TIME 20 MINS

TOOLS TIEDOWNS READY RAMP

DIFFICULTY RATING

TRICK OF THE MON TH TROUBLE You’ve got two buddies who want to go riding with you, and you’ve got a dual-cab ute. Like most of us, your tight-arse mates want to save some coin and the best way to do that is to share one vehicle, but you don’t have a trailer and you’ve only ever fit two bikes into your ute. While browsing through ADB #442, you noticed we squeezed three into the tray of the latest Toyota HiLux and your brain exploded…

TRICK Fitting three dirtbikes into a dual-cab tub is a squeeze but it’s not impossible if you follow these steps very carefully. If you don’t follow these steps exactly you will have rub marks all over your shiny bikes. Step 1 Clear your ute of gearbags, fuel churns and any miscellaneous riding equipment. Position your straps where they need to be for all three bikes to fit facing forward. This is typically three tiedowns in the front corner anchor points. To improve leverage, we pass the outside tiedowns for

118 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

the two outside bikes around the sportsbar. Step 2 Roll the bike that’s going to be on the left into the tray, positioning it roughly 7-10cm from the left wheel arch. Roll it all the way to the front ensuring the rear wheel is in the same track as the front one and the rear-end is as far to the left as possible. Step 3 Once the bike is in the ute, angle the front wheel into the left-hand corner of the tub. The fender may have to go above or below the sportsbar. Pass the outside tiedown around the sportsbar and secure it to the handlebar. Do the same with the right-hand side tiedown, but you will not need to go around the sportsbar. Step 4 Repeat Step 3 but flip everything so that it works for the bike being loaded on the right side. Ensure the front wheel is tucked into the right-hand front corner and the tiedown runs around the outside of the sportsbar. Make sure you pull down on the outside tiedown of each bike so they are angled outwards.

Step 5 Push the back of both bikes towards the sides of the tub as far as they will go. Turning the front wheels into the front corners of the tray moves the inside handgrips upwards and out of the way of the middle bike’s handlebar. If you don’t turn the front wheels into the corners, the handlebars of the two outside bikes will prevent the middle bike’s front tyre from hitting the front of the tub. Step 6 Roll the third bike up the middle. If you’re tall enough, you should be able to hop up on the ute’s left rear tyre and guide the bike all the way to the front. For most full-size dirtbikes the front wheel should be able to rest against the front of the tub, while the fender passes under the crossed over tiedowns. This is why it’s important to hook the tiedowns on the handlebars and not the triple-clamps. If you’ve pulled the outside tiedowns on the outside bikes down hard, there should be plenty of room for the middle bike. Use the two remaining tiedowns to secure the middle bike via the handlebar. Transportation Editor Mitch Lees


Got a Trick of the Trade you’d like to share? Send words and hi-res images to adbmag@adbmag.com.au

1

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DIFFICULTY RATING

COMPLETE DRAINAGE

FULL BLOWN

TROUBLE

TROUBLE Whenever you start your bike in the garage, it starts overheating within a few minutes and dumps coolant all over the floor.

When you drain the sump, it runs out really slowly and takes forever to completely drain.

TRICK

3

TRICK Take a pedestal fan and sit it in front of the bike. Turn the fan on flat out and aim it directly into the radiators. The air flowing through the radiators will cool the coolant flowing through the radiators and prevent the bike from overheating. This will allow you to keep the bike running in your garage while you work on it.

COST

TIME

$20

2 MINS

TOOLS PEDESTAL FAN

Remove the timing plug from the motor. This will allow air into the crankcase and the oil will run out more quickly.

TIME

DIFFICULTY RATING

2 MINS

TOOLS HEX KEY

FREE TIPS

4

5

TRAPPED IN

DIFFICULTY RATING

TROUBLE

ROLL IT UP TROUBLE

6

You are trying to tape up an electrical wire but it is in a hard-to-reach place and you can’t get the whole roll of tape in there.

Dirt gets trapped behind the fork guards and can get jammed into the seals when the forks are compressed, causing the seals to leak. It also can scratch the stanchions and start corrosion.

TRICK TRICK Roll some tape back on itself. Keep rolling it up until you have enough tape to perform the job and then cut it off from the main roll. Now that you have rolled up a short length of tape you will be able to fit it into small spaces for those difficult taping jobs.

COST

TIME

$1 FOR TAPE

1 MIN

TOOLS ELECTRICAL TAPE

Make sure you wash behind the fork guards so there is no dirt causing problems. Technical Editor Mat Boyd

TIME

DIFFICULTY RATING

1 MIN

TOOLS PRESSURE WASHER

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 119


THE BACK END |

PRO W O H TO

Y CRATBTBY PAgreat technique forn

so is a The crab hills but only work berg g Erz descendin es. Just watch an ders e ri p on very stee eo and you will se g! n id v ro o w e d Rod right an getting it

DESCENDING VERY, VERY STEEP HILLS Sometimes a hill is so steep, the idea of standing on the ’pegs and descending scares you more than Ghostbusters. If that’s you, here’s a technique for getting rider and bike to the bottom without letting it go.

1

PICK YOUR LINE

When you get to the top of the cliff you’re planning to descend and decide you can’t stand up and ride down it, stop and assess your line for crabbing. Crabbing is when you slide the bike almost sideways down a hill. Once you start crabbing, changing your direction is not easy.

2

3

STAND OR SIT?

Always stand using this technique just in case the bike gets away from you and you have to dispatch it down the hill alone. Lean the bike in towards the slope and stand up. Leaning the bike in towards the hill enables you to slide the rear-end a little more easily as the rear tyre has less grip and the bike will lowside if it gets away, rather than highsiding.

BODY POSITION

Getting set early is the key to staying in control when crabbing down very, very steep hills. This technique will only work if the hill is so steep that the rear-end will slide sideways when the rear brake is locked on. As you professional riders always should, have one finger covering both the brake and clutch levers and your right boot planted firmly over the brake pedal. Place your left boot on the ground. 120 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

4

START MOVING

Angle the bike at about 70 degrees to the face of the hill. It should be on an angle facing across and down the hill. To initiate the crab, release the front brake a little but keep the rear brake on. Lean back and in towards the hill with your right boot still on the rear brake.

5

SLIDE THE REAR

Make sure you are well and truly out of the

saddle to unweight the rear tyre and slowly release the rear brake so the rear-end slides down the hill. It should track down the hill at 70 degrees to the face of the slope. If you can lean the bike over enough to slide the rear-end with the brake on, keep doing this (kinda the opposite to everything we’ve been taught).

6

INSIDE BALANCE

The entire time your left boot should be on the ground balancing the bike. Slide or hop on your left (inside) leg as the bike crabs. Inch-by-inch you want to repeat releasing the front brake slightly and sliding the rear-end, while maintaining that 70-degree angle to the slope and keeping the bike leaned into the hill as far as possible so it doesn’t pitch you off. Continue crabbing until it is safe to straighten up and ride the rest of the way to the bottom. Editor Mitch Lees


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IF IT GOES WRONG, LOOK OUT Always make sure your body and bike are in the right position. If you weight the outside ‘peg too much and lean down the hill, you can end up high siding and rolling with your bike to the bottom of the valley. If you lean the bike in towards the hill and you feel it is getting too steep, you can always lie the bike down on its side and slide down on your arse with your bike.

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The crab technique is very popular for riders at events like Erzberg. If a competitor doesn’t make the top of a hill, they head back down and try again. A lot of riders will walk beside their bikes to do this, but you cannot lean the bike into the hill or cover the brake this way, resulting in a bunch of cartwheels. You’re best using the crabbing technique because, while it might take longer, it gives the rider more control and is safer. Be confident when using this technique. Standing at the top of a hill and looking down can be daunting, but if you convince yourself you can do it and concentrate on body position, balance and strength it should be no problem.

DO Stand up and lean the bike in towards the hill. Keep your boot over the brake pedal and feel free to skid down. Ensure the bike is at 70 degrees to the sloop. If you aim too far down hill you will not be able to crab the rearend. Too sideways and gravity will not slide the rear for you.

5

6

Always have the bike running. An idling engine helps with balance and if it all goes wrong and you have to try and ride it out, a running engine will prevent the rear wheel from locking up and skidding out of control.

DON’T Sit down. If you sit you cannot balance the bike with your inside leg. It will also put unnecessary weight on the rear-end, causing it to slide too much. Take your foot off the brake. Skidding the rear end sideways is the aim of the game. If you neglect the rear brake it will roll the bike in the direction you’re facing. Look down at your handlebar. Look in the direction you want to crab, and try maintaining momentum. Stopping and starting a crab can be difficult.

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 121


THE BACK END | LONG TERMERS

Technical Editor Mat Boyd bids farewell to another long-term test bike The time has come once again HUSQVARNA for me to part ways with a FC350 long-term test bike. Every time this happens it feels a little like a break-up. I put endless hours of tool and seat time into each of my long-term test bikes in an effort to get my head around living with each particualr machine. But in the end I always have to give them up for adoption to some lucky punter, kinda like a seeing eye dog trainer farewelling their pup. However, you know this is the case with long-termers and I’m not complaining for one second. This time round I have to say goodbye to my Husqvarna FC350, but before I do, let me reminisce about the 12 months we have spent together. 1 The FC350 is light and nimble. It feels like riding a 250cc four-stroke but with more 2 power. It’s lightweight, easy to handle and changes direction like a rabbit. The bike’s balanced and tips in and out of ruts quickly. The biggest surprise to me was the power – it was much better than I expected. After riding almost every 350cc four-stroke in the last five years and not being overly impressed with any of them, I was glad to notice such a big improvement in power. That being said, the motor was still a little soft off the bottom compared with a 450cc four-stroke. To fix the bottom-end power I opened up the airbox by drilling holes into the sidecover 3 of the airbox and fitting wire mesh over the holes to allow more airflow but prevent rocks or large clumps of dirt getting in. I also removed the mesh cone from the silencer which is designed to make the bike quieter but restricts gas flow. Once the exhaust and the airbox were opened up, the bike was able to breathe better and the power delivery became stronger with more torque. My only other issue with the bike was with the front suspension which I found unpredictable. The fork felt rough and choppy, like it was too hard, but then when pushed hard or under high fork speeds it would blow all the way through and bottom

122 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

RECALL The FC350 was recalled about a month ago for the spokes and condensor. The front spokes and condensor were replaced and a new condensor bracket fitted. The recalls were issued by Husqvarna Australia and I suggest if you have a 2016 model and haven’t been contacted by Husky then give them a call to see if your bike is affected.

Main: Boydy’s last Swedish fling 1. KustomMX graphics holding up perfectly 2. That’s the original chain. Strecthed and a little rusty but still working 3. Holes in the airbox improved bottom-end


TOTAL HOURS

45

MODS THIS MONTH None

MODS NEXT MONTH None

COSTS RRP: $11,695 Warranty: Three months parts Distributor: Husqvarna Australia Web: husqvarna-motorcycles. com.au 1800 644 771

MY INITIAL REACTION TO THE FC350 WAS HOW LIGHT AND NIMBLE IT WAS TO RIDE www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 123


THE BACK END | LONG TERMERS 1 out with a large clunk. The fork definitely didn’t inspire confidence. I had to go up to .50kg in the springs while totally revalving the compression, mid and rebound valves. To get the valves flowing better I machined wider ports and converted the fork to an open-cartridge format instead of 4CS. This allows me to run a 60mm oil-to-air gap in the fork. This smaller air gap allows the fork to operate smoother and more progressively. It solved the bottoming issue while still being plush and forgiving. It took many hours of work to get the fork where I wanted it but I am now happy to say that I am very pleased at where the suspension is. It is forgiving and plush, but progressive enough to take big hits on large and fast jumps or large braking bumps. This bike now handles better than it did when I first got it. The rear-end worked very well from standard. In fact, it’s probably closest to being one of the best standard production shocks I have ridden. While the suspension received the most work and the airbox and exhaust got small modifications the rest of the bike remained completely standard. There were a few other little tricks I did to the FC350 like lock wire the oil filler cap on because I kept kicking it and undoing it with my boot while riding,

Main: Looks good for a bike with nearly 50 hours 1. Clutch cover coating held up better than anticipated 2. Still running the stock header pipe 3. Map switch as standard for all conditions

124 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

and I lock wired the ignition wires in place from the stator as I was worried about them getting caught on my boots. If I had more time with the bike the next modification I would’ve made would be a different seat cover. The standard one is super grippy but the seat is rough and tears into your pants. I’d then port the head and raise the compression, as well as remap the ignition to get more power out of the engine. The engine is strong but it has more power there that could be unleashed which would make it a real threat to the 450’s. And while I believe the brakes are already great standard, I believe an oversized front disc would have given just a little more stopping power as well as a taller set of handlebars that would have suited my frame a little better. The tyres I’ve been running on the bike are Bridgestone Battlecross with an X20 compound on the front and an X30 compound on the rear. The X20 is the softer of the two which found more grip while the X30 is a harder compound and lasted a little longer. The bike has been well maintained which, in turn, has rewarded me with great reliability. The bike has been serviced every five riding hours and obviously washed after every ride, with the air filter cleaned too. Mat Boyd

2

3

THE REAR-END WORKED VERY WELL FROM STANDARD


THE BACK END | LONG TERMERS

AT LAST After missing out on Hattah, our Enduro Editor finally runs out of excuses

PHOTO: JP MEDIA

The Yamaha YZ250X long-term test bike is in its final days with YAMAHA me before activating it’s homing YZ250X beacon and returning to the Yamaha depot, and it’s been a hell of a ride. As reported in the last issue, I was meant to compete in the Hattah Desert Race, but had an accident at work and missed out. So the poor YZ250X just sat for six weeks before I could get back on it and twist the throttle. Six weeks is a long time off the bike. It may not feel like it but when I finally was able to get back on the bike, I felt so rusty. My balance was off, my arms pumped up and I could only manage about two laps of my grass track at pace. But then a brilliant idea came into my head. Because I couldn’t race Hattah, I thought it would be good if I raced the two rounds of the Australian Off-Road Championship, in Monkerai, NSW. Nothing says ‘return to riding’ like racing a three-hour cross country on Saturday and then jumping back on the bike for sprints on Sunday. So I trained for two weeks (because a whole two weeks was going to help so much… Not!) and did a bunch of

1

126 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

2

3


FIRST UP, I PLAYED AROUND WITH THE JETTING AND GEARING. OBVIOUSLY

TOTAL HOURS 51 MODS THIS MONTH 178 main Jet, 14/50 gearing, RK XW Ring chain, suspension, graphics, brake pads

MODS NEXT MONTH I’m buying it!

COSTS RRP: $10,999 with lights Warranty: Three months parts Distributor: Yamaha Australia, Web: yamaha-motor.com.au (02) 9757 0011

BEFORE TIME Before the YZ250X moved to Sydney from Melbourne it was used as a trailrider’s mule in the Toolangi, Kinglake and Wombat State Forests. The custodian was ADB sub editor Wolter Kuiper, who made some small changes like a heavier flywheel to better handle the slow speed trail conditions, a bigger fuel tank and softer grips. While we had some issues with the jetting early on, Wol could not fault the YZ250X. It played well in the trees as a weekend warrior, before Geoff Braico transformed it into a competitive racer.

Main: Top 10 result for Braico’s return to racing 1. GYTR radiator guards look like new 2. GYTR disc guard copped a beating 3. Blue anodised levers look factory

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 127


THE BACK END | LONG TERMERS

IT WAS A GOOD WEEKEND AND I ENJOYED BEING BACK RACING

testing. It felt good to get back testing. First I played around with the jetting and gearing. Obviously, the desert-spec YZ250X was no good for a round of the AORC. I dropped back down to a 178 main jet and also went back to my original 14/50 gearing. RK helped out with a schmick new XW-ring chain which is its top-of-the-line chain, extremely long lasting and looks the part. Next, I tested the two exhaust systems I had, stock vs GYTR/FMF. I decided to stay with the stocker as the race was going to be wet and the bike runs a little richer and produces smoother power with the stock unit on it. The big IMS tank stayed on the bike and that was great for the race as its translucent so I could see how much I was using. I think I used between 15-20 litres over the three hours. Jay, from All Pro Racing, had firmed up the fork before Hattah and I found it to be a bit too harsh on the smaller tree roots and bumps but, with a few clicker adjustments, I had the bike working great. It was tracking nice and getting great drive. Having a firmer front-end also helped with the sharp G-outs that come with the softer ground at Monkerai. And finally, Brett Kenny from Holeshot Graphics kitted me out with a fresh set of graphics and I fitted some new brake pads! So how did my only race this year go? Well, I almost scored a holeshot in the cross country, which was pretty cool. The YZ250X fired up super-fast and only points 128 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

leader Daniel Sanders (KTM 300EXC) beat me to the first turn. And then for the next three hours, I battled with all the top Aussie off-roaders (I say battle, they probably say blocked) and eventually faded back to fifth in E2 and 11th outright. Not bad, I thought. Unfortunately, my lack of fitness became obvious on Sunday morning, when I had to get out of bed for the sprints. I could barely move I was so sore. Nevertheless, the YZ-X carried me through the day and I ended up with another fifth in E2 but was only 14th outright. It was a good weekend and I enjoyed being back racing. Of course the good people at Alpinestars had me all decked out in the 2017 gear which was awesome! Finally, as this is my last article on the YZ-X, I just want to say a massive thanks to everyone involved. The bike had been unreal. From out of the crate to a race bike, it’s been an easy transition and if anyone is looking for a bike that is predictable, low maintenance and still has a heap of power and grunt to have fun on, then the YZ250X is your bike. I didn’t have any experience with a YZ250X before this project and I’ve been surprised at how good it is. So much so that I’ve decided to buy it! Thanks again to everyone involved, your help and support has not gone unnoticed and I really appreciate it. Enduro Editor Geoff Braico

PIPE DREAM After Geoff bounced back and forth between the GYTR pipe and the stock unit, he decided the stock one worked best with the YZ250X.

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Main: Fresh Holeshot Graphics kit fits perfectly 1. RK XW-ring chain is ideal for AORC racing 2. All Pro Racing retuned the suspension from desert to off-road


THE BACK END |

BASIC W O H TO

CUTTING DOWN A HANDLEBAR While it’s not common to have to cut down handlebars on adult bikes, it’s not unusual on kids’ bikes. Sometimes the handlebar is too wide for a small child and it needs to be cut down so the bike is easier to steer. In saying that, I also know quite a few adults who like narrow handlebars and cut theirs down. Here’s how it’s done:

1

BLOW OFF GRIP

First you need to remove the grips from the handlebar. You can use compressed air to blow them off or, if the grips are stuffed anyway, cut them off. You might need to remove the throttle tube from its housing to get air to the right handgrip or get in there with a thin screwdriver and penetrating oil.

2

REMOVE LEVERS

Remove the brake and clutch levers, throttle housing and switchblocks that could get in the way. 130 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

3

MEASURE UP

Take a ruler and measure the amount you want to cut off. Don’t go overboard. Using a scriber, mark the handlebar where you want to cut it.

4

CUT THROUGH

Take a hacksaw with a sharp blade and cut through the ’bar where you have scribed the marks. Take your time and keep the hacksaw straight. You may need to get someone to hold the handlebar so you can use two hands on the hacksaw.

5

CLEAN THE EDGES

Once you have sawed all the way through the handlebar, take a file and smooth off any rough edges that have been produced by the cut. Pay special attention to the throttle side of the handlebar as any roughness there could cause the throttle tube to stick.

6

PLUG THE ENDS

While you have the grips off it is a good idea to take a piece of wooden dowel and hammer it into the ends of the handlebar. This will prevent the ends from taking a


1

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MAKE THEM STICK QMake sure you glue the grips onto the handlebar and throttle tube with grip adhesive or contact cement to prevent them from coming loose and, for extra security, add lockwire.

3

4

QWhen plugging handlebars, head to the hardware store and buy a length of dowel. Hammer it inside the handlebar and then cut it off flush. QMake sure you don’t cut the handlebar too short. You must leave enough room for the lever perches and any switchblocks on the straight sections.

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6

QSome aftermarket handlebars have measurement marks on the ends from new to save you the hassle of measuring where to cut.

DO QUse a fresh blade in your hacksaw.

7

QMeasure twice before cutting the handlebar, making sure there will be enough room for switchblocks and lever perches after you’ve shortened it. QOnly cut small amounts off at a time, such as 5mm or 10mm, and go for a ride. You can always cut more off later but you can’t put it back.

DON’T flesh sample from your guts in the event of an accident. If the bike has Barkbusters and you are fitting new handgrips, you can have fun cutting the ends out. Grips produced for dualsport bikes may be easier to use as they often have the ends removed to allow for balance weights.

7

GLUE GRIPS

Glue the grips into place and then refit the throttle, levers and switches. Then go for a ride and enjoy your new handlebar. Technical Editor Mat Boyd

QDon’t rush with the hacksaw, let the blade do the work and take your time. QLeave any rough edges on the ends of the handlebar. QLeave any filings inside the handlebar. They can make their way into the throttle and cause it to stick. Blow them out with compressed air.

www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 131


THE BACK END | READER’S RIDE 2006 SUZUKI RM-Z450 REBUILT SUBFRAME

PROTAPER HANDLEBAR

WHAT 2006 Suzuki RM-Z450 WHO Justin Ali WHERE I GOT IT I bought it on the internet HOW MUCH Not sure

RHK FUEL CAP ONE INDUSTRIES GRAPHICS

EIBACH SUSPENSION

RHK RIMS

STRAIGHT SHOOTER WHY I BOUGHT IT

HOW DOES IT GO

I bought the RM-Z250 because that was the bike I was looking for. I had an RMX250 two-stroke and I just wanted to upgrade to a newer bike. I used to ride in Ballarat but I got out of it for a while. I recently got back into riding and this was the bike I wanted. This ’06 model popped up and I was told by my bike shop that it was a really good one.

The bike runs really well. I just love the balls that it has. The suspension works really well and when you’re landing you barely even feel it. It’s set up really well. I would say that it’s sometimes a prick to start. Once it fires up, it goes really well on the track and in the bush.

5

was born in Melbourne but grew 1Justin up in Ballarat. He now lives in Rosebud. in the bush around Ballarat 2south,Heandrode also at Monza Park. Since moving he’s ridden at Frankston motocross

SHOULD I BUY ONE? WHAT I DID TO IT I haven’t done a lot. It already had some bits and pieces on it. I got the suspension done by Chad’s Off-Road Setups. It’s got Eibach suspension front and rear. Other than that, I’ve put a lot of cosmetic stuff on it, things like RHK gold rims, Ringmaster seatcover and ProTaper handlebar.

1. ProTaper handlebar gives Justin the control he wants 2. RHK machined and anodised fuel cap like our giveway bike 3. Ringmaster in Victoria supplied the seatcover, but not the graphics kit

132 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

1

track and in the bush at Neerim. Justin has owned Suzukis, Yamahas and Hondas. He prefers riding in the bush, although he does ride on the track often. He doesn’t race and rides purely for enjoyment.

If someone came up to me and asked if they should buy a bike like this, I would say “for sure”. It’s a great bike and I’d recommend it. Although it’s tough to start at times, especially when it’s cold, it’s a really good bike. I haven’t always ridden Suzukis but my last two have been and I’ve loved them. with Dylan Ruddy

2

FIVE THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT JUSTIN’S RM-Z

3 4 5 3


NIGHT-TIME IS

NO OBSTACLE XEO

headlamps from LED LENSER deliver strong, focused light so you can keep both hands free for hitting up your favourite trail... day or night. They‘re also versatile, and can be attached to your bike, helmet or even body using GoPro™ mounting systems.

ledlenser.com.au


THE BACK END | USED BIKE 1983-1986 HONDA XR350R CHASSIS

SUSPENSION

The steel frame is notorious for cracking around the footpeg mounts.

Make sure the Showa fork moves freely and is not leaking from the seals hidden inside the forkboots.

BRAKES The front stopper is a hydraulic disc while the rear is a single-leading shoe drum.

ENGINE The XR runs a six-speed gearbox which was unusual for enduro bikes at the time.

HONDA’S SERIOUS XR PRICE GUIDE $200 to $400 NEW PRICE 1983 $2419 1984 $2519 1985 $3149 1986 $3149 SECOND HAND 1983 $200-$400 1984 $200-$400 1985 $200-$400 1986 $200-$400 All prices listed on this page are from The Red Book (redbook.com.au) and are indicative market range only.

Everybody has a story about an XR, whether it be one of the hundreds we hear from the old days or one from our own experience. Most people have ridden one and my XR story happens to be me as a young fella jumping on my Dad’s XR, kicking it over with two feet and then starting off with one foot on a wooden bench. Whatever your story may be, it’s hard to ignore how popular and dominant the mighty XRs were in their day. While only made for a few years, the XR350 filled the gap between the 250cc and 600cc. The single-overhead camshaft, four-valve engine was reasonably bulletproof if maintained. I have even seen clapped-out ones running around with little-to-no oil and rattling like a Milo tin full of nuts and bolts.

The biggest problem I see with XR350Rs is butchery. A lot of backyarders seem to get their hands on the engines and strip every thread. The rocker cover has 6mm bolts holding it down that only need to be nipped up but always seem to be over-tightened and stripped. The bolts clamping down the barrel and head also get over tightened and stripped. If you are working on one of these engines, buy yourself a torque wrench and follow the manufacturer’s settings. Well-worn engines can use oil and blow smoke from worn rings and can develop rattles from worn pistons as well as play in the little end and big end bearings. If the engine has been revved excessively or run without oil, the rockers can be worn and cause ticking

or rattling noises. It will sound like loose tappets but the noise won’t go away when you adjust the clearances. When buying an XR350R be sure to have a good listen for any noises or rattles that shouldn’t be there. A rebuild on a bike of this age will cost you more than the bike is worth. Check for oil leaks and make sure the bike starts and idles easily with plenty of compression. Check the frame for any cracks or fresh welds. Give all the bearings a look, checking for excessive play, and make sure they rotate freely. Check the front and rear suspension for leaks and make sure it moves freely. If you manage to find an XR350R in top shape, then hang on to it. One in top condition will be prized. Technical Editor Mat Boyd

ET MARK ENTS L EQUIVA

134 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

Honda XR250R

Suzuki DR250

Yamaha TT350

Kawasaki KLR250

$1400-$1700

$650-$700

$1400-$1600

$1250-$1400


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THE BACK END | FACTORY RIDE WIL RUPRECHT’S SHERCO 450SEF-R TOPLINE SEATCOVER

SHERCO LONGRANGE 13L TANK

DELTRAN BATTERY TENDER BATTERY

MSC STEERING DAMPER STEG PEGZ

DESERT STORMER THE RIDER: WIL RUPRECHT This was my first year at Hattah and I went in with limited expectations and limited knowledge of the event. I am from around Sydney so there’s not really any terrain that is similar to Hattah. I had to prepare for the sand, the speed and also the endurance. The first half of the Off-Roads [AORC] was basically sprints, so you have to change up your fitness a bit. A few weeks out, I was down with the team testing in similar conditions, which was very good and I really got to see what it was all about. I was really happy with how the event went and the Sherco guys all work really well together. Everything went smoothly. I’ll still be in the U19s next year so I’m looking to defend my title.

TEAM MANAGER: STEPHEN TUFF Pre-season we tested with Wil on our 300SE-R, 300SEF-R and 450SEF-R. Over three days on different tracks he was consistently faster on the 450. As the year has progressed he’s really settled on the bike and is comfortable in his ability to ride it well. We knew the bike would be fast at Hattah and Wil proved it. There’s

just three main modifications for Hattah: fuel capacity, gearing and comfort. A larger tank for more laps, steering damper, StegPegz and taller gearing.

TEAM MECHANIC: DAVE SUTER The bike was a 2016 Six Days replica and then we upgraded it with ignition mapping and Akrapovic exhaust system. Other than that, the engine is basically standard. Wil didn’t need any more power; the engine was more than good enough. We run an MSC steering damper, Topline seatcover, Acerbis handguards and Sherco long-range tank. We run AFAM sprockets and our gearing was 15/50. We went out with Wil and tested suspension, tyres and fuel range. Fortunately, we were able to get two laps. We run the chain adjusters right back for stability and run a slightly lower rear-end for the same reason. We just run a sand setting in the suspension. Wil is a quick learner and he knows what he wants when it feels right. We were lucky enough to have two days testing for this event. Under the circumstances [a workshop fire], that was a real boost. with Dylan Ruddy

5 1 2

The team runs two-stage Unifilters to avoid element changes during races. The bike has a Deltran Battery Tender battery with 240 cold-cranking amps. This is an increase in output and the lithium-ion device also saves weight. Wil runs his Steg Pegz back further than the standard set-up. The team puts an extension on them for taller guys like Wil (see main photo). Sherco uses a Pirelli Full Soft front and a Mid Soft rear. The team runs a mousse in the front and an ultra-heavyduty tube in the rear. The Sherco team was hit hard by a fire at Dave’s workshop in the King Valley, Vicco. Several bikes were lost and the team worked hard to get back on track.

3 4 5

1. Sherco provides protection for the crankcase 2. The Akrapovic full-system unleashes the beast 3. Deltran Battery Tender lithium battery sucks some weight out of the guts of the bike

1 136 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

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THE BACK END | PRODUCT EVALUATIONS

PRO-BOLT RACE SPEC ENGINE FASTENER KIT $95.36, Pro-Bolt Australia, probolt-australia.com, (03) 9792 5025 Everyone needs a little bling in their lives, especially if the item in question looks good and works well. The Pro-Bolt Race Spec Engine Fastener Kit is bling that actually works better than the standard stuff (inset). I took over the YZ-X when the bike had done 12.2 hours and the kit was already on it. It took me a while to get used to the sight of the blue bolts but the longer I had the bike, the more I liked the bling. So after 45ish hours of abuse, how have the bolts held up?

WE LIKED INSTALLATION We followed the Pro-Bolt instructions on taking out the stock fasteners one at a time and matching them to ones from the kit. The kit includes a tiny tube of a copper-based lubricant, called Pro-lube, to stop the threads oxidising in the alloy crankcase and seizing. PHILLIPS HEAD Having the kit enabled us to get rid of the poxy Phillips-head screws on the plastic magneto cover. DURABILITY I’ve used plenty of anodised 138 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

parts over the years and some are better than others. The Pro-Bolt anodising hasn’t faded or worn excessively, which is a plus. The fasteners are made from top-notch T7075 high-tensile alloy so you know they are strong. DESIGN AND FIT Each of the bolts has the manufacturer’s name on it in tiny letters and comes with a number of holes so that you can tie-wire them for a little extra insurance. I never wired them and they all stayed in place for the entire 45 hours. The ones that I did remove during maintenance were easy to refit thanks to the Pro-lube and all the sizes worked really well. PRICE For under $100, you get a full kit of 25 dished and flanged bolts, which works out at around $3.80 a bolt. It’s less than when we fitted the kit, thanks to Brexit, and not bad considering you keep all your original bolts. Having spare bolts is always a big plus. You can get Allen-head fastener kits for even less.

WE DIDN’T LIKE NOT TITANIUM I had heaps of people ask if

the bolts were titanium and I had to say “nah, just alloy”. Would be sweet if they were blueplated titanium but that kit is well over $100 [if you must know, check the website]. POWER VALVE Fasteners for the exhaust power valve are not included but that may be because the housing gets too hot for aluminium fasteners. Pro-Bolt does have stainless steel or titanium bolts for this if you are desperate to take it to the next level. WEIGHT We only saved 140 grams with the 25 bolts, so don’t go figuring you’re going to turn your old XR into a featherweight racer.

VERDICT If you want to trick your bike a bit then these kits are great. They last well, are made of very good quality alloy and, at the end of the day, you have a tub of spare bolts for emergencies that you know are going to fit. Pro-Bolt offers an amazing array of fasteners for production and race bikes so visiting the website is a bit like being a kid in a lollyshop. Enduro Editor Geoff Braico


WE’REG TESTIN

MATRIX M1 TIEDOWNS

GYTR OFF-ROAD FLYWHEEL

The range of M1 Tiedowns are top of the line and packed with features. We’ve been running them for nearly a year and have not had any problems (see below). But then again, tiedowns are one of the items dirt riders never expect to give them problems, until they break. So, if they’ve proven to be a reliable set of bike anchors, what did we and didn’t we like about them?

One of the best things you can do to tame a two-stroke motocrosser for the bush is to fit a heavier flywheel. Yamaha has known this for centuries and therefore offers one to tame the power delivery of its wide-ratio YZ250X crosscountry racer. Surprisingly, the Off-Road Flywheel is only 228g heavier than the 588g stocker but it does have its weight concentrated more towards the rim, to give it increased “inertia mass”. It’s also 87.25mm in diameter compared with the stocker’s 83. Now it would be nice if you could just whack this new do-dad on for backto-back testing in the bush but you do need a flywheel puller and we still had those poxy Phillips head screws in the magneto cover. We went to the guys at First Class Motorcycles in Vicco, where Lilydale’s resident Hugh Jackman lookalike, Chris (below), got the job done before heading off to perform in the matinee of his latest Broadway musical. The extra 4mm in diameter does make the flywheel look like a bit of a squeeze past the power valve operating cable but it fits. A quick blast up our favourite hill at Toolangi indicated an amazing improvement in the bike’s tractability. The difference was so dramatic we had to check nothing else had been done. We didn’t bother telling new Enduro Editor Geoff Braico about the Off-Road Flywheel before the YZ250X headed his way. He’s probably still wondering why the engine doesn’t zip to redline. We’ll check if he figured it out when we do the “full evaluation” in a few months’ time. Wolter Kuipe

Premium $39.95, Worx $49.95, Phatty (37mm) $64.95, Monza Imports, monzaimports.com.au, (03) 8327 8899

WE LIKED DURABLE When these tiedowns aren’t being used to secure our dirtbikes they usually just slide around in the back of the ute, subject to everything the weather and the beach near where I live can throw at them. And still, they have not ripped or rusted. They’re just as good as the day we got them. SILKY BUCKLE You know how some tiedown buckles become stiff and hard to release when removing your bike? Well not these ones. After all the dust and water, the buckles have not rusted and can still be released with just your thumb. EXTRA STRAP The M1 Tiedowns come with a plastic sleeve to secure the extra webbing that normally flaps around after the bike has been secured. This plastic has not cracked despite being bent repeatedly over the sports bar on our ute. CARABINERS The carabiners which secure the tiedowns to the ute or trailer

are as tough as nails and the springloaded pins still slam shut and won’t open, unlike on some other tiedowns we’ve used. I’ll never use hooks again.

WE DIDN’T LIKE PLASTIC SLEEVE While the sleeve that provides room for your name and holds the leftover strap worked a treat, it did get a little annoying. When pulling on the free end to secure the bike, the sleeve slides up to the buckle and stops you from tightening the strap any further. If you remove the free end from the sleeve to avoid this, you have to feed it back through the sleeve again. NO SWIVEL The carabiners do not swivel. I’ve seen some straps which have a swivel joint at the carabiner end which prevents the tiedown from twisting while you’re trying to hold the bike and tighten the tiedowns at the same time.

VERDICT The Matrix M1 Tiedowns might be a little on the expensive side but they are incredibly durable. Cheapie tiedowns that fray or jam are frustrating and if your view of the precious cargo on the trailer is obstructed it’s reassuring to know that the Matrix carabiners and rubber-coated hooks won’t let go and have you skull dragging your bike down the road. Editor Mitch Lees

1

$350.53, Yamaha Australia, y-shop. yamaha-motors.com.au or dealers

Main: The plastic sleeve and nameplate can be a bit fiddly 1. These tiedowns never die

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THE BACK END | PRODUCT EVALUATIONS

Main: Despite looking like plastic the Stuckmate Winch is made of a tough carbon-fibre reinforced polymer 1. Easy-to-use locking mechanism 2. Fork leg brackets were tough 3. Stuckmate holds the RMX450Z

1

2

STUCKMATE TRAIL WINCH

3

$170, Stuckmate, www.stuckmate.com

The Stuckmate is for those who like a challenge but respect their steed and don’t want to see it cartwheel down a rocky hill. After a year testing it, I can definitely say it is an accessory designed primarily for those riders who focus on extreme terrain. It would be ideal for someone attempting Erzberg because it can double as a tow rope with which spectators can pull you. That being said, it could also be used to instil confidence in beginners who are nervous about pushing their skills to the next level. The thought of falling off the back of their bike on a hill with the possibility of the thing landing on them can scare a novice out of attempting something at the limit of their skill. For example, when riding with my wife, who is a beginner, at a farm recently, she baulked at a small hillclimb. But when I attached the Stuckmate Winch to her bike and reassured her the bike would not land on top of her if she looped out, her attitude changed. The device attaches to the fork legs, and uses a rope that retracts and holds your bike as you inch up the hill.

But after a little research we learnt it was made of a carbon-fibre reinforced polymer like Husky subframes. Stuckmate, a French company, chose this material because it was light but also very strong. After several towing excursions and endover-end crashes, we haven’t broken it. MOUNTING The Stuckmate is meant to mount to your fork legs and bolt to your front guard but we didn’t want to put a hole in our long-term test bike's guard so we only used the fork leg mounts and had no issues. We did have to tighten them occasionally but it was better than a hole in the fender. LOCKING MECHANISM The red dial for the ratchet mechanism on top of the unit is massive, meaning it is easy to use wearing gloves and it has not failed. RACHET The mechanism that locks the rope inside the device as it retracts is incredibly strong. It easily held our Yamaha WR450F on a steep climb in the Ourimbah State Forest and can supposedly hold 300kg.

WE DIDN'T LIKE WE LIKED UNBREAKABLE When we got the Stuckmate it felt and looked plasticky.

140 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

ROPE LENGTH The length of rope is just shy of six metres, which wasn’t ideal when attempting longer hillclimbs. If the hill is

steep enough to need the Stuckmate Trail Winch, then the slope is probably longer than six metres and if you think you can just stop half way up the hill and then use the winch, then the hill obviously isn’t that hard and you should just ride up. DISTRACTING I couldn’t really feel the Stuckmate on the front but I could see it and knowing it was there made me think it was effecting the handling. If less than five per cent of your ride is extreme enduro, maybe leave it in your backpack until you get to that dreaded climb.

VERDICT The Stuckmate Winch is more useful than a tow rope or grab handle. The winch rope can be strapped to a tree at the top of a hill so you don’t need a riding partner, or strapped to another rider and their bike if you need more help. If the rope was longer it would become very useful, but we can’t fault the rest of the unit. All those attempting Erzberg next year, just remember the human chain the top riders formed last year when they couldn’t pass one particular section called Downtown, and think how easy their job would have been if they had a Stuckmate Winch or three. Mitch Lees


USWE PATRIOT 15 HYDRATION PACK

WE’REG TESTIN

$249, Steve Cramer Products, (03) 9587 1466, www.stevecramerproducts.com The Patriot 15 carries the marketing slogan No More Dancing Monkey, which has nothing at all to do with raising money to protect performing animals. The creative geniuses at USWE got the term from the way they believe conventional hydration packs dance all over your back when you hit bumps. So, has USWE stopped the monkey dancing? Their strap system acts like a sports bra by securing each corner of the pack to one central fastener (I promise I haven’t tested women's lingerie). By running a strap tightly underneath your arms and pecs, or man-boobs, the hydration pack does not bounce into the back of your head. Unlike conventional backpacks, which rely mainly on the two straps that go over your shoulders and then a separate strap across your guts, the Patriot 15 is pulled down and into your back when you tighten it. A slab of removable memory foam running from the top to the bottom of the backpack is used to improve support and spinal protection while the Patriot’s padding offers supreme

comfort and no annoying rubbing or wear in places you don’t want it. The hydration bladder holds 2.5 litres and uses a folded section at the top of the bag with a slide-on plastic clamp. The bite valve is similar to every other bite valve, and the tubing that runs from the pack to the valve is secured to a shoulder strap via a clip on the left side. A waterproof smartphone holder also keeps you up to date on Instagram as you ride. There’s a compartment for spares and trail snacks at the front, which is connected via a tough elastic strap. This can stretch out to fit the likes of a spare tube between the main compartment and the secondary compartment. All the features on this hydration pack are impressive, but it’s the “sleeping monkey” that is impressing me the most. It may be expensive but we’ve only listed a handful of the features. Stay tuned and we’ll see how this thing wears. Mitch Lees

1

2

3

Main: The Patriot 15 doesn't dance on your back 1. Bra-like straps hold the Patriot 15 secure 2. 2.5L and a memory foam back protector 3. Padding in the support is comfortable

WE’REG TESTIN

GYTR BILLET CLUTCH COVER

$238.71, Yamaha Australia, y-shop. yamaha-motor.com.au or dealers Yamaha two-stroke motocrossers haven’t changed a great deal in the last 10 years, apart from the plastics, and while they are still a great package, there are things that look old school on them. The stock clutch cover, for example, on our YZ250X long-termer looks dated and I think it is probably the same as it was back in 2001 as well as being wafer thin. While that might be okay on a motocross track it’s not so hot when you are bashing around the bush on the wide-ratio version. So, the good people at Yamaha Australia hooked us up with a GYTR Billet Clutch Cover. It is stronger than the stocker, being made out of 6061 T6 alloy, and looks about a million times better, especially held in place by the Pro-Bolt anodised alloy fasteners we review on the previous page. The cover comes in what GYTR calls a ball-burnished finish. We don’t know what that is but it sure sounds painful. Sadly they don’t make a billet alloy replacement for Yamaha’s plastic magneto cover on the other side but there’s no oil behind that one to worry about in the event of a crash. We’ll let you know how the clutch cover holds up in a future issue. Geoff Braico

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THE BACK END | KIDS’ CORNER

INDONESIAN EXPEDITION

AXO JUNIOR GEAR FICEDA, FICEDA.COM.AU

JERSEY, $39.95

PANTS, $109.95

BOOTS, $179.95

Most of you are probably too young to buy some bikes, an old 4WD and just take off on an epic adventure, but it doesn’t mean you won’t one day. Harrison Roach and Zye Norris did. The pair of surfers-cum-dirtbike riders packed up and headed to Indonesia where they drove an old Land Rover with two custom dirt bikes and a stack of surfboards in tow with sponsorship from Deus Ex Machina. They travelled between West Nusa Tengarra and North Sumatra, stopping at places along the way to surf perfect waves and freeride in volcanic wasteland. The epic journey is captured in South to Sian. The film is a great example of what it’s like to just throw caution to the wind and go live your dreams. It’s probably a good idea to wait until you are 18 before you try something like this, but hey, it’s never too early to start planning, right? You can catch this movie, along with plenty of other awesome dirt bike and action sports movies, on Garage Entertainment.

142 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

The Trivia Time competition (issue #444) winner will be announced next issue. Stay tuned to see if you won the Scott 89Si Oxide Pro goggles!

GLOVES, $29.95

DUTCT PRO ALER

AVADE HEATED GARMENT Keep warm during winter with this heated top by Avade. The garment is like a compression top but is fitted with heating coils that warm your upper body and back. There are three settings, Green, Yellow and Red, so you’ll be able to find just the right temperature. The settings are operated by a wrist-mounted button. The tops come in various sizes and retail for $199.


TALE OF THE TAPE

WHAT’S ON YOUR PLAYLIST? What music gets you pumped up for a big day’s riding? Here are some of the latest releases that we are digging at ADB.

BLINK 182 – CALIFORNIA San Diego’s pop-punk masters are back with a vengeance and will have you itching to get out on the track.

THE AVALANCHES – WILDFLOWER

SUZUKI RM85L VS KTM 85SX 19/16 SUZUKI RM85L

KTM 85SX 19/16

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: JAPAN ENGINE: SINGLE-CYLINDER, TWO-STROKE TRANSMISSION: SIX-SPEED CONSTANT MESH SUSPENSION: 37MM SHOWA FORK, SHOWA MONOSHOCK BRAKES: 220MM FRONT DISC, 200MM REAR FUEL CAPACITY: 5L SEAT HEIGHT: 875MM WHEELBASE: 1280MM WET WEIGHT: 74KG PRICE: $5490

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: AUSTRIA ENGINE: SINGLE-CYLINDER, TWO-STROKE TRANSMISSION: SIX-SPEED, CONSTANT MESH SUSPENSION: 43MM WP FORK, WP PDS SHOCK BRAKES: 240MM FRONT DISC, 210MM REAR FUEL CAPACITY: 5L SEAT HEIGHT: 890MM WHEELBASE: 1290MM DRY WEIGHT: 68.5KG PR CE: $7495

The Melbourne electronic acts’ acclaimed debut album was released in 2000 and, 16 years later, they have done it again with a follow-up that will be the soundtrack to summer.

RED HOT CHILLI PEPPERS – THE GETAWAY The Chilli’s are still going strong after 33 years and have produced the goods yet again with The Getaway.

FLUME – SKIN Sydney producer Flume’s debut album provided some ripper tracks that appeared in more than a few dirtbike clips. The follow-up is just as epic.

DRAKE – VIEWS For all you OGs out there, this album will have you popping monos with one hand like a boss. Plenty of hits here.

KIDS’ SIZED TRAILS If you’re sick and tired of watching dad and all his mates pack the ute and head off for a weekend of roosting at an organised trailride than do a little research on the interwebs and try and find an organised trailride like the North Star Trailride (NSTR). NSTR is a family friendly event, and all ages are allowed to ride.

They have specific tracks for pint-sized riders which mum and dad can tag along on. Or, if you’re feeling confident, organisers will allow junior riders out on the adult trails if supervised. NSTR is run on provate property which means they are allowed to let all ages and skill levels ride. www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

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THE BACK END | KIDS' CONFIDENTIAL

FUJI

I WOULD RIDE AROUND IN CIRCLES AND DAD HAD A STRING ATTACHED TO A LANYARD, PROBABLY LIKE FLYING A MODEL AEROPLANE

Main: Loosekid Industries is a perfect sponsor for this smooth kid 01. Standard Oz rubber set-up with a knobby on the front and trials on the rear 02. Not bad for the first night

144 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


WORDS // DYLAN RUDDY PHOTOS // KAWASAKI

>01

MAX’S MASSIVE WEEK

FUJI

Max Whale is too young to compete in 450cc dirt track racing in Australia, but that didn’t stop him from heading to the US and dominating on one

ax Whale is probably not a familiar name to the average dirtbike fan, but the Queenslander is one of the best up-and-coming riders in the country. Having conquered Australia, he turned his sights on the US. But it is neither on the motocross track nor enduro course that he plies his trade. Max’s discipline of choice is dirt track. The scene is very grassroots here, but it is an important stepping stone to racing overseas. ADB caught up with Max to find out a little more about him and talk about his recent successes overseas. Can you tell us where it all started for you? How did you get into riding bikes and when did your racing career start? It all started at the age of four. Mum and Dad had motorcycle shops in Brisbane and the Gold Coast and they both rode. Dad used to take me to a park on the Gold Coast near where we used to live. I would ride around in circles and Dad had a string attached to a lanyard, probably like flying a model aeroplane. My first race was at four at Mike Hatchers [junior motorcycle club] and I was riding a Kawasaki KDX50.

M FUJI >02 FUJI

For those that aren’t too familiar with dirt track, can you tell us what it’s like to race in that category and what is involved? Flat track racing has been around for more than 100 years, it started in America. It’s now getting bigger in a lot of countries. A lot of road racers are doing it for practice in places like Spain and Valentino Rossi’s ranch. Kenny Roberts also did a lot in America when he was racing. A lot of the top road racers like Casey Stoner have got dirt track backgrounds. Dirt track racing is a grassroots family sport, and can be done on a motocross bike with minimal changes and at minimal extra cost. How did you get involved with Kawasaki and what do you like most about the bikes? My family had a strong history with Kawasaki and as I got older and my results improved, I sent Kawasaki Australia my resume, asked for assistance and flew to Sydney for an interview. I was lucky enough to become part of their KX Junior Squad. My Kawasaki KX250F is an awesome all-round motorcycle; the bike is amazing straight out of the box. On my race bike I still run standard grips, ’bars and levers. The footpegs and ’bars can be moved around to suit smaller or taller

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FUJI

THE BACK END | KIDS' CONFIDENTIAL

>01 FUJI MAX WHALE Age: 15 Hometown: Coondoo, Qld Favourite movie: On Any Sunday Favourite music: Hilltop Hoods Favourite food: Pasta Favourite holiday destination: US Favourite track: Gunnedah, Qld

people, which is a great feature. Apart from a few minor engine adjustments the bike is good to go and I love it. You’ve had a lot of success in Australia. Can you tell us about your most memorable victories? My most memorable was when I was 13 and my first year on big bikes. I just signed with Kawasaki Junior Squad and the Queensland titles were at my home track, North Brisbane Junior Motorcycle Club. I had the best weekend’s racing, coming away with six titles out of six aboard my KX250F and KX125 ’03 model. Also my Australian titles that year were very memorable. Age restrictions prevent you from racing 450cc machines in Australia. Was that the main factor in your decision to go to the US? That's true but, age restrictions were not the reason. I knew I could ride a 450 as I’d been practising at home or mates’ places. The Americans are the best in the world at flat 146 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

track and I wanted to gauge myself against them, (although I’m) not saying that I don’t have strong competition here in Australia. Can you tell us a bit about your time in the US? What was your favorite location and what did you like most about it? We were in the US for five weeks prior to the amateur nationals. I raced in four states, did 6000 miles and 17 events, made 16 podiums and came away with the Ohio state championship. I also got to ride with some pro guys at their private tracks; Henry Wiles, Jeffrey Carver and Brandon Price. We went and saw some AMA Pro Flat Track races, the highlights being the Springfield Mile and Lima Half Mile. My favourite location was New York, where I had my first race on a 450 and also my first in the US [at Port Crane]. It was called Square Deal Riders' Motorcycle Club. Medina in New York was also a great place. Did you find racing the 450cc class a big challenge or was it easy to adapt to?

I’ve always been a smooth rider so adapting to the KX450 wasn’t that difficult. It’s all about throttle control. How did you go at the AMA Dirt Track Grand Championship in Du Quoin, Illinois, and what was the experience like? The amateur nationals are run over a week, with points over four disciplines, the Mile, Half Mile, TT and Short Track. The first day was the Mile; I rode really well and won the premier class, which was the 450 Modified, so that was a real highlight for me. Over the next five days I had mixed results but overall I came away with a second in 450DTX (stock class), a third in 450 Modified and a fourth in 450cc Open Singles. I struggled a little towards the end of the week. It’s a bit tougher than junior 250 and 125 racing in Australia but I learnt so much and meet some great people and loved it. What are your goals in dirt track racing? Do you plan on making a career out of it or will


Main: Leathers are compulsory in some AMA flat track classes because of the speeds involved. 01. Trade-up time for a young Max Whale 02. Max rode a relatively stock 450 in the US

I’M REALLY LUCKY TO HAVE SOME GREAT PEOPLE AND PRODUCT HELPING ME OUT SUCH AS KAWASAKI

you try your hand at other disciplines? I plan on going back next year and doing the amateur nationals again. I can’t turn pro until I'm 16 so I’ve got 10 months to go. I’d love to make a career out of it but if the opportunity came up for an FX300 Ninja Cup ride [an Australasian Superbike Championship class] I’d jump at the chance, hint, hint. What are some of your interests outside of racing? On the weekends I’m not racing I do a lot of farm riding with my mates. There’s a bunch of us that have KLX140s and we have a ball. Are there any sponsors, family or friends that you’d like to give a shout out to? I’m really lucky to have some great people and product helping me out such as Kawasaki Motors Australia, Shoei, Shark Leathers, 100%, Serco, LKI Clothing, Motul, RK, Thor, Michelin, UniFilter, Marty Blake and especially Mum and Dad because, without them, I wouldn’t be going anywhere.

FUJI

>02 FUJI www.adbmag.com OCTOBER 2016

| 147


THE BACK END I KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CANNON Main: The YCF50E doesn't mind being ridden aggressively 1. Steel frame backbone is the same as on the petrol version. E model-specific cradle is alloy 2. Bolt mechanical calipers are floaters 3. Upside-down fork was popular among testers 4. Yellow means head for a powerpoint

FUJI

>01

>02 FUJI

FUJI >03

148 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


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!

C I R T C E L E CKS! SHO FUJI

d ance an n e t in a heir ss m parts, le inibikes have tg g in v o Less m ht. Electric m ’t complainin less weigd the kids aren place an

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WORDS & PHOTOS // OLLY MALONE

FUJI YCF 50E MOTOR Type 1200W electric Fuel source 48 volt, 10,000mAh lithium Battery life 800 cycles Charge time Six hours Run time 1.5 hours Input Standard 240V Transmission Single speed Final drive Chain DIMENSIONS Wheelbase 855mm Seat height 550mm Ground clearance 220mm Weight 36kg (claimed) SUSPENSION Front USD fork, 135mm travel Rear Monoshock, 90mm travel BRAKES Front Bolt mechanical caliper, 160mm wave Rear Bolt mechanical caliper, 160mm wave PRICE & CONTACT Price $2499 Website ycf-motorcycles.com.au Warranty Six months

TUNING No oil to change, no carburettor to tune, no air filter to clean, say goodbye to all-nighters in the garage rebuilding your kid’s bike – just don’t forget to charge it!

E

veryone has their own ideas about electric devices, be they car, motorcycle, scooter or Big Mouth Billy Bass. It’s true that battery technology isn’t quite there yet and can’t replace the internal-combustion engine without an adjustment in the user’s habits, but that shouldn’t be the deciding factor. If you’re willing to accept this and you don’t need a petrol bike then you’ll come to realise that the benefits of an electric dirtbike outweigh the elephant in the room that is run time, and its calf, charge time. French manufacturer YCF has come to the party with its electric 50E for riders aged three to seven and positioned it not as a replacement but an alternative to petrol 50s. It’s aimed at riders in areas where noise might be an issue, parents who want a bike that is simpler to maintain or want one that is extremely safe for a child to learn to ride on – the YCF50E ticks all those boxes. When we pulled up at the Gwandalan Mini Trials Club with the YCF50E on the back of the ADB ute, our three test riders didn’t know what to make of it. They’d all heard of electric dirtbikes but none had been on one. The YCF50E is discrete in appearance. This isn’t a futuristic e-bike that looks like it belongs in a sci-fi thriller. It’s based on the YCF50A petrol machine but where the petrolburning 50cc four-stroke should be, there’s a 1200W electric motor, which still burns fossil fuels but in a different way. The power for the electric motor comes from a 10,000mAh lithium battery that is good for 800 cycles and, with roughly 1-1.5 hours of run time per charge, that’s a long

time between ‘rebuilds’. Turn on the ignition and the only thing indicating that it’s ready to go is a green light on the charge meter. First time out our test riders were confused. With no sound they tentatively applied the throttle and looked around nervously until the bike took off with a quiet humming sound. It’s eerily silent when the YCF50E is being flogged around the track. Just the chain slapping up and down as the bike goes over jumps and the unmistakeable sound of the rear locking up on corner entry remind you there’s a kid out there. The cable-operated disc brakes got the thumbs up from our test riders. They were simple to use and simple to service.

NOISE WORKS It’s important to mention the impact noise has on the riding experience of kids versus adults. For papa bears who have grown up riding rattly old two-smokers and then progressed onto thumpers, most associate noise with enjoyment and speed. There is a reason why punters chuck the stock pipe in the bin and bolt the latest and greatest race pipe to the back of their four-fiddy, regardless of any power gains. On the flip side we had three seven-yearold kids. Most kids are scared of the dark, get grumpy when they’re tired and are terrified of loud noises! We took a survey of our test pilots and they all felt less intimidated and more relaxed sitting on the YCF50E compared to its petrol-powered cousin. They agreed that, if you were a novice, the lack of noise would make the learning process slightly less stressful and more enjoyable. But don’t be fooled, twist the throttle on www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2016

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THE BACK END I KIDS’ CANNON

>01

FUJI

FUJI

> FUJI

FOOT BRAKE YCF can supply a brake pedal conversion kit to move the rear brake from the handlebar to the traditional position on the frame. Main: Lawson could easily throw around the light-weight YCF50E 1. Our test riders, Ashleigh Mitchell, Lawson Baxter and Matthew Mitchell 2. Matthew spent more time on one wheel than two 3. Ashleigh managed to pry the 50E away from the boys and get in some quick laps

DON’T BE FOOLED, TWIST THE THROTTLE ON THE YCF AND IT’LL TAKE OFF QUICKER THAN ANY 50CC PETROL BIKE the YCF and it’ll take off quicker than any 50cc petrol bike your kids have ridden. In a race-start situation, much to the amazement of the kids and their parents, the YCF50E smoked the petrol 50s off the line and to the first corner. Because of the instant torque from an electric motor it can be too much for a learner, so YCF has wisely installed a ‘potentiometer’ below the seat which can easily be adjusted with a screwdriver to limit the power output. Our fastest rider, Matthew, noticed a trait associated with petrol bikes that didn’t hit the YCF50E. When coming into a corner and trying to slide the rear wheel on a semi-automatic petrol bike the inertia of the crankshaft and piston makes it hard to lock the rear, you really need to stamp on the brake, because the clutch 150 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

doesn’t disengage until the revs drop. On the YCF, Matthew said he could come charging into a corner and lock the rear wheel a lot easier to slide the back tyre. Now, we know this isn’t considered best practice when it comes to lap times, but when you’re lighting it up for the camera there is nothing wrong with backing it into the corner with the rear locked up! ADB’s other test pilots, Lawson and Ashleigh, couldn’t get enough of the YCF50E. While not as quick as Matthew, they found the bike a lot of fun. Lawson, six, was happier sliding the rear into corners than he normally would be on a bigger, heavier 50cc four-stroke. A few times, our test riders took dirt samples but that couldn’t stop them from charging on.

FUJI >03 FUJI

They’d have the YCF50E up and going before mum even had the chance to put down her latte. That’s the beauty of the electric bike, no stalling, no petrol, no flooding, just pick it up and away you go. Lawson said he found the 50E was great off the line and had good top speed, but the really boggy, sandy sections zapped power from the electric motor. The chain did stretch throughout the day, but five minutes on the tools and it was sorted. The YCF50E doesn’t claim to be the cure to your minibike wows. It has positioned itself as a viable alternative for parents and kids who might have different needs or circumstances. It has got a lot of things going for it; less noise, weight, maintenance and intimidation and it can be ridden in a suburban backyard without starting a neighbourhood war.


THE BACK END | HOGAN’S HOTSHOTS

Compiled by: Lee Hogan

SAM TAKES A HIT

The promising racing future of Sam Warren has been halted by a freak accident

SAM MICHAEL WARREN Age: 13 Date of birth: 17/4/03 Hometown: Longreach, Qld First bike: Yamaha PW50 Current bike: Husqvarna TC85 Club: Cl b EEmerald Junior Motorcycle Club

At five, Sam Warren had to make a choice between following in his dad’s footsteps with football or following his dreams on two wheels. The decision was an easy one for Sam and within no time he had convinced his Mum to allow Dad to buy him a bike so the pair could go riding. Sam and Alistair spent plenty of time riding together on the tracks and trails around Longreach. Sam started on a Yamaha PW50 before progressing to bigger and faster bikes. Before they knew it, Sam had scored a handful of podiums at the local races. His skills were starting to blossom and the family found themselves travelling all over Queensland. At 13, Sam was racing a Husqvarna TC85 and doing exceptionally well locally, with plans to travel interstate if the opportunity arose. But a freak accident put a stop to his immediate raacing plans. On 2 January, Sam was training with a mate on o a track about a kilometre from town. There also were a handful of riders at the track from out o of town. As he became airborne on a tabletop ump, Sam saw a bike coming straight for him. A ju 21-year-old on a 450 was coming the other way 2 head-on. and they had a massive head on.

The impact left Sam with life-threatening injuries. He was placed in an induced coma and airlifted to Mackay, where surgeons raced to save his left leg. The injuries consisted of a shattered tibia, destroyed knee joint, broken left wrist, broken right upper arm (humerous), fractured ribs, fractures to the C5 and C6 vertebrae plus facial fractures requiring plates in his forehead and right eye socket. Sam also sustained a broken jaw, nose and fingers. Sam remained in the induced coma for three days while surgeons did their best to save his leg and reduce the trauma. On 12 January, facial reconstruction surgery was done over eight hours. The early days proved extremely difficult for the family and Sam. The subsequent months of operations and recovery time took a toll but he stayed positive. As the month’s passed, Sam regained strength and escaped from hospital. Now he can start to focus on his dream of getting back on a motorcycle but could certainly use a boost from ADB’s readers. If you would like to send your best wishes to Sam you can email him at samlibbie@icloud.com

Sam would benefit from hearing your words of support so flick him an email at samlibbie@icloud.com

152 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


Would like to thank everyone who helped with our Finke 2016 efort. Honda MPE B & B Of Road Mt Buller Motorcycle Adventures Greenield Racing Suspension Motorex Dunlop Tyers KCR Racing Flea Designs Ethen Goggles Novik Gloves Choice Suspension Pro4mance EZE Race products SP Seats And special thanks to the fuel crew and helpers Riders: #20 Mark Grove (14th) | #X09 Montie Hare (31st) | #520 Ben Nicolson (33rd) | #415 Madison Bird (135th) | #487 Alex Long (185th) | #831 Gary Hare (235th)

SCRIVENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RACING Specialising in Honda Race Performance Setup & Servicing 38 Boundary Street, Kerang VIC | 03 5452 1676 | www.scrivens.com.au


THE BACK END | WHERE TO RIDE

GH OAKLECIYCLE R MOTOLUB C

SPOT CHECK HIGHLIGHTS

LOCAL SECRET

• Wide variety of terrain and obstacles • Caters for junior riders and beginners • On Melbourne’s doorstep • Communal area with BBQ and playground • Hosts numerous competitions • Runs evening sessions during daylight saving

The Oakleigh Motorcycle Club is tucked away in Melbourne’s south eastern suburbs but is a prominent trials breeding ground Nestled in between the market gardens, industrial estates and landfill sites of Clarinda, Clayton and Dingley lies one of Melbourne’s biggest dirtbike secrets. The Oakleigh Motorcycle Club has been around since 1925 and caters exclusively for trials riding with a number of natural and man-made obstacles at its Clayton South headquarters to test even the best riders. Using rocks, dirt, concrete, logs, wood, tyres and natural terrain, the facility covers all bases and helps riders improve their skills for all situations. The complex is spread over a reasonably large area, meaning that there is plenty of room for everyone. Kids are more than welcome and the junior DRINKING

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FACILITIES

154 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

COVERAGE

course is a perfect way to ease them into the sport. If the kids aren’t riding, then a playground will keep them occupied. The spacious clubrooms provide shelter as well as a canteen. The outdoor area includes BBQs, so you can cook up a feast after a day’s riding. There is also a bike wash bay and sizeable car park. The club hosts a number of competitions throughout the year and has produced many successful trials riders. For those just getting into the sport, coaching is available. The best part of being an Oakleigh member is that the venue is just 35 minutes from the CBD. Dylan Ruddy GUIDE

ACCOMMODATION

TOILET

SHELTER

BBQ

TECH

LOCATION • Simpsons Rd, Clayton South, Vic

COST • Membership: $90 per calendar year • The fee is pro-rata so the cost decreases based on when you join • Rider levy fee (to ride for free on any practice day): $60 (pro-rata)

CONTACT P: 0403 800 918 E: president@oakleighmcc.com W: oakleighmcc.com

EFTPOS

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THE BACK END | WHAT’S ON RACING & TOURS

CALENDAR

OCTOB

HOME

&

ABROAD

VICTORIA 3 Oct 9 Oct

Supermoto Come & Try Day, Broadford Victorian Classic Motocross Interclub Series, Undera

NEW SOUTH WALES 8-9 Oct NSW Senior Dirt Track Championships, Woodlands Speedway 8-9 Oct Two-Day National Open, Trials Club of Canberra, Top Naas Homestead 22-23 Oct State Minikhana Titles, JTMCC, Gwandalan

INTERNATIONAL 1 Oct Speedway Grand Prix, Rd10, Torun, Poland 1-7 Oct Rallye Du Maroc, Cross-Country Rallies World Championship 15 Oct Monster Energy Cup, Las Vegas, US 11-16 Oct International Six Days Enduro, Navarra, Spain 22 Oct Speedway Grand Prix, Rd11, Melbourne Speedway GP's coming to Melbourne on 22 October, 2016

QUEENSLAND 30 Sep-2 Oct 2 Oct 8-9 Oct 8-9 Oct 9 Oct 15-16 Oct 15-16 Oct 22-23 Oct 22-23 Oct 22 Oct 29-30 Oct

Long Track/Dirt Track Championship, Townsville MotoFest, QMP SEQ Junior MX, Rd3, Chinchilla FNQ MX Development Series, Rd1, Cairns Husqvarna Sprint Series, Rd3 FNQ MX Development Series, Rd2, Ravenshoe CQ des MX Clubs, Mackay SEQ Junior MX, Rd4, Kilcoy FNQ MX Development Series, Rd3, Tully Pony Express, Rd3, Murphy’s Creek FNQ MX Development Series, Rd4, Mareeba

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 8-9 Oct 9 Oct 16 Oct

Murray Williams Cup, Gillman Morgan MX Club Series, Rd9, Morgan Mount Barker Moto Trials, Mount Barker

RALLIES AND TRAIL TOURS

TASMANIA 9 Oct 23 Oct

MERC Enduro, TBA LMSC Grasstrack, Bridport

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 23 Oct

Back to Wanneroo Junior & Senior Interclub, Wanneroo

NATIONAL 8-9 Oct 14 Oct 29 Oct

Australian ATV Nationals, Wonthaggi, Vic Australian Supercross Championship, Rd2, Toowoomba, Qld Australian Supercross Championship, Rd3, Wayville, SA

1-2 Oct 3-10 Oct 6 Oct 7-9 Oct 11-18 Oct 15-16 Oct 23-28 Oct 30 Oct

Barcaldine, dalbymoto.com.au Eight-Day Cape York Adventure (north bound), capeyorkmotorcycles.com.au Trapp Tours Cape York to Cairns, amcr.com.au Three-Day Sunset Desert Trail Adventure, klausatbt@optusnet.com.au Eight-Day Cape York Adventure (south bound), capeyorkmotorcycles.com.au Cooyar, dalbymoto.com.au Six Day Fish-N-Ride Tour, capeyorkmotorcycles.com.au Otway Entree, otwayoffroad.com

If your club or local dirtbike tour operator is running an organised trailride or rally in your area please let us know at: adbmag@adbmag.com.au

156 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


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THE BACK END | HERITAGE

Compiled by: Warren Jack

OCT 1986 ISSUE # 86 88 PAGES, $3.50

BIG-BORE ENDURO STANDARD ADB regarded the ’84 Husky WR400 as the benchmark and that opinion was strengthened by the ’85 model. They then went on to claim the ’86 was even better. Suspension was the same as on the CR and XC models, with 330mm travel at the rear and 285mm at the front. The engine produced good torque and if the bike was kept in the fat part of the powerband it ate hills without a hiccup. The new swingarm was lighter while a front disc had been added. The rear was still a drum. The shock was from Ohlins, the tank held 12 litres, weight was 107kg and it could be put in your shed for $4499.

ON THE COVER We were so keen to race Honda’s new XR250 that we braved rain, hail, sleet and even snow! The little booger performed as ADB had always said the XR should perform – at last! Inset: Indoor supercross finally came to Australia. Naturally ADB was there, but we didn’t bang off as much film as the other photographers.

FAST REACTION VEHICLE Geoff Ballard wandered into a bike shop outside Atlanta, Georgia, just as the owner was uncrating a personal import from KTM. It was a military-spec model designed for warfare in northern climates and with nonriders in mind. Two versions were available, one with the standard clutch and the other with an auto clutch and left-hand rear brake. This gave you a free left hand for shooting or map reading. Keeping the more northern battle fields in mind, the KTM had

158 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

heated grips and skis that clipped to the fork sliders. It was powered by an older, air-cooled, 250cc engine and put out 26hp while only generating a whisper-quiet 72dbA to allow enemies to be snuck up on. The tank held almost 21 litres, giving a range of 320km, and the 109kg bike was claimed to be good for 120km/h. They weren’t available except by special order and the price in the US was $3150, which was about $4700 here at the time.


BIKES FROM THE DAYS WHEN DINOSAURS ROAMED THE PITS

ADSK BACN… THE

THINGS YA GOTTA DO! You never get very far into a conversation about the early days of ADB before Honest Muz and his creative views on dirtbikes are mentioned. This example shows Muz’s unique slant on riding techniques with his advice under each cartoon. Under the heading, ‘You gotta have good eyesight,’ it says: “To operate effectively as a motorcycle rider, your brain must be constantly supplied with accurate information supplied by your eyes. If you’ve ever gone out to the shed to take your bike for a ride and spent 20 minutes trying to kickstart the neighbours’ old washing machine [wrong shed] then there’s a chance your eyesight could be a bit dodgy.”

Suzuki dropped the price of the DR200 by $400. Why can’t we get deals like that now?

IN YOUR FACE The Moto 3 Pro was the third generation of Bell’s full face off-road helmet, a design it pioneered.

SOCKS TO JOCKS

wrote in XR Man from Drysdale, Vic, as the ed bias n bee had claiming ADB s aha Yam had es issu four previous was he on the cover. GE replied that to made biased towards whatever pho r. cove t bes the

f Mr round o jury second in e e e th n d k e ad all miss , Vic, due to a G n e m h la p h Step roadford A front axle c B t rn a , tu s e s g. Motocro hile practicin did a 90-degre bar. dw andle h wheel t e n th suffere o r fr 10 ed ove ff, the issed in atapult come o ll was c X round he’d m the top a G r M rM and as on e first M ter he w ke. It was th t two weeks la in F t a m u years, b p of the podiu ste

IN

SUZUKI GOES SOFT

NIGHT OF SUPERCROSS The dearly departed Sydney Entertainment Centre, sometimes shortened to the EntCent or disparaged as the Empty Container Centre, was completed in 1982 and stood at the southern end of Darling Harbour. Promoters Phil Christensen and Phil Harrison saw the potential for more than rock concerts and, after 18 months of negotiation, they finally got the green light to hold Australia’s first indoor supercross. Friday night drew 10,000 to watch the Aussie team of Gall, Bell, Dack and Leisk take on the US team of Ellis, Cooper and Keller, with Brekker a last minute no-show due to injury. The podium hosted Ellis, Bell and Dack. Everyone got to ride, from Junior 80cc riders to A-graders over the two-night event. Channel Nine’s Wide World of Sport had five cameras.

OLD T

JT Racing got its start in the late ’60s when husband and wife pharmacists John At the first NSW Enduro Stat e and Rita Gregory Championship round at Obe ron, started selling riders had to battle through up stretchy socks to six inches of snow. at motocross events as a way of off-setting John’s racing expenses. By 1970 they had shut the pharmacy and US expat Jim Ellis handed the Finke gone full-time. lead to Gall on th e return leg when The range a day-one crack in Ellis’ barrel we of products nt the rest of the wa y. expanded and Lyndon Heffernan ’s motocross the business is column appeared for the first time still going. and ran for many years.

The 125cc enduro class was popular for beginners until experienced riders started realising how much fun could be had and beat them senseless. As the market grew, the factories started supplying proper enduro bikes and people moved on from the converted MX’ers or trailbikes they had been using. In 1980, SWM brought out the GS125, which had typical Italian flair. It did some things brilliantly but had a few shortcomings. Perhaps the biggest shortcoming was the tank, which looked attractive but only held eight litres and that limited the bike to about 80km. The tool compartment in the top of the tank would have been more useful for fuel. The Pirelli Regalorita tyres gave good grip, which was needed as the bike was tested at the Blue Light Rally on a very wet weekend. The muffler looked bulky but kept the bike quiet and the brakes were good. The rear stopper came in on gold for its strength and ability to keep mud out despite the many ruts on the course. Today’s disc-braked riders have yet to experience the thrill of a drum brake full of mud and water on a steep hill. The ruts also tested the steering, but ADB’s tester claimed the GS125 was the only bike he’d ridden that was capable of being ridden out of a muddy rut rather than dismounting and lifting it out. Torque was found to be good and where bigger bikes were wheel spinning in the mud the SWM often got grip and pulled away up the hills littered with greasy logs. The downside was the suspension, with travel a bit less than most. The fork only had 8.6 inches and the shocks 9.8, courtesy of Marzocchi. The rotary-valve, two-stroke Rotax pulled well on hills using a 25:1 petrol/oil mix fed through a 32mm Bing. Starting was primary kick, spark was from a Bosch CDI unit and the lights were 6V. It produced 26.8hp, which pushed the 97kg (dry) bike along and the ask was a pricey $2400. See our test on the 2016 SWMs on p62.

www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2016

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THE BACK END | HERITAGE

P A LA H WIT A

Compiled by: Warren Jack

LEGEND

For Mick Cook, motocross wasn’t about bikes as much as beating everyone When was your first time on a bike? It was in the early ‘80s when I was about 11. We lived on the Sunshine Coast and had a bit of land but not a lot of money so Dad got me a second-hand Kawasaki KV100 ag bike to putter around the yard on. I got into a bit of strife from the start when Dad said just stay in first gear but I somehow got it into second. Mum wasn’t too keen on it at first, she was a bit worried about me getting hurt.

How did you make the move from backyard to motocross track? I moved up to a YZ125, which I inherited from my brother, I was way too small for it at first. I went to a local race just to have a go and thought “hey this is all right” and kept at it. It wasn’t the bike riding so much as it was the competition to beat the others. That’s why I never really got into the trailriding side of things. I think if Dad had got me a go kart instead of a bike I would have gone that way, just for the thrill of competing.

You’ve collected more than the odd title. What sits in the trophy cabinet at home? I won 21 Queensland championships across all the classes, 125, 250 and 500, in both MX and SX as well as four-stroke classes. I also won the Australian 125cc Motocross Championship in 1995. I was also picked to represent Australia in the MXdN in 1995, ’96 and 2003. The ’95 was in Slovakia, ’96 in Spain and I missed 2003 after breaking my ankle the week before.

Have you only ridden motocross? That’s right, I dabbled a few times in local short-circuit events just as a bit of a muck around but really all I’ve ever ridden is motocross and supercross.

MXGPs in Malaysia and Indonesia but I sometimes wish I’d had a go at the supercross scene in the US. I was making pretty good money here at home so it would have been a leap into the unknown in some ways. After the ’96 MXdN I was offered a spot in Europe for ’97 and I regret not taking it up. Staying home seemed the more financially sensible decision at the time.

that has possibly taken away some of the skill needed in motocross.

Are you still riding?

What would you think was your toughest day?

The last time I was on a bike was years ago at the World Vets MX in America. I got motivated and did a lot of training and my speed was good enough to win but I made a few mistakes and finished third.

Lining up at the MXdN in 1996 between Jeremy McGrath and Sebastien Tortelli was pretty daunting, let me tell you. That was mentally challenging but as the old saying goes, “when the flag drops, the bullshit stops” and you just concentrate on racing. I finished my two motos with a seventh and a ninth which wasn’t too shabby, I thought, at an event like that. The toughest races physically were any at Manjimup in WA. That track can leave you exhausted.

What are you doing these days? I’m semi-retired. I had a business for 11 years doing glazing and it was good but I got out of that last year. I’m just cruising along and, occasionally, help out a few mates. Fifteen years as a professional motocrosser helped get me set up in the business both with the money earned and lessons learnt in terms of commitment.

What differences stand out in the sport? We often travelled together when I was racing but there seems to be more segregation between the teams today. The egos are definitely bigger, there seems to be a lot who think they are the next Chad Reed but they’re still to get anything meaningful in the way of results. A lot don’t seem to realise how much work has to be put in to it, especially the younger riders. I also think that the four-stroke bikes are easier to ride than the twostrokes, especially in the big bores and

Does any bike stand out? My ’03 YZ450F was a great bike as Serco was sponsoring me with engine work and Moose Covus was doing the suspension work. It was a great thing to ride. I won four or five national races that year up against people like Craig Anderson and the King brothers.

Does any rider stand out for you? I was happy to beat everybody, it’s that competitive thing in me, I suppose, but it was particularly satisfying to beat Peter Melton or Andrew McFarlane as I held them both in high regard.

Was anybody a big influence on your career? My wife has been a terrific help. We’ve been married 24 years and she was always hard on me. She knew what was needed as she is a personal trainer and knew what I needed to stay motivated and focused. She did a lot of work in the background with my training program. I owe her a lot of gratitude.

What win stands out as a special one? Winning the Australian 125cc championship against Andrew McFarlane is a great memory as I always regarded him as the better out of the two of us. It was very close, with me winning one then him winning one until we had six rounds each but at the end I had the most points.

What events have you missed that you wished you’d competed in. I was lucky enough to ride in a couple of

160 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au

“I was happy to beat everybody, it’s that competitive thing in me, I suppose”


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THE BACK END | ON ANY SUNDAY

ELIJAH OXENHAM Blasting through the mud on his Braaap at Frankston, Vic

DAMIEN CR

AWFORD Bit of sync hronised sw imming in the Kenilw orth State Forest, Qld

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fo

162 | OCTOBER 2016 www.adbmag.com.au


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| 163


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ETT LARRY CARRdays ory Reliving the gl sic metal as cl with some

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CONGRATULATIONS QUINTIN! YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE WON A LUCAS OIL PACK VALUED AT $86.35 FROM OUR MATES AT CARLISLE TYRES & ACCESSORIES, WWW.CTAAUSTRALIA.COM.AU, (02) 9820 4444 To get your mug and machine in the pages of ADB, and for your chance to score a great prize, send your pics to: On Any Sunday, Australasian Dirt Bike magazine PO Box 2094, Oakleigh, Vic 3166 You can also email high-resolution images to adbmag@adbmag.com.au. Please send copies of prints as we are unable to return hardcopy photos.

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THE BACK END | BUYERS' GUIDE Aprilia

aprilia.com.au

BIKE TYPE M Motocross E Enduro A Adventure T Trail F Fun ENGINE TYPE 2T Two-stroke 4T Four-stroke

(02) 9772 2666

APRILIA CAPONORD RALLY The Rally has proved popular as a long-haul tourer and was one of the surprise packets of the comparo test in our Adventure Edition back in January (#436). Caponord 1200 Rally

A

4T

840

24

E

$24,000*

RR350 RR390 RR430 RR480 Xtrainer 300

BMW

E E E E T

4T 4T 4T 4T 2T

940 940 940 940 910

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I I P P I

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Prices are for base models

The PR5 Extreme runs a very colourful Marzocchi fork to match the chrome-moly/alloy frame. We tested the standard PR5 in this issue on p62. PR3 MX 125cc PR3 MX 240cc PR3 Enduro 240cc PR4 MX 240cc PR4 Enduro Pro 240cc PR4 Extreme 240cc PR5 Enduro EFI 250cc PR5 Extreme EFI 250cc

M M E M E E E E

9

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7 7 7 7 7 7 7.5 7.5

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550 700 700 840 840

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$699 $799 $850 $1050 $1490

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MX-50F MX-110F MXA-125 MX-125F MX1 MX2 MX3 MX17

Cobra

14 16 16 24 20 30

I I I I E E

$9990 $12,965 $16,840 $18,650 $21,990 $24,590

1300 272 227

F F F M M M M M

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

cobranation.com.au

570 700 720 720 785 785 720 825

3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

B B B I I I I I

$1499 $1999 $1499 $2499 $4499 $3599 $2999 $3299

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4T

860

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E

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680 762 762

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I I I

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CF125 The CF125 is the little brother of the CF140L with a big-valve head residing in the Lifan engine which, this year, has a 26mm PZ2 Mikuni carburettor for sharper response.

We tested the RR430 in our 450cc Enduro Shootout in May (#439), with riders finding it a great trailbike with sharp steering, smooth power and plush suspension. E E

M M M

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BETA RR430

RR250 RR300

780 790 880 890 850 890

CX50 benelli.com.au

The Trek Amazonas 1130 is a rugged version of the standard Trek and is about to be joined by a little brother, the Trek 502, sporting a twin-cylinder engine, panniers and more adventurish styling.

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The MX110F runs a semi-automatic clutch for kids learning the ropes of riding while tipping the scales at 67kg dry. With four litres of fuel you'll be surprised how far they can get.

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A A A A A A

MX110F

0

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F

4T

823

8.5

B

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20.8 21.5 12

I E E

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FC450 The 2017 FC450 is lighter than air, with WP's AER fork replacing the 4CS. Traction control and launch control are part of the revised Keihin ECU. On-sale date and pricing are yet to be announced.

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F F F F

4T 4T 4T 4T

830 900 920 920

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3.0 5.0 5.0 6.7

B I I I

$1479 $1959 $1999 $2999

FC250 FC350 FC450 FE250 FE350 FE450 FE501 TC85 small wheel TC85 big wheel TC125 TC250 TE125 TE250 TE300 701 Enduro

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4T

810

17.3

B

$7599

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F M F F F F M T T M M A A A F

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

548 667 735 785 832 832 866 872 875 951 952 870 870 870 823

2.6 4.0 4.3 4.3 7.2 4.3 4.3 8.2 7.7 6.3 6.3 18.8 18.8 18.8 8.5

B B B B B B I B I I P E E E B

$1999 $2999 $3599 $3999 $5099 $6499 $6899 $5799 $5899 $10,999 $11,999 $15,499 $16,999 $17,999 $4999

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 4T

kawasaki.com.au

992 992 992 970 970 970 970 855 890 992 992 960 960 960 935

7.5 7.5 7.5 9.5 9.5 9.0 9.0 5.0 5.0 7.5 7.5 11 11 11 11.5

P P P I I P P I I I I I I P I

$11,695 $12,395 $12,695 $12,495 $14,695 $14,995 $15,495 $7795 $7795 $10,795 $11,695 $10,995 $12,995 $14,295 $15,995

(02) 9684 2585

KLR650

The Africa Twin has been pulling big sales numbers for Honda with its blend of off-road prowess and open-road acumen. The 998cc parallel twin pumps out 70kW at 7500rpm.

CB500XA

M M M E E E E M M M M E E E E

There are plenty of nasty myths surrounding Kawasaki's venerable KLR but it has many good features. Editor MItch Lees put the myths to the test for our July issue, #443. KL250 Stockman KLX110 KLX110L KLX140 KLX140L KLX150L KLX250S KLX450R KX65 KX85 KX85 II KX250F KX450F KLR650

F F F F F T T E M M M M M T

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 2T 2T 2T 4T 4T 4T

830 680 730 780 800 875 890 935 760 840 870 945 955 890

9.0 3.8 3.8 5.8 5.8 7.0 7.7 8.0 3.8 5.5 5.5 6.1 6.2 22.1

If you need your daily fix of all things dirty and can’t get your hands on a copy of ADB magazine, tune into www.adbmag.com.au for all the lastest in the world of dirtbikes. You'll find breaking news, race video highlights, exclusive ADB videos, how tos and tech tips.

B B B B B B B P I I I I P I

$6199 $2999 $3199 $4799 $5199 $4099 $6299 $10,999 $5399 $6199 $6699 $9999 $10,999 $8099


THE BACK END | BUYERS' GUIDE KTM

ktm.com/au

50SX Mini 50SX 65SX 85SX small wheel 85SX big wheel 125SX (150 to order only) 250SX 250SX-F 350SX-F 450SX-F 200EXC 250EXC 250EXC-F 300EXC 350EXC-F 350XC-F 250R Freeride 350 Freeride 450EXC 500EXC 690 Enduro R 1050 Adventure 1190 Adventure 1190 Adventure (EDS) 1190 Adventure R 1290 Super Adventure

Moto Guzzi

BIKE TYPE M Motocross E Enduro A Adventure T Trail F Fun ENGINE TYPE 2T Two-stroke 4T Four-stroke

Sherco

1800 644 771

300EXC

450 SEF-R

The 300EXC two-stroke has been revamped for 2017 with lots of changes, including a relocated starter motor, but no fuel or oil injection. Pricing is yet to be revealed.

The Sherco 450 SEF-R is the company's seoond attempt to crack our biggest market segment and the motor is extremely compact for a DOHC design.

M M M M M M M M M M E E E E E E T T E E A A A A A A

2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 2T 4T 4T 4T 2T 2T 4T 2T 4T 4T 2T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

motoguzzi.com.au

530 650 750 865 865 992 992 992 992 985 960 960 970 960 970 970 895 895 970 970 935 850 875 890 890 860

2 2.3 3.5 5.1 5.1 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 5.5 5.5 9.5 9.5 12 23 23 23 23 30

I I I I I I P I P P I P I P P P I I P P I E E E E E

$3995 $4795 $6295 $7495 $7495 $9995 $10,995 $10,995 $11,695 $11,995 $10,995 $11,995 $12,995 $12,995 $13,495 $12,495 $9995 $10,995 $13,795 $13,995 $14,495 $17,995 $19,995 $22,995 $22,995 $26,995

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V7II STORNELLO The Italians are jumping on the scrambler wagon, with this entry being based on Moto Guzzi's 744cc V7 platform with a highmounted pipe, but a fairly low power output. V7II Stornello

Odes

A

4T

798

downunderdirtbikes.com

21

E

$17,800

(07) 4613 0622

MCF450E The Odes MCF450E runs a 48mm twin-cartridge fork with 16 position compression and rebound damping adjustment and weighs only 115kg dry with ADR compliance. MCF250E MCF450E

sherco.com.au (03) 8363 1600

T E

4T 4T

960 963

8 7.2

B I

$5890 $6890

250 SE-R 300 SE-R 250 SEF-R 300 SEF-R 450 SEF-R

E E E E E

ray

zuma.com.au

2T 2T 4T 4T 4T

950 950 950 950 950

8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5

I P I P I

$13,090 $13,490 $12,990 $14,190 $14,790

(02) 4285 9400

XY150GY SCRAMBLER The XY150GY Scrambler is Shineray's entry in the playbike market. It runs a 150cc air-cooled motor and features handguards and a carrier for work on the farm. rambler 2 Motard XY250GY-2 Enduro

ki

F M T

4T 4T 4T

840 950 980

suzukimotorcycles.com.au

5.8 8 8

B B B

$2350 $2999 $2999

(03) 9931 0500

V-STROM 1000 GT Suzuki has added a bag of fruiit to the V-Strom 1000, including panniers , a topbox, bashplate and crashbars, to create this GT version for the road trip that never ends. DR-Z70 DR-Z125 DR-Z125L DR200S DR-Z250 DR-Z400E DR650SE JR80 RM85 RM85L RM-Z250 RM-Z450 RMX450Z TF125 V-Strom 650 & LAMS version V-Strom 650 XT LAMS V-Strom 650 XT V-Strom 1000

F F F F T T T F M M M M E F A A A A

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 2T 2T 2T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

560 775 805 845 880 935 865 685 850 875 955 955 955 835 835 835 835 850

3.0 4.8 4.8 12.5 10.5 10 13 4.1 5.0 5.0 6.5 6.2 6.2 13 20 20 20 20

B B B B B I I B I I I P P B I I I I

$2390 $3690 $4390 $4990 $6990 $7990 $8090 $2590 $4990 $5490 $9990 $10,990 $12,490 $2990 $10,290 $10,990 $11,490 $16,990*

V-Strom 1000 GT

A

4T

850

20

I

$19,990*

Prices are Manufacturer's List Prices, which include GST but exclude on-road costs and dealer delivery, unlessstatedotherwise.Allpriceswerecorrectattimeofgoingtoprintandaresubjecttochangewithout notice. To contact ADB about this list, please email adbmag@adbmag.com.au

ADB'S SOCIAL MEDIA


SEAT HEIGHT Millimetres FUEL CAPACITY Litres RIDER LEVEL P Pro E Expert I Intermediate B Beginner

SWM

swm-motorcycles.co.it

Yamaha

(03) 8362 1600

yamaha-motor.com.au

YZ250F

RS300R

The YZ250F has received a host of upgrades that were introduced on the 60th anniversary YZ450, with a revamped engine, swingarm and gearbox changes to make shifting easier.

Some of you might recognise this SWM as an updated version of the Husky TE310. It weighs in at just 107kg dry with electric start, is out now and priced competitively.

RS300R RS500R RS650R

TM

E E E

4T 4T 4T

tmracing.com.au

963 963 900

7.2 7.2 12

E E I

PW50

$8290 TT-R50E $8990 TT-R110E $9490 TT-R125E

(07) 3376 5729

MX JUNIOR TM's MX Junior now comes in 85 and 100cc two-stroke capacities and in small and big wheel versions. As you'd expect from the boutique Italian brand they are plastered with trick bits.

MX Junior MX 125 MX 144 MX 250 MX 250 Fi MX 300 MX 450 Fi EN 125 EN 144 (not ADR compliant) EN 250 EN 250 Fi EN 300 EN 450 Fi EN 530 F

M M M M M M M E E E E E E E

(02) 9757 0011

2T 2T 2T 2T 4T 2T 4T 2T 2T 2T 4T 2T 4T 4T

880 960 960 960 950 960 950 960 960 960 950 960 950 950

6.5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

I I I P I P P I I P I P P P

$7350 $9890 $9999 $10,399 $11,990 $10,599 $12,890 $10,499 $10,699 $11,499 $13,090 $13,190 $13,790 $13,499

TT-R125LWE TT-R230 WR250R WR250F WR450F XT250 XT660Z Ténéré XT1200Z Super Ténéré Super Ténéré Outback Edition Super Ténéré Electric Suspension YZ85 YZ85LW YZ125 YZ250 YZ250X YZ250XR (with lighting kit) YZ250F (2017) YZ250FX YZ250FXR (with lighting kit) YZ450F (2017) YZ450FX

YCF

F F F F F F A E E F A A A A M M M M XC XC M XC XC M M

2T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 2T 2T 2T 2T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

485 555 670 775 775 870 930 965 960 810 865 845 845 845 864 904 973 976 965 965 965 965 965 965 965

www.ycf-motorcycles.com.au

2 3 4 6 6 8 8 7.5 7.2 10 23 23 23 23 5 5 8 8 6.4 7.5 6.4 7.5 7.5 6 6

B B B B I B B I I B I E E E I I I P I I I I I P P

$1899 $2099 $3299 $4199 $4599 $5699 $8299 $11,999 $12,999 $6299 $13,999 $19,990 $21,890 $21,999 $6699 $7199 $9599 $10,799 $10,899 $11,199 $11,099 $11,699 $12,199 $12,099 $12,699

(07) 5520 2483

START F125SE KIDS

Triumph

triumphmotorcycles.com.au

For 2016, the F125SE Kids has new discs, a new seatcover and a frame-mounted plug so you can keep the battery charged over the long, cold winter.

(03) 9381 9765

TTIGER EXPLORER XCX Triumph has followed its expanded Tiger range with a truck load of new Explorer models to give Australian buyers five different flflavours to chose from.

Tiger 800 XR Tiger 800 XC Tiger 800 XRX Tiger 800 XCX Tiger 800 XRT Tiger Explorer XRX Tiger Explorer XCX Tiger Explorer XCX Low Tiger Explorer XCA Tiger Explorer XRT

A A A A A A A A A A

4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

850 850 850 820 820 837 837 805 837 837

19 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20

I I I I I E I E E E

$14,090 $15,590 $16,850 $17,950 $18,150 $22,700 $24,200 $24,200 $26,700 $25,200

50A 50E Start F88SE Lite 125 Start F125SE ‘Kids’ Start F125SE ‘Adult’ Start F125E Pilot F125 Pilot F150 Factory F150 SP1 Factory F150 SP2 Factory F150 SP3 Factory F190 SP3 Supermoto F125S Supermoto F150

F F F F F F F F F M M M M SM SM

4T E 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T 4T

550 550 655 765 720 765 765 790 790 800 800 800 800 765 790

2.0 N/A 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8

B B B B B B I I I I I E E B I

$1699 $2499 $1999 $1590 $2199 $2199 $2199 $2249 $2499 $2999 $3599 $4799 $4999 $2099 $2699

YCF prices are 'no more to pay'

Don't forget, to keep up with all the latest from the world of ADB, check out our Facebook page (facebook.com/ADBmag) and our Instagram feed (@adbmagazine) Get involved by commenting and sending in your own photos and videos. Be sure to tell your mates!


DTM TRADING - WHOLESALE OUTLET 11 Rushwood Drive, Craigieburn Vic 3064 | 03 9303 8328 | 0418 510 111 dtmsales@hotmail.com | TRADING HOURS: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-1pm

Motorcycle Lift Bench. 450kg rated, Air-Hydraulic Lift 2000x670mm + ramp. $579

Motorcycle Wheel Chock $89.90

Motorcycle Lift Bench. 450kg rated, air hydraulic lift 1800x600mm + ramp. $519 Engine Crane. Folding, 2T. $279

Wheel Clamp $49.95

Lift Stand 500kg $99.95

Hyd Lift Stand* 135kg $219 Motorcycle Dolly/Stand $189.90

Motorcycle Scissor Lift 500kg. $119.99

Hydraulic Lift Stand. 135kg $199.95

Wheel Chock $99.90

Parts Washer 20 Gallon $185

Motorcycle Dolly. 560kgs $199

Pallet Truck/Trolley. 2T $279

Lift Stand $45.99

Hyd Lift Stand Hoist. 680kg $179.99 Motorcycle Dolly. $119.99

We accept

Hydraulic Shop Press 20 ton $399

Multi Tyre Changer (suits up to 21â&#x20AC;? wheels) $219.99

CAN FREIGHT TO ANYWHERE IN AUSTRALIA *MOTORCYCLE NOT INCLUDED

79


THE BACK END | NEXT MONTH

WHAT’S COMING UP? Next issue we take a look at Dean Ferris’ CDR Yamaha and what makes it one of the fastest bikes in the country. To do this, ADB Motocross Editor Lee Hogan has been given a rare opportunity to ride the MX1 machine at Cheyne Boyd’s Park4MX. With Ferris just nine points off the lead with two rounds to go in the MX Nationals as we went to press, there’s a good chance we’ll be riding the title-winning bike.

PLUS • Sherco Factory 300 2T tested • Stand-up jet skiing – is it motocross on water? • Townley talks about his future • AORC, MX Nats and AMA Pro Motocross wrap

MMXVI Australasian Dirt Bike magazine

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of ADB is published by Bideford Black Pty Ltd (BB). BB may use and disclose your information in accordance with its privacy policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other BB publications, products, services and events. Our privacy policy is located at www.citrusmedia.com.au/privacy. It also sets out on how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. BB may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world. In addition, this issue may contain reader offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting BB in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact BB’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacy@bidefordblack.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer, Bideford Black, PO Box 20154, World Square, NSW 2002 ©.

www.adbmag.com.au OCTOBER 2016

| 177


WE BUILD A TRIP TO THE PODIUM INTO EVERY TYRE.

OFFICIAL TYRE PARTNER

160242

64 trips to the top step of the Podium in the MX GP Championship and consecutive MX Nationals titles in Australia prove we build winning tyres. The Pirelli Scorpion MX range is no exception. Tread patterns and compounds built to dominate in all conditions, including the new MX32 Pro. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the choice for professional and amateur riders who want podium performance out of every ride.

Australian dirt bike 2016 10  
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