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Geographic Entertainment

Japanese Culture Today we are talking about Japan, we expect that you learn a little from other cultures.

Martes

28

mayo

Flamenco-Arevalo 9째A

2013


A LITTLE BIT FROM JAPAN‌

Particularly traditional Japanese culture has many roots in traditional Chinese culture, however Japanese culture, even historically differed from Chinese culture and due to the separation of the two land masses, plus the enforced periods of isolation from the outside world, further extended the differences between the two cultures.

Japan is an archipelago of 6,852 islands. The four largest islands are Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Shikoku, which together comprise about ninety-seven percent of Japan's land area. Japan has the world's tenth-largest population, with over 127 million people. HonshĹŤ's Greater Tokyo Area, which includes the de facto capital city of Tokyo and several surrounding prefectures, is the largest metropolitan area in the world, with over 30 million residents.


Largest cities or towns of Japan 2010 Census Rank

City name

Prefecture

Pop.

Rank

City name

Prefecture

Pop.

1

Tokyo

Tokyo

8,949,447

11

Hiroshima

Hiroshima

1,174,209

2

Yokohama

Kanagawa

3,689,603

12

Sendai

Miyagi

1,045,903

3

Osaka

Osaka

2,666,371

13

Kitakyushu

Fukuoka

977,288

4

Nagoya

Aichi

2,263,907

14

Chiba

Chiba

962,130

5

Sapporo

Hokkaidō

1,914,434

15

Sakai

Osaka

842,134

6

Kobe

Hyōgo

1,544,873

16

Niigata

Niigata

812,192

7

Kyoto

Kyōto

1,474,473

17

Hamamatsu

Shizuoka

800,912

8

Fukuoka

Fukuoka

1,463,826

18

Kumamoto

Kumamoto

734,294

9

Kawasaki

Kanagawa

1,425,678

19

Sagamihara

Kanagawa

717,561

10

Saitama

Saitama

1,222,910

20

Shizuoka

Shizuoka

716,328

Nagoya Osaka

Tokyo Yokohama


CLIMATE The climate of Japan is predominantly temperate, but varies greatly from north to south. Japan's geographical features divide it into six principal climatic zones: Hokkaidō, Sea of Japan, Central Highland, Seto Inland Sea, Pacific Ocean, and Ryūkyū Islands. The northernmost zone, Hokkaido, has a humid continental climate with long, cold winters and very warm to cool summers. Precipitation is not heavy, but the islands usually develop deep snowbanks in the winter. In the Sea of Japan zone on Honshū's west coast, northwest winter winds bring heavy snowfall. In the summer, the region is cooler than the Pacific area, though it sometimes experiences extremely hot temperatures because of the foehn wind. The Central Highland has a typical inland humid continental climate, with large temperature differences between summer and winter, and between day and night; precipitation is light, though winters are usually snowy. The mountains of the Chūgoku and Shikoku regions shelter the Seto Inland Sea from seasonal winds, bringing mild weather yearround.


Economy

Some of the structural features for Japan's economic growth developed in the Edo period, such as the network of transport routes, by road and water, and the futures contracts, banking and insurance of the Osaka rice brokers. During the Meiji period from 1868, Japan expanded economically with the embrace of the market economy. Many of today's enterprises were founded at the time, and Japan emerged as the most developed nation in Asia. The period of overall real economic growth from the 1960s to the 1980s has been called the Japanese post-war economic miracle: it averaged 7.5 percent in the 1960s and 1970s, and 3.2 percent in the 1980s and early 1990s.


Music in Japan Japanese music is eclectic and diverse. Many instruments, such as the koto, were introduced in the 9th and 10th centuries. The accompanied recitative of the Noh drama dates from the 14th century and the popular folk music, with the guitar-like shamisen, from the sixteenth.[196] Western classical music, introduced in the late 19th century, now forms an integral part of Japanese culture. The imperial court ensemble Gagaku has influenced the work of some modern Western composers.


Some of the most popular cultures of Japan‌ Are traditional Japanese female entertainers who act as hostesses and whose skills include performing various Japanese arts such as classical music, dance and games.

The appeal of a high-ranking geisha to her typical male guest has historically been very different from that of his wife. The ideal geisha showed her skill, while the ideal wife was modest. The ideal geisha seemed carefree, the ideal wife somber and responsible. Geisha do sometimes marry their clients but they must then retire; there can never be a married geisha. Geisha may gracefully flirt with their (often infatuated) guests,[40] but they will always remain in control of the hospitality. Over their years of apprenticeship they learn to adapt to different situations and personalities, mastering the art of the hostess.



Japan Culture