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A Weather Delay: June 5, 1944 Eisenhower selected June 5, 1944, as the date for the invasion; however, bad weather on the days leading up to the operation caused it to be delayed for 24 hours. On the morning of June 5, after his meteorologist predicted improved conditions for the following day, Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for Operation Overlord. He told the troops: “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you.”

Later that day, more than 5,000 ships and landing craft carrying troops and supplies left England for the trip across the Channel to France, while more than 11,000 aircraft were mobilized to provide air cover and support for the invasion. A Weather Delay: June 5, 1944 Eisenhower selected June 5, 1944, as the date for the invasion; however, bad weather on the days leading up to the operation caused it to be delayed for 24 hours. On the morning of June 5, after his meteorologist predicted improved conditions for the following day, Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for Operation Overlord. He told the troops: “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you.”

Later that day, more than 5,000 ships and landing craft carrying troops and supplies left England for the trip across the Channel to France, while more than 11,000 aircraft were mobilized to provide air cover and support for the invasion.


D-day (dd) 1. The unnamed day on which an operation or offensive is to be launched. 2. The day on which the Allied forces invaded France during World War II (June 6, 1944).

June 6, 1944. In the early morning hours Allied forces landed in Normandy on the

north coast of France. In an operation that took months of planning, a fleet of 2,727 ships of every description converged from British ports from Wales to the North Sea. Operation Overlord involved 2,000,000 tons of war materials, including more than 50,000 tanks, armored cars, jeeps, trucks and half-tracks. The US alone sent 1,700,000 fighting men. The Germans believed the invasion would not take place under the adverse weather conditions of this early June day. But as the sun came up, the village of Saint Mère Eglise was liberated by American parachutists, and by nightfall the landing of 155,000 Allies attested to the success of D-Day. The long-awaited second front had at last materialized. Or………….. Ever since June 6, 1944, people have been asking what the "D" in "D-Day" means. Does it stand for "decision?" The day that 150,000 Allied soldiers landed on the shores of Normandy was certainly decisive. And with ships, landing craft and planes leaving port by the tens of thousands for a hostile shore, it is no wonder that some would call it "disembarkation" or "departed."

There is not much agreement on the issue. But the

most ordinary and likely of explanations is the one offered by the U.S. Army in their published manuals. The Army began using the codes "H-hour" and "D-day" during World War I to indicate the time or date of an operation's start. Military planners would write of events planned to occur on "H-hour" or "D-day" -- long before the actual dates and times of the operations would be known, or in order to keep plans secret. And so the "D" may simply refer to the "day" of invasion.


The 'D' in D-Day does not stand for anything, it's a just a name the military use when planning an event. The military started planning the details of the invasion before they knew the date when it would take place. In order to organize things like when the troop ships should leave England they referred to it as D-Day.

Here's how it worked In May 1944 they couldn't say: "Captain Smith will set sail for France on 5 June" because they didn't yet know that the invasion was on 6 June. So they said: 'Captain Smith will set sail at D-Day minus one.' Then all Captain Smith had to do was wait until someone told him the date of D-Day. He just deducted one day to work out the date he should sail for France. The name D-Day has been used for many military operations, but it is now firmly associated with the Allied invasion of Normandy. The name D-Day has been used for many military operations, but it is now firmly associated with the Allied invasion of Normandy.



d-day