Page 1


“Every poet and musician and artist, but for Grace, is drawn away from love of the thing he tells, to love of the telling till down in Deep Hell they cannot be interested in God at all but only in what they say about Him.� -C.S. Lewis


Advanced Design A

Solar Decathlon | Advanced Design A Design | Build Seminar Instruction by: Professors Stanley Russel and Mark Weston Spring Session: 2011

Alderman | 4


Design | Build Seminar


PROJECT CONTENTS FLEXhouse Expansion

Advanced Design A

Retractable Louver mockup

Haiti Ideas Competition

Alderman | 6


6.

10.

18.

Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A

FLEXhouse Expansion Proposal Critics: Stanley Russel and Mark Weston

Sketches and Schematic Alderman | 8

The FLEXhouse expansion project uses the existing modular design systems around which the single family home is currently based, and calls for proposals for both an expanded singlefamily home, and the implementation of a multifamily unit.


Flex House Expansion Speculative Section Perspective - single family module

Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Single - Family Housing Alderman | 10

ABOVE: This proposal uses the modular systems established by the single family FLEXhouse and incorporates pivoting container units which house the living space modules. A third container mudule is used for vertical circulation and for growing amounds of mechanical equipment RIGHT: Using this ordering system, the FLEXhouse can indefinitely stack vertically for space concious and urban environments.


Multiple-Family housing

Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A

South Facade Prototypes: The teams were charged with proposing solutions to miscellaneous design challenges facing various components of FLEXhouse. These proposals address shading on the south-facing glass door. In Collaboration with Matthew Johnson

Alderman | 12

Material Exploration of the Real Carriage Door system. ABOVE:Cypres Louver RCD LEFT: Transluscent Hurricane Canvas RCD RIGHT: Transluscent Corrugated Metal RCD TOP: Product Spec for Real Carriage Door System


Proposal Two:Pivoted Retractable Louver

Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Retractable South Louvre Alderman | 14

A pulley installation in the underside of the south-facing overhead louvre panels provides an easy, manually accessable mechanical system to allow a 4.5-5 foot louvre extension to swing down from an upright position which encloses the plenum created by the louvre panels. This gesture not only defines the space more directly by creating an overhead volume above the south deck, but it also hides the mechanics and structural members beneath the south louvres, which are otherwise hidden through out the house. A pulley-cable mechanism allows an either manual or automated process which uses a rolling shutter gearbox to crank a cable fixed onto the pulleys in order to raise and lower the louvre panel. The pulleys fix the cable along the contour of the plenum, which creates an unobtrusive system while the panel is deployed, while it still allows the cable/gearbox system the greatedst mechanical advantage against the 180lb louvre panels.


Design | Build Seminar


Alderman | 16

Advanced Design A


Design | Build Seminar

|

SOLAR VILLAGE WASHINGTON, D.C. SEPTEMBER 2011


Alderman | 18

Advanced Design A


Design | Build Seminar

|

SOLAR VILLAGE WASHINGTON, D.C. SEPTEMBER 2011


Haiti Ideas Challenge Design Competition Proposals for Long-Term Reconstruction Solutions

Advanced Design A

Critics: Steve Cooke, Jan Wampler, Vikas Mehta

Alderman | 20

In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake which fractured Port au Prince’s already fragile structure, the country experienced a population dispersion into surrounding urban settings. This demographic shift creates an opportunity for a more equitably distributed and functioning infrastructure. The primary strategies of this proposal addresses this demographic shift, capitalizing on it, and seeking to provide Haitian communities with methods and opportunities to achieve economic autonomy. The city of Jeremie, capital of the Department of Grand ‘Anse, has been one of the most densely populated cities in the country, and is among the largest influx of population proceeding the earthquake in 2010. Looking back at the area’s geographic and economic history, the surrounding land area has proven ample soil for field and crop land, the largest use of which was coffee bean growth. I propose a small-scale education facility with a focus on agriculture. While the curriculum will be determined by the teaching staff and initial trainers, the purpose of the facility is a magnet school which will prepare students to cultivate agricultural businesses throughout the country, possibly influencing an agricultural centrality to the city itself.


Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Alderman | 22

ABOVE: Nodes indicate scale of population re-distrubution from Port au Prince following the earthquake of 2009. LEFT: Mapping indicating agriculture-dense Departments of Haiti; emphasis on Department of Grand 窶連nse


ABOVE: Mapping of urban | rural grid associations of Jeremie, including location of site. RIGHT: Mapping indicating agriculturedense economic zones of Haiti; emphasis on region of Grand 窶連nse Design | Build Seminar


Alderman | 24

Advanced Design A


Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Alderman | 26

Due to its agricultural history, and its location on pasture and farming land on a hillside set against the Carribbean Sea, the city of Jeremie in the department of Grand’ Anse provides an equitable environment for an interdisciplinary learning center which focuses on agricultural cultivation. The facility will provide housing for both students and teachers, and generate an hetertopian environment for learning and cultivation.


Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Alderman | 28

In addition to housing and educational facitilies, the program includes irrigation and processing facilities for farmland that would be dispursed throughout the plot of land. The site is approximately one city block from the water, on the south end of Jeremie at the base of a hillside approximately 100 feet above sea level.


Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A Diagramatic Study Alderman | 30

The Gabion wall establishes a west-east datum which progresses from an agricultural processing space to a public farmer’s market.


ABOVE: Early exploration of the wall datum took inspiration from Richard Serra’s sculptures, which use massive, imposing walls as boundaries which both uses the wall’s negative as a spatial phenomenon, and directs foot traffic with its innate permenance. RIGHT: Sketches explored the idea of directing walls to both delineate space and to mold the building into Jeremie’s mountainous landscape Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design A

ABOVE: Cross-Sections cutting through the ampatheater, residences and office space. RIGHT: Section model showing both faces of cross section.

Alderman | 32


Design | Build Seminar


Advanced Design B

Advanced Design B

Instruction by: Professors Martin Gundersen and Nancy Sanders Summer Session: 2011

Alderman | 33


Vertical Techtonics


PROJECT CONTENTS

CHICAGO EXPO

Advanced Design B

11 S. ASHLEY DR. TOWER

Alderman | 35


38.

50

Vertical Techtonics


2011 Chicago World Expo: A Speculative Exercise in Vertical Thinking

Advanced Design B

Critics: Albert Alfonso, Lavent Kara

Alderman | 37

Chicago was the birthplace of the world expositions which swept large cities around the world from the start of the industrial revolution. This design exercise challenged us to use the concept of the World’s Fair and transpose its variety of cultures, influences, and programs into a vertical tower which both engages the ground condition of the site, a peninsula which extends into Lake Michigan, and addresses the programmatic variety of a vertical exposition. The ground level and entry of the tower connects to the path following the Chicago River, with a glass enclosed bridge which crosses Lakeshore Drive, touching down in a green open space with may be developed into a park space overlooking Lake Michigan. The vertical program splits into two towers; the first contains the majority of the expo activities, and has a much more plastic section to illustrate a variety of programs, the second tower ,which begins above the mid- level gardenscape, contains resedences and office space to facilitate the activities of the World Exposition.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 39

ABOVE: The world exposition uses contributions from various countries, typically around the world. My design focuses on the germanic haritage that populated early Chicago. Early concepts of the design included an overlay of figure-ground maps (pictured) from respective countries in the germanic area of northern Euroupe RIGHT: Conceptual massing seated on the site. Lakeshore Drive divides the site area, leaving the tower with a crossing point to reach an open park space which gives views to the lake at the human scale.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 41

ABOVE: Expiremental sections using mapping collages illustrate multiplicities of vertical density. Voids in vertical promenade illustrate possible circulation paths, as well as exterior terraces. RIGHT: Final speculative section illustrating an animated activity area as a lobby space before the expositional and office/residential towers split. The activity area includes both interior and exterior garden spaces, and a ballroom area below the mid-level puncture


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 43

ABOVE: A variety of programs surround the armature which extends between the ground level component of the program and The Void. Angular volumes express different activity areas, which contrasts the more stratified levels which sit adjacent to the armature. RIGHT: Structure between the armature and the suspended volumes of the Activity Zones expressed in the model.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 45

LEFT: Process models exploring the midlevel Void. The Void signals a collision of all the tower’s components, the point from which all core peices travelled vertically together, and the point at which these core components split. The Void not only signals a point of transition, but it also provides a wind tunnel which relieves wind loads against the towers themselves, due to the building’s height of over 1000 feet. RIGHT: The Void seen in model. This central joint at which the tower splits suspends the Activity Zones on each side of the tower (above left).


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 47

ABOVE: The Chicago World Tower sits on the edge of the Chicago skyline, and stands among the residential towers visible from the north shore. Following Lakeshore Drive, one can see the Chicago World Tower during the approach, ending with passage through the glass sky bridge which sets down in a park on the edge of the peninsula. RIGHT: Illuminated images of the Chicago World Tower at night reveal the plasticity of the section in the Exposition Tower, in contrast to the stratification of the service tower.


Vertical Techtonics


11 N. Ashley Drive: Live | Work Fusion Tower on the Hillsborough River

Advanced Design B

Critics: , Lavent Kara

Alderman | 49

The future Tampa Riverwalk carries enormous potential energy to generate both activity and urban density on waterfront downtown Tampa. Extending from the Tampa Museum to Channelside, the pedestrian right-of-way provides an opportunity to catalyze gentrification in a struggling urban fabric. 11 N. Ashley Dr. sits mid-way in this pedestrian connection, and provides not only a destination point for a potentially active community, but it also opens up an otherwise condensed segment of the riverwalk and transfers movement into a multiplicity of scales and spaces. The lower seven floors of the tower connects the building to the ground level activity which directly links with the riverwalk into an outdoor park which undulates with a series of steps and slopes. With an open-air skin system, the lower section of program allows inhabitants to move around, up, and through a series of spaces and programs of activity while still remaining connected to the riverwalk and street realm of the city. The variation of planes, openings, and volumes allows jocund movement through an area of light commercial program anchored to a dense lobby area that extends through all seven floors and houses the primary and secondary cores of the tower. The density of this core structure not only balances the lightness of the planes, but also anchors the suspended towers above. The first, lower core reaches twenty stories through a boutique hotel which ends with a rooftop lounge and pool deck. The second, primary core extends thirty stories through corporate offices and designer studios and ends in a public observation deck.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 51

The split tower structure informs the nature of the individual programs in each volume, but sky bridges extending between selected floors of the hotel to the larger core link the two, otherwise separate programs. The permeable skin which wraps the arid commercial floors continues vertically around the towers, unravels around the taller corporate volume with three transitions which opens up the skin system to the street, and extends with the sky bridges across to delineate suites and other special programs in the hotel.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 53

The public retail floors, which connect to the riverwalk, create an important diolog between the tower and a struggling, empty park space which sits, somewhat inaccessibly, adjacent to the Sharaton hotel. The active programming of the covered parkspace underneath 11 N. Ashley Drive brings various uses to the region, which allows the existing park space, sometimes used as a sculpture park, to become an open, sunlit space for outdoor recreation and pedestrian traffic.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 55

LEFT: Speculative section to explore programmatic density with respect to a central core. RIGHT: Cross section comparing office and residential towers with the public levels above the riverwalk.


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B Alderman | 57

ABOVE: Street- level views of the tower express the open-air public realm present at the human scale. The east facing facade features the conditioned building lobby, which anchors the central core of the structure, but the primary spatial conditions of the public realm orient themselves toward the riverwalk and the pedestrian realm. RIGHT: Exploded diagram expressing the various systems which compose and enclose the building.


Core Circulation Structural Frame Floor Stata Tower Glazing Skin Enclosure Vertical Techtonics


Alderman | 59

Advanced Design B


X-Ray Site Plan Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design B

“In a quality city, a person should be able to live their entire life without a car, and not feel deprived.” – Paul Bedford

Alderman | 61


Vertical Techtonics


Advanced Design C

Advanced Design C

Instruction by: Professors Vikas Mehta and Trent Green Spring Session: 2012

Alderman | 64


Olympic Park | Seattle, WA

Suburban Renewal


The University into the City: Urban redevelopment for suburban sprawl

Advanced Design C

Critics: Jan Wampler, Machael Haflants

Alderman | 66

This studio was a response to calls from major economic influences in the USF area for redevelopment proposals to link the fabric of the city of Temple Terrace into the USf campus, in order to redefine the USF region into Tampa’s Innovation Corridor. The studio was composed of teams which developed a master plan strategy for an area around USf which spans an area of more that twenty square miles. Each team then focused on an area of central development. Reconstructed Green proposed a central corridor which uses the context of both USf and the natural, existing green spaces to create dense, urban environments laced in-between various scales of green spaces, both of design and of untouched earth, to link a vibrant innovation corridor which links a promenade straight into the heart of the USF campus. This project was designed and built in collaboration with Michael Marti and Mayre Parez-Valez


Suburban Renewal


Alderman | 68

Advanced Design C


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 70

Walkability and transit LEFT: Diagrams illustrate possible vectors between various points of interest through varying levels of integration with city density, these diagrams arrive at the MacroTransit scheme with relation to I-275, I-75, and USF. RIGHT: Urban masterplan studies relate key greenspace points of interest to the pedestrian scale in order to understand realistic walking distances. This study generated key solutions for both pedestrian greenways and transit infastructure


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 72

LEFT: The new USF area masterplan orients itself around a series of constructed parks and greenways, which link up to naturally existing greenspaces (above left). Figure-ground and building use plans map out two major districts in the redevelopment proposal; the research and development district (top) which would serve as a livework community, and the cultural entertainment district (below) RIGHT: the Reconstructed Green urban master plan. Drawing features both districts plus orientation with regards to the USF campus. Not only were the geographic regions remapped with a dense urban fabric, but this grid was also carried into the university campus to encourage development in concentrated ares, and to create transparency between the university and the city


Suburban Renewal


Alderman | 74

Advanced Design C


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 76

ABOVE: Exploded diagram (at left) deconstructs all infastructural systems which combine to compose the master plan of Reconstructed Green. RIGHT: Rendering illustrates the community garden, which features various planters and irrigated crops (in above section) the community garden connects to the downtown corridor’s multi-use cultural park.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 78

LEFT: Building types preserve green space within city blocks to allow both private space for occumants of dense buildings, and to create continuity of greenways and public space. RIGHT: A new central core connects the heart of the USF campus and a central parkspace in the university area’s new downtown. This green corridor places emphasis on the padestrian scale, with larger walking spaces featuringa tree canopy, and pushing construction agains the strees boundary.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 80

McKinley Drive becomes a new mainstreet which focuses on research and development in Reconstructed Green. The pedestrian path includes deviations which meander in and out of the street wall, which provides opportunities of both urban engagement in shops and communities along the streat, as well as privacy, and seclusion.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 82

LEFT: Drawings illustrate variations in building elevations along the street face. These elvation differences allow conditional changes between the pedestrian scale at street level, and taller portions of the buildings. Variations within a structure allow a myriad of uses without the character of the street becoming monotonous. RIGHT: Rendering illustrating the new McKinley Dr. development corridor.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 84

McKinley Drive Revisited Individual team members proposed interventions which provided details based on the schematic of the McKinley Dr. innovation corridor. Each team member focused on a specific arrangement of city blocks along McKinley Dr. and proposed ways in which the schematic green spaces would benefit the existing pedestrain conditions. The following works focus on the transition between the innovation corridor and the community garden residential public space.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 86

LEFT: Diagrams illustrate the relationship between interior green spaces and the open park plaza which links the McKinley corridor with the community garden. RIGHT: Aerial rendering of block typologies connecting to public plaza which extends over McKinley Dr.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 88

LEFT: Open spaces which connect to both residential and commercially zoned blocks are programmed to suit the needs of those who would use it; the commercial block features a semi-private space for temporary solitude and peace, while space within the residential block provides community uses in a private, safe environment.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 90

Various viewpoints of the park block intersection; each perspective emphasizes pedestrian mobility with respect to public space and the built environment. Sectional changes in constructed public space (above left and right) also define program within the public and green spaces themselves.


Suburban Renewal


Advanced Design C Alderman | 92

Final project model serves to define both the variations of buidling types held within a dense cluster of city blocks, which allows a reinforcement of a live-work lifestyle, and the introspective nature of the block typologies, and the buildings which reside on them, themselves. Each block fills the perimeter facing the street and public plaza with building edges to reinforce the pedestrian scale, but the inside edges of these buildings orient themselves toward open green spaces and constructed spaces within each block. This construction technique is an alternative to a strictly service-based alley condition.


Suburban Renewal


Design Elective

Elective Design and Professional Work

Alderman | 94


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Elective

Thinking and Making Instruction by: Dr. Lavent Kara Summer Session: 2011

Alderman | 96


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Elective Alderman | 98

Cinemagraphic Mapping The primary task of Thinking and Making was to translate the sights, sounds, and experiences of film into a matrix of two dimensional and three dimensional space. I used two films for my exploration; Good Bye Lenin, by Wolfgang Becker, and Reconstruction, by Christoffer Boe. Interpretation of Good Bye Lenin was purely experiential, while Reconstruction focused on the film’s relationship to its setting, the city of Copenhagen.


Compelementary Papercraft


Alderman | 100

Design Elective


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Elective Alderman | 102

“Reconstruction� by Chrisoffer Boe uses a dislocation of place and time to tell a narrative of deconstruction. This study uses a dislocation of Copenhagen, Denmark to create a matrix which reconstructs a mapping of the city. The final iteration of the study (pictured; p. 148) is a papercraft construct of a museum which celebrates the reconstructed city of Copenhagen.


Compelementary Papercraft


Alderman | 104

Design Elective


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Elective

Professional Work

Alderman | 106

Conceptual Illustrations of a community master plan for RIvercrest CDD in Riverview, FL. The masterplan is an expansion of an existing proposal from JAHarchitects for a Rivercrest Community Center at the entry to the community development. Expansion includes a second, adult-oriented pool space opposite the original familyoriented pool, which crosses the central lake; a nature walk, athletic fields, and a tranquility garden which divides the fields and event space


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Elective Alderman | 108

LEFT: Digital brochure for promotional materials regarding vairous project types offered by JAHarchitects. Part 1 of a 10-part brochure series. RIGHT: Aerial illustration of Central Beef Industries master plan. CB is currently the largest meat processing facility in Florida, with 10000 sf in additional phasing projected.


Compelementary Papercraft


Design Development

Design Development Craftsman’s Workshop Revisited Instruction by: Professor John McKenna Summer Session: 2012 Alderman | 110


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

The project site occurs at the grid collision of Tampa’s northern downtown corridor. The program uses an infill lot on the corner of N. Franklin St. and a proposed expansion of E. Harrison St. Florida Building Code limits a building of this type to nine(9) stories and/or to 100 feet with 1.5 hr rated Fire Walls at the ground floor.

Alderman | 112


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

SECTION a

SECTION b Alderman | 114

section a: A doubleheight space over the workshop allows for both an open working environment and a simpler duct system throughout the building. section b: A glu-lam screen sheilds the southfacing curtain wall of the workshop, attached to aluminum trusses anchored to load-bearing columns.


Lavatory Aprentices’ Residence

3 Lavatory Acoustic Test Room

2

Lavatory Pivoting Wall System Craftsman’s Workshop

1 1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Building Type: Live-Work Unit (LWU) Project Breif: This project is a workshop for a craftsman who designs and builds double basses. The program requires a carpentry workshop which occupies most of the ground floor, with public access to a courtyard located in an alley which connects to Franklin St. The building use is classified under Florida Building Code Section 438 as a live-work unit, which is directed under Group R-2. This Code requires the primary work space to occupy the first floor only; and the Live-Work Unit may have a maximum of five(5) nonresidential employees present in the building at a time.

Alderman | 116


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

One way joist construction is an economical system for heavy loads or relatively long spans. The system is also sometimes desirable for the distinctive appearance of the underside of the slab, which may be left exposed in finished construction. Standard joist spans are 20-30� o.c. and one may assume a 6� joist for preliminary purposes. The use of joist bands the same depth as joists is a highly economical alternative to deeper beams in convetional construction. This system reduces building height, speeds construction, and simplifies the installation of building utilities. With lighter loads, joist bands may run parallel to the long axis, in the case of a rectangular bay. Alderman | 118


Site-Cast One-Way Joist Slabs

Load-bearing Columns

Load-bearing Shear Walls

1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Dimensions for this concrete wall and footing: 1. The wall is 12 inches thick. 2. The wall and footings are 36 feet long. 3. The wall is 468 inches high. 4. The footing is 18 inches thick. 5. The footing is 38 inches wide. From the National Renovation & Insurance Repair Estimator available from Craftsman Book Company. QuickCalculator results for this concrete wall and footing: The cubic yards of footing is: 6.33 CY

Design Development

The cubic yards of wall is: 52 CY Total cubic yards of wall & footing: 58.33 CY How to calculate: The total cubic yards of concrete in the wall and footing are calculated by adding the cubic yards of footing to the cubic yards of foundation wall.

NOTE Finish ceiling allows space for air ducts and fire suppression. Turns in ducts may run in between joists. Plenums and shear walls use THERMOMASS insulated concrete, and shear walls use insulated tilt-wall construction. Foundation footings should be sunk 3’-0� for utilities service access.

Alderman | 120


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

1. Wood 2. Finished Concrete 3. Glass 4. Aluminum

Material Legend

1. Cyprus Panneled Cladding / Glu-Lam Cyprus Screen on South-Facing facade 2. Site-Cast Finished Concrete; Painted, see finish sched. 3. Single-Paned Tinted Glass 4. Aluminum Truss Louver Framing and Window Mullions

Alderman | 122


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Alderman | 124

Design Development


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Voyager R410A 12.5-25 tons RTU The TRANE Voyager Rooftop Unit will provide central cooling for the workshop Direct-Drive Plenum Fan

Three Stages of Cooling

Enhanced comfort through matching cooling load, savings. Allows for increased part load efficiency.

Alderman | 126

Potential to achieve quieter operating environment. High efficiency, direct-drive fan allows for ease of service and overall lower cost of ownership. Easier start-up time in reducing overall time on the jobsite. No belts means less waste.

In conjunction, ductless .25 ton mini split A/C units service the five small residences located on the third floor.


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Supply Air

Return Air

Notes: Mechanical Load - 12.5 ton or larger system needed Primary Vertical Duct Run @ 4’ x 4’ Horizontal duct run @ 2’ x 3.5’ Alderman | 128


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

1.Electrical Meter 2.400 Amp NEMA 3r Disconnect 3.Primary Vertical Run Alderman | 130


1

2

3

1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Architectural Systems | Electrical Alderman | 132


Primary Electrical Rise

NEMA 3r Outdoor Disconnect Electrical Meter

Underground Main Service 1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

3

Alderman | 134 2 1


1. Primary Sewage Rise 2. Hot Water Supply 3. Vent Stack

Hot Water Heater Curb Box

1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Alderman | 136

Design Development


Fire Closet access adjacent to secondary fire stair Siamese Fire Valve @ ground level fire closet and Vertical Riser

Exterior West Stair provides alternative means of egress into the alley, as well as fire 1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Architectural Systems | Building Entry Alderman | 138


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Alderman | 140

Design Development


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Alderman | 142

Design Development


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

Aluminum Kawneer Mullion Fastens to Spruce-wrapped colunm by steel plate which runs vertical length

Alderman | 144


1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Alderman | 146

Design Development


Window and Spandrel | Exterior Wall 1100 N. Franlin St. Revisited


Design Development

“The essence of place is fundamental to the creation of an architecture of belonging. Good design springs from understanding context.� -Moshe Safdie Alderman | 148


Measured Multiplicity  

Collected works of graduate architectural design from 2011-2013