__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

09

11TH GREEK GOURMET TOURING

MAGAZINE

Greek Cheese A TRIBUTE Coookk boTO COOK HOWKE A PRO LI

G A S T R O N O M Y • T R A D I T I O N • C U LT U R E • N AT U R E • T R AV E L


C E L E B R AT E L I F E U N X P E C T E D TA S T E S


Belf ast

urg rineb Ekate

Naple s

lavl Yaros

Pisa

Scents & Senses

Turin

Lille

Μanchester

Deauville

Geno va

don Lon

Ha nno ver

ris Pa

Le ipz ig urg rsb ete P . St

lin Ber

arest Buch

London

Dublin

Kiev

Tel Aviv

Mi lan

ia yn Gd

w sa ar W

Salty, Creamy & Buttery happiness SYMPOSSIO 2020 “Give me a sharp knife and a good cheese, and I am a happy man”, said George R.R. Martin. Cheese is one of the greatest Greek “meze”, a perfect wine and beer partner, a dreamy hors d’oeuvre, an ideal closing of your meal. The world of Greek cheeses is a continuous exploration of Greece’s real character and the meaning of “meraki” brought to your plate and palette. We welcome you to Sympossio 2020, and we invite you to cook, create and discover new tasteful territories with us.

Just bring your cheese-knife with you!

03


CONTENTSYMPOSSIO 2019 1 1 TH G R E E K G O U R M E T T O U R I N G

08

WELCOME

BY A. ANGELOPOULOS, CEO ALDEMAR RESORTS

GREETINGS

10 H. THEOHARIS, GREEK MINISTER OF TOURISM 12 D. FRAGAKIS, SECRETARY GENERAL GNTO 15 A. GEREKOU, PRESIDENT, GNTO 16 S. ARNAOUTAKIS, GOVERNOR, REGION OF CRETE 18 P. NIKAS, GOVERNOR, REGION OF PELOPONNESE A. KALOGEROPOULOU, COUNCILOR OF TOURISM FOR THE PELOPONNESE REGION 20 N. FARMAKIS, GOVERNOR, REGION OF WESTERN GREECE 22 A.VASSILIKOS, PRESIDENT OF HELENIC CHAMBER OF HOTELS G. TASIOS, CHAIRMAN OF HELLENIC HOTELIERS FEDERATION 24 K. ALEXOPOULOS, CEO DOMOTEL HOTELS & RESORTS

06

26 28 30 34 36 38 40

42 52

ALL ABOUT CHEESE

THE ART OF CHEESE HISTORICAL CONTEXT A WORLD OF CHEESE YOUR LITTLE HANDBOOK FOR CHEESE OUR CHEESEBOARD THE NUTRITIONIST’S SCOPE TRADITION MEETS SUSTAINABILITY

THE RECIPES

THE DISHES INGREDIENTS & PREPARATION


issue

09 CONCEPTUALIST & PUBLISHER Alexandros Angelopoulos COMMERCIAL DIRECTORS Mandy Kalliontzi, Vassilis Fragoulakis THE CHEFS George Chatzopoulos, Ioannis Rodokanakis, Petros Lambrinidis, Manolis Roumbakis, Vassilis Daskalakis, Panayotis Roumeliotis, Christos Apostolidis, Dimitrios Karambinis, Nikos Tsatsaris PHOTOGRAPHY Theodore Psiachos FOOD STYLING George Chatzopoulos, Ioannis Rodokanakis, Theodore Psiachos CREATIVE COPYWRITER - EDITOR Marialena Gousiou CREATIVE ART DIRECTOR Despina Saliverou ONLINE Maria Rossi, Aristea Tsakali CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Dimitris Koumanis, Maria-Sofia Pelagidou, Alexandros Kouris PUBLICITY & MARKETING Katerina Karagianni, Myrto Karga, Giouli Papakitsou, Jenny Panagiotidou, Maria Mastronikola PRINTING Pressious Arvanitidis

IN PRACTICE

SPECIAL THANKS TO The team of ALDEMAR RESORTS in Crete and our many supporters and sponsors

62 HOW TO MAKE HOMEMADE CHEESE 70 CHEESE PAIRINGS

It is illegal to reproduce any part of this publication without the written permission of ALDEMAR RESORTS. This magazine is distributed free of charge.

73 90

COOK BOOK

MORE CHEESE RECIPES INGREDIENTS & PREPARATION

Kωδ.: 60509525

ALDEMAR RESORTS, 262 Kifissias Ave., Kifissia 145 62, Athens, Greece T. +30 210 6236150, F. +30 210 8017451

96

CONTRIBUTORS

www.sympossio.gr

PARTNERS & SPONSORS

07

EN


EDITORIAL

OFF TO A NEW GASTRO-DESTINATION Sympossio has been a magical journey! One to be remembered as a breakthrough in the way Greece promoted itself. Not because it changed the perception of what Greece represents, but because it lifted the image of Greece to a higher level, through what is globally recognized as superior; its gastronomy. o instead of closing the 10-year circle with a bang, we move on to Sympossio 2020, the beginning of the next decade. I have only feelings of gratitude and appreciation for the many supporters and co-travelers (more than 150 so far) that helped us map-out this massive caravan of flavors and tastes*. Recognized as the leading gastronomy exporting event in Greece, Sympossio is an ambitious project that reflects my dream and aim for a collective promotional strategy that will not be limited by pettiness or short-term goals. It will be shared and must be embraced as multi-parent child. This year, with the active interest of the Ministry of Tourism, our long term partner Aegean Airlines and the unlimited support of the prefectures of Crete, Peloponnese and Western Greece, Sympossio is proud to present the Greek cheese, as a basis of the gastronomic culture that differs from the north to the east and from the islands to the mainland. Cheese, bread, wine and Olive oil have been raising generations of Greeks all over the country. In fact you can distinguish an inhabitant of the mountains of Peloponnese, from an islander coming from Chios or Naxos just by observing their preference in cheese, wine or beer. And on that note…, did you know you can combine cheese with beer? Let’s explore this side of the Greek Culture. Let’s dig in to some more secrets of what makes a Greek heart beat! *An expression borrowed by my dear friend and Communications Specialist, Katerina Gagaki. Alexandros Angelopoulos ALDEMAR RESORTS / SYMPOSSIO 08

YOU CAN DISTINGUISH AN INHABITANT OF THE MOUNTAINS OF PELOPONNESE, FROM AN ISLANDER COMING FROM CHIOS OR NAXOS JUST BY OBSERVING THEIR PREFERENCE IN CHEESE, WINE OR BEER.


C E L E B R AT E L I F E


MINISTRY OF TOURISM

GREECE, MAPPING THE GLOBAL GASTRONOMY SCENE Our gastronomy is a great ambassador of our country. Salutation from the Greek Minister of Tourism. s Greece’s strategy towards tourism is being transformed in order to embrace... to embrace a new model of year-round tourism based on quality and experiences, it is a great pleasure to endorse such initiatives as the Sympossio Greek Gourmet Touring. Aldemar Group has been investing towards this strategy for a decade now, and promoting Greek gastronomy internationally; indeed, Greek produce and Greek cuisine are an integral part of the touristic experience and it is our responsibility to safeguard its authenticity and its potential. I firmly believe that Greece should claim a leading role in the global gastronomy scene and be a catalyst in our effort to offer guests coming to Greece unique lifetime tourism experiences. Our gastronomy is also a great ambassador of our country and to this end, I would like to congradulate Aldemar Group for successfully establishing Sympossio. I am certain that all participants will immensely enjoy it and that it will further promote our country’s brand abroad. Harry Theoharis MINISTER OF TOURISM

10

I FIRMLY BELIEVE THAT GREECE SHOULD CLAIM A LEADING ROLE IN THE GLOBAL GASTRONOMY SCENE.


GREEK NATIONAL TOURISM ORGANIZATION

CHEESE, AS GREECE’S COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE IN TOURISM The dynamic of a strong Tourism sector towards the promotion of Greek hospitality and tradition. Salutation from Dimitris Fragakis, Secretary General GNTO. ourism is one of the most dynamic sectors of the Greek economy, contributing directly and indirectly more than 25% of GDP. Greek tourism as a product has become very popular in recent years, but it has to go to the next stage in terms of maturity and enrichment. This constitutes a prerequisite, in order to attract more visitors and increase revenue. The shift to quality tourism for Greece cannot be achieved without putting emphasis on our unique comparative advantages; one of them is Greek cuisine, which has been an integral part of our tourism-related initiatives for decades. But we have to go beyond. The time for Greek gastronomy to become one of the main incentives for visitors to choose Greece as their destination is now. Our obligation is to successfully communicate the variety, quality and nutritional value of the Greek cuisine, so that Greece is consciously chosen by more specific audiences for its gastronomy. We have all the necessary equipment to successfully cope with competition in this area; products of top quality and people with relevant expertise and passion for work. We also have the ability to offer end-to-end experiences connected with gastronomy. Various types of Greek cheeses have their own special identity, while many of them are recognizable worldwide. Thus, a holistic tourism experience connected with cheese culture can be built in almost every region of our country, all year round, a special kind of authentic experiences that will be inscribed in our visitors’ memory! The Greek National Tourism Organisation has integrated the promotion of gastronomy in its next years’ strategy and supports all initiatives towards this direction. We believe that is a matter that in fact concerns many sectors, initiators and audiences; a big bet for the Greek tourism that we can win together. Dimitris Fragakis SECRETARY GENERAL GNTO 12

A HOLISTIC TOURISM EXPERIENCE CONNECTED WITH CHEESE CULTURE CAN BE BUILT IN ALMOST EVERY REGION OF OUR COUNTRY.


GREEK NATIONAL TOURISM ORGANIZATION

GREECE IN THE PATH OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM GROWTH ourism is a crucial part of Greece’s economy and it’s time to move further concerning investments, the quality of services that are offered and of course marketing. Greece is a many-in-one country and by that we mean many and different options for international travelers. In Greek National Tourism Organization we respond to the global trends and promote sustainable tourism growth, as we strongly believe innovation is a major key for a successful tourism development. And this is a strong reason for our 2020 marketing campaign in digital media, targeting towards the introduction of smart technologies and innovation in tourism industry and giving a strong push for the right balance between attracting visitors and quality management. We ought to be more productive proactively, in favor of both businesses and local communities. Adding quality to the mass tourism products and services and unlocking the potentials of special interest tourism fields such as cultural, culinary, athletic, rural tourism etc, is a guarantee that Greek tourism can handle future crises that may arise. We are all well aware that competition is fierce and in the Greek National Tourism Organization we are aiming to a new beginning, in the rise of the new decade. In order to promote Greek Tourism and be essential for the whole country’s development we have established the new Regional Tourism Council, to promote cooperation between the 13 Regions of Greece and the State, and also, we have an open and continuing dialogue with business actors and local authorities. Although not everything depends on tourism, tourism depends on almost everything. This also requires thinking long-term (10, 20+ years) and realizing that change is often cumulative, gradual and irreversible. For succesful future plans, economic, social and environmental aspects of sustainable development must include the interests of all stakeholders including indigenous people, local communities, visitors, industry and government. The Ministry of Tourism and the GNTO are working together, towards the path for sustainable/responsible planning and management that is imperative for the industry to survive as a whole. Angela Gerekou PRESIDENT GNTO 15

ALTHOUGH NOT EVERYTHING DEPENDS ON TOURISM, TOURISM DEPENDS ON ALMOST EVERYTHING.


REGION OF CRETE

CRETAN DIET LEADING THE GASTRONOMIC WAY he Region of Crete follows innovative strategic plans for the touristic promotion of the island, as a destination for people with special gastronomic interests and visitors that follow international trends and seek experiences, where gastronomy, local products and cuisine are key-points. Having that in mind, we see Symposio Greek Touring as a reinforcing power, along with all our initiatives for the exposure of Cretan culinary tradition and civilization. For us, the agriculture-gastronomy duo, co-exists with the land’s authentic character and history. This constitutes the uniqueness of our land that dares-among others- to break away from the safety of conventional tourism, by bringing forward its gastronomic identity and its rich raw materials. Towards this direction, Cretan cheeses are one of the most basic pillars for the overall promotion of the famous Cretan diet, that consists of products of high nutritional value, made with devotion and craftsmanship, by livestock producers and cheesemakers that follow traditions of thousands of years, that have lived for ages at the high tops of the island’s mountains. To this year’s 11th Sympossio, under the subject “Greek Cheeses” and personally to Mr. Angelopoulos, we wish every success, while we also congratulate the brilliant effort to promote the Greek and Cretan diet. Stavros Arnaoutakis GOVERNOR OF THE REGION OF CRETE 16

THE UNIQUENESS OF OUR LAND THAT DARES-AMONG OTHERS- TO BREAK AWAY FROM THE SAFETY OF CONVENTIONAL TOURISM.


GASTRONOMY IS THE IDEAL AMBASSADOR FOR OUR ISLANDS, ADDING VALUE TO HOSPITALITY & SHAPING THE KIND OF TOURISM WE WANT


REGION OF PELOPONNESE

PELOPONNESE, A CULTURAL AMBASSADOR OF MEDITERRANEAN DIET

A basket of Peloponnesian goodies

t is with great pleasure that the Region of the Peloponnese will take part in the Sympossio 2020, as it is well known that the Sympossio initiative became an institution that has been excellently and very effectively promoting Greek gastronomy and the exceptional quality of traditional Greek products.The Region of Peloponnese is well known for the quality of its agricultural produce. Our strategic aim, as a regional authority is to promote these products, a goal that completely aligns with the objectives of the Sympossio initiative. Peloponnesian gastronomy incorporates the concept, but mainly the essence of Mediterranean diet, whose unique features led UNESCO to enlist it as a representative of humanity’s “intangible cultural heritage”. In our Region, there is also the historic town of Koroni, which UNESCO has been proclaimed as the Emblematic Community of Greece, for the protection, preservation and dissemination of Mediterranean Diet; as it is easily understood, these distinctions result from the unquestionable quality of the agricultural products of Peloponnese. Prominent treasures of our land are the extra virgin olive oil and Kalamata olives, as well as our excellent wines- most famous probably being the wines of Nemea. In conclusion, I express my strong conviction that the participation of the Region of Peloponnese in this excellent initiative of Aldemar Resorts and Alexandros Angelopoulos for another year, will promote Greek gastronomy abroad and will also benefit our Region overall.

n order to progress in the tourist sector, every region must strategically expose its own unique identity. Gastronomy is the ideal territory to attract visitors and promote the uniqueness of our land, and it is a perfect opportunity to bring forward the combination of primary sector with gastronomy and tourism. The Region of Peloponnese holds a big basket full of products with Protected Designation of Origin (olive oil, sfela, olives, oranges, siglino, raisins, aubergines, rusks, honey, sesame seed candy, figs); with tourism professionals as well as all local people as ambassadors, it attracts numerous visitors every year, and has already established a comparative advantage and an important source of income for the region’s economy, through gastro-tourism. We are present in every extrovert initiative and exposure of our products, and we wish Sympossio 2010 new, happy and delicious journeys around the globe, for the most efficient promotion of Greek gastronomic treasures.

Anna Kalogeropoulou COUNCILOR OF TOURISM FOR THE PELOPONNESE REGION

Panayotis Nikas GOVERNOR OF THE REGION OF PELOPONNESE 18


REGION OF WESTERN GREECE

THE DYNAMIC AUTHENTICITY OF LOCAL FLAVORS estern Greece can become a great tourist destination, paying respect to its history, civilization and its natural resources; a land perfectly capable to attract high-class visitors from around the globe, as it offers multi-level travel and culinary experiences. In general, gastronomy is a perfect ground, on which we can build the future of Greek tourism; every corner of Greece is a different culinary proposal, with pure local products leading the way and offering a piece of the land’s identity to the visitor, whether gastronomy is or is not their primary concern. Based on that, we have included in West Greece’s strategic development plan the promotion of tourism combined with primary production and famous local products with Protected Designations of Origin; Wine (Mavrodafni of Patras, Moschato of Rio), cheese (Feta of Kalavrita, Kefalograviera of Aitoloakarnania), gourmet suggestions (Avgotaraho-caviar of Messologi), and pure traditional flavors (Bostitsa raisin, bio olive oil), will be the main ambassadors of our idea of gastro-tourism. We encourage every attempt towards a broad expansion of Greece’s tourist potential to new delicious territories, by bringing forward the authenticity of local flavors. Nektarios Ath. Farmakis GOVERNOR OF THE REGION OF WESTERN GREEECE

20

GASTRONOMY IS A PERFECT GROUND, ON WHICH WE CAN BUILD THE FUTURE OF GREEK TOURISM.


THE GREEK HOTEL INDUSTRY

A TASTY BREAKFAST BASKET ear by year, the significance of Gastronomy grows stronger in the Greek mindset – and so do the initiatives promoting relevant products, events and ideas. It is a common fact that this country has a unique privilege when it comes to quality of goods and variety of tastes, attracting visitors who seek gastronomic value in their journeys. Having realized this for a long time now, the Hellenic Chamber of Hotels introduced and established the “Greek Breakfast” Program 10 years ago. An essentially integrated product, with a distinguished identity and a proper certification system, that has won over the hearts of Greek hoteliers and of course their guests and has opened new avenues of extroversion for the Greek production. The “Greek Breakfast” Program is the best example of the value of synergies among various sectors and industries of the economy, in order to productively exploit the comparative advantages of our country, a prerequisite for exiting the financial crisis. It serves as a vehicle for showcasing the value of nutritional culture, as well as creating new opportunities for the demand of Greek products in international markets. Τhe Hellenic Chamber of Hotels fully supports the “Sympossio Greek Gourmet Touring”, this laudable initiative of Aldemar Resorts Group, and wishes every success to its 10th consecutive organization. Through its culinary events, “Sympossio Greek Gourmet Touring”, is an ambassador of Greek products, our nutritional culture, tourism and our beloved country after all! Alexandros Vassilikos PRESIDENT OF HELLENIC CHAMBER OF HOTELS

BRINGING FORWARD GREECE’S DELICIOUS ADVANTAGES astronomy really upgrades the overall touristic experience, while it could also be strong “magnet” for high-class visitors with special interests, that ultimately constitutes the core audience of gastronomic tourism. Greece has every right to take advantage of the global food trends, methodically and in an organized way, to bring forward its unique characteristics, such as the richness of Greek cuisine, which stands on top of the Mediterranean diet, and is based on top quality Greek products. Surely, there have been important steps towards this direction. However, we have to move further and smarter; we have to expose the great variety and sophistication of Greek cheeses, apart from the globally known Feta. In the very competitive hospitality market, Greek gastronomy can make a difference in terms of user experience, especially if it we add parallel activities as well, such as cooking workshops, local market and production areas visits, or food festivals. Moreover, gastronomic activities can serve as the best example to prove the benefits of synergies between sectors can do, a necessary condition for a progressive way of doing sustainable macro-economy. As a project that engulfs this modern concept of strategically planned gastronomy, I wish every success to Sympossio Gourmet Touring, a dynamic institution that rightfully exposes Greek products, local markets, our food culture, Greek tourism and our country in general! Grigorios Tasios CHAIRMAN OF HELLENIC HOTELIERS FEDERATION 22


HOTELIER

SOCIAL AND CULINARY EVOLUTION ON THE MENU By focusing on cheese’s contemporary narrative, our authenticity can be preserved and our mission to help our guests can be accomplished. ay cheese! The Greeks have been reported to smile over cheese since the years of Homer’s ‘’Odyssey’’. The act of transforming nature’s gifts into a work of art is consistent with our cultural heritage. Year by year, the evidence of cheese production around Greece was abundant. In some areas the process was celebrated like a ritual. Since then, cheese became a vital element of the Mediterranean culture and civilization. Feta cheeseProtected Designation of Origin-, a global brand and favorite, is having its own journey throughout the world, entering the kitchens of star chefs and casual local cuisines. Today, over 65 different types of cheese are to be found in different parts of the country, all reflecting the local culinary and cultural peculiarities, as well as social and culinary evolution. Diving into the flavors of this variety is like taking a trip around the different parts of the country and having some small bites of locality. Domotel Hotels and Resorts is set to promote all the authentic experiences that Greece has to offer, including the ones of the gastronomic spectrum. As part of our commitment to interact in a balanced way with local stakeholders, local identity and sustainability, we think it is as our duty to promote and advocate the deserving to be admired. By supporting and focusing on cheese’s contemporary narrative – its history, geographical origin, varieties, producers, exports and production methods-, and by carefully choosing the best products, we believe that our authenticity can be preserved and our mission to help our guests discover it can be accomplished. Konstantinos Alexopoulos CEO DOMOTEL HOTELS & RESORTS

24

DIVING INTO THE FLAVORS OF THIS VARIETY IS LIKE TAKING A TRIP AROUND THE DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE COUNTRY.


The Art of Cheese

An ancient secret that travels through the ages, reaches Greece’s highest mountains and the most sunbathed beaches of its islands, and reveals the true meaning of craftsmanship and local tradition. Art is for the lovers; travel for cheese, explore new cheeses, create cheese, cook with cheese!

26


27


HISTORICAL CONTEXT

oon we came to the cave, and found him absent, he was grazing his well-fed flocks in the fields. So we went inside and marveled at its contents. There were baskets full of cheeses, and pens crowded with lambs and kids, each flock with its firstlings, later ones, and newborn separated. The pails and bowls for milking, all solidly made, were swimming with whey. At first my men begged me to take some cheeses and go, then to drive the lambs and kids from the pens down to the swift ship and set sail. But I would not listen, though it would have been best, wishing to see the giant himself, and test his hospitality. […] So we lit a fire and made an offering, and helped ourselves to the cheese, and sat in the cave eating, waiting for him to return, shepherding his flocks”. Odysseus, hiding in his cave, secretly watches Cyclops Polyphemus doing everyday chores of a cheesemaker. Indeed, in Homer’s Odyssey, we find the first mentions of him as one of the first known cheesemakers, and a famous one for his expertise. His primitive cheese was a fresh one, something probably like Greek Feta, and, judging by the historical mentions, it was broadly appreciated, along with Polyphemus’s technique and craftsmanship. The historical journey of cheese seems to be quite a long one; an Odyssey of innovations

and evolution, a gift of eternal value that the gods gave to the people, as it is stated in Greek mythology. Since then, people’s interest for cheese never seemed to stop. MILESTONES OF CHEESE’S HISTORY Around 8000 B.C. at the highlands of Iran, the first goats are domesticated, a fact that initiated interest in dairy products overall. Not by chance, a thousand years later, a massive influx of cattle from Asia happened in Europe, because temperate climate allowed for huge grasslands to flourish and animals to be healthy and productive. Simultaneously, an Asian myth talks about the first accidental cheesemaker; a shepherd who thought to carry milk inside a goat’s stomach and was lucky enough to indulge into a great fresh cheese a couple of hours later, as whey was produced in the animal’s intestines and transformed the milk into curd. Some centuries later, wild cow is domesticated for the first time in Greece from nomad tribes, who start using their meat and milk, and, from then on, the history of cheese is mainly played and evolved in Mediterranean land. In the Roman years, cheese is much loved and crafted; Romans 28


“Αn Odyssey of innovations & evolution, a gift of eternal value that the gods gave to the people”

created a specific kind of round cheese named “Luna”, that weighted a ton and had a 2 meter-diameter. During the years they were conquering Europe, they put guard troops everywhere, including Greek land, and sometimes the kings forgot about them, so the soldiers started breeding animals for food, and taught the locals how to make cheese. Later on, Byzantines loved the Greek cheeses, and, in their times, cheesemaking became an acknowledged profession. In manuscripts we read about impressive feasts that included Mizithra cheese, an otherwise humble cheese that accompanied cooked vegetables in middle to low-class Greek tables. It is interesting that Mizithra was so important for the whole area where it was produced, that it gave its name to the famous Mistras of Peloponnese (Mizithra>Mizithras>Mistras). Other soldier populations had also discovered and appreciated the dietary value of cheese, like the ancient Spartan warriors, who would never come to battle malnourished and considered cheese as one of the main components of their meal. In Sparta, there was also a special ceremony for young men entering the age of manhood (12-13 years), where elder men would hide chunks of cheese in 29

secret places and the teenage boys would have to find as many as possible, in order to earn their right to fight with the great Spartans. Many European and Arabic scripts talk about Crete and specifically Chania as a great cheese-producing area called “Tiropolis” (city of cheese). Impressive proof of sophistication comes from Aristotele who writes about a cheese from Frygia as one of the best of its time, made from donkey milk mixed with fig juice. Around 200 B.C. we find mentions of another famous Greek white cheese named “Kithnos”, which was wildly popular all over Greece and also conquered the Roman Agora in very high prices. The gourmet finding earned its great taste from the goats and sheep’s main food, a bush named “Kitisos”, found in the salty grasslands of Kithnos island. Overall, Greeks seem to have pretty good knowledge of a good cheese since the ancient times (maybe it’s not completely random they also knew much about wine, but more on that later…). Remember that up until this point we talk about soft cheeses, until the Romans brought their knowledge on new kinds of cheese and experimentation in Greece just explodes. From the impressively fast and enthusiastic way that every population accepted, included and evolved cheese use in their meals, it is safe to say that, the cheeseworld is still up for grabs!


A WORLD OF CHEESE

CHEESE MAKING THROUGH THE AGES WITH A HISTORY OF OVER 5000 YEARS LONG, THE JOURNEY FROM BEING A MILK PRESERVATIVE TO TODAY’S DAZZLING VARIETY OF CHEESE TASTES AND TEXTURES IS TRULY FASCINATING. WORDS BY MARIALENA GOUSIOU, CREATIVE COPYWRITER

30


31


A WORLD OF CHEESE

ntelligent speculation is all we have to explain how people begun to make cheese curds. Scientifically speaking, animal stomachs were routinely used as vessels for carrying liquid in the ancient years, so the rennet that naturally exists in the stomachs of calves would turn any milk being carried in them into curds and whey. Cheese as we know it today was not on the menu back then, however in Egypt, milk preserving techniques such as salting and pressing were well established, so it might be the case that curds would have been treated the same way, producing something like a salty and sour Feta texture. Overall, the reality at the beginning of cheese’s history is that the process was valuable for preserving milk in hot climates, rather than creating cheese for its own sake. Cheese as it is today, with different flavours and textures, is thought to have arisen because of cooler European climates; much less salt was needed for preserving the curds, which meant enzymes had a better chance of growing in the preserved milk, and it was this change that probably made cheese a basic kind of food and made room for new creations. Indeed, what happened next is that the Roman Empire started making really sophisticated cheeses, even mentioned in the Bible (2 Samuel, 17). Many Roman writings refer to different kinds of cheese and the best places for them to be produced, including Nimes in present-day France; interestingly, records also show that Romans were carrying out most of the processes we go through today to produce cheese: coagulation, salting, pressing and ageing. It is also known that they cared to flavor their cheese, for example with dried apple chips, and that they created harder, Parmesan-like cheeses. As Roman history is one of invading and conquering huge areas in Europe, many or their encounters with local populations resulted in a massive diversification in cheese making. The combination of Romans mixing their cheesemaking techniques with those of the locals, the different animal breeds, climates and feeding conditions caused the number of cheese flavours to flourish. As a result, in the Middle Ages, cheese consumption significantly increased. Made primarily by women, and still considered the best way of preserving milk, cheese’s density made it nutritious and cheap for the lower classes, which is why bread and cheese were a staple part of people’s diet at that time. It was also the ideal travelling food, for it was easily packed and lasted for a long time time with no spoiling to worry about. The same behavior carried on for thousands of years, and was also embedded in the history of American cheese making, which started by the colonial settlers of the 1700s. Milk from the dairies was skimmed of its cream for butter making, and what couldn’t be immediately consumed was preserved converting it to cheese.

GREECE IS WORD’S FIRST IN CHEESE CONSUMPTION, WITH 23 KILOS A YEAR PER PERSON, FOLLOWED BY FRANCE WITH 22 KILOS. GERMANY CONSUMES ABOUT 8-10 KILOS, AND THE LIST GOES ON WITH OTHER COUNTRIES THAT DO NOT PRODUCE THEIR OWN CHEESE MOSTLY IMPORT BY THE U.S.

The major changes in how cheese was made, which get us to where we are today, really begun with the invention of industrialized production in Switzerland. In the mid-1850s, Joseph Harding, the father of cheese making, was unveiling his system for draining the curds of as much whey as possible in Somerset, U.K., and so modern Cheddar cheese was born. We get even closer to modern cheese making, with rennet being commercially produced since the 1860’s. This big leap forward rescued valuable unwanted male calves from sacrificing (females were important for continuing the heard) for the vital coagulant, and around the same time milk Pasteurisation became the norm, making all dairy products practically risk-less to the population that consumed them. Today, the word’s cheese cradle is Europe, with Japan, India and Argentina consuming very little amounts and China never having bred animals for cheese and dairy making purposes. Greece is word’s first in cheese consumption, with 23 kilos a year per person, followed by France with 22 kilos. Germany consumes about 8-10 kilos, and the list goes on with other countries that do not produce their own cheese mostly import by the U.S. The fascinating history of cheesemaking brings out new varieties, local producing units, gourmet options and everyday ideas, that hopefully fits right in your own kitchen! You can start your own cheesemaking history, too! Find instructions on how to make cheese in Cookbook, page 62. 32


e s e e h C r u oy

YOUR LITTLE HANDBOOK FOR CHEESE

The most basic way to classify a cheese is firmness, which varies according to the degree of moisture. The moisture content of firm cheeses may be as low as 30%, while that of soft or fresh cheese being as high as 80%. Other basic designations include fresh (or unripened) cheeses, soft ripened cheeses, firm or semi-firm cheeses, blue-veined, processed and goat’s-milk cheeses. Let’s roll:

Choo se

On your table or on the cheese counter, just bear in mind some basic rules by the experts and you’ll dine fine.

FRESH CHEESES Fresh or unripened cheeses are drained after formation of the curd, but they are neither ripened nor fermented. This category includes cottage cheese, ricotta, mascarpone, cream cheese and quark. You can use fresh cheeses mainly for baking and desserts (hello cheesecake), plain or flavored with vegetables, fruits, herbs or spices. SOFT CHEESES Soft cheeses are ripened for a relatively short period of time, before being drained and turned into molds without being pressed or cooked. They have a moisture content of 50% to 60% and their fat content is 20%-26% of the cheese’s weight. They develop a soft rind that can be more or less satiny and are usually eaten with bread, since they tend to lose a lot of flavor when heated. Soft cheeses are divided in two categories, according to the characteristics of the rind: the surface-ripened soft cheeses (covered with a thin layer of a white down or mold) like Brie, Camembert and Coulommiers, and the interior-ripened soft cheeses (washed in light brine to maintain the moisture level and softness of the cheese) like Munster, Pont-l’Évèque and Époisses. 34


like a P ro Welcome experimenta tion, indulge and feel free to discover y our (new) favorite s!

FIRM AND SEMI-FIRM CHEESES Semi-firm cheeses are uncooked pressed cheeses that are dense and usually pale yellow in color. They include Cheddar, Cantal, Reblochon, Edam, Gouda and Monterey Jack. Firm cheeses are cheeses that have been cooked and pressed. The curd is heated for an hour in order to make it more concentrated, which, upon pressing, produces a more compact cheese. Their texture is usually firm, although some hard cheeses, like Parmesan and Romano, may have a rather granular texture. Gruyère, Emmenthal, Jarlsberg, Raclette and Beaufort also are a part of that category. BLUE-VEINED CHEESES Blue-veined (or blue) cheeses are neither cooked nor pressed; the curd is inoculated with a species of blue-green mold, which is injected into the cheese by means of long needles. Fermentation occurs from the inside toward the outside. These cheeses - including Roquefort, Gorgonzola, Stilton, Bleu de Bresse and Danish Blue - have a strong and sharp, peppery flavor and are often crumbled in texture. GOAT’S-MILK CHEESES Goat’s-milk (or goat) cheeses are soft cheeses with a natural rind; they may be made from 100% goat’s milk or from a mixture of goat’s milk and cow’s milk. They are available unripened, soft and surface-ripened, or in some cases hard. Whiter than cheeses made from cow’s milk, they also tend to have a more pronounced flavor. These cheeses are often very salty, a factor which has the effect of prolonging their storage life. Cheeses in this family include Crottin de Chavignol, Valençay, Chevrotin and Feta.

35


OUR CHEESEBOARD

A Guide to Gourmet Greek Cheeses

They say that the talent of a host is mirrored in the way they compose their cheeseboard. Here is our list of 9 gourmet Greek cheeses we absolutely recommend you to try and include in your talented plateau.

36


“ARSENIKO” (I.E. “MALE”) KEFALOTIRI OF NAXOS Naxos Kefalotiri is made of sheep’s and goat’s milk and has a very distinctive taste, as it becomes spicier and more aromatic, the more it ages and matures. It is a perfect “meze” for ouzo and tsipouro. “KASKAVALI” OF LIMNOS A historical cheese of the island, made of local sheep’s milk, with a unique buttery taste. You can serve it raw, but it is also great as “saganaki” (fried) or grated on your pasta and risotti.

Imagine the perfect meal... then add traditional Greek cheeses, find out what ‘more than perfect’ tastes like.

“METSOVANA” OF METSOVO A rare cheese from Metsovo, it is made of cow’s milk and matures for two years on wooden shelves. You could say it is the Greek Parmesan; strong taste, hard in texture, and with a spicy aftertaste. “KEFAVOGRAVIERA” OF AMFILOHEIA Rich taste from sheep’s and goat’s milk, this is a salty and spicy cheese with butter and nuts aromas, that makes a perfect match for raki and wine. “FETA” OF KEFALONIA A famous Feta made of goat’s and sheep’s milk, that ages in barrels, where it acquires a rich buttery taste. The king of Greek salad. “GRAVIERA” OF CRETE/PAROS/NAXOS/ANDROS The great “Graviera” form the Greek islands is made of sheep’s milk and ages for at least three months, to bring out its semi-sweet buttery taste. It is amazing with with Greek honey and fried zucchini or eggplant. “KOPANISTI” OF MYCONOS Soft, spicy and aromatic, looks like a spread but it is definitely more than that. Serve it on traditional Greek rusks, with a side of tomatos. Thank us later! “SFELA” OF MESSINIA Often called “The cheese of fire”, because of its strong peppery taste. A semi-hard cheese, made of sheep’s or mixed sheep’s and goat’s milk, that matures in brine. Serve drizzled with Greek olive oil and oregano. “SAN MIHALI” OF SYROS One of the most famous cheeses of Cyclades; a hard, golden-yellow cheese, made exclusively of local cow’s milk. Spicy and buttery, it makes the greatest “saganaki” and also works great with fruit.

37


THE NUTRITIONIST’S SCOPE

e s e e h C in a Nutshell

38


In Greece, we tradition ally combine wate rmelon or melon wit h Feta or Graviera, which is a very good combination

Cheese is undoubtedly one of the most favorite foods globally, as it is an indulging and satisfying suggestion for every meal of your day. Although there is a huge variety of options available in the cheese market, which may be tricky for the consumer, all kinds of cheese demonstrate some basic nutritional characteristics, that make them really valuable in our diet. WORDS BY MARISOFI PELAGIDOU, DIETICIAN –NUTRITIONIST MSC, www.sofidiet.gr

n general, cheese offers high quality proteins, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium and of course the most unique and rich element in all dairy, calcium. Protein content of different kinds of cheese may vary, according to their moisture percentage and production processes. Something really interesting and helpful, that is not widely known, is that people who experience lactose intolerance can eat cheese in reasonable amounts, as it contains lactose in low levels, which makes it easier for the human body to digest, thus intolerance symptoms are avoided. However, something that will surprise mostly Greek and Meditteranean diet-friendly audiences is that their favorite habit of combining legumes, like lentils for example, with Feta can have catastrophic results, in terms of iron absorption into our body. (You ‘d rather consume Vitamin C to counterbalance this effect.) In general, contrary to popular belief, yellow cheeses include more calcium content that white ones. Specifically, Parmesan has presumably the highest iron content of all cheeses. Love Parmesan? You’d be surprised to knew that there is a reason you cannot do without it in your meals; a Yale University study proves that cheese is

in fact addictive, because of its high levels of casein. (Note: Casein is a milk protein of slow action but of high biological value, which activates the same brain cells with drugs, thus the addictive element mentioned above). In terms of nutrients, all cheeses contain the very important complex B vitamins, necessary for a well-functioning neurological system and a strong memory. In Greece, we traditionally combine watermelon and melon with Feta or Graviera, which is actually a very good combination, because the vitamin C of the fruits helps the calcium salts of cheeses to be absorbed to our teeth and bones. It also promotes the lycopene input from the fruits- abundant in watermelon. Another favorite, easy and pleasant cheese partner is wine. Why is that? Because cheese can ultimately change our perception of a wine’s flavor, by strengthening it fruity aromas. In studies conducted on red wines, cheese brought out the wine aromas by simultaneously reducing its sharpness and the dryness cause by tannins. In sweet white wine, cheese did not alternate its flavor much, but in dry whites the main aroma was notably strengthened. As a rule, it is generally advised to combine your wine with cheese, as it is more likely to get more benefits from dairy products, whatever the personal choice of wine or cheese.

39


TRADITION MEETS SUSTAINABILITY

Say “cheese”& think vegan! In the last decade, we observe a huge global rise in vegetarian and vegan cheese products on market shelves; plant-based alternatives for dairy have already made their appearance on the cheese counter and new recipes are up for grabs. WORDS BY MARIALENA GOUSIOU, CREATIVE COPYWRITER ave conventional dairy products met their vegan match? Well, it seems that, as for all kinds of cheese, it is a matter of evolution of techniques and craftsmanship. For now, with the demand for new options in the non-dairy market continually rising, it is safe to say that new roads for experimentation are open, and that means many new flavours for us to try!

IS IT TASTY? Cheese counters are filled with options; flavors vary and more ingredients have been added, so that each kind of non-dairy cheese well matches with your meal. You can observe differences in calories, fat content, and of course taste. This expanded variety is exactly what makes it difficult evaluate plant-based cheeses in general, as one may find very processed cheeses of low nutritional value, but also great non-dairy alternatives of high-quality, made with excellent ingredients and of exquisite taste. Like for all food products, successful selection rests in the eye of the consumer.

THE BASICS Either you follow a vegetarian of vegan lifestyle, you are fasting or you just refrain from dairy, there is a whole new cheese scene to discover. Here is some basics: Conventional cheese is made with casein, a milk protein produced by cows, goats, sheep or buffalo. Cheese producers can now substitute casein with plant proteins that can cause the same kind of fermentation; by adding them to plant-based milk (such as soy, oat or almond milk) they are able to produce cheese that contains no animal products in all production steps. Plant-based cheese is mainly composed of soy, coconut/pal/nut solid oil, nutritional yeast, agar-agar (algae), dried nuts like cashews, macadamia or almonds, corn or potato flour, natural enzymes and bacteria, and pea protein. The whole idea of non-dairy cheese is not entirely new and it is deeply grounded in tradition. Our beloved tofu is basically a soy cheese and it has been the traditional Japanese cheese since the ancient times, poor in carbohydrates and fat, and rich in plantbased protein, as most Japanese dishes. Recent progress in the vegetarian/vegan cheese industry has now made the producers able to enrich their cheeses with more flavor and even more nutritional value, which makes plant-based cheese a tempting option, even for those who do eat regular cheese, but would like to cut down on dairy or just experimentate. Lactose intolerants, it’s your time to shine!

IS IT HEALTHY? Conventional cheeses present a variety in flavor, texture or maturity, however their basic ingredients basically remain the same. Non-dairy cheeses, on the other hand, significantly differ from one another, as the producer’s hand bears great responsibility in every step of the production process. To make a good choice, aim for the ingredients label on the product; you will notice that most of them naturally contain less saturated fat than real cheese, no cholesterol and they are rich in fiber. Calcium levels, which is the primary aspect for which cheese is really valuable, are low in plant-based cheeses; nonetheless, they contain high levels of protein and basically the same amount of fat and calories. Plant-based cheeses that contain dried nuts offer proteins of high value, so opt for them. In general, a portion contains 30-80 calories, 1-2gr. of fat, 2gr. carbohydrates and 1-2gr. of protein. YOU’ LL NEVER KNOW IF YOU LIKE IT, UNLESS YOU TRY IT! Overall, the secrets of successfully selecting alternative dairy products lay on the specific ingredients. Read the labels to avoid high content of sugar or salt, and you can find yourself great options for your cheeseboard or your everyday meal-prep. You can gradually incorporate non-dairy cheeses in your meals, by substituting a part of the cheese they contain with plant-based cheeses. Try them in snacks, like sandwiches, or combined with fruit and nuts. 40


THE RECIPES

Your favorite

Cheese Recipes...

TIROKAFTERI (HOT CHEESE SPREAD)

...are ones you haven't tried yet 42


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 54 PG.

43


THE RECIPES

BUREKAKI

I WITH FILO PASTRY, FETA AND GRAVIERA CHEESE, SUN-DRIED TOMATO AND FRESH BASIL I

44


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 55 PG.

45


THE RECIPES

BEETROOT SALAD

I (PANTZAROSALATA) WITH MANOURI CHEESE, ORANGE AND WALNUTS I

46


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 56 PG.

47


THE RECIPES

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 58 PG.

48


BAKED CHICKEN

I STUFFED WITH KASERI CHEESE, SMOKED METSOVONE CHEESE AND PEPPERS I

SPINACH RICE

I (SPANAKORIZO) WITH GRATED FETA CHEESE AND DILL I

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 59 PG.

49


THE RECIPES

CRISPY KATAIFI

I WITH CREAM OF GREEK CHEESES (MIZITHRA, GALENI, GRAVIERA) AND PISTACHIO ICE-CREAM I

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 60 PG.

50


Recipes

By the Chefs of Aldemar Resorts

GEORGE CHATZOPOULOS OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE CHEF & IOANNIS RODOKANAKIS OPERATIONS CHEF À LA CARTE

TIROKAFTERI

BUREKAKI

(HOT CHEESE SPREAD)

WITH FILO PASTRY, FETA & GRAVIERA CHEESE, SUN-DRIED TOMATO & FRESH BASIL

(PANTZAROSALATA) WITH MANOURI CHEESE, ORANGE AND WALNUTS

54 PG.

55 PG.

56 PG.

52

BEETROOT SALAD


BAKED CHICKEN

SPINACH RICE

STUFFED WITH KASERI CHEESE, SMOKED METSOVONE CHEESE & PEPPERS

(SPANAKORIZO) WITH GRATED FETA CHEESE & DILL

WITH CREAM OF GREEK CHEESES (MIZITHRA, GALENI, GRAVIERA) & PISTACHIO ICE-CREAM

58 PG.

59 PG.

60 PG.

CRISPY KATAIFI

53


THE RECIPES

TIROKAFTERI

(HOT CHEESE SPREAD) Yield

10

INGREDIENTS Feta cheese 1kg • Strained Yogurt 500gr • Hot peppers, red or green 20gr • Olive oil 100ml Sweet paprika powder 1tsp

PREPARATION Start by removing the pepper seeds. Put the peppers and olive oil in a blender and mix. Smash the Feta cheese with your hands or use your tomato grater, and mix with yogurt. Put all the ingredients together in a bowl and serve in room temperature.

54


BUREKAKI WITH FILO PASTRY

I FETA AND GRAVIERA CHEESE, SUN-DRIED TOMATO AND FRESH BASIL I Yield

10

INGREDIENTS Filo pastry 500gr • Feta cheese 500gr • Graviera cheese 500gr • Sun-dried tomatoes 100gr Fresh basil 10gr • Olive oil 500ml

PREPARATION Cut the Feta and Graviera cheese in sticks, about 10cm long and 1cm thick. Then, chop the sun-dried tomatoes and the basil leaves. Cut the filo pastry into strips slightly bigger than the cheese sticks, so that you can properly wrap the sticks and create the Burekakis. Take one filo strip and drizzle with olive oil. Put one Feta and one Graviera stick on top, some sun-dried tomatoes and basil. Roll tightly and repeat until you have used all your ingredients. Fry the Burekakis in olive oil until they get a golden color. Alternatively, you can bake them in pre-heated oven (the edge of the filo pastry facing down), for about 30 minutes at 1800C.

55


THE RECIPES

BEETROOT SALAD

I (PANTZAROSALATA) WITH MANOURI CHEESE, ORANGE AND WALNUTS I Yield

10

INGREDIENTS Beetroots, boiled 1.5kg • Manouri cheese 500gr • Oranges 5 pieces Walnuts 100gr • Olive oil 100ml Dill a handful • Salt, pepper

PREPARATION Cut both the beetroots and the Manouri cheese in cubes. Peel the oranges and cut out the fleshy part (fillet). Smash the walnuts with your hands and chop the dill and spearmint. In a bowl, mix all the ingredients together, except for the cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste and whisk. Serve the salad and add the Manouri cheese on top.

ORGANIC EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL A full-bodied biological olive oil, rich in flavour and aroma, that can easily turn a slice of bread charred on coal into the most delicious gourmet delicacy.   BALSAMIC VINEGAR Each time you taste a fresh salad rocket with any Greek cheese on top, your mind will surely be drifted away into a Greek countryside scenery, where a bunch of Corinthian grapes grew and turned into this special vinegar.  56


57


THE RECIPES

BAKED CHICKEN

I STUFFED WITH KASERI CHEESE, SMOKED METSOVONE CHEESE & PEPPERS I Yield

10

INGREDIENTS Chicken fillet 10 • Kaseri chesse 500gr • Metsovone smoked cheese 500gr Green peppers 5 pieces • Olive oil 200ml • Fresh thyme A handful Garlic 3 cloves • Onion 1 piece • Parsley ½ bunch • Salt, Pepper

PREPARATION Knife the chicken fillets in 5-6 places (careful not to entirely cut them). Add salt and pepper (keep in mind that cheeses also offer a lot of salt in this recipe). Cut the cheeses and peppers, and stuff them into the incisions on the fillets. Put the fillets on a baking tray, baste with olive oil, and add garlic and onion chopped in thick pieces for more flavor. Sprinkle with thyme and bake in pre-heated oven at 1800C for about 12-15 minutes. 58


SPINACH RICE

I (SPANAKORIZO) WITH GRATED FETA CHEESE AND DILL I Yield

10

INGREDIENTS 1kg Chicken or vegetable broth 3lt • 2lt Baby spinach leaves • 1kg Red onions 1 piece • Fresh onions 5 pieces Dill A handfull • Olive oil 150ml • Salt, pepper • Feta cheese 200gr

PREPARATION Chop the onions and sauté with olive oil in medium heat. Add rice and sauté until they get a golden color. Gradually add warm broth until the rice is cooked. Just before the rice is done, add spinach and chopped dill (in order to keep their green color and vitamins). Whisk carefully, add salt and pepper and let the ingredients slowly boil together until the mixture thickens. Add Feta cheese, simmer and rest until you serve.

59


THE RECIPES

CRISPY KATAIFI

I WITH CREAM OF GREEK CHEESES (MIZITHRA, GALENI, GRAVIERA) AND PISTACHIO ICE-CREAM I Yield

10

INGREDIENTS Kataifi shredded filo pastry 500gr • Fresh Mizithra cheese 125gr Graviera cheese 125gr • Galotiri (cream cheese) 250gr Sugar 10gr • Melted butter 100ml Lemon 1 piece • Sugar for the syrup 500gr Cinnamon clove 1 piece • Aegina Pistachio, grated 100gr Pistachio ice-cream 1kg

PREPARATION Prepare the syrup: Boil 500gr sugar, 500ml water, a lemon peel and a cinnamon clove for 5 minutes. «Comb» the kataifi filo with your fingers, so that the “hair” gets untangled. In a bowl, whisk together the Mizithra cheese and the Graviera cheese, grated. Add the cream cheese, the sugar and the rest of the lemon zest. Optionally, you can add some grated Aegina pistachio. Take a part of the kataifi filo and spread it. Put a spoonful of the cheese mixture and roll tightly. Continue with the rest of the mixture and put the rolls on a cooking tray (the end of the kataifi fillo must be facing down). When you’re done, butter the rolls with a basting brush. Bake at 1800C for about 20 minutes, until it gets a golden color. When you take the tray out of the over and while it’s still hot, dress each roll with a tablespoon of syrup. When it reaches room temperature, add a ball of pistachio ice-cream, sprinkle with grated pistachio and serve.

60


Raw materials are carefully selected with respect to seasonality and nature itself. The combination of Greek soil, the water and the sun give these ingredients their rich and memorable flavour. Imagination and innovation go a long way.

61


62


How to...

MAKE HOMEMADE CHEESE Fill your cheese-board with taste, love and craftsmanship.

63

easyystep

b step ethod m


How to...

MAKE HOMEMADE CHEESE

Ingredients

FOR 4 SERVINGS • High quality sheep’s, goat’s or mixed fresh milk • 3 lit (alternatively you can use cow’s milk) • Citric acid 1 tsp • Sea salt 1 tbsp • Water 125 ml

Equipment • • • • •

1 big cooking pot 1 wooden ladle 1 slotted spoon Cheesecloth A cheese basket, if you want to give a specific shape to your cheese

1 By the Chefs of Aldemar Resorts

GEORGE CHATZOPOULOS OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE CHEF & IOANNIS RODOKANAKIS OPERATIONS CHEF À LA CARTE

Diffuse the citric acid in water (room temperature). Gradually warm the milk, starting in low temperature. When it starts to bubble and puff, add the water and citric acid mixture, and stir with wooden ladle. 64


easyystep

b step ethod m

2

3

Almost immediately, the milk starts to thicken. Using a slotted spoon, gather the cheese curds and put them in cheesecloth. In the end, what will remain in the cooking pot is whey.

Fold the cheesecloth tight. Then, press gradually until all the liquids are strained. As soon as you have a solid mass in the cloth you are ready for the next step.

65


How to...

MAKE HOMEMADE CHEESE

4 If you want, you can put the curd in a basket, in order to give it a more specific shape. Press with your fingers so that there won’t be any air-holes in the solid mass, and carefully flip the basket over. Alternatively, you can leave it in the cheesecloth in the shape of a ball. Leave your cheese rest for about 4-5 hours, so that all the moisture is gone.

66


easyystep

b step ethod m

67


How to...

MAKE HOMEMADE CHEESE

5

easyystep

b step ethod m

Tips ALTERNATIVELY, you can keep it in a vase, covered in virgin olive oil and, if you like, add oregano or thyme, for deeper and more sophisticated taste. YOU CAN USE THE CHEESE in many ways. Enjoy it as an all-day snack combined with Greek rusks, in salads or sandwiches. Use mature cheese in your recipes grated or fresh, cut in pieces. * This soft cheese is called “tirozouli” in Crete.

You can enjoy your cheese immediately. Keep it refrigerated in wax paper-not in shrink wrap- so that it can “breathe”. If you want to let it mature, coat with coarse sea salt and let it dry, in a well-ventilated space and covered with tulle to protect it from insects. Also, in that case, it’s best to add more salt to the recipe. When the cheese is as mature as you like, keep it refrigerated in wax paper. 68


CHEESE PAIRINGS

ACLOSE UP THE CLASSIC

WORDS BY DIMITRIS KOUMANIS, WINE WRITER THE COMBINATION OF GREEK CHEESES with wines from Greek grape varieties is often a riddle. In Greece, we consume cheese as a starter or a side-dish. A Sunday walk at a tavern will persuade everyone that, in Greece, cheese is equal to “meze”, and although the majority would say that cheese is better with red wine, the number shows that almost 75% of wine consumption refers to white wine. Contrary to stereotypes, most white wines seem to love cheese. Besides, most Greek white wine varieties are really complicated and sophisticated in flavor, and practically more interesting than the reds. Even the most demanding flavors, such as Feta, are smoothly tamed by an Achaean Sideritis as its acidity highlights the fatty elements in dairy; overall, remember that the locality of a wine drastically defines both its taste and the flavors with which it works well. The Greeks have a saying: “As for your craving, eat pumpkin-pie”, that translates to: “What you like is totally up to you”.

Wine


Charles de Gaulle once said “How can you govern a country with 258 cheese varieties?”, which properly reveals France’s great cheese-making history; Greece is not far behind, especially if we consider its small size and its varying geo-natural terrain. The 21 Greek cheeses and cheese products that have been officially recognized by the European Union as products with Protected Designation of Origin, depict our country’s strong production, long-time tradition and real love for cheese.

govern u o y n a "How c with y r t n u o ac ties?" e i r a v e es 258 che

THE GAMECHANGER WORDS BY ALEXANDROS KOURIS NONETHELESS, REAL CONNOISSEURS already know that cheese is really good with beer; sometimes even better than with wine, as, for example, red wine’s tannins can cover up the sub-flavors of cheese, and bring out a more aggressive result in terms of aftertaste. France seems to adopt this approach, and that is why the French mostly prefer to pair their cheeses with white wines. The same happens with beer; sour and, ever more, double fermentation beers-like Nisos Apokalispi- practically “penetrate” cheese fat and make its taste lighter, clearing your palette and helping it to accept the sub-flavors of cheese. A kind of harmony through antitheses in your mouth; for those who know, cheese and beer can be the new gastronomic #couplegoals.

Beer


GEORGE CHATZOPOULOS OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE CHEF & IOANNIS RODOKANAKIS OPERATIONS CHEF À LA CARTE

es

y

en

ou

gh!

Recipes

By the Chefs of Aldemar Resorts

Ain't no r

e p i ec

e h c

73

Coookk bo COOK TO HOW E A PRO LIK


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

SAGANAKI

I (FRIED) CHEESE WITH MULTI-GRAIN SEEDS I

You r be st d ish es a re t he

74


one s yo uh ave n't trie dy et w ith Gre ek che ese s...

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 90 PG.

75


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

KALITSOUNIA

I (SMALL PIES) WITH SWEET MIZITHRA CHEESE I

76


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 90 PG.

77


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

GREEN SALAD

I WITH GRILLED TALAGANI CHEESE, KALAMATA OLIVES, PINE NUTS AND SPEARMINT I


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 90PG.

79


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

OVEN STUFFED PEPPERS I WITH GREEK CHEESES I

80


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 92 PG.

81


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

GRILLED CHIOS MASTELO CHEESE

I WITH FIG JAM, APAKI (SMOKED PORK MEAT) AND MOLASSES I

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 92 PG.

82


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

GLUTEN-FREE PASTA I WITH BEETROOT PESTO I

84


SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 92 PG.

85


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

MIZITHRA CHEESE MOUSSE

I WITH YOGURT, HONEY, CINNAMON AND LEMON ZEST I

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 94 PG.

86


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

ANTHOTIRO CHEESE & WHITE CHOCOLATE CREAM

I WITH TSOUREKI (GREEK BRIOCHE) DRESSED IN GREEK COFFEE I

SEE HOW IT'S DONE ON 94 PG.

88


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

Cheesy kitchen stories SAGANAKI (FRIED) CHEESE WITH MULTI-GRAIN SEEDS

PREPARATION • For the pastry, whisk butter, sugar, milk and eggs well with a wire-whisk, until they become a homogenous mixture. • Add sifted flour with baking powder and manually whisk well. The pastry must be soft. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes. • For the stuffing, manually crack the Mizithra cheese and add all the other ingredients. • Using a pastry roller, make a sheet about 2-3mm thick, and cut round discs of 8-10cm diameter. • In each disc, we put a spoonful of stuffing and fold pinching with your fingers to give them their characteristic polygonal shape. • Beat an egg with some water and dab on the mixture using a cooking brush, to give it a more vivid color. • Bake in pre-heated oven, in 170⁰C for 25-30 minutes, until they get a golden color. Keep in room temperature.

Yield 4 INGREDIENTS Graviera cheese 4 pieces of 100gr each Oat flakes 10 tbsp Pumpkin seeds 2 tbsp Sunflower seeds 2 tbsp Sesame seeds 1 tbsp Black sesame seeds 1 tbsp Olive oil (for frying) Eggs 3 pieces All-purpose flour 100gr Water

GREEN SALAD WITH GRILLED TALAGANI CHEESE, KALAMATA OLIVES, PINE NUTS AND SPEARMINT

PREPARATION • Put the oat flakes and all the seeds in a blender and mix (be careful to stop before they become dust). • Beat the eggs in a bowl. In another bowl put the flour and in a third bowl put some water. • Take a slice of cheese and dip into the water, then flour, eggs and oat-seeds mix. • Fry in medium to high heat, until they get a golden color and the cheese becomes soft. • Serve warm, as an appetizer or accompanying a salad.

Yield 4 INGREDIENTS FOR 4 SERVINGS Baby rocket 100gr Baby spinach 100gr Kalamata olives 15-20 pieces Talagani cheese 200 gr Pine nuts 30 gr Fresh spearmint 10 leaves Extra virgin olive oil 40 ml White vinegar 20 ml or according to taste Salt

KALITSOUNIA (SMALL PIES) WITH SWEET MIZITHRA CHEESE (approx. 20-25 pieces /person) INGREDIENTS For the pastry Butter 130gr Sugar 200gr Milk 200gr Eggs 2 pieces Baking Powder 2 tbsp All-purpose flour 1kg

PREPARATION • Cut the Talagani cheese in pieces (size according to taste). Drizzle a non-stick pan with a bit of olive oil and grill the cheese, until it starts melting and gets a golden color. • In a bowl, combine rocket and spinach leaves, olives, chopped spearmint and pine nuts. Marinate with olive oil, vinegar and salt. • Serve the salad in a bowl, with warm cheese on the side or cut in pieces around the salad. • Serve warm, as an appetizer or accompanying a salad.

For stuffing Cretan Mizitha cheese 1 kg Sugar ½ kg Cinnamon 1 tsp Eggs 2 pieces

For more recipes, visit www.sympossio.gr 90


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

Cheesy kitchen stories OVEN STUFFED PEPPERS WITH GREEK CHEESES

GLUTEN-FREE PASTA WITH BEETROOT PESTO Yield 4

Yield 4 INGREDIENTS For the beetroot pesto Boiled beetroots 3 medium White Vinegar 2-3 tbsp, depending on its strength Wallnuts, peeled 50 gr Garlic 1 clove Olive oil 50 ml Manouri cheese 50 gr Dry Anthotiro cheese (or other dry cheese) 30 gr Fresh basil 5 leaves Freshly ground pepper, Salt

INGREDIENTS Horn peppers 10-12 pieces Grated Feta cheese 700gr Grated Graviera cheese 700gr Anthotiro cheese into pieces 300gr Parsley, chopped ½ a bunch Fresh marjoram or oregano 1-2 small branches Extra virgin olive oil 80ml Hot paprika Pepper PREPARATION • In a bowl, mix the cheeses, chopped parsley, marjoram, pepper and hot paprika (if you are into hot flavors). • Wash the peppers and carefully open them from upside to remove their seeds. Keep the part you cut, to use it as a lid. • Tightly stuff the peppers and cover with their lid. • Put the peppers in a cooking tray (try to place them straight), dress with olive oil and bake at 1800C, until they get a golden color and the cheeses melt. Leave them rest in the oven for 10 minutes and serve.

For the pasta Whole-wheat/gluten-free/ any type of pasta 500gr PREPARATION • Put all the ingredients for the pesto in a blender and blend until wellmixed. Add salt, if needed. • Boil the pasta, according to packaging instructions. Drain and keep one cup of boiling water. • In a bowl, mix the pasta with as much pesto sauce as you like, and add some of the water you saved, until the mixture gets creamy. • Serve while it’s warm and add Manouri cheese in thick pieces, raw olive oil and some basil leaves.

GRILLED CHIOS MASTELO CHEESE WITH FIG JAM, APAKI (SMOKED PORK MEAT) AND MOLASSES* Yield 4 INGREDIENTS Mastelo cheese cut in thick slices of about 1cm 400gr Apaki (smoked pork meat) in slices of about ½ cm 200gr Molasses 50gr Fig jam 100gr

KNOW-WHAT* Molasses is a viscous product, that comes from the long simmering of grape must, until it gets dark and syrup-like in texture. As a product, it can be perfectly preserved for a long time, and along with honey, it is one of the main natural sweeteners used in antiquity.

PREPARATION • In a hot grill pan, grill the cheese until it gets a golden color and starts becoming soft. • Repeat the same process with the apaki. • In a plate, serve the Mastelo cheese, the apaki and the jam. Dress with molasses. Alternatively, you can serve the ingredients separately as a snack.

For more recipes, visit www.sympossio.gr 92


THE COOKBOOK ARCHIVES

Cheesy kitchen stories MIZITHRA CHEESE MOUSSE, WITH YOGURT, HONEY, CINNAMON AND LEMON ZEST

ANTHOTIRO CHEESE AND WHITE CHOCOLATE CREAM, WITH TSOUREKI (GREEK BRIOCHE) DRESSED IN GREEK COFFEE

Yield 4

Yield 4 INGREDIENTS FOR 4 SERVINGS Sweet Mizithra cheese or Anthotiro 400gr Yogurt, strained 400gr Honey 100gr + 100gr extra for garnish Cinnamon, ground Zest from 1 lemon

INGREDIENTS FOR 4 SERVINGS Anthotiro cheese 0.5kg Milk cream 250ml Egg yolks 2 pieces White chocolate 150gr White sugar 100gr Gelatin sheets 10gr Tsoureki 1 piece Greek coffee 2 doses

PREPARATION • In a mixer or blender, beat Mizithra and honey, until you get a smooth mixture. • Transfer to a bowl and add yogurt, cinnamon and lemon zest. Lightly whisk with a plastic ladle. • Serve in small bowls and garnish with extra honey and spearmint leaves.

PREPARATION • In a bowl filled with cold water, dip the gelatin sheets until they get soft. • In another bowl, mix sugar and eggs. Gradually warm the milk cream, and when it starts to boil add it in the egg-sugar mixture. • Add softened gelatin and white chocolate, and blend with a handblender, so that the whole mixture becomes smooth and shiny. • Beat the Anthotiro cheese in a mixer, until it becomes soft (you can also manually beat with an eggbeater), and add the white chocolate mixture until all the ingredients blend into it. • Cover with cling film and refrigerate for 1-2 hours. • Make a Greek coffee. • Cut the tsoureki in slices and we dress it with Greek coffee, using a cooking brush. (Adjust the amount of coffee to your taste. You can dress one or both sides of the tsoureki slice). • Spread the Anthotiro-white chocolate cream on the tsoureki slices and accompany with a cup of fresh hot Greek coffee.

* You can also crack a cinnamon cookie on top.

* You can also crack a cinnamon cookie on top.

TASTY OPTION In the recipe above, instead of yogurt you can also use “xinogalo” (sour/fermented milk) from Siteia-Crete, which resembles to yogurt in texture and has a more acidic flavor. In that case, you might want to skip the lemon zest and add some more honey to the recipe, according to your taste.

For more recipes, visit www.sympossio.gr 94


SPONSORS

STRATEGIC PARTNERS

MAJOR COLLABORATOR

UNDER THE AUSPICES

PARTNERS

ORGANIZATIONAL PARTNER

96


urg Naple s

avl Yarosl

Pisa

Scents & Senses

Turin

Lille

Îœanchester

Deauville

Genov a

don Lon

Ha nno ver

ris Pa

Le ipz ig

SPONSORS

MEDIA PARTNERS

97

urg sb ter Pe St.

in Berl

rest Bucha

London

Dublin

Kiev

Tel Aviv

Mil an

ia yn Gd

w sa ar W


Belfa st

g inebur Ekater

Naples

vl Yarosla

Pisa

Îœanchester

G R E E K G OU R M E T T OU R I NG

Deauville

Turin Lille

Genov a

don Lon

Ha nno ver

ris Pa

Le ipz ig

urg sb ter Pe St.

in Berl

arest Buch

London

Kiev

Dublin

Tel Aviv

Mil an

ia yn Gd

w sa ar W

We like socializing Follow us

#sympossio sympossiogreece sympossio sympossio sympossiogreece

www.sympossio.gr

FSC LOGO

98


C E L E B R AT E L I F E


Profile for Aldemar Resorts

SYMPOSSIO MAGAZINE 2020 11th GREEK GOURMET TOURING  

Sympossio 2020_Greece Cheese “Give me a sharp knife and a good cheese, and I am a happy man”, said George R.R. Martin. Cheese is one of the...

SYMPOSSIO MAGAZINE 2020 11th GREEK GOURMET TOURING  

Sympossio 2020_Greece Cheese “Give me a sharp knife and a good cheese, and I am a happy man”, said George R.R. Martin. Cheese is one of the...

Advertisement