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The Social and Economic Impact of Albion in the Community

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Welcome

Albion in the Community is the official charity of Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club and I am pleased to present a report on the social and economic impact of our work measured during the Club’s first season in the Premier League. Using the power of football and the Brighton & Hove Albion brand, Albion in the Community is able to create opportunities for everyone, breaking down barriers be they physical, economic or social. An example of this work is demonstrated by the programmes aimed at people with a disability where Albion in the Community creates opportunities for those who may not otherwise have the chance to play the sport they love or take part in physical activity. The impact that Albion in the Community has is in many cases transformational, building confidence, inspiring learners, helping people to gain nationally-accredited qualifications or getting them into work. The health programmes encourage healthy lifestyles, help reduce the risk of diabetes, and save lives through an early detection programme for various forms of cancer. I am immensely proud of the work that Albion in the Community does and the fact that it has become an integral part of the Football Club. In a recent study 94% of fans responding to a survey agreed that it was an important part of the culture and philosophy of the Club. They too are proud of Albion in the Community. We could not achieve so much without our dedicated and passionate staff and the collaboration and support of our many valued partners including statutory agencies, education providers or our partners like American Express who provide both financial support and volunteers for many of the programmes and also take a keen interest in our activities. I hope you enjoy reading this report and it will give you a greater understanding both of the work and the value that Albion in the Community brings to the Greater Brighton City Region and beyond. I extend our huge thanks on behalf of all of the 43,000 beneficiaries of our programmes to all of those people and organisations that support us.

Martin Perry Chair of Trustees - Albion in the Community

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Executive Summary Albion in the Community (AITC) is one of Sussex’s leading independent charities. As the official charity of Brighton & Hove Albion, AITC enjoys close links with the region’s leading professional football club—something which it uses to inspire people of all ages. The charity’s work aims to help people raise their aspirations, build self-esteem and resilience, develop new skills, and improve their physical and mental health and wellbeing. Launched more than 25 years ago, AITC supports some of the most-vulnerable people in Sussex. During 2017/18 it worked with more than 43,000 people, running 60 different projects throughout the county. In fact, the geographic spread of AITC’s programmes is vast—stretching from Hastings in the east of the county, to Chichester in the west.

Delivering £28.75 million of economic value In 2017/18 AITC had an income of £3.25million, just over half of which, £1.78million, was secured from grants and commissioned contracts. The remaining £1.47million came from fan donations and payments for activity sessions. This means AITC levered in £0.82 for every £1 it received in grants and from commissioned services. The economic impact of its activities in 2017/18, based on monetary values provided by the Social Value Bank, is estimated to be £28.75million. This means the charity delivered £8.84 worth of impact for every £1 of income it received. If only income from grants and commissioned contracts are included, the return is significantly higher at £16.13 for every £1 of investment.

INCOME

IMPACT VALUE

VALUE PER £1

Total AITC income

£3.25m

£28.75m

£8.84

Grants and commissioned contracts

£1.78m

£28.75m

£16.13

Multiple award winner Everyone at AITC and, indeed, Brighton & Hove Albion, is incredibly proud of the charity’s delivery and reputation. AITC is widely-recognised as one of the most-active and respected football charities currently operating in the UK and has won a host of awards for its work in recent years. AITC is also something which Brighton & Hove Albion supporters are understandably proud of and keen to learn more about. According to the Premier League Fan Matchday Survey 2018, more than nine out of ten (94%) of Brighton & Hove Albion fans surveyed agreed AITC’s work in the community is an important part of the culture and philosophy of the club; a similar proportion (92%) were aware of Brighton & Hove Albion’s community initiatives, compared with a Premier League average of 73%. The charity is also considered to be leading the way in terms of organisational best practice, governance and policies. This has been recognised by the British Standards Institute and the Premier League, with the charity helping to develop a BSI kite mark for charity governance.

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Promoting equality and diversity Central to almost everything AITC does is the belief that barriers, be they physical, economic, or societal, should not prevent people from accessing opportunities. That strong focus on equality has resulted in more than 1,500 girls now regularly participating in AITC’s girls’ football programmes, in addition to the 2,000 boys who were regular participants at the charity’s football sessions. The charity’s commitment to widening access to participation has also enabled more than 500 people with a disability to take part in the 30 regular sessions AITC delivers which are aimed specifically at people with a disability—including many who may otherwise not have had the chance to play the sport they love or take part in regular physical activity.

Building confidence and inspiring learners AITC works hard to equip people of ages with the skills they need to reach their future goals. The charity works extensively with almost 150 local schools, using the popularity of football to develop young people’s academic skills through pioneering programmes like Premier League Primary Stars, Tech Girls, or its football-themed numeracy programme Goal Difference. AITC also has its own thriving further education programme, which has helped more than 400 local people gain nationallyaccredited qualifications, while its employment support projects saw 95 people move off benefits and into work. The charity’s football employability project, Albion Goals, has also successfully helped more than 230 people improve their life skills and confidence, making them better equipped to find and keep jobs or access further education. C

Promoting healthy living

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AITC runs an array of projects which improve the health and wellbeing of local people of all ages. For example it is having a positive impact on early detection rates of a range of cancers as a result of its successful Speak Up Against Cancer campaign, which saw AITC engage directly with more than 17,000 people in 2017/18 alone. MY

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Its support for people affected by cancer does not stop there. AITC’s Brighter Outlook programme provides free support to a significant number of people in Brighton and Hove who have, or have recently had, cancer—helping them stay physically active during and after treatment. AITC also runs a popular smoking cessation course and a pre-diabetes project aimed at preventing diabetes among those who are most at risk, including many people who live in some of the most-deprived areas of Sussex.

Working together Much of AITC’s work is only possible as a result of its collaboration with its many valued partners—namely statutory agencies and voluntary and private sector organisations. Whether working with local education providers to deliver nationally-accredited qualifications, or creating bespoke corporate social responsibility programmes for businesses like American Express, AITC is an outward-looking charity keen to embrace any opportunity for collaboration if it results in improved outcomes for its participants. The charity also benefits from the support of the almost 500 people who regularly volunteer alongside AITC’s paid staff, providing welcome assistance and expert input to its programmes and helping ensure maximum impact in the local area.

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Contents Page Welcome 3 Executive summary 5 1. Introduction 8 2. Setting the context 12 3. Football’s contribution to delivering social value

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4. Albion in the Community’s contribution to Sussex

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- 4.1 Promoting health and wellbeing 14 - 4.2 Employment, learning and skills 18 - 4.3 Community capacity building 20 5. Summary and conclusions 22

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1. Introduction Albion in the Community (AITC) has become one of Sussex’s leading independent charitable organisations, providing a wide range of programmes throughout the local area. These are predominantly aimed at improving the health and wellbeing and life chances of vulnerable people throughout Sussex. AITC was established as an independent charity more than 25 years ago. Its close links with Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club mean it is in a unique and enviable position where it can use the power of football and the popularity of the club to engage people from across the local population. This approach gives AITC the best possible change to succeed in its objectives of improving the health, wellbeing and education of local people of all ages, while raising the health and wellbeing of the local community. The charity retains a focus mainly on supporting those members of the local community who face the greatest challenges and disadvantages—who are traditionally among the most difficult for mainstream organisations to reach.

“The work Albion in the Community does across Sussex is fantastic. The quality of its delivery is consistently high and the experience of its staff and the organisation’s insight into the challenges facing local people make Albion in the Community the obvious local charity for American Express to work with. “Everyone at Amex is hugely-committed to having a positive impact on the communities in which they work and our relationship with Albion in the Community enables us to do just that—whether by providing financial support to the many superb programmes the charity is delivering, or by colleagues volunteering at sessions and sharing their passion and professional expertise with participants. C

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“We are all incredibly proud of our relationship with Albion in the Community.” K

Beverly Sawyer - VP International Consumer Operation Excellence, American Express

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Much of AITC’s work focuses on young people, improving their resilience and wellbeing, and building links with local schools. However, its work stretches well beyond this and includes encouraging people of all ages to become more active, take advantage of the opportunity for further education, and to take steps to improve their personal health and wellbeing. In recent years the charity has received multiple national, regional and local awards in recognition of the work it has done to support local people. These include:

Argus Community Star Awards 2019 - Best Community Event (finalist) 2019 - Contribution to Sussex Sport (finalist) 2016 - Contribution to Sussex Sport (winner)

Football Business Awards 2018 - Best Football Community Scheme Premier League (finalist) 2018 - Best Corporate Social Responsibility Scheme (finalist) 2017 - Best Football Community Scheme (winner) 2016 - Best Community Scheme non Premier League (winner) 2015 - Best Community Scheme non Premier League (winner)

Card and Payments Awards 2017 - Best CSR Programme (winner) 2013 - Best CSR Programme (winner)

Royal Society for Public Health Awards 2018 - Community Health Development Award (runner-up)

Football for Good Awards 2015 - Champion of the Women’s Game (winner)

Football League Awards 2017 - South East Community Club of the Year (winner) 2016 - South East Community Club of the Year (winner) 2015 - South Community Club of the Year (winner)

FA Women’s Football Awards 2015 - We Can Play Participation Award (winner)

This report will assess the value of AITC’s work. Socio and economic monetised values have been taken from the Social Value Bank, produced by Housing Associations Charitable Trust (HACT) to estimate the economic contribution of AITC’s activity to the Sussex economy. The Social Value Bank provides monetised values for a wide range of health and wellbeing; employment, learning and skills; and community impacts. Estimates which have been used in this report are based on known impacts and where participants have engaged regularly in AITC programmes for a minimum of two months. AITC also delivers other lower impact and lighter touch activities, such as disability awareness assemblies to school children, which have not been included in the estimates because the attributable impacts are more difficult to evidence. In 2017/18, AITC invested £3.25million on activities aimed at improving people’s lives. This included reaching out to more than 43,000 people across Sussex, including supporting hundreds of people with a disability, working with 11,000 school children and engaging just under 500 regular volunteers.

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£1.78million of AITC’s income came from grants and commissioned contracts. The remaining £1.47million was from fan donations and payments for activity sessions. This means AITC levered £0.82 for every £1 it received in grants and from commissioned services. The social value economic impact of its activities in 2017/18 is estimated to be £28.75million. This means it had £8.84 worth of impact for every £1 of income it received. If only income from grants and commissioned contracts are included, the return is £16.13 for every £1 of investment.

INCOME

IMPACT VALUE

VALUE PER £1

Total AITC income

£3.25m

£28.75m

£8.84

Grants and commissioned contracts

£1.78m

£28.75m

£16.13

Quality

Teamwork

by providing premium quality services, including training to enrich and transform people’s lives.

by working with other agencies and partners to deliver the best services to local businesses.

The charity’s work is shaped by four distinct values:

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Commitment to making a positive difference to the lives of people throughout Sussex.

Respect

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for people, including celebrating diversity, understanding the needs of individuals and encouraging personal development. CY

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These values reinforce the leading role AITC has taken in promoting diversity, tackling inequality and developing respect for all sections of the community, reflecting the openness and tolerance of the city of Brighton and Hove itself.

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The charity recently underwent a full strategic review, aimed at re-focusing its delivery on areas where AITC was bestplaced to have maximum impact. As a result of that process, AITC published a five-year strategy document, titled Changing Lives, Creating Opportunities and Building Futures 2017-2021, in which it outlined the six strategic pillars which would now shape its work. These are:

ACTIVE PARTICIPATION

INSPIRING SUPPORTERS

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

to encourage healthier lifestyles through breaking down barriers, generating confidence and inspiring involvement.

to ensure the passion with the club is shared with the charity.

to stimulate behavioural change required to improve attainment, health, wellbeing and employability.

RAISING ASPIRATIONS

COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT

SUPPORTING STAKEHOLDERS

to support the communities of Brighton and Hove and Sussex in overcoming inequalities and raising aspirations.

to understand the needs of the local communities and deliver solutions which solve their challenges.

to create mutual benefit which delivers the charity’s aspirations and the needs of its partners.

AITC’s strategic review is further illustration of not only the charity’s determination to provide insight-led support to the local community, but also its commitment to creating sustainable interventions in areas where they are most-needed. Alongside its delivery programme, AITC also has an advocacy role in promoting awareness, building social capital and developing community cohesion within Sussex’s diverse communities. This report summarises AITC’s activities and achievements in 2017/18 and assesses the social value economic impact of the charity to the Sussex economy over that period. The work AITC does improves the quality of life for many individuals within Sussex and provides clear economic impacts through cost savings to the public sector by reducing beneficiaries’ dependence on public services and increasing their productive capacity to the local economy.

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2. Setting the context AITC is based at the American Express Community Stadium in the city of Brighton and Hove, with an additional facility at the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre in Lancing. It also uses venues across both East Sussex and West Sussex. Sussex has a diverse economy, with high concentrations of wealth and economic vibrancy sitting alongside areas of deprivation, disadvantage and poverty. Just over 1.72million people live in the 13 districts and boroughs which make up Sussex, with one in six living in the city of Brighton and Hove. There are 300,000 people who are aged under 15 (18%) living in the county, alongside just over 1million 16- to 64-year-olds (60%) and just over 380,000 residents aged 65+ (22%). Deprivation in Sussex is mainly concentrated along the coastal strip and most-commonly relates to health, disability, education, training and skills, with particular concentrations around Hastings and parts of Brighton and Hove. However, there are also pockets of poverty in rural areas, where access to services can be particularly difficult. Even in areas with high levels of employment, many people with low skills and other challenges are at risk of being left behind without the support of organisations like AITC. There are 129,000 adult residents in Sussex with a health problem or disability which limits their day-to-day activities. There are 47,000 adults who have no formal qualifications, and 208,000 working age adults who are economically inactive. Educational attainment among young people in Sussex varies considerably and those from poorer backgrounds are more likely than those from more affluent backgrounds to face educational disadvantage, which, if not addressed, can have longterm negative impacts on their future opportunities and wellbeing.

In West Sussex, 16% of Year 6 children are obese, only 60% of adults are physically active to the expected levels and nearly two-thirds (64%) of adults are carrying excess weight. C

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In East Sussex 17% of Year 6 children are obese, 67% of adults are physically active to the expected levels, and over half (59%) of adults are carrying excess weight. CM

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Established local authority priorities differ in both East Sussex and West Sussex, although both counties do share similarities. The West Sussex Sustainable Community Strategy (2008-2020), for example, includes strands around improving education and skills levels, promoting healthy lifestyles, and promoting respect and social inclusion. The East Sussex Sustainable Community Strategy includes among its priorities job creation, the provision of high-quality learning, education and skills opportunities, the improvement of local health and wellbeing, and ensuring people and communities are safe and secure. The strategy also looks to create strong communities and community leadership and enable people to enjoy culture, sports and leisure. Reducing inequalities and narrowing the gap between the least and mostdeprived individuals and communities is central to the approach which is being taken in East Sussex. In the city of Brighton and Hove, Brighton & Hove Connected’s 2030 vision has five themes. These include giving children and young people the best chance in life, helping them enjoy a stable and healthy childhood and a good education; improving the health and wellbeing of local residents; creating a safe city which respects its diverse communities; and establishing an economy which provides good quality jobs. Improving equality and engagement are the two principles which run through the priorities within the strategy. Across Sussex public, private and voluntary sector organisations, including AITC, work closely together to improve the lives of some of the most-vulnerable residents in Sussex.

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3. Football’s contribution to delivering social value The power of football to deliver social outcomes and to contribute to the health and wellbeing of some of the country’s mostvulnerable residents is now well-recognised, with all professional clubs delivering community programmes in their local areas. The Premier League has had a significant impact on the work being done throughout the country. According to The Economic and Social Impact of the Premier League, produced by Ernst & Young in 2019, half a million people were engaged in Premier League-funded projects in 2016/17. These included: • Premier League Primary Stars, which involves working with 15,400 schools to improve the educational attainment and skills of children and young people; • Premier League Kicks, which encourages 70,000 young people living in areas of deprivation to play football, and other sports, and develop life skills; and • The Football Foundation, which since 2000 has resulted in £1.5billion worth of projects to improve local community facilities, widen participation in football and help increase physical activity among people of all ages.

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4. Albion in the Community’s contribution to Sussex AITC has become one of Sussex’s leading charitable organisations and a trailblazer for other football foundations and charities across the country. As a charity it is leading the way both locally and nationally in promoting equality and diversity, improving health and wellbeing and building confidence and self-esteem. AITC’s contribution has received recognition by the Premier League and is a source of genuine pride for Brighton & Hove Albion fans and local people. The Premier League 2018 Fan Matchday Survey report found more than nine out of ten (94%) of surveyed fans agreed AITC’s work in the community is an important part of the culture and philosophy of Brighton & Hove Albion and a similar proportion (92%) were aware of Brighton & Hove Albion’s community initiatives, compared with a Premier League average of 73%. AITC now runs 60 different projects, ranging from further education courses which lead to nationally-accredited qualifications and programmes which support people into work, to health awareness campaigns, and programmes which directly encourage people of all ages to engage in regular physical activity.

4.1 Promoting health and wellbeing Many of AITC’s programmes are aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of people living in Sussex, focusing on areas and communities where health improvements are most needed. In 2016/17 more than 11,500 people participated in AITC’s programmes with genuine health benefits which could be clearly evidenced in this report, with an estimated social value economic impact of £24.70million. The following table is a summary of this impact:

HEALTH IMPACTS: £24.701M C

BRIGHTER OUTLOOK

BOYS’ FOOTBALL PROGRAMME

£8.166M

PE AND SPORT PROGRAMMES

£0.014M

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£1.183M

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GIRLS’ FOOTBALL PROGRAMME

£6.581M

PRE-DIABETES PROGRAMME

£0.654M

PRIMARY SCHOOLS ENGAGEMENT

£0.459M

SOCIAL INCLUSION ENGAGEMENT

£6.153M

SMOKING CESSATION PROGRAMME

£0.044M

DISABILITY PROGRAMMES

£1.447M

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This report will now provide a brief illustration of some of the work mentioned in the table above. Tackling cancer and other health conditions Brighter Outlook provides free, personalised physical activity for Brighton and Hove residents who have, or have had, cancer. Staying active helps to reduce tiredness, improve mood, limit the risk of cancer progressing and the risk of it recurring. In 2016/17 more than 400 people took part in the Brighter Outlook programme. Alongside this, AITC delivers a range of health awareness and support programmes. These include the Speak Up Against Cancer campaign, which reached 17,000 people in 2017/18 and which raises awareness of the early signs of cancer through regular workshops and public events. The programme includes mole checks and is complemented by a smoking cessation programme which has engaged more than 800 participants. Elsewhere, AITC also runs a pre-diabetes programme, which helps people to reduce the risk of diabetes, and a Shape Up at the Stadium course, aimed at improving the health of overweight men. Healthy eating and nutrition advice is also embedded across the charity’s delivery areas, with participants in its regular football activities given support on how to eat healthily and guidance on the importance of regular exercise.

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Increasing football participation among girls Local research shows that typically, school-age girls across Sussex are not taking part in the recommended levels of physical activity—something which can result in a range of negative physical and mental impacts. Increasing participation among girls has, therefore, been established as one of AITC’s strategic goals. As part of a five-year plan, the charity aims to increase participation in its programmes by girls by 15% every year up to and including 2021. It is an ambitious target which AITC is currently succeeding in meeting. In 2017/18, there were 1,644 regular participants in AITC’s girls’ football programme, with girls’ football sessions run at venues throughout Sussex. Efforts are also being taken to increase attendance at after school clubs and Brighton & Hove Albion Soccer Schools. The charity works closely with Brighton & Hove Albion’s FA Women’s Super League squad, whose members regularly attend sessions, acting as inspirational role models for the charity’s younger participants. Increased participation among girls is helping boosts participants’ skills and confidence, as well as providing a route to Brighton & Hove Albion’s regional talent centre for the most-accomplished footballers. Promoting physical activity for people with a disability AITC is playing a leading role in making football and physical activity more accessible to a wider range of people and it delivers more than 30 regular football sessions across Sussex for people who have a disability. It actively promotes disability sport and invests in improving the quality of specialist coaching available to local players with a disability. Just under 550 people take part in AITC’s regular inclusive football sessions, while the charity is also working with a growing number of local Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) schools to improve PE and school sport provision. AITC’s disability delivery is built across two strands: pan-disability, which anyone with a disability can attend, and disabilityspecific, which is limited to people with a particular disability, such as Down’s syndrome or autism. The rationale behind this approach is that while pan-disability sessions give participants the chance to take part in football outside of their specific disability peer group—something which is actively encouraged by AITC—disability-specific sessions allow the charity’s coaches to adapt delivery to best suit people with shared additional needs. There is also the fact that national and regional competitive opportunities exist, but are predominantly focused on disability-specific structures. With AITC keen to provide participation opportunities at various levels of ability, these disability-specific sessions—and the teams which they support— are an important part of the charity’s disability programme. In total AITC runs 18 different teams for players with a disability, including four which compete in national disability-specific leagues under the Brighton & Hove Albion banner. These are Brighton & Hove Albion Amputee FC, Brighton & Hove Albion Cerebral Palsy FC, Brighton & Hove Albion Deaf FC, and Brighton & Hove Albion Powerchair FC. The other 14 teams represent AITC in the Sussex Disability Football League.

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Case study – Tate Willis Tate Willis attends the charity’s football sessions for people with a disability. Tate had previously been forced to twice change school because of bullying—leaving her facing a 60-mile round trip to and from school each day; the situation was having a significant impact on not only Tate, but her entire family. Her dad, Alex Willis, explained: “It is heart-breaking. All kids want to be involved and have fun and to be singled out for having a disability is horrible. “She really stands up to it as much as she can and ignores things, but eventually it takes its toll. “As a parent it is devastating. You are not just dealing with bullies, you are dealing with ignorance. “Tate had had a tough life up until her involvement with AITC. She was becoming depressed at the thought of going to school. Wanting to play football but finding it extremely hard to be included meant Tate was starting to become reclusive. “To watch someone who you love become so unhappy was just the worst, so to see the transformation in her in such a short space of time is the best feeling we could ever have. “Tate is now doing incredibly well. Her confidence, motivation and self-esteem are sky-high.”

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“Tate is a different girl. She now has things she really looks forward to. It is incredible. You watch what Tate can achieve, but you also see what other people with a disability can achieve as well. It is so rewarding to see your child do the things she wants to do. “There are so many things I could say about AITC on behalf of Tate and our family. It is just a wonderful charity to be involved in. “It has breathed life in to our little girl and changed her life for ever.”

Case study – Cadogan Guy Cadogan Guy was a year 5 pupil at Coombe Road Primary School in Brighton when he began working with Albion in the Community’s schools team. He took part in the charity’s Premier League Primary Stars sessions, working closely with one of Albion in the Community’s sports mentors, who use football to improve pupils’ physical literacy, boost their confidence and work on their communication skills and resilience. Carly Farrell, the sports mentor paired with Cadogan, said: “Cadogan is a great example of what we’re trying to achieve through the project. “It’s been a real pleasure to see him grow in confidence and develop his social and emotional resilience.”

“Cadogan only had a certain amount of friends at school and he would only do certain things. He didn’t really want to get involved with other things. “Now I can’t express enough what a different child he is. When he is happy he communicates and he interacts with everybody and that’s all down to the school and down to working with Albion in the Community—it’s fantastic. It has changed his life.” Cadogan’s father, Cris.

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4.2 Employment, skills and learning AITC works with 148 primary and secondary schools in Sussex, making a significant contribution to raising skills, confidence and learning among young people throughout the local area. It also runs a wide-ranging further education programme aimed at boosting people’s employment prospects. Almost 1,000 people took part in one of the charity’s employment, skills and learning programmes in 2017/18, not including the many students at local schools who participated in AITC’s school activities. The social value economic impact of AITC’s employment, skills and learning programmes in 2017/18 is estimated at £2.818million.

EMPLOYMENT AND LEARNING IMPACTS: £2.818M ALBION GOALS

£0.887M

FURTHER EDUCATION

£0.359M

APPRENTICESHIPS

£0.048M

EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT

£0.871M

FOOTBALL AND EDUCATION

£0.473M

SCHOOLS ENTERPRISE

£0.179M

Further education C

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One of the most-popular courses delivered by AITC is its football and education programme, which allows learners to play football or futsal alongside studying for Level 2 Diploma in Sport (Sport, Exercise and Fitness) or a Level 3 Extended Diploma in Sport and Physical Activity (Sport and Exercise Science). CMY

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The charity also delivers apprenticeships in a number of different subject areas, with apprentices placed with the charity, Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club, and a growing number of local businesses. Building confidence and skills for work The focus of AITC’s Albion Goals programme is to build confidence, improve social skills and physical fitness, and enhance participants’ long-term job prospects. Some 232 people participated in the programme in 2017/18; 90% reported they had increased their self-confidence as a result of doing so. The programme uses free football and mentoring sessions to improve participants’ life skills, including teamwork, discipline and time-keeping. The main aim of Albion Goals is to help people to boost participants’ chances of finding paid work and many people who take part in the programme are also referred to AITC’s further education courses or volunteering opportunities. AITC also runs a number of projects which introduce school-age children to the world of business. The Premier League Enterprise programme, for example, uses the business model of professional football clubs to inspire young people to engage positively in their education, while also helping them develop important life skills and raise their awareness of the world of work. Lessons take place at the American Express Community Stadium, providing an inspirational learning environment, and AITC helps participants develop a wide range of work-ready skills, including communication, selfconfidence, financial capability, initiative, organisation, problem solving, resilience and team working. Other projects, such as AITC’s football-themed numeracy programme Goal Difference, have also had significant results; 96% of Goal Difference participants said the sessions helped them develop their understanding of the subject. Elsewhere

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AITC runs a pioneering programme aimed at encouraging more girls to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects at GCSE and beyond. Supporting people into work AITC works with 16- to 17-year-olds across Sussex who are not in education, employment or training, with the charity acting as an important bridge between secondary education and employment or a return to full-time education. It also helps some of the most-vulnerable people in Sussex back into work. This includes people who are long-term unemployed, have disengaged with full-time education, have experienced periods of homelessness, have challenging mental health conditions, or have historic substance misuse problems. AITC’s employment support activities supported 95 people into work in 2017/18. The charity also encourages personal development throughout many of its non-education programmes. Participants in its Premier League Kicks programme—which offers free football to young people living in areas of deprivation—are also encouraged to complete short education courses. In east Brighton, where unemployment rates are significantly higher than the national average, AITC has had particular success in this area. As a result of the mentoring and support provided at Premier League Kicks sessions—and the qualifications and volunteering opportunities accessed—all of the school leaving age participants have progressed into employment.

“I am always incredibly impressed and encouraged by Albion in the Community’s efforts to grow the game of football locally and to use the sport as a way of driving positive personal and community-wide change. Its on-going determination to remove many of the barriers which prevent people from regularly participating is having a genuine impact on local people— including many who, were it not for Albion in the Community, would likely not have the chance to play football. “At Sussex FA we are well aware of the many social, physical and mental benefits which physical activity provides and it is brilliant to see Albion in the Community working so hard to ensure that everyone in Sussex—regardless of their personal situation—has the chance to enjoy those benefits. “We work closely with Albion in the Community in many areas and share the charity’s commitment to making football a sport everyone can enjoy. Having such a well-respected charity operating in Sussex is something the county should be very proud of.” Ken Benham - Chief Executive, Sussex County FA

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4.3 Community capacity building All the activities AITC delivers are aimed at strengthening capacity within communities. They involve bringing people together and creating spaces for people to build new relationships with each other and encourage people to be active participants in their local communities. Regular volunteering Although AITC directly employs 179 paid staff, its success depends on the skills, commitment and active involvement of regular volunteers, which numbered just under 500 in 2017/18. Volunteers help AITC to deliver many of its activities. For example, they have been central to the success of the Speak Up Against Cancer campaign, which has involved raising awareness of the signs and symptoms of different cancers, with the aim of improving early detection rates. Volunteers have given up over 275 hours of their time to support this campaign during the period covered by this report. AITC works closely with large local employers to enable their employees to develop new skills by volunteering. The Realise the Potential of the Community Programme (RTPC) is a bespoke volunteering partnership between American Express and AITC. It focuses on improving the skills, confidence and physical and mental wellbeing of residents across Sussex and has received national plaudits for the impact it has had throughout the local area.

COMMUNITY IMPACTS: £1.236M VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME C

£1.236M

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Y

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MY

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The social value economic impact of AITC’s regular volunteering programmes is estimated at £1.24 million. CMY

K

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The Community Pitch

36,000 HRS

The Community Pitch is a key benefit provided to the local community by Brighton & Hove Albion as part of the planning permission granted for the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre in Lancing. During the course of the year, the Community Pitch had more than 36,000 hours of participation, with access offered to more than 450 Sussex schools and more than 30 grass roots junior football teams. AITC regularly runs training sessions at the Community Pitch, providing beneficiaries with the opportunity to access a world class sports facility.

As part of an agreement with the local authority, AITC has targets to provide Community Pitch access to members of specific local demographic groups. The charity has successfully met these targets and see usage among many of those groups increase on an annual basis, including: • A 29% increase in use by people with a disability, from 785 hours of pitch usage in 2017 to 1,010 in 2018; • An 18% increase for people aged 18 and under from 1,522 actual pitch use hours in 2017 to 1,795 in 2018; • A 12% increase for beginners: hours of pitch usage increased from 1,129 hours in 2017 to 1,268 in 2018; and • A 13% increase in use targeted at improving skills and training; hours of pitch usage increased from 901 hours in 2017 to 1,018.5 hours in 2018. Subsidising community activity at the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre is part of the football club’s ongoing commitment to the local area and population, and is an important feature of its positive influence on the wider Sussex community. In 2018 £85,000 of the Community Pitch’s running costs were subsided by Brighton & Hove Albion. AITC has sustained its range and regularity of Community Pitch-based delivery throughout 2018 and, indeed, into the early part of 2019. The charity has also continued to expand its use of the wider training ground facility, with a 153% increase in the hours of pitch use in the indoor dome, and a 128% rise in the hourly use of teaching space at the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre. The charity remains committed to providing access to the club’s world class training facility to the wider community, not just elite level footballers and club staff.

21


BTEC N02-02 Training Room Wall Graphic B 25% PRESS.pdf

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5. Summary and conclusions The voluntary and community sector performs a vital role in delivering social outcomes and implementing national and local government policy objectives around social inclusion, reducing inequality and improving people’s health and wellbeing. Without its contribution, statutory and private sector organisations would struggle to engage residents most in need of support and most at risk of becoming isolated from their communities and left behind. AITC is proud to be part of a vibrant and active voluntary and community sector which serves Sussex and passionately believes working in partnership with others and deploying skills and expertise effectively is essential to delivering the mosteffective outcomes. Sport, and football in particular, has a pivotal role in supporting people to develop the skills, attitudes and self-confidence required for them to live healthy and productive lives. AITC’s close links with Brighton & Hove Albion and its strong focus on tackling inequality, promoting diversity and improving health and wellbeing, put it in a unique position to make a major contribution. The social value of AITC and other similar organisations is difficult to estimate. The impact of many interventions can sometimes only become clear many years later, while it is not always easy to attribute impacts to specific activities. AITC has used the Social Value Bank to estimate the economic value of its contribution to the Sussex economy and to help to develop how it monitors its impacts in the future. It provides monetised unit values for a wide range of impacts from social interventions, where there is tangible evidence of positive and sustained and regular participation in AITC’s activities. AITC received grants and other commissioned contracts worth £1.79million and levered in a further £1.46million in fee income and from fan and business donations. This means for every £1 in grant funding, AITC secured a further £0.82 from other income sources. C

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CMY

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AITC’s social value impact Based on Social Value Bank estimates, the economic value of AITC activity in 2017/18 was more than £28.75million, based on a turnover of £3.25million. This means for every £1 invested in AITC, Sussex receives social value equivalent to £8.84. If only income from grants and commissioned contracts are included, the social value impact is significantly higher at £16.13 for every £1 of investment. AITC has worked successfully with people from all age groups, from primary school pupils to older people recovering from cancer. It has supported hundreds of people to gain new qualifications, inspired thousands to re-engage with learning and has encouraged many more to take up football and to live more active and healthy lives.

Based on AITC’s turnover of £3.25 million this represents an economic benefit of £8.84 for every £1 invested in Albion in the Community.

£8.84

£1

AITC will continue to work with partners in the voluntary and community, private and public sector to continually improve and extend what it does and to make tangible differences to the quality of people’s lives.

COMMUNITY IMPACTS: £1.236M VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME

£1.236M

EMPLOYMENT AND LEARNING IMPACTS: £2.818M

HEALTH IMPACTS: £24.701M BRIGHTER OUTLOOK

£1.183M

GIRLS’ FOOTBALL PROGRAMME

£6.581M

SOCIAL INCLUSION ENGAGEMENT

£6.153M

ALBION GOALS

£0.887M

BOYS’ FOOTBALL PROGRAMME

£8.166M

EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT

£0.871M

PRE-DIABETES PROGRAMME

£0.654M

FURTHER EDUCATION

£0.359M

SMOKING CESSATION £0.044M PROGRAMME

FOOTBALL AND EDUCATION

£0.473M

PE AND SPORT PROGRAMMES

£0.014M

APPRENTICESHIPS

£0.048M

PRIMARY SCHOOLS ENGAGEMENT

£0.459M

SCHOOLS ENTERPRISE

£0.179M

DISABILITY PROGRAMMES

£1.447M

ALBION IN THE COMMUNITY

SOCIAL VALUE IMPACT:

£28.754M 23


Albion in the Community, American Express Community Stadium, Village Way, Brighton BN1 9BL. Tel: 01273 878265. Company limited by guarantee in England and Wales (No. 5122343). Registered charity in England and Wales (No. 1110978).

www.albioninthecommunity.org.uk Albion in the Community

@AlbionintheComm

Prepared by: Marshall Regen Ltd

Profile for Albion in the Community

Albion in the Community Social and Economic Impact Report  

Albion in the Community Social and Economic Impact Report

Albion in the Community Social and Economic Impact Report  

Albion in the Community Social and Economic Impact Report

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