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50PHOTO TRAVEL

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES Top Canon pros reveal how to take amazing shots

CANON SCHOOL

TELEPHOTO LENS SKILLS How to get the best photos when using your long lenses

BIG INTERVIEW

ICONIC IMAGES Lorenzo Agius uncovers his most famous photos ESSENTIAL ADVICE

Blur water and skies with super-long exposures to really bring scenic shots to life Peter Travers – PhotoPlus editor

TRUE GRIT PORTRAITS Pro tips on how to take gritty black & white shots


TRAVEL PHOTO TECHNIQUES

Phillip Lee Harvey

Learning to capture moments like this takes years of practice. Or you can just read our great travel photography skills guide! See page 26

OUR GUARANTEE • We’re the only photo magazine in the

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newsagent that’s 100% DEDICATED TO CANON EOS DSLR OWNERS so we’re 100% relevant to your needs.

ravel, they say, broadens the mind. It is also a great way to broaden your photography, as new locations, people and places offer exciting new scenes and subjects to capture with your Canon camera. However, knowing how to act fast and not miss any moments (while trying to also enjoy your holiday with your family in tow) can be tricky. So this issue we’ve enlisted ten top Canon pros to share 50 of the best travel photography tips and techniques. It begins on page 26. This issue we also test Canon’s all-new budget-friendly EOS 1300D. It’s the most-basic DSLR in Canon’s range and aimed at absolute beginners. Although, on paper, it seems like a 1200D with a few minor extras, the added benefit of Wi-Fi and NFC is a real game changer for those wanting to match their smartphone’s speed for sharing shots instantly online. Learn more about the 1300D is our full test. We also test eight wide-angle primes, six Canon compact and bridge cameras, and one Metz flashgun in our jam-packed Gear section – see page 91. Also inside, learn how to take gritty black-and-white portraits with the help of Canon pro Tim Booth (page 8), and we talk to celebrity and advertising photographer Lorenzo Agius about his incredible portfolio of some of the world’s most famous faces (page 66). Don’t forgot our Canon Skills section, with more awesome photo projects – and accompanying video guides – to help you master all these fantastic new photo, camera and image-editing techniques yourself. The fun starts on page 43. If you’re not a Photo Club member already, turn to page 38 to find out how to subscribe and save, as well as getting some amazing offers and discounts on all sorts of goodies.

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CONTENTS

26

WIN!

MANFROTTO GEAR WORTH

ÂŁ840! PAGE 55

NEW CANON SKILLS

50 TRAVEL PHOTO TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Ten of the best Canon travel and documentary photographers share their tips for capturing your best-ever holiday images this summer

44

94

ESSENTIALS

CANON PROS

NEW TESTS

18 Inspirations

8 The Apprentice

92 Gear Update

26 50 travel photography tips

40 David Noton On Location

94 Full test: Canon EOS 1300D

38 Photo Club 55 Competition 74 Photo Stories

66 The Canon Conversation

98 Mini Test: Canon Powershots

:LQD0DQIURWWRFDUERQÀEUHWULSRG plus a backpack to stash all your kit in‌

CANON SCHOOL

6HQGXV\RXUYHU\ÀQHVWSKRWRJUDSKV² and share the story behind them – and they could appear in these coveted pages‌

80 Canon DSLR Essentials 84 Software Solutions

100 Metz Mecablitz 44 AF-2 Test: Wide 102 Super prime lenses

This issue’s jaw-dropping gallery showcases the very best Canon images of springtime scenes – taken by you :H¡YHSHUVXDGHGWHQRIWKHÀQHVW travel photographers – both pros and keen enthusiasts – to share their secrets with you

Join Photo Club to never miss an issue of PhotoPlus again, plus get loads of goodies

114Next issue 130 Focus Point

Discover what’s up and coming in the next issue of your favourite magazine

Share your photographic opinions, plus the best of the web, a new poll and more stats than you can shake a spreadsheet at

4

Learn how to shoot gritty monochrome portraits through the eyes of our Apprentice, and a little help from pro Tim Booth Our globetrotting columnist winds up admiring the setting sun in South Africa’s Western Cape, while eating a sausage

Celebrity photographer Lorenzo Agius reveals how shooting publicity shots for a cult movie helped springboard his pro career

This issue’s lesson is on telephoto lenses for portraiture, action and other stuff

Our latest look at Canon Digital Photo Professional explains all you need to know about selective colour adjustments

86 EOS S.O.S

Not seeing eye-to-eye with your gear? Brian is here to help solve your Canon queries

A new 15-stop Lee Super Stopper ND ÀOWHUDSRUWUDLWOHQVZLWKEXLOWLQœDSRGL]DWLRQ¡ ÀOWHUSOXVORDGVRIRWKHUVKLQ\QHZVWXII How does Canon’s brand-new budget baby stack up against its predecessor and the rest of the EOS range? Six Canon-branded compact and bridge cameras, for when taking your full DSLR kit simply isn’t an option

:HSXWWKLVQHZEXGJHWĂ DVKJXQ and-video-light combo through its paces

Need top quality for your wide-angle photography? We pit eight landscape primes against one another

118 Buyers’ Guide Every current Canon EOS DSLR – plus HYHU\&DQRQÀWOHQVIURP Canon, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and more!

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ISSUE 114 JUNE 2016

18 9 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY TODAY

44

48

Project 1: Use Wi-Fi and the Project 2: Learn how to Canon Connect app to help customize and save your own picture styles shoot your family photos

52 Project 3: Use 10-stop ND filters to add motion blur to bring scenic shots to life PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS

66 56

59

60

Project 4: Bring together subjects near and far with a telephoto lens

Project 5: Get to grips with Canon’s new Auto White Balance settings

Tutorial 1: Create your own Instagram-style filters using layers and layer masks

PHOTOSHOP CC

LIGHTROOM CC

CANON SOFTWARE

62

64

84

Tutorial 2: Make a stunning Tutorial 3: Download and Canon School: How to low-polygon portrait effect use the free Nik Silver Efex selectively adjust colours with our easy-to-follow guide Pro plug-in for mono images in your images

READ THE TUTORIALS… THEN WATCH OUR EXPERT VIDEOS

LOOK OUT FOR THIS ICON! IDEO VIEW THE V

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To view our ‘pop-out’ videos, tap these badges that appear alongside the tutorials inside the magazine, or type the link that appears alongside into your web browser.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THESE VIDEO TUTORIALS ARE 100% INDEPENDENT AND NOT ENDORSED OR SPONSORED BY CANON OR ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

The Canon Magazine

5


Meet the team... Print 18,915 Digital 4,099 The ABC combined print and digital publication circulation for Jan-Dec 2015 is

23,014 A member of the Audited Bureau of Circulations

Who we are, what we do, and our personal highlights of this issue…

PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, Future Publishing, Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA Editorial +44 (0)1225 442244 photoplus@futurenet.com

Peter Travers

Adam Waring

Editor s 5D Mark III

Operations editor s 7D

peter.travers@futurenet.com

adam.waring@futurenet.com

A man of the world, Peter loved the inspiring photos and camera skills advice in this month’s ‘50 Travel Photo Tips & Techniques’ guide. PAGE 26

The recent sunny weather really has put a spring in Adam’s step, so he particularly enjoyed the images in our ‘Spring Scenes’ Inspirations photo gallery. PAGE 18

Hollie Latham

Martin Parfitt

Technique editor s 60D

Art editor s 600D

hollie.latham@futurenet.com

martin.parfitt@futurenet.com

Hollie has a rather black-and-white view of the world, so she enjoyed spending time with pro Tim Booth and our Apprentice shooting mono portraits. PAGE 8

Like PhotoPlus columnist and keen traveller David Noton, Martin is a fan of ‘jobbies’ and ‘puffies’ though he’s probably not talking about the same things. PAGE 40

Angela Nicholson

Tom Welsh

Head of testing s 5D Mk III

Technique writer s 5D Mk II

angela.nicholson@futurenet.com

tom.welsh@futurenet.com

Angela enjoyed having so many compact cameras in the office to play with. They make a great alternative to a DSLR when you have to travel light. PAGE 98

This issue Tom made himself busy by whacking a long lens onto the front of his Canon to compress perspective and bring elements in his scene closer together. PAGE 56

Portrait pro Tim teaches our budding Apprentice the art of shooting folk in gritty monochrome. PAGE 8

Marcus Hawkins Marcus has a big lens and he’s not afraid to use it – you won’t be either, after this issue’s lesson. PAGE 80

Tim Allen Itchy-footed Tim is just one of ten Canon professional photographers to contribute to our travel photo tips guide. PAGE 26

George Cairns George knows Canon’s DPP like the back of his hand, and shows you how to adjust colour selectively. PAGE 84

Production & distribution Vivienne Calvert Production controller Mark Constance Production manager Michelle Brock Trade marketing manager 0207 429 3683 Printed in the UK by: William Gibbons & Sons Ltd Distributed by: Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT, Tel: 0207 429 4000 Overseas distribution by: Seymour International Subscriptions & back issues UK reader order line & enquiries 0844 848 2852 Overseas order line & enquiries +44 1604 251045 Online enquiries www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Email photoplus@myfavouritemagazines.co.uk

Management Joe McEvoy Managing director Matthew Pierce Editorial director Chris George Global editor-in-chief Rodney Dive Group art director

Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand Tel +44 (0)207 042 4000 (London) Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244 (Bath)

David Noton David’s in South Africa’s Western Cape this time, enjoying a braai – and the cracking scenery. PAGE 40

Brian Worley There’s no problem too big or too small – or, indeed, too regular-sized – for Brian to tackle. PAGE 86

Lorenzo Agius The British photographer of the rich and famous spills the beans on shooting Hollywood celebs. PAGE 66

Matthew Richards Wide-angle primes get the Super Test treatment, courtesy of our technical expert Matthew. PAGE 102

Our contributors Lorenzo Agius, Janie Airey, Timothy Allen, Tim Booth, George Cairns, David Clapp, David Clark, Amy Davies, Guy Edwardes, Paul Forgham, Adam Gasson, Peter Gray, Marcus Hawkins, Ali Jennings, Phillip Lee Harvey, Simon Lees, Julian Love, David Noton, Sue O’Connell, James Paterson, Matthew Richards, Brian Worley, Tony Woribec

6

Advertising & Marketing Matt Bailey Account director 01225 687511 matt.bailey@futurenet.com Claire Harris Account manager 01225 687221 claire.harris@futurenet.com Sasha McGregor Advertising Business Manager 01225 687675 sasha.mcgregor@futurenet.com Charlotte Jolliffe Campaign Manager

Licensing Matt Ellis Senior licensing & syndication manager matt.ellis@futurenet.com

This issue’s contributors… Tim Booth

The PhotoPlus team Peter Travers Editor Adam Waring Operations editor Hollie Latham Technique editor Martin Parfitt Art editor Shona Cutt Deputy art editor Angela Nicholson Head of testing Ali Jennings Lab manager Cover photo Tom Mackie

Printed in the UK by William Gibbons and Sons Ltd, on behalf of Future. Distributed by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT. Tel 020 7429 4000. Overseas distribution by Seymour International.

PhotoPlus is an independent publication and is not in any way authorised, affiliated, nor sponsored by Canon. All the opinions expressed herein are those of the magazine and not that of Canon. ‘EOS’ and all associated trademarks are the property of Canon. © Future Publishing Limited 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. Registered office: Registered office: Quay House, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA. All information contained in this publication is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. You are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price and other details of products or services referred to in this publication. Apps and websites mentioned in this publication are not under our control. We are not responsible for their contents or any changes or updates to them. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

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THEAPPRENTICE

APPRENTICE NAME:

JIM ROSS CAMERA:

CANON EOS 5D MK II JIM, a hotel manager from Christchurch, enjoys spending time exploring the New Forest in search of landscape and wildlife photo opportunities. Having been asked by family and friends to shoot weddings, parties and family portraits, he thought it was time to try his hand at portraiture, and Tim was just the person to show Jim how it’s done.

TRUE GRIT PORTRAITS Our Apprentice gets a lesson in light for capturing engaging and gritty black-and-white portraits with Canon pro Tim Booth 8

www.digitalcameraworld.com


SHOOT WITH A PRO

CANON PRO NAME:

TIM BOOTH CAMERA:

CANON EOS 5D MK III TIM has spent his life travelling the world and taking photos for magazines and newspapers, as well as commercial, corporate and design work from his London studio, while pursuing personal projects. Now based in Dorset and after the success of his most recent book A Show of Hands, he was just the person to show our Apprentice how to shoot engaging black-and-white portraits. More info on Tim at www.timbooth.com

The Canon Magazine

9


NO FILL

WITH FILL

THEAPPRENTICE TECHNIQUE ASSESSMENT Tim checked over Jim’s camera settings to ensure that he was prepared for portraiture APERTURE PRIORITY “TO GET professionallooking portraits you need to isolate your subject from their surroundings by shooting with a shallow depth of field. I got Jim to shoot in Aperture Priority mode so he could dictate the depth of field in his images. To start off with I got him to shoot between f/2.8 and f/5.6 to ensure the key facial features, the eyes, are in focus.”

RECORD IN RAW “I WAS pleased to see Jim was already shooting in Raw. This captures high-quality files containing all the data that your camera’s sensor captures, giving you far greater control when it comes to post-production. As JPEGs are compressed, info is lost, so if you make a mistake it’s harder to recover detail.”

ONE SHOT AF “I NOTICED that Jim’s autofocus mode was set to AI Servo, because he shoots a lot of wildlife. I got him to switch to One Shot as our models were going to remain perfectly still. If they did move unexpectedly, or their hair flew in front of their faces, AI Servo may try to track the movement and lose focus, resulting in soft images.”

EXPERT INSIGHT

EYES ARE KEY When shooting a subject with brown eyes, you need to inject a bit of life into them, otherwise they will look rather flat, says Tim. Use a reflector to brighten them up and make your portrait more engaging. A reflector will also add some fill light to your subject’s face, to remove nasty shadows and even skin tone, but don’t position it too close, otherwise it will have the opposite effect and flatten the light.

TOP GEAR #1 Zoom lenses “I HAVE two go-to zoom lenses for portraiture,” Jim reveals. “Depending on the person, type of shot I’m after and the location, I have a range of focal lengths covered with the Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM and the Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM. The longer of the two is ideal when you want to shoot from a distance and throw the background out completely into soft blur.”

SLOW IT DOWN WITH LIVE VIEW TO GET Jim to slow down the process so he could think about the composition, Tim suggested he set his camera up on a tripod. Using Live View can really help with the composition as you have a much bigger and clearer view. Scan round the frame to look for any distractions, such as a hair out of place, to ensure you’re happy with the image before you fire the shutter. If you’re worried about accurate focusing when shooting wide open, focus manually when on a tripod.

10

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SHOOT WITH A PRO

JIM’S COMMENT Tim showed me how to create a dark backdrop for portraits by using doorways. We positioned model Tilly just inside a shed, so that she was shaded from the direct sunlight but near enough to the entrance to be lit by plenty of diffused natural light. By Spot metering from her face, the difference in light contrast between her and the darkness inside the shed meant we could create a black backdrop free from distractions. Finally, I ensured that the camera was level with Tilly’s eyes for a more intimate portrait.

HOT SHOT #1 Lens

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM II

Exposure

1/500 sec, f/3.5, ISO400

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HOT SHOT #2

JIM’S COMMENT Tim told me that directing your model is a big part of portraiture. He said to ask them to change the angle of their head between frames, and give separate direction for their eyes. For this shot I also changed my position, shooting down for a flattering angle to elongate the model’s face.

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Lens

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM II

Exposure

1/400 sec, f/5, ISO400

www.digitalcameraworld.com


SHOOT WITH A PRO

TIM’S PHOTO BOOTH Tim talks us through a small selection of his stunning portrait portfolio

CALISTA ROBERTSON

VINCENT REGAN

CHARLES DANCE

I PHOTOGRAPHED singer Calista in daylight, zooming in close to frame her face with her dark hair, to echo her haunting and beautiful music.

I SHOT the actor in the same shed we used for this Apprentice. A successful portrait doesn’t always have to have eye contact – or be a mono conversion!

SHOT out on location on a film set in daylight with a very shallow depth of field, this gritty image of Charles Dance is one of my favourite portraits of late.

TOP GEAR #2 Reflector

HAIR MOVEMENT MOVEMENT in your subject’s hair can add another element of interest to your portraits. But there’s no need to spend hundreds of pounds on a wind machine. Use a hair dryer on a cool, low setting, or if outside, flapping some cardboard will work wonders for gently lifting hair.

“I COULDN’T be without my reflector on a shoot, it serves so many purposes,” confides Jim. “It adds key lights to flat eyes, brightens faces and fills in shadows. If you don’t have one, a piece of crumpled up foil that has then been flattened out will work too. Without the creases you’ll get a big hit of reflected light, whereas the crumples will produce lots of small pockets of light for the best results. My reflector also serves as a windbreak, a diffuser, and can be strategically placed to block light too, if required. A large bit of board will also work just as well for this.”

EXPERT INSIGHT

SOFTBOX IN THE SKY Direct light cast over your subject’s face isn’t a good look as it creates far too much contrast, resulting in horrible dark shadows that are very unflattering. Shoot on cloudy days instead, as the clouds will act as a giant softbox in the sky to diffuse the light. This will give you far more control, as you can position your subject to suit the light and use reflectors to manipulate it for the best results.

13


THEAPPRENTICE EXPERT INSIGHT

POST-PROCESSING Tim does his post-processing in Lightroom and Photoshop, making selective adjustments to bring out key features, such as the eyes, before converting to black and white. Here’s how… INCREASE CLARITY “I will increase Clarity locally as it tends to blow out the whites when used globally and can leave the overall image looking over-processed. With the Adjustment Brush selected, I whack up the Clarity and Sharpness sliders, then paint over areas such as the eyes, lashes, brows and – on men – stubble, to increase the contrast. By painting over with the mask I can see exactly where the adjustment will be applied, and then I can dial down the sliders to an appropriate level.” CONVERT TO MONOCHROME “The Black and White adjustment tool is great for mono conversions; it gives you sliders that enable you to tweak individual colour channels for more control, and there are also a range of presets that mimic various darkroom filters. The Blue filter is great for gritty male portraits as it locates the red tones in the skin to increase gnarly details, whereas a Red filter will neutralize reds, which is great for smoothing out a female complexion.”

SHOOT INTO THE LIGHT AFTER shooting in a controlled setup with diffused light, try shooting into the sun to capture some creative lens flare. Jim fired off a few shots but they contained too much sky, so Tim suggested he fill the frame and remove the lens hood to capture more flare from the sun.

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HOT SHOT #3

Lens

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM II

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/5, ISO400

JIM’S COMMENT We had a rather nondescript background for this shot, so Tim told me to zoom right in for a head-andshoulders shot as the surroundings wouldn’t offer any story to the scene. Rather than composing centrally, as I had been doing, he suggested positioning Tilly to one side and frame using the shape of the hair, which leads the eyes up to her face.

TOP GEAR #3 Prime time FOR sharpness my Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM wins hands down. It’s a really fast lens and great for shooting in low-light conditions, although shooting wide open isn’t very forgiving, so you have to be very accurate! I also use my Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro; I can get super-close with it, and it’s razor-sharp, which is great for gritty portraits.”

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SHOOT WITH A PRO

HOT SHOT #4

JIM’S COMMENT We were back in the shed for this shot of male model Harry. We wanted even less light than before, to avoid blowing out the gnarly details in his face, so Tim set up a black backdrop behind Harry and brought it round to one side to further reduce the ambient light hitting the right side of his face, to balance the shadows with the left side.

Lens

Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

Exposure

1/800 sec, f/1.6, ISO100


THEAPPRENTICE JIM’S COMMENT This shot was taken towards the end of the session, which enabled me to put everything I had learnt so far into practice. I wanted to avoid taking a conventional centrally composed portrait shot, so I framed Harry with a landscape crop in mind and positioned him to one side of the frame. I wanted his eyes towards me but his head angled into the black space on his right. After a little helping hand in Lightroom from Tim, I am really pleased with the final outcome of this portrait.

TIM’S VERDICT For someone who’s never ventured into the world of portraiture, Jim did extremely well. He’s used to being out in the countryside with just his camera, so being surrounded by people and learning to give direction to models was completely out of his comfort zone. He should be very proud of this shot; it’s a very engaging portrait and the eyes are pin-sharp. I like how he’s composed the image and am very pleased to see that he’s not included lots of space above Harry’s head. He’s listened to all my advice and taken it on board. Well done!

Lens

Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

Exposure

1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO100

A SHOW OF HANDS Tim Booth’s stunning book showcases a collection of unique portraits of hands from all corners of society. It’s published by XII Books and costs £39.95. For further information, please see www.ashowofhands.co.uk

WORKSHOPS Tim offers bespoke one-to-one photography workshops for a full day or half-day. Whether you’re interested in portraiture, landscapes or improving your post-processing, Tim will tailor the day to suit you. For more details, check out Tim’s website www.timbooth.com

16

BE OUR NEXT APPRENTICE Do you need some help to take your Canon photography to the next level? Let us know what you’d like help with and we could pair you up with a top pro for the day! Send an email to photoplus@futurenet.com with ‘PhotoPlus Apprentice’ in the subject line, and include your telephone number and address. www.digitalcameraworld.com


NEXT MONTH PET PORTRAITS

SHOT OF THE DAY! The Canon Magazine

17


STUNNING IMAGERY FROM THE WORLD OF CANON PHOTOGRAPHY

18

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FANTASTIC CANON PHOTOGRAPHY

01 UNDER BLOSSOM BY CATHERINE PERKINTON

This was taken at the driveway entrance to St Peter’s Church, Stratton, near Cirencester in the Cotswolds. I love the tree-lined drive, with the leading line of the fence below. The blossom-laden trees transformed an ordinary drive into an enchanted walkway.

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS

Exposure

1/60 sec, f/7.1, ISO100

All the images in this gallery were entrants to the PhotoPlus ‘Spring scenes’ competition hosted on Photocrowd – a website where a public vote on the best-liked images is pitted against expert opinion. To enter our current contest, and vote on your favourite photos, simply visit www.photocrowd.com

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INSPIRATIONS

02

02 GOSLING IN THE SNOW BY MALCOLM HARE

I spend a few weeks around the end of April shooting at York University as it’s a lovely time to see newborn goslings. The weather was awful when I spotted this lone gosling heading swiftly back to mum, so I lay down quickly in the mud to get the shot. Lens

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

Exposure

1/1000 sec, f/6.3, ISO320

03 DANCE OF THE JACARANDAS

BY HAYLEY ROBERTS I created this image as an ode to the jacaranda flowers that blossom around Brisbane, Australia, each spring. The scene is a composite of three different images: fallen petals for ground coverage and a self-portrait captured in my backyard. Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

1/320 sec, f/9, ISO400

04 IN THE LIGHT BY ERIKA EROS

I took this at Cologne’s Botanical Garden, Germany. I was taking portraits of my friends in the sunset when I observed that the grass was full of colourful crocus flowers, hiding under the trees. It was such a vibrant sight, I had to catch it! Lens

Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/4, ISO400

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03

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INSPIRATIONS

05

05 95 BY TIM CRABB

06

This picture was taken on a farm in Exmoor National Park. The initial reason I stopped was to capture a beautiful rainbow, but this quickly started to fade. However, on the other side of the road I saw sheep family 95 in another ďŹ eld. I captured the moment when they inquisitively looked my way. Lens

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM

Exposure

1/350 sec, f/4, ISO100

06 POPPY GLOW BY KATHY

MEDCALF These beautiful oriental poppies grow around the sand dunes at Bamburgh, Northumberland, during the spring. I set my tripod down low and waited until the sun came up over the dunes so I could capture the poppies in their best light. To control the light I used a Lee 0.9 ND grad. Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/4 sec, f/11, ISO100

22

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07 SNOWDROP DRIP BY DAVE STROUD

Taken in February this year, I got down to the level of the snowdrop and was careful to avoid any distracting backgrounds, which involved lying on the ground. I used a spray bottle to moisten the snowdrop, and was lucky enough to capture the droplet as it fell from the flower. Lens

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

Exposure

1/5000 sec, f/5.6, ISO1000

08 SPRING HAS SPRUNG! BY MARK HORTON

Crocuses emerging in spring always means the queen bumblebees will be out. I saw this buff-tailed bumblebee head in to feed, and waited for her to emerge. From the liberal coating of pollen she’s smothered in, she’d had a very good meal. 07

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/13, ISO200

08

The Canon Magazine

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09 WHEN IT’S TIME TO

SLEEP BY PÉTER ORBÁN Some years ago I inherited an old Russian telephoto lens from my friend’s father. I had forgotten all about it until this year when I found the lens deep inside my cupboard. All it needed was an EF converter and off I went. I caught sight of this nice pair of pulsatilla and lay on the ground to compose, with the light of the setting sun in the background. Lens

Jupiter 200mm f/4 M42

Exposure

1/100 sec, f/4, ISO200

09

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NEW CANON SKILLS Learn how to take great travel portraits like this one by Timothy Allen featured on page 33

50PHOTO TRAVEL

TIPS & TECHNIQUES Ten of the best Canon travel and documentary photographers share their tips for capturing your best-ever travel images this summer

ravel photography is one of the most popular genres, and it’s easy to see why. Even the most jaded SKRWRJUDSKHUFDQXVXDOO\ÀQG inspiration in exotic places, particularly in wonderfully photogenic countries like India, Iceland, China or Myanmar. Even a short city break can get WKHFUHDWLYHMXLFHVà RZLQJDQG

T 26

you don’t need to leave the UK – there are plenty of interesting places to shoot on these shores. In some ways, however, getting to your destination is the easy bit. Once you arrive, jet-lagged and with a family to keep entertained, serious travel photography can get pushed further and further down the agenda. To help you make the most of your limited time in a

place, we’ve spoken to ten leading photographers and asked them to distil their experience and wisdom into handy, bite-sized tips. It’s quite a GLYHUVHEXQFKIURPKLJKSURÀOH pros like David Noton and Guy Edwardes, to skilled enthusiasts such as Sue O’Connell, who has done particularly well in travel photography competitions. Let’s hit the road! www.digitalcameraworld.com


LEARN FROM THE PROS

TOP CANON PROS THIS ISSUE‌ Paul Forgham Architecture and cityscape specialist www.paulforgham.co.uk

Phillip Lee Harvey Travel Photographer of the Year 2014 www.philipleeharvey.com

Guy Edwardes Nature and landscapes www.guyedwardes.com

Julian Love Travel and architecture www.julianlove.com

David Noton Travel and landscapes www.davidnoton.com

Timothy Allen Travel and documentary humanplanet.com/timothyallen

Tony Worobiec Travel, landscape and architecture www.tonyworobiec.com

Janie Airey Award-winning modern architecture www.aireyspaces.com

David Clapp Travel, landscape and architecture www.davidclapp.co.uk

Sue O’Connell Keen travel photographer www.sueoconnell.photography

The Canon Magazine

27


HISTORIC BUILDINGS Paul Forgham Must-read advice before hitting cities like Florence, Venice, Paris or Rome

01

Plan to succeed

It pays to plan your shots well in advance. Compile a list of vital landmarks and favourite places, and mark their locations on a map. Think about what time of day would be best to shoot different scenes.

02

Go wide and long

Use a wide-angle lens to capture the subject in its entirety, but don’t forget to pick out details on historical buildings, particularly around archways, windows, doors and columns.

03

Explore the angles

Take some time to study the scene. Stand back and consider the shot from a distance to capture a ‘sense of place’ and then walk around it to identify more options. A tripod can restrict your creativity in these situations, so set a fast shutter speed and go handheld.

04

Shape up

When framing your shot, look for dominant elements that can be used as leading lines to emphasize perspective and depth. Tilting your camera upwards to a building will create ‘converging verticals’, this can add power and drama. Be sure to make use of symmetry, curves, repeating shapes and colours.

05

Three evenly spaced figures on The Vatican’s famous doublehelix staircase

Choose your moment

Low sunlight in the morning and evening will offer the best directional light for buildings, enhancing the structural detail, texture and tones of your subject. Early mornings mean fewer crowds too. Work out the sun’s position using The Photographer’s Ephemeris (http://photoephemeris.com).

28

www.digitalcameraworld.com


MASTERING LIGHT Buddhist monks walk out of the great Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia

Phillip Lee Harvey An award-winning pro shares some invaluable advice for making the most of natural light The Venetian island of Burano’s narrow canals and colourful houses

06

Shoot in dramatic light early in the morning and late in the evening. You rarely get good shots under the harsh light of PLGGD\,QHYHUXVHDà DVKJXQ – natural light is so much more HPRWLYH²EXW,GRXVHUHà HFWRUV

07

The River Arno on a still morning offers beautiful reections of Florence’s iconic Ponte Vecchio medieval bridge

Get up early and stay out late

Know your kit

You don’t want to miss a shot as you are fumbling around with your settings. I don’t trust the Evaluative metering system – I switch to Spot metering and then keep checking the histogram. I only use Manual exposure mode, too.

08

Research what has been shot before

09

Use daylight to create emotion

subject. For example, if you are shooting a cowboy, use direct light with heavy shadows to make them look more imposing.

10

Involve your subject

For my images of the Himba tribe, which won Travel Photographer of the Year 2014, I got the subject involved in the process – it became a pleasant experience for her as well as me.

Don’t turn up cold. Local photographers have often done a good recce for you. Do the postcard VFHQHVÀUVWDQGWKHQDOORZWLPHLQ JRRGOLJKWWRH[SHULPHQWDQGÀQG your own voice.

Elaborate marble panels of Il Duomo di Firenze, Florence – impossible to photograph in its entirety due to its sheer size The Canon Magazine

Hard light will give a different look compared with soft light, so the lighting you use should be sympathetic to your

A young woman of Namibia’s Himba tribe had been asked to pose for this portrait

29


WILDLIFE

Without a local guide this poison dart frog, in Costa Rica, would be very hard to find

Think out of the box: this lion was photographed in South Africa at night using a powerful torch

Guy Edwardes Five tips for capturing wonderful images of wildlife while on your holidays

11

Watch what you check in

Take all your essential gear in the cabin with you. Some airlines, for example, easyJet and British Airways, have no weight limit on hand baggage. Keep your tripod head in the hand luggage, too. I use quick release plates and they’re hard to replace.

12

Research animal behaviour patterns

As well as doing a web search on destinations for image ideas, research wildlife and its environment, particularly unique behaviour. Not understanding animal behaviour means you won’t be able to anticipate when a great shot is coming up.

13

Crank up the ISO

Some photographers stick doggedly to ISO100 for ‘quality’, regardless of the light, working at too slow a shutter speed. Increase ISO for sharp shots – grain is better than softness.

30

14

Get a good local guide

They’ll have a sound knowledge of animal behaviour, and when things are about to happen and where. The best guides are usually found by word of mouth, so ask other photographers.

15

Taken in Tanzania, using some fill-in flash to reveal iridescence in the superb starling’s plumage

Use big memory cards

High-capacity memory cards have tumbled in price over the years, so backup images to your laptop and still keep them on the card for additional safety until you get back home. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Istanbul from the air: this cityscape was shot from a helicopter

DOCUMENTARY & URBAN

The San Francisco skyline, shot using a telephoto lens while riding the ferry to Alcatraz

Julian Love More tips for capturing the magic of the metropolis when staying in the city

16

Experiment with shutter speeds

When shooting anything that moves in the landscape, such as water or clouds, vary your shutter speed to add drama. 1HXWUDOGHQVLW\ÀOWHUVKHOS to get very long exposures.

17

Isolate patterns in buildings

Isolating little patterns in buildings or landscapes using a telephoto lens can work very well, or zoom out for the bigger picture.

18

Be creative with composition Sometimes you can

The Canon Magazine

exclude the sky completely – it doesn’t need to be always near the horizon line. Try different types of framing, rather than the same old compositions every time.

19

Get up high

Look for a raised vantage point, such as a high building, cathedral or minaret to take shots of city skylines from. 2UVSODVKRXWRQDVFHQLFÁLJKW

20

Break the rules

You can get great shots in the middle of the day, but you must expose for the highlights. Yes, you may get strong shadows, but you can often pull detail back.

Big Ben and the River Thames from the rooftop of the House of Lords, for a campaign shot for London’s tourist board

31


LANDSCAPES Storm clouds clearing the volcanic peak of Gunung Agung, near Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

David Noton

Window arch at Loch Ard Gorge at dawn, on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia

Get better landscape shots on your travels with these top tips from our columnist

21

Don’t just take images in isolation

Wherever you go, think about taking a picture essay or DSRUWIROLRRILPDJHVWKDWUHÁHFW your travel experiences.

22

Don’t just copy

Researching other people’s photos is useful but you need to develop your personal vision. Even in the most photographed places in the world there is scope, if you are creative.

23

Give yourself time

The less you rush around the more you see. If you have only two days in Bangkok it’s EHWWHUWRIRFXVRQVSHFLÀFVUDWKHU than trying to do everything. There is strong temptation to believe there is something better over the next hill, but try to get under the skin of a place.

32

24

It’s all about location

2IWHQ\RXFDQÀQGJUHDW pictures close to where you’re staying – especially if you plan accommodation in advance to ensure you’re in a prime location to take the best photos.

25

Cordes-sur-Ciel hilltop town shrouded in mist, Midi-Pyrénées, France

Pack the essentials

My must-take kit includes fast 24-70mm, 70-200mm and 100-400mm lenses, along with a sturdy tripod, ND grads, straight 1'VDQGSRODUL]LQJÀOWHUV www.digitalcameraworld.com


A courtship ritual in Papua New Guinea’s central highlands

Timothy Allen

PORTRAITS

It’s the shots of the people that really capture the sense of a place, so brush up your portrait skills Bajaj sea gypsy girl on her boat, Sabah, Malaysia

26

With a telephoto lens, such as a 70-200mm, there is nothing connecting you to the subject, it removes the environment and puts distance between you and the person. Distance is the enemy of intimacy, which is what people love about travel photography.

27

Young girl drinking fermented mare’s milk, Blue River Valley, Mongolia

Avoid using ‘long toms’ for portraiture

Know your subjects

Give people something of yourself before you take photos from them. Rather than just shooting a cobbler on the street in India – which has been done a million times – get to know that cobbler, go and meet his family. $JRRGORFDOÀ[HUKHOSVKHUH

28

Think different

Shoot a weird subject in DZHLUGFRXQWU\RUĂ€QGD

different angle. One of my winning photos in a Travel Photographer of the Year competition was a Kazakh wedding, which I shot in the same part of Mongolia as the much more predictable eagle-hunters festival.

29

Switch to back button focussing

Take the focus function away from the shutter button and add it to a back button – otherwise you run the risk of the camera refocusing every time you touch the shutter button.

30

Manual everything

I love low light, but the camera may get confused and screw up the exposure. Also, I always expose for the highlights when I am out shooting. Left to its own devices, the camera will try and expose for whole frame.

33


EXPOSED TO THE ELEMENTS Tony Worobiec Unbalanced exposure? Bad weather? Read on for help with all lighting eventualities

31

Balance the exposure

To balance the illumination of the foreground and sky, WU\DVRIWJUDGXDWHGÀOWHU)RUWKH main shot of Goosenecks Canyon, (right) I used a Lee 0.9 ND grad, 20 minutes after sunset. The longer you shoot into the night, the more interesting the colours get.

32

Celebrate the man-made landscape

Always remain openminded to what constitutes ‘landscape’ photography. You can miss interesting opportunities if you avoid anything shaped by man.

33

Don’t let rain stop play

Often, the best landscape photographs are to be had immediately after a period of bad weather. You can get wonderful double rainbows after a storm.

34

Shoot pre-dawn

Before sunrise is a calm period with truly mystical light. Shoot 15 minutes before dawn, with the sun rising behind you, for maximum illumination.

35

Seek side-lighting

It can be perfect for revealing texture and rich detail. Here, the sun was setting to my left which illuminated the truck and church (right). The lower the light, the more dramatic the effect.

This remote church at Dooley, Montana, is located a handful of miles from the Canadian border

Rainfall and rainbows at Death Valley’s Zabriskie Point, California

34

www.digitalcameraworld.com


MODERN BUILDINGS Goosenecks is just a 35-minute drive from Utah’s more famous Monument Valley

The water polo arena of London’s Olympic Park

Janie Airey How to do justice to the jewels of modern architecture

36

Contrast and colour!

Maximize the best contrasting elements in modern buildings, whether it’s contrasting colours, or light and shade, to make shots more engaging.

37

Get up high

Think about getting up high and photographing one interesting looking building from another building. You’ll get a greater sense of location and environment.

38

Don’t just stand and shoot from head height. Get high, get low

39

Follow the rules

Think about using diagonal lines to lead the eye into the frame, and adhere to the rule of thirds.

40

Get graphic

Materials, textures and lines make for strong graphic images. Think in a very two-dimensional way and you’ll capture some great abstract forms and colours. www.aireyspaces.com

A telephoto lens exploits the graphic qualities of a line of telegraph poles, south of Death Valley

Vary your composition

down, maybe lie on the ÁRRUDQGORRNXS/HDQ against a wall and shoot down the wall, shoot from the inside out. Really explore the building and try it with different lenses.

The Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, Hong Kong

The Canon Magazine

35


INTERIORS & CITIES AT NIGHT David Clapp Insider techniques to capture the spirit of the world’s great cities

41

Ask for forgiveness, rather than permission

Trespassing (within reason) often produces the best pictures. I got thrown out of the Guggenheim Museum in New York for using a tripod, but I managed to get the shot.

42

Make sure you are symmetrical

Symmetry for interiors is important, so make sure your images aren’t slightly off centre. Also shoot vertically upwards, DQGXVHÀVKH\HVIRULQWHULRUV

43

Big cityscapes at night

Don’t let everything get too dark – it’s best to shoot at the end of twilight and to be aware of urban lighting that can cause colour casts.

44

Increase ISO to shoot panoramas quickly

45

Get good shapes in trafďŹ c trails

Don’t be afraid to use ,62RUWKHQÀUHRII shots, rather than an image every 30 seconds at ISO100. Take too long and your shutter speeds will be out of sync.

Dead straight ones can be boring so look for a distinct curve. $YRLGWUDIĂ€FFKDQJLQJODQHV which causes weird overlaps.

The stunning City of Arts and Sciences complex in Valencia

36

A ďŹ sheye lens inside Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur

A sweeping highway in Barcelona, Spain, produces fantastic trafďŹ c trails

The Guggenheim, New York, before being spotted by security‌


TIPS FOR ANY TRIP

A batik seller plies her wares in Semarapura, Bali, Indonesia

Sue O’Connell Whether you’re going to Mongolia or Manchester, these tips will see you right

46

Think in black and white

Recognize the features that a monochrome conversion will enhance. Even though the original of the main shot (above) was colourful, the black-and-white version is more striking, focusing attention on the old woman’s face, her twinkling eyes and skin texture, as framed by the fabrics she is selling.

47

Look for juxtapositions

The best images offer a comment or insight, or maybe tell a joke. One way to do this is by juxtaposing different elements in the picture – whether contrasting or complementary.

48

Engage with subjects

Photographic judges often criticize images for ‘lack of

The Canon Magazine

engagement’, and it’s true that, when there is a connection between a subject and the photographer, the image feels immediately more dynamic and involving, drawing the viewer into the scene.

49

Faces of faith at Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar

Spot the abstract

Sometimes the most interesting image is right in front of us, if we could but see it. So check out every location with an inquisitive eye.

50

Try a different angle

Cut out messy backgrounds and overbright skies by shooting down on your subject from a vantage point (stow a stepladder in the car, if practical). Try an overhead shot for a different take on portraits, too.

Kecak – or ‘monkey dance’ – performers in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

37


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DAVIDNOTONONLOCATION

Hope for the best

01

The Western Cape, South Africa. 17:30pm local time. 15 December 2014

For his last night in South Africa, David Noton is back where he belongs: in a tent 02

t the Silvermine Camp we have braai (barbecue) pits, showers, a pristine 01 The cloud-topped Table Mountain looms over Cape Town, as mattress and all we could wish for, plus viewed from Bloubergstrand, in South Africa’s Western Cape the location, high up in Table Mountain Lens Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Park, is perfect. This evening we’ll have a hike of a few kilometres to an overlook of Hout Bay for Exposure 2.5 secs, f/16, ISO100 the last shoot of this trip. The job is almost done; 02 Rolling farmland in the Overberg region near Villiersdorp; a fast tomorrow I’m on the bird home, but I don’t want this adventure shutter speed and image stabilization counter the brisk wind WRHQG,W¡VEHHQIDEDQGĂ€QLVKLQJZLWKDEDUEHFXHMXVWVHHPV Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM ULJKW,FDQ¡WEHOLHYHP\OXFNFRPLQJWR6RXWK$IULFDZDVFOHDUO\ Lens a good move. Virtually every photography session over the past Exposure 1/320 sec, f/8, ISO400 WHQGD\VKDVEHHQEOHVVHGZLWKJRUJHRXVOLJKW,FRXOGQ¡WKDYH VWURNHRIOXFNIRUVXUHEXWWKHPRUH,SXWP\VHOILQWKHULJKW UHDVRQDEO\KRSHGIRUDQ\EHWWHUSURGXFWLYLW\ SODFHDWWKHULJKWWLPHWKHOXFNLHU,VHHPWRJHW Overlooking Hout Bay I’m set up, this time with the 17mm $FRXSOHRIKRXUVODWHU(YDQ P\JXLGHDQGORFDOĂ€[HU DQG 76(OHQVGURRSLQJRQWKHIURQWRIP\&DQRQ(26'6OLNH ,DUHZDLWLQJDJDLQWKLVWLPHIRURXURVWULFKNHEDEVWRFRRN &RQFRUGH¡VQRVH$VXVXDOZKHQZRUNLQJZLWKWKLVVXSHUKLJK on the braaiZKLOHDSDUW\RIERLVWHURXVVFKRRONLGVUXQDPRN UHVROXWLRQSOXVPHJDSL[HOFDPHUD,QHHGWREHVXSHU between the tents. It may be the start DWWHQWLYHWRWKHIXQGDPHQWDOVRIFDPHUD RIWKH6RXWK$IULFDQVFKRROVXPPHU VWDELOLW\IRFXVSRLQWDQGGHSWKRIĂ€HOG KROLGD\VEXWWKHĂ€HUFHZLQGXSKHUH I zoom in on the Live View display yet robs the setting – and it would seem the DJDLQWRFKHFNWKDWHYHU\WKLQJLVVKDUS FRDOV²RIDQ\KHDW,¡PZUDSSHGXSLQ 7KHPDUULDJHRIP\WLOWVKLIWOHQVZLWK all my layers. I think better of observing WKLVFDPHUDVHHPVDQDWXUDORQH WKDWWKHMDFNHWSRWDWRHVDUHJRLQJWRWDNH HVSHFLDOO\IRUODQGVFDSHZRUN:LWKD DQDJHWRFRRNDWWKLVUDWH6RXWK WRXFKRIGURRSWLOW,FDQRSWLPL]HGHSWK $IULFDQVGRQ¡WOLNHKDYLQJWKHLUVNLOOVDW RIĂ€HOGZLWKRXWKDYLQJWRUHVRUWWRWKH the braai TXHVWLRQHGHVSHFLDOO\E\VRPH tiny apertures that rob lenses of their %ULW,GRQ¡WFDUHWKHMRE¡VGRQHDQG,¡P RSWLPXPSHUIRUPDQFH7KHVHLPSRUWDQW VWRNHG(YDQ¡VEHHQDVWDUEXW,KRSHKH FRQVLGHUDWLRQVEHFRPHSDUDPRXQWZKHQ YLVLWVXVDWKRPHVR,FDQOLJKWP\braai VKRRWLQJZLWKWKH'6DQG'65WZR IRUKLP,¡OOJHWWKHMDFNHWVRQHDUO\ FDPHUDVWKDWDUHFDSDEOHRIWKHPRVW Pro travel & landscape photographer 7KHQH[WGD\WKHSODQHWDNHVRIIWR LQFUHGLEOHLPDJHTXDOLW\EXWRQO\DVORQJ the south, giving a superb view from my as I do my bit right. DAVID IS AN AWARD-WINNING Canon VWDUERDUGZLQGRZVHDWGRZQRQWR&DSH In my foreground this evening I have photographer with more than 28 years’ 7RZQ7DEOH0RXQWDLQDQGWKH&DSHRI VRPHDUWIXOURFNVDQGSLQNÂśMREELHV¡ professional experience. During his career *RRG+RSH7KHUH¡VZKHUHZHVWRRGODVW ZLOGĂ RZHUV WREULQJGHSWKWRWKH David has travelled to just about every night overlooking Hout Bay, and there’s FRPSRVLWLRQ,¡PMXVWZDLWLQJIRUVRPH corner of the globe. In 2012, Canon invited &DSH3RLQWEDWKHGLQORYHO\ODWH ÂśSXIĂ€HV¡ FORXGV WRGULIWLQWRVKRW$VWKH\ David into its Ambassador Program by afternoon light, yet again. do, a bird alights on the most prominent designating him an OfďŹ cial Canon Explorer. URFNDQGP\VKXWWHUFOLFNV*RRGWKLQJV Info and photos at www.davidnoton.com happen to those who wait. That was a NEXT MONTH: SPAIN

A

DAVID NOTON

40

www.digitalcameraworld.com


A stroke of luck, but the more I put myself in the right place at the right time, the luckier I get

A tilt-shift lens extends depth of field and a polarizing filter gives the ‘puffies’ punch at Hout Bay Lens

Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L

Exposure

1/10 sec, f/11, ISO100


CANON SKILLS

Sharpen up your photography skills with our all-new photo projects and expert guides

Hollie Latham Technique editor hollie.latham@futurenet.com

New projects with video guides Follow our Canon DSLR walkthrough guides and Photoshop editing videos

Welcome... WE’VE got another great lineup of projects this month. If you’re always the one behind the camera and never in family shots, see how to control your camera wirelessly with the Canon Connect app. For landscape lovers who want to give long exposure photography a go, we’ve got a simple step-bystep guide explaining how. For something a bit different, learn how to compress perspective by shooting a landscape with a telephoto lens. If you like to delve into your camera’s menu and experiment with settings, we’ve got two projects just for you. Get to grips with picture styles and find out about Canon’s newand-improved Auto White Balance settings, Ambience and White Priority. Over in the digital darkroom, create Instagram-style filters, transform a portrait with a low-polygon effect and make the most of the Silver Efex Pro plug-in for stunning mono conversions.

The Canon Magazine

44Shoot family selfies 48Picture perfect Take part in family photos using the handy Canon Connect app to wirelessly control your camera

Use picture styles to help improve your photography, and learn how to customize and save your own

52 Take things slowly

Combine a 10-stop ND filter with a narrow aperture for a superlong exposure to create motion blur

56 Keep it in perspective 59 All about ambience 60 Insta-gratification Bring together near and far subjects using a telephoto lens for a more comparable perspective

Get to grips with Canon’s new-and-improved Auto White Balance settings

Learn how to create your own Instagram-style filters using adjustment layers and masks

VIEW THE VIDEOS

62 Plot a poly portrait 64 Pro mono magic Discover how to make a stunning low-polygon effect that can be used to transform any portrait

Fans of black and white rejoice as Silver Efex Pro now costs absolutely nothing

WHENEVER you see this icon you’ll find an accompanying video – tap the IDEO link and the video VIEW THE V will ‘pop-out’ of the page (as long as you have an internet connection). You can also download project files to your computer.

43


VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_1

IDEO VIEW THE V

PROJECT 1

THE MISSION Set up and shoot a group photo remotely with your smartphone and Wi-Fi-enabled EOS Time needed 20 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Canon DSLR with Wi-Fi • Tripod • Smartphone • Flash kit (optional)

Shoot family selďŹ es Gone are the days of the self-timer group photo. James Paterson gets in on the action with a Wi-Fi-enabled DSLR and smartphone ave you ever noticed how – because you’re the one with the camera – you end up not being in family group photos? Of course, there’s always the old trick of setting the self-timer then dashing into the frame. But group photos are often IUDXJKWZLWKHQRXJKGLIĂ€FXOWLHV without the extra effort this involves, especially if you throw kids and animals into the mix. However, now there’s a feature that makes it much easier, a way

H

in which nobody needs to man the camera. If your Canon has a Wi-Fi feature (EOS 6D, 70D, 750D, 760D or 1300D) you can connect to it wirelessly using your smartphone or tablet. This means you can see exactly what your camera sees, set a focus point, tweak your exposure settings and take the shot, all without having to go near your camera. As such, it’s the perfect shooting setup for DIDPLO\VHOÀHDV\RXFDQJHW everyone in position and take the shot at the right moment, without

having to resort to something as hit-and-miss as a self-timer. The great thing about Canon’s remote shooting setup is that the camera emits its own Wi-Fi signal, so it works equally well, whether shooting in the home or on top of a mountain. You can connect any device that is capable of running WKHDSSDQGÀQGLQJD:L)LVLJQDO so most smartphones and tablets will work. So why not consign the old self-timer-and-dash routine to history and start shooting group VHOÀHVWKHVPDUWZD\"

STEP BY STEP SET UP YOUR GROUP SHOT Learn how to get everything in place for the perfect family photo

POSING GROUP PHOTOS Posing a group is never easy, but there are a few tricks that can help. The key is to turn the mass of heads, bodies and limbs in front of you into a neat-and-tidy shape. So, rather than standing everyone in a line, why not make one row sit in front, with others stood up, leaning over from behind. Look for ways to get the heads on different levels, like having the kids on the parent’s laps. Triangles are visually pleasing, so bring the head in close to form one. For larger groups, look to shoot from above, or position people on varying levels.

44

01 POSE THE GROUP

02 LIGHT THE SCENE

Set up on a tripod and get everyone else into position. A simple plain backdrop, like the white wall here, works well. Squeeze everyone in close together and then loosely compose the frame.

Solid lighting is important for group shots. Everybody should be lit evenly, so if in natural light wait for an overcast sky or ďŹ nd shade. When inside use a large window, or try a Speedlite or a home studio kit.

03 SET A MODE

04 TAKE THE SHOT

Set whatever exposure mode you’re comfortable with – we’ve used Manual for complete control – but think about depth of ďŹ eld, as you’ll need enough to record everyone sharply. Here we have an aperture of f/11.

Connect your smartphone to the camera (see over the page) then get into position. Get everyone posing nicely, and take the shot. If you don’t want to be shot holding a phone, set a 2-sec delay then hide it. www.digitalcameraworld.com


WI-FI SELFIE SHOTS

TOP TIPS ADVICE FOR SETTING UP A GROUP SELFIE

01 CHOOSING CLOTHES

02 MAKE IT FUN

03 TAKE LOTS OF SHOTS

04 SWEETS AND TREATS

05 FRAME LOOSELY

When choosing clothes to wear, keep things simple – go for solid blocks of colour or a consistent shade for everyone, and steer clear of big brand names emblazoned across chests.

Group photos can quickly become a chore for everyone involved, especially at family events or weddings, so try to keep things brief and upbeat. When young kids are involved, make it fun!

Fire off lots of shots as there’s bound to be a blink or a dodgy expression. If you don’t want to be seen holding a phone, you can set up to ten continuous frames in some Canon DSLR’s Self-timer menus.

Everyone knows the saying about working with children and animals. It can be hard work, but if all else fails, try bribery! The promise of a few sweeties or a dog treat may help make everyone play ball.

Even with the help of your smartphone, composing a group photo isn’t easy. When framing, leave a little wiggle room around the edges. Better to crop in later than find you’ve cut off half an aunt!

The Canon Magazine

45


PROJECT 1

STEP BY STEP CONTROL YOUR DSLR WITH YOUR PHONE Learn how to tether your camera to your smartphone or tablet using the Canon Camera Connect app

SEND IMAGES TO YOUR PHONE After firing your DSLR with your phone, you can use the Canon Camera Connect app to check through the captured images and send any that you like to your phone. This way, you can quickly pick the best shot and then share on social media with your phone. For group shots, being able to review photos instantly has another benefit – you can check that everyone is sharp and, if necessary, make changes to increase the depth of field. This is easily done from within the app, as you can simply close down the aperture then compensate by increasing your ISO for a good exposure.

NEXT MONTH UNDERWATER PORTRAITS 46

01 INSTALL THE APP

02 ENABLE WI-FI

Go to the Apple App Store or Google Play Store on your iOS or Android device. Search for and install the Canon Camera Connect app. Don’t open it yet as it won’t work; we need to connect the camera first.

Go to Wi-Fi/NFC in your camera’s menu and enable it. You’ll be asked to ‘Register a nickname’, which will show up as the Wi-Fi name when connecting other devices to the signal emitted from the camera.

03 CREATE A SIGNAL

04 CONNECT TO WI-FI

Go to ‘Wi-Fi function’ and choose ‘Connect to smartphone’. You can connect to a Wi-Fi network with ‘Infrastructure mode’ or set ‘Camera access point mode’ so the camera creates its own network.

Choose ‘Camera access point mode’ then select ‘Easy connection’. Go to your device’s Wi-Fi settings and find the network (SSID) and enter the ‘Encryption key’ to connect – both displayed on your camera’s LCD.

05 START REMOTE SHOOTING

06 FINE-TUNE CAMERA SETTINGS

Start the Canon Camera Connect app then confirm the connection on both camera and phone. Choose Remote shooting to see what the camera sees. Tap the bottom-right button to open the camera controls.

You can set aperture/shutter speed (depending on what the Mode dial is set to), exposure compensation, the AF point and the Drive mode. Tap the screen to focus and hit the circle button to take the shot. www.digitalcameraworld.com


WI-FI SELFIE SHOTS

STEP BY STEP TOUCH AND GO If your device has Near Field Communication then touch it to your camera for an instant connection

01 FIND THE ICON

02 HOLD TO CONNECT

03 TRANSFER PHOTOS

If your smartphone or tablet boasts Near Field Communication (NFC) then connecting it to your camera is simple. First look for the NFC icon on the underside of the camera, and then find the similar NFC point on your device (it’s at the top of our Google Nexus 7 tablet).

Hold the NFC points together and they will recognize one another and give you the option to connect. You can then access the Canon Camera Connect app on your device and take control of the camera in seconds. It’s certainly much quicker than creating a Wi-Fi connection each time.

As well letting you link quickly to the Canon Camera Connect app, NFC brings a couple of other benefits. While reviewing images on your Canon DSLR, hold the phone or tablet to it to quickly transfer the image across to the device. You can also transfer several images at once.

WHY NOT TRY? TAKE YOUR DSLR TO NEW PLACES The ability to control your DSLR from your phone can open up all kinds of new shooting possibilities GROUP portraiture is just one example where remote shooting through your phone can bring benefits, and there are plenty of others, like preventing camera shake, shooting wildlife, or changing exposure settings for an HDR image. It can open up entirely new shooting possibilities by allowing you to control your camera while it’s in unreachable places. Here a suction cup lets us attach the camera to the front of a car. An ND8 filter and a narrow aperture gave us a shutter speed of 1/2 sec. Even when driving very slowly, this creates beautiful streaks of motion blur and gives the shot a dynamic sense of speed.

The Canon Magazine

47


PROJECT 2

BEFORE

AFTER THE MISSION Delve into your camera’s menu to discover how to apply picture styles to your photos for different effects Time needed 10 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Standard lens • Tripod

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Picture perfect Style-conscious Hollie Latham gets to grips with in-camera processing n-camera effects may be seen as a bit of a gimmick, but one worth experimenting with is picture styles. As the name suggests, you can control the overall look of your image by applying a picture style in-camera. All Canon DSLRs offer six different preset picture styles, plus an additional Auto option in some models. The six preset options are Standard, Portrait, Landscape, Neutral, Faithful and Monochrome, and are tailored to

I

a different scene or colour preference by different combinations of contrast, saturation, sharpness and colour WRQH,I\RXZDQWWRÀQHWXQH these presets, each of these parameters can be adjusted by hitting the Info button on your camera. You can also save up to WKUHHPRGLÀHGSLFWXUHVW\OHVLQ WKH8VHU'HÀQHGVORWVRIWKH Picture Style menu. For this project, we’re going to be concentrating on the Monochrome picture style.

This has a slightly different set of parameters than the others, with Filter Effect and Toning Effect replacing Saturation and Colour Tone. We’ll also look at how you can customize the Monochrome SLFWXUHVW\OHDQGFUHDWHSURĂ€OHV with different combinations of EODFNDQGZKLWHĂ€OWHUWRQLQJ effect and contrast, and register these to the available ‘User Def’ slots. This can be handy if you want to quickly switch between a number of monochrome setups for the best results. www.digitalcameraworld.com


IDEO VIEW THE V

PICTURE STYLES

VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_2

STEP BY STEP THE PICTURE STYLES MENU Learn how to set a range of picture profiles, customize them, and create your own

QUICK TIP! In the Picture Style menu, parameters that have been adjusted and saved are highlighted in blue 01 SHOOTING MODE

02 PROCESSING JPEGS

Picture styles enable you to adjust the saturation, sharpness and contrast of your images in-camera. To use picture styles you need to be shooting in one of the four creative zone modes: Manual (M), Shutter Priority (Tv), Aperture Priority (Av) or Program (P).

If you do very little post-production, picture styles are a great way to process your JPEG images in-camera and avoid spending time in front of a computer. It’s worth noting that picture styles are embedded into JPEG files and cannot be changed in post-production.

03 RECORD IN JPEG AND RAW

04 PREVIEW

If you shoot in Raw, the picture style can be changed later in Canon’s Digital Photo Professional, but this picture style information isn’t carried over into third-party software like Photoshop. If you shoot in Raw+JPEG, you have the best of both worlds.

The image displayed on the back of the camera has the picture style applied, making the Monochrome preset particularly helpful if you intend on converting Raw images to black and white in post-production and you want to check that the scene is going to work.

ESSENTIAL CAMERA SKILLS SETTING AND CUSTOMIZING YOUR PICTURE STYLE

01 SHOOTING MENU

02 ACCESS THE PRESETS

03 PARAMETERS

04 MONOCHROME

05 RESET

Hit Menu and navigate to Picture Style under the Shooting tab, then hit Set. For quicker access, hit the Q button for the Quick Control screen or, depending on your EOS, you may have a dedicated Picture Style button.

There are six presets, from Standard (default) to Monochrome. Scroll down to access a further three User Defined slots for your own customizations. Navigate to highlight the one you want and hit Set to select it.

The top five presets, Standard to Faithful, use combinations of the following four parameters; Sharpness, Contrast, Saturation and Colour Tone. You can adjust them by hitting the Info button and moving the arrow.

The Monochrome setting gets a different set of parameters: Sharpness, Contrast, Filter Effect and Toning Effect. Again, by hitting Info you can adjust the amount of Sharpness and Contrast, and select a Filter and Toning effect.

If you adjust any of the picture style parameters, those settings will be saved permanently, even if you switch your camera off. To reset them, hit Info and scroll down to the Default Set option, then hit the Set button.

The Canon Magazine

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PROJECT 2

STEP BY STEP CUSTOMIZE THE MONOCHROME PICTURE STYLE Discover how to apply colour filters to black-and-white shots and save modified picture styles for later use

LIVE VIEW MODE Shooting in Live View has many advantages, one of which is that you get a preview of the picture style before taking the shot. Naturally, this is particularly relevant if you’re shooting JPEGs or movies, enabling you to fine-tune the preset before you take the shot or record footage.

NEXT MONTH BACKLIT FRUIT

01 CONTRAST AND SHARPNESS

02 YELLOW AND ORANGE FILTERS

In the Monochrome picture style, only the Sharpness and Contrast parameters can be adjusted, but this can make a big difference. Here we’ve taken a photo using the default Monochrome style then increased Sharpness and Contrast for punchier results.

You have the additional option of applying Filter Effects, which mimic the colour filters that were used when shooting black-and-white film. The Yellow and Orange filters gently lighten warmer colours, such as the yellow and red peppers in our shot.

RED

GREEN

03 RED AND GREEN FILTERS

04 TONING EFFECTS

The Red filter has a much stronger effect on lifting warmer colours and can make yellow appear almost white. The Green filter does the opposite, darkening warmer colours while subtly lightening cooler colours, as seen in our example images here.

You can apply a more creative filter by adding a Toning Effect to your image, and the available options include Sepia, Blur, Purple and Green. However, these can look rather garish and you can get much better results toning your shots in post-production editing software.

STEP BY STEP PIMP MY PICTURE STYLE You can create up to three custom picture styles to suit your preferences for a variety of shooting situations EACH CUSTOM style is based on an existing one. Navigate to a User Defined slot and press Info, then hit Set to highlight the picture style you want to base it on and hit Set again. You can then adjust the available parameters, hit Menu to save your style.

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YOU CAN also download additional picture styles from http://bit.ly/picstyle. They can be transferred to one of the User Defined slots in your DSLR or applied to your images in postproduction using Digital Photo Professional. www.digitalcameraworld.com


PROJECT 3

10-STOP ND FILTER

THE MISSION Capture extra-long exposures to add motion blur to water and skies in scenic shots Time needed 2 hours Skill level Intermediate Kit needed 10-stop ND ďŹ lter • Tripod • Remote release • Wideangle lens

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NO ND FILTER

Take things slowly Combine a 10-stop ND ďŹ lter and narrow aperture for long exposures to add movement to your scenic shots. Peter Travers is on a go-slow 10-stop neutral density Ă€OWHU²DNDDÂś%LJ 6WRSSHU¡²LVVXSHU GHQVHQHDUEODFNĂ€OWHU that can extend your exposure time from split seconds into minutes. It reduces the amount of light that reaches your Canon DSLR’s sensor to around just 0.05%, therefore requiring a super-slow shutter speed for a good, bright exposure. Dramatically slowing shutter speeds in this way blurs

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any movement within the scene. ,¡YHXVHGDQ1'ÀOWHUWRFDSWXUHD very long exposure of the gently lapping waves around Penarth Pier, South Wales, smoothing the waters and blurring skies to really bring this scenic shot to life. $GPLWWHGO\WKHÀUVWVKRWZDV taken about an hour before the main one, but you can see how much difference shutter speed can make to your shots. The main image was shot just after sunset and when the pier’s lights were

FRPLQJRQVRXVLQJDQ1'ÀOWHU extended our exposure from 1/200 sec to 120 secs, turning the sea and clouds into dreamy blurs. But it’s not just during low light at dusk or dawn that you can capture long exposures – you can also shoot in broad daylight with DVWRS1'ÀOWHUWRFDSWXUH dramatic results. I’ll explain the kit and camera settings you need to capture great long-exposure shots yourself, with easy tips and techniques to follow. www.digitalcameraworld.com


IDEO VIEW THE V

SUPER-LONG EXPOSURES

VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_3

STEP BY STEP SETTINGS FOR SLOW SCENIC SHOTS Learn which camera gear you need, and how to get set up to slow things down

QUICK TIP! We reduced the temperature and saturation of our Raw image (left) to emphasize the blues for a more artistic finish

01 WIDE LENS

02 TRIPOD & REMOTE CONTROL

You’ll need a wide-angle lens to include more sky in your shot so you can reveal movement in the clouds with motion blur. The same goes for showing more water to turn milky smooth with your long exposure.

Use a sturdy tripod to keep your camera still during the exposure for a pin-sharp shot, and a remote shutter release to fire the camera without potentially nudging it as you begin the long exposure.

03 HOW TO FOCUS

04 NARROW APERTURE

You can’t autofocus when you have a dark ND filter on your lens – or even see through the viewfinder. Use Live View’s Exposure Simulation so you can see your scene, then zoom in to 10x view and manually focus.

Use a narrow aperture (eg f/11 or f/16) to capture a good depth of field through the scene. Going narrower will slow the shutter speed further, but at the potential cost of loss of sharpness at the edges of your frame.

HOW TO USE A 10-STOP ND FILTER

01 LONG EXPOSURE TIME

02 BE SMART ABOUT IT

03 ATTACH ND FILTER

04 START THE EXPOSURE

05 MINUTES OF FUN

Before attaching the ND filter, set an aperture of f/16 in Av mode and ISO100, compose your shot and half-press the shutter for an exposure reading. Note the shutter speed, then calculate the 10-stop difference; here 1/30 sec become 30 secs, for example.

A smartphone app, such as NDTimer, can do the maths for you. For 30 secs-plus exposures you’ll need to use Bulb mode (B on your Mode dial, or in Manual mode dial ‘past’ 30 secs, depending on your camera) so you can keep the shutter open for as long as you like.

By following the step-bystep, above, you will already have your DSLR focused, composed and set up on your tripod. Now you have also calculated the exposure length, you can screw the ND filter onto the front of your lens, but be careful not to touch the focus or zoom rings.

In Bulb mode, press the button on your cable release to begin the exposure (and start the timer on your app, if using one). Watch the seconds tick away on your camera’s LCD and, when your exposure time is reached, press the button again to end the exposure.

With these filters being so dense their ‘10’ stop rating should be taken as a guide only, so examine the image and adjust the exposure accordingly. If you need to brighten a shot by 1 stop, this could mean doubling the shutter speed from 60 to 120 secs, for example. So relax – and be patient!

The Canon Magazine

53


PROJECT 3

TRY THIS EXERCISE SHUTTER SPEED SEQUENCE Experiment with exposure length to add more blur to your seascapes as the sun sets

TURN DOWN THE NOISE Long exposures can increase the ‘noise’ of an image, especially with dark night scenes, and this shows up as irregular speckles or colour. The Long Exposure Noise Reduction feature counteracts this by taking a second ‘dark frame’ immediately after the shot is taken, but without opening the shutter to expose the sensor to light, to create a map of the noisy pixels, which are then removed from the main image. Bear in mind this will double the exposure time as the second exposure has to be of the same length to reproduce the noise patterns, so a 30-second exposure will increase to one minute.

NEXT MONTH INDOOR GIGS

01 SHUTTER SPEED 1/8 SEC

02 SHUTTER SPEED 1/2 SEC

Shot at f/8 and ISO800 to achieve a shutter speed of 1/8 sec, ripples can clearly be seen in the water, while there isn’t any blur in the clouds. At sunrise/sunset, wind levels are often naturally lower than in the daytime, which equates to less cloud movement.

Shot at a narrower aperture of f/16 at ISO800 to achieve a shutter speed of 1/2 sec, you can still see ripples in the water. Had the waves been faster and bigger coming onto the shore, this exposure would have been long enough to capture some motion blur.

03 SHUTTER SPEED 4 SECS

04 SHUTTER SPEED 8 SECS

Still shot at f/16 but dropping the ISO to 100 has achieved a slower shutter speed of 4 secs. The water has certainly smoothed out more, resulting in the reflection of the pier in the sea becoming clearer, plus there’s a hint of blur in the clouds, too.

Shot at the narrowest available aperture of f/22 at ISO100 has doubled our shutter speed to 8 secs. This has really smoothed out the surface of the water and added motion blur to the clouds. Try shooting your own sequence of decreasing shutter speed shots.

STEP BY STEP SLOW IT DOWN IN DAYLIGHT Capture long exposures in the sunshine using a 10-stop neutral density filter FAST SHUTTER SPEED: Shot under bright spring sunshine with an exposure of 1/250 sec, f/11, ISO200. In the middle of the day the wind can be at its strongest, but this fast shutter speed has frozen any perceptible movement in the clouds.

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SLOW SHUTTER SPEED: A 10-stop ND filter – combined with a narrower f/20 aperture and dropping the ISO to 50 has created a much longer exposure of 25 secs to totally smooth out the waters and reveal lovely artistic movement in the clouds. www.digitalcameraworld.com


MANFROTTO COMPETITION

MANFROTTO TRAVEL TRIPODS & BACKPACKS GIVEAWAY Win one of two bundles, consisting of a Befree carbon fibre tripod with ball head and Pro Light RedBee backpack

e’ve teamed up with our friends at Manfrotto for another fantastic giveaway of top-notch camera gear. This issue, we have two great bundles in the shape of a Manfrotto pro backpack to carry your Canon gear plus a brilliant and SRUWDEOHFDUERQÀEUHWUDYHO tripod-and-head kit. The Manfrotto Pro Light RedBee-210 BP is a strong and sturdy yet lightweight backpack that can hold two Canon camera bodies and a 400mm telephoto lens, or three DSLR bodies along with a few smaller lenses DQGÁDVKJXQV9HUVDWLOHGLYLGHUVHQDEOH \RXWRFRQÀJXUHWKHEDJIRU\RXUSKRWR gear, and there’s space for a laptop or iPad in the easily accessible back panel.

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The Canon Magazine

The RedBee-210 provides both side and top access so you can instantly grab your DSLR. The Manfrotto Befree carbon ÀEUHWULSRGZLWKEDOOKHDGLV ideal for advanced hobbyists and professionals who want to travel light with a super-compact support for their Canon DSLR and lenses. It’s fast to set up, easy to use, and very stable to ensure pin-sharp shots. The Befree weighs only 1.1kg, and thanks to its unique Quick Release Adaptor ball head, its four-section legs pack very tightly making the folded length just 40cm. It also comes in a padded carry bag for added comfort. Win one of two of these Manfrotto kit bundles ‡3UR/LJKW5HG%HH %3EDFNSDFN – worth £140 ‡%HIUHH&DUERQ)LEUH7ULSRGZLWK %DOO+HDG – worth £280

WIN!

£840 TOTAL P

RIZE VALUE

HOW TO ENTER For your chance to win one of two Manfrotto bundles, simply go to www.futurecomps.co.uk/befree and answer the following question: How light is the Manfrotto Befree carbon fibre tripod? A. 1.1lb B. 1.1kg C. 1.1 ton Entries must be received by 27 July 2016. UK only. The winner will be selected at random from all correct entries received by this date. The prize is as stated: no alternatives, cash or otherwise, are available. For full terms and conditions please visit www.futuretcs.com

For more information on Manfrotto’s products go to www.manfrotto.co.uk 55


VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_4

IDEO VIEW THE V

PROJECT 4

THE MISSION Use a long lens to compress a landscape and far-off subjects Time needed Half-an-hour Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Telephoto lens • Tripod (optional)

NEXT MONTH BLUEBELL WOOD SCENES

Keep everything in perspective Tom Welsh brings together near and far subjects in a landscape using a telephoto lens for a more comparable perspective istant landscapes can EHGLIÀFXOWWRFDSWXUH LQDSKRWRJUDSKThe temptation is often to keep it wide to take in a vast view that looks great to the naked eye, but in the shot the scene can become a tiny slither sandwiched between a mass of dull foreground and plain sky. So we’re going to shoot with a

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telephoto lens instead. While this ZRQ¡WÀWLQDVPXFKRIWKHVFHQH it compresses perspective to bring distant elements together for a layered effect. We’re going to demonstrate this use of perspective using two church towers. The idea is to shoot from not too high a vantage point, so you’re about level with your

subjects, rather than angling the camera up or down. While we’re using a cityscape for our example, it’s a great technique for misty mornings in rural locations. With the right conditions, we can reveal a semi-concealed landscape, with features such as hills, trees or buildings dramatically poking up through the fog.

STEP BY STEP PREPARATION BEFORE YOU SHOOT Get yourself, your location and your kit ready to compress landscape elements together

TRY IT WITH FOG! The effect can be emphasized by mist and fog in valleys, breaking up the hills in the scene. To get the best chance of low-lying mist you need to shoot at sunrise after a clear sky overnight. Mist occurs after a temperature increase while there is high humidity. The moisture in the air condenses due to the clear sky and cold night, settling on the ground as dew. When the sun rises the temperature increases, rapidly lifting the moisture into the air in the form of fog.

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01 A LONG LENS

02 A SUITABLE LOCATION

You’ll need a telephoto lens to capture far-off detail. We used the Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L, which is long enough to capture fairly distant subject while still ďŹ tting in plenty of foreground detail.

For this technique, you need two or more prominent subjects that are a good distance apart from one another, such as rolling hills, lines of trees, or tall buildings – like the church spires in our city shoot.

03 THE GOLDEN HOURS

04 DON’T MISS THE MIST

This effect requires a low-angled sun to really shine. Sunrise is the optimum time for brighter light and mist gathering in the valleys, but sunset also works well, emphasizing haze on the horizon.

Be aware that, during the summer months, the sun rises and sets further to the north than in winter. There is also less chance of mist, with less drastic temperature variation between night and day. www.digitalcameraworld.com


COMPRESS PERSPECTIVE

QUICK TIP! Keep a lens cloth with you when shooting in early mornings to clean away any moisture caused by an increase in temperature

IN THE GLARE The low sun can be tricky to shoot around, as it is at an angle where it can easily strike the lens, even when out of the frame to one side. Attach your lens hood to block the sun from creating glare, or shield the lens with your hand or a piece of card, or similar.

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PROJECT 4

LOCATION SHOOTING CAMERA SETUP Set up your Canon DSLR and telephoto lens to compress a scene 01 ELEVATION

02 KEEP IT RAW

03 APERTURE PRIORITY

We want to be level with our subjects, but we don’t need to go so far up so that we’re looking down on the flat landscape. Find your ideal elevated position to look across the hills and valleys – or the city rooftops, as we did.

Set your camera to shoot in Raw to capture as much detail as possible. When photographing in difficult conditions, such as bright low light with mist and haze, we want to be able to pull back the highlights and shadows later, if needed.

To ensure your image is as sharp as possible, switch to Av shooting mode with a narrow f/11-f/16 aperture for a great depth of field. Stick to ISO100 for the optimum image quality. With a tripod we don’t have to worry about shutter speeds.

04

05

03

01

02

06

04 SUN ANGLE

05 LOCK THE EXPOSURE

06 COMPOSE THE SHOT

We want to avoid completely blown-out skies, or unwanted glare hitting the lens, while keeping the warm golden light peering into the frame. To achieve this in the golden hours, shoot facing north or south so that the sun is to your side.

Select Spot or Partial metering mode, so the camera reads light from the central circle in the viewfinder. Place this over your subject, such as this tower, then press the Auto Exposure Lock (AEL) button, marked with a star symbol to lock the exposure.

You can now recompose your image, using an autofocus point over the closest subject, and take your shot. Because the exposure has been locked, the camera won’t take another meter reading and will correctly expose for the scene.

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


IDEO VIEW THE V VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_5

WHITE BALANCE PROJECT 5

It’s all about the ambience Hollie Latham gets to grips with Canon’s new-and-improved Auto White Balance settings for photographing in artificial light THE MISSION Take control of Auto White Balance in artificial light with newer EOS DSLRs Time needed 10 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, 5DS/R, 80D or 1300D

NEXT MONTH CREATIVE FILTERS

he ‘colour’ of light has a noticeable impact on colour in our photos. While this may not be obvious to the eye, as we perceive the colour of light as neutral, our camera may need a little help because it records colour exactly how it is, resulting in colour casts from different light sources. For example, DSKRWRXQGHUDUWLÀFLDOKRXVHKROGOLJKWV will produce a warm, orange cast. By setting the White Balance control, the camera takes into account the colour temperature of the light source to render objects that are white to the eye as white in our photos. Auto White Balance (AWB) does a good job most of the time, but the latest Canon models – the 5DS/R, 1D X Mark II, 80D and 1300D – feature two AWB settings, Ambience Priority and White Priority, which take GLIIHUHQWDSSURDFKHVWRDUWLÀFLDOOLJKWWR give us more colour balance control.

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AWB: WHITE

STEP BY STEP AUTO WHITE BALANCE To test the new AWB options we shot interiors under artificial lights

AWB: AMBIENCE

01 SHOOTING INDOORS

02 AMBIENCE PRIORITY

03 WHITE PRIORITY

When shooting a scene lit by incandescent bulbs, the conventional AWB setting tends to emphasize warmer tones. This colour temperature is fine in some situations but can result a strong orange tint.

Ambience Priority works in a similar way to the AWB setting on older Canon cameras, by retaining the warmer tones to preserve the atmosphere of a scene. This is the default Auto White Balance setting.

White Priority eliminates most of the warmer tones to render a colour-neutral image. With AWB selected in the White Balance menu, hit Info to switch between Auto: Ambience and Auto: White Priority.

The Canon Magazine

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VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_6

IDEO VIEW THE V

PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS

THE MISSION Lend a funky lo-ďŹ â€˜Instagram’ look to your images Time needed 10 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Photoshop Elements

DOWNLOAD PROJECT FILES TO YOUR COMPUTER FROM: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp114.zip

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Insta-gratiďŹ cation Snap-happy Hollie Latham shows you how to create your own Instagram-style ďŹ lters using adjustment layers and masks ith smartphones offering increasingly better cameras, photography has come accessible to even the most technically challenged. With social media playing a large part in people’s daily routines, you can’t escape the hordes of photo updates of people’s whereabouts – or even go a day without seeing what they had for lunch‌ As ‘iPhoneography’ has grown in popularity, we’ve seen an array of image-editing and sharing apps, offering a whole host of

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weird and wonderful ways to process your photos. None more so than with Instagram, which offers numerous vintage and UHWURLQVSLUHGÀOWHUVZLWKDWDS RIDÀQJHU$OWKRXJKLPDJH quality can’t hope to match that of a DSLR, it doesn’t matter too much if you’re only uploading to social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. So if you’ve ever tried, or are considering, printing your retro phone snaps, don’t expect quality prints. If you want to create highquality images with a retro feel

then it’s easy enough to do it in Photoshop, however, while it will require more than one click of a button, you’ll have far more FRQWURORYHUWKHÀQLVKHGLPDJH In this tutorial we’ll show you how to get the Instagram look by showing you how to achieve some key effects. We’ll begin with a square crop, then show you how to achieve a retro and contrasty colour look, how to recreate the tilt-shift and vignette effects, DQGÀQDOO\KRZWRDGGDURXQGHG rectangular border to add the ÀQLVKLQJà RXULVK www.digitalcameraworld.com


INSTAGRAM-STYLE IMAGES

STEP BY STEP GET THE INSTANT INSTAGRAM LOOK Follow these simple steps to give your images a retro look without compromising on quality

DON’T BE SO DESTRUCTIVE

01 MAKE IT SQUARE

02 BLUR BACKGROUND

Open filter_start.jpg or your own photo into Elements. Grab the Crop tool and select the 5x5in preset for a square crop. Elements will suggest crops to choose from – or position it yourself by clicking on the box and moving it around. Click the green tick to apply.

Duplicate the ‘Background ‘layer, rename it ‘blur’. Go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur, set Radius to 15 pixels. Add a layer mask and paint with black at 100% opacity to reveal the sharp subject on the layer beneath. Lower the brush opacity to blend the edges.

03 ADJUST COLOURS

04 CREATE A VIGNETTE

Add a Levels adjustment layer, select the Red channel and set Shadows: 10, Midtones: 1.39, Highlights: 234. Target the Green channel, set Shadows: 15, Midtones: 1.06, Highlights: 225. On the Blue channel set Shadows: 15, Midtones: 1.54, Highlights: 235.

Add another Levels adjustment layer. Set Midtones: 0.70 to darken the image. Grab the Elliptical Marquee tool, set Feather: 200px. Click-drag to create a circular selection around the subject and hit Ctrl+I to invert the Levels adjustment to create a vignette.

05 BOOST CONTRAST

06 ADD A BORDER

Add a Brightness/Contrast adjustment layer, with Brightness: 8, Contrast: 9. Grab Shape tool and select Rounded Rectangle. Set Radius: 90px and Geometry Options: Square. With Shape Layer: Normal, click just outside the top-left corner and drag to bottom-right.

A rounded rectangle will cover entire image. Select Subtract from Geometry Options and draw another a little further inside to remove the middle, creating a border. Use the Move tool to fine-tune. Select white for the border, in keeping with the Instagram look.

The Canon Magazine

By working with layers and layer masks you can edit our image nondestructively. This means that you can easily return to the original image by removing layers that you decide you don’t want and you can go back and tweak each of the adjustments applied at any time, too. For example, if you want to tweak the colours, double-click on the Levels adjustment layer thumbnail above the ‘Background’ layer; you can go into the channels the same way as before and adjust until you’re happy with the final look.

QUICK TIP! Hit D to reset the foreground to black and background to white, and hit X to toggle between the two when working with masks

NEXT MONTH PORTRAITS THAT SPARKLE 61


VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_7

IDEO VIEW THE V

PHOTOSHOP CC

THE MISSION Turn a portrait into a low-poly design with a combination of Photoshop ďŹ lters and selections Time needed 1-2 hours Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Photoshop CC

DOWNLOAD PROJECT FILES TO YOUR COMPUTER FROM: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp114.zip

62

Plot a portrait with polygons Discover how to make a stunning low-polygon effect that can be used to transform any portrait, as James Paterson points out olygon portraits like this are very popular at the moment, but before we get stuck LQWRWKLVWXWRULDOÀUVWD warning: it’s going to take a while. There aren’t any magic ÀOWHUVWKDWZLOOGRWKHMRELQVWHDG HDFKWULDQJXODUVKDSH\RXVHHLQ WKHLPDJHKHUHKDVEHHQSDWLHQWO\ SORWWHGRXWE\KDQG6RLW¡OOWDNH DWOHDVWDQKRXURUWZRWRDFKLHYH DGHFHQWOHYHORIGHWDLO%XW WKDQNIXOO\RQFHWKHLQLWLDOVWHSV DUHRXWRIWKHZD\DQGHYHU\WKLQJ

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LVVHWXSSORWWLQJWKHWULDQJOHVLV WKHNLQGRIUHSHWLWLYHMREWKDWFDQ EHGRQHZKLOHOLVWHQLQJWRWKH UDGLRRUHYHQKDOIZDWFKLQJ79 $QGDOOWKHHIIRUWRQO\VHUYHVWR PDNHWKHÀQLVKHGHIIHFWHYHQ PRUHUHZDUGLQJ :H¡YHVXSSOLHGDVWDUWLQJ LPDJHEXWIDUEHWWHUWRXVHRQHRI \RXURZQVKRWV$Q\SRUWUDLWZLOO GRDQGLWGRHVQ¡WQHFHVVDULO\KDYH WREHDSHUVRQ²DQLPDOVDQGSHWV FRXOGZRUNMXVWDVZHOO7KHEDVLF WHFKQLTXHKHUHLVYHU\VLPSOH )LUVWZHVHOHFWDWULDQJXODUSRUWLRQ

RIWKHSRUWUDLW7KHQZHDSSO\WKH $YHUDJHÀOWHUZKLFKFRPHVXS ZLWKDQDYHUDJHIRUDOOWKHFRORXUV ZLWKLQWKHVHOHFWLRQDVLIPL[LQJ WKHPWRJHWKHULQDELJSRW7KHQ ZHVLPSO\UHSHDWXQWLOGRQH +RZHYHUWKHUH¡VQRQHHGWR SHUIRUPWKHWDVNPRUHWKDQRQFH ZKHQZHFDQVLPSO\UHFRUGD TXLFNDFWLRQWRGRDOOWKHUHDOO\ KDUGZRUNIRUXV:HFDQHYHQ DVVLJQWKLVDFWLRQWRDNH\ERDUG VKRUWFXWVRWKDWWKHRQO\WKLQJZH KDYHWRGRPDQXDOO\LVSORWRXW HDFKRIWKHWULDQJOHV www.digitalcameraworld.com


POLYGON PORTRAITS

STEP BY STEP GET INTO SHAPE IN PHOTOSHOP CC Learn how to create the low-poly effect and discover how actions can be a huge timesaver

01 SET UP AN ACTION

02 BLUR TO AVERAGE

Open your image, in the Layers panel click New Layer. Grab the Polygonal Lasso tool and make a random triangle shape. Go to Window>Actions, click the New Set icon and name it, then click the New Action icon. Name the action, assign a function key, hit Record.

Follow this bit precisely. Click on the ‘Background’ layer, then hit Ctrl+J to copy the selection to a new layer. Go to the Layers panel, Ctrl-click the thumbnail on the triangle layer to load the shape as a selection. Go to Filter>Blur>Average, then hit Ctrl+D to deselect.

QUICK TIP! Using the Polygonal Lasso tool, doubleclick to send the selection back to the start point; Backspace deletes a previous point

LINING UP

03 MAKE EDGES CLEARER

04 ENABLE THE GRID

Click the Fx button in the Layers panel and choose Stroke. Set Size: 1, Position: Inside, Blending Mode: Difference, Opacity: 100%, and set colour to white to make the edges clearer. Hit OK, then click Stop in the Actions panel. Drag the top two layers to the trash.

Go to Preferences and click Guides, Grids and Slices. Set a suitable Grid Size, such as 5 pixels. Go to View> Show>Grid, then View>Snap To and check Grid. Make a triangular selection with the Polygonal Lasso – it should snap to the grid. Hit the action shortcut key.

05 FILL THE PORTRAIT

06 ADJUST THE STYLES

Select a triangle, run the action and repeat until finished. Try to divide the face into different patches of tonality and detail. Each triangle should meet at the corner points of the one beside it, so the sides match. Use smaller triangles in areas of detail, like the eyes.

Double-click Stroke Style. Set Blending Mode: Multiply, Opacity: 10%. Click Gradient Overlay, choose ‘Black to White’, Blending Mode: Soft Light, Opacity: 20%. Right-click>Copy Layer Style, Shift-click top and bottom triangle layers, right-click>Paste Layer Style.

The Canon Magazine

For the low-poly effect to look right, each triangle shape needs to be neatly butted up against the one beside it, with the points lined up so that no triangle intersects the side of another. We also need to make sure everything is joined up neatly. This is why we enable ‘snap to grid’ so that grid points become slightly sticky. But it still takes plenty of patience to plot each point precisely (especially in a portrait like this, which has over a thousand layers). Examine the image once complete and if you spot any gaps then delete the layer and redo the selection.

NEXT MONTH TRANSFORM DAY TO NIGHT 63


BEFORE

AFTER THE MISSION Download and use the free Silver Efex Pro plug-in with Lightroom for eye-catching mono conversions Time needed 15 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Lightroom

DOWNLOAD PROJECT FILES TO YOUR COMPUTER FROM: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp114.zip

64

Pro monochrome magic for the masses Fans of black and white rejoice as Silver Efex Pro – and the rest of the Nik Collection – now costs nothing! Freeloader James Paterson explains all or years the Nik Collection has been at the top of the plug-in pile. Anyone looking for pro-level presets, quality effects and editing tools could get the very best for the princely sum of $500. Until recently, that is. As of last month, the entire Nik Collection became absolutely free, courtesy of Google, who acquired Nik a few years ago. That means the same black-and-white, analogue and HDR effects the pros have been relying on for years are available to everyone. For image-editing enthusiasts, this is a really big deal. Now we

F

can take advantage of the entire Nik roster: Analog Efex Pro, Color Efex Pro, Silver Efex Pro, Viveza, HDR Efex Pro, Sharpener Pro and 'ÀQH,QIDFWWKHRQO\SHRSOHZKR might greet the news with alarm are those who have already paid for it (unless you did so in 2016, in which case Google will give you your money back). What’s more, each program is available either standalone, or as a plug-in for Photoshop or Lightroom. There’s Analog Efex 3URIRUUHWURÀOPHIIHFWV+'5 Efex Pro – a quality HDR program, and Color Efex Pro 4 for a range RISKRWRHIIHFWVDQGÀOWHUV%XW

perhaps the jewel in the crown is Silver Efex Pro 2. This classy black-and-white converter has long been an essential tool for anyone who loves their images VWULSSHGRIFRORXU,QWKLVWXWRULDO we’ll show you how it works. You don’t have to have Photoshop or Lightroom to use the Nik Collection, but if you do, it’s easy to integrate into your ZRUNà RZ:H¡OOVKRZ\RXKRZ then go on to apply a range of excellent monochrome presets, ÀQHFRQWUDVWFRQWUROVJUDLQ settings and colour toning. ,WUHDOO\LVVLPSOHWRDFKLHYH stunning results in seconds... www.digitalcameraworld.com


IDEO VIEW THE V

NIK SILVER EFEX PRO

VIDEO ALSO ONLINE http://bit.ly/pp_114_8 LIGHTROOM

STEP BY STEP GET STARTED WITH SILVER EFEX PRO Learn how to use this Lightroom black-and-white plug-in for some classy monochrome effects

QUICK TIP! Save a preset and any effect you make can be instantly applied to other images by clicking ‘+’ next to Custom at the bottom-left 01 OPEN THE PLUG-IN

02 CHOOSE A PRESET

Go to www.google.com/nikcollection to download it (Windows or Mac). Upon installation, the program will detect and add plug-ins for Lightroom or Photoshop. Once installed, open Lightroom. Right-click over any image and choose Edit In>Silver Efex Pro 2.

When prompted, choose ‘Edit a copy with Lightroom Adjustments’ and hit OK. Begin by sampling a few mono presets in the list on the left of the interface. Here ‘017 Full Spectrum’ works well. You can filter the 38 effects with the buttons at top left.

VINTAGE FILM EFFECTS

03 FINE-TUNE THE TONES

04 REPLICATE A FILM

Use the sliders and controls on the right to fine-tune tones, contrast and highlight/shadow details. You can use Colour Filters to mimic the effect of lens-mounted filters (we used green). But avoid using the Selective Adjustments controls; Lightroom’s tools are superior.

Go to the Film Types drop-down to replicate the look of different analogue films, accurate in structure, grain and contrast. Fine-tune the look of the grain using the sliders below this. It’s best judged when zoomed in close – use the Zoom button at top right.

05 ADD COLOUR TONING

06 BURN THE EDGES

Scroll to the Finishing Adjustments settings at bottom right and use the Toning drop-down to apply colour toning effects, which mimic traditional chemical processes. For a larger view of the image, click the arrows at top left and right to minimize either panel.

Add a vignette or apply a burn edges setting to darken the corners. Click and hold the Compare button, or use the Split-Screen buttons, for a before/after image. Once done, hit Save to exit Silver Efex Pro. Back in Lightroom, the mono image will be beside the original.

The Canon Magazine

The interfaces for the range of Nik Efex programs are all very similar – with presets on the left and fine-tuning controls on the right – so they’re very easy to get to grips with. One of our favourites is Analog Efex Pro 4 which enables you to retro-fy your images with old film effects, scratches and other ageing tricks. The other great thing is that effects like light leaks can be repositioned, so no two retro images need look the same. Like all the Nik programs, you can save your favourite ‘recipes’ for use on other images.

NEXT MONTH SELECTIVE ADJUSTMENTS 65


THECANONCONVERSATION

01

66

www.digitalcameraworld.com


LORENZO AGIUS Lorenzo Agius’s Trainspotting pictures catapulted him to the big league of celebrity portrait photographers, and 20 years on he’s still there. He tells David Clark how he does it

LORENZO

AGIUS

The Canon Magazine

ORENZO AGIUS is one of WRGD\¡VKLJKà \LQJSRUWUDLW SKRWRJUDSKHUVKHUHJXODUO\ SKRWRJUDSKVWKHZRUOG¡VPRVW JODPRURXVFHOHEULWLHVDQGKDV DQHQYLDEOHOLVWRIWRSHGLWRULDO DQGFRUSRUDWHFOLHQWVYet he’s also VRPHRQHZKRVHIHHWUHPDLQÀUPO\RQWKH ground, because he knows from experience how hard it can be to get to the top – and to remain there. We meet at his home in a quiet street in northwest London. The decor is minimalistic and clutter-free, but there are still clear signs of his passions. He loves motorbikes, and, parked in his ORXQJHLVDFXVWRPPDGH+DUOH\ 'DYLGVRQ/HVVREYLRXVO\VLWWLQJRQ his coffee table, there are books about two of his heroes: portrait and fashion photographer Richard Avedon and designer Alexander McQueen. $JLXVLVD\RXQJORRNLQJ\HDUROG ,W¡VHDV\WRVHHZK\KHJHWVRQVRZHOO ZLWKKLVFHOHEULW\VXEMHFWVKH¡VFKDUPLQJ relaxed and open. Sitting on his sofa, ZLWK&ODVVLF)0SOD\LQJTXLHWO\LQWKH background, he settles down to talk about his career, his kit and what he loves about shooting the world’s most famous faces. :KHQGLG\RXUHDOL]H\RXKDG DSDVVLRQIRUSKRWRJUDSK\" $WVFKRROWKHVXEMHFW,PRVWHQMR\HGZDV DUWDQG,ZDQWHGWREHFRPHDÀQHDUWLVWD 01 BRYAN CRANSTON, PACIFIC RIM, 2013

“I liked the idea of multiple images of one person,� Lorenzo says. “But technically it was a nightmare of a shot!� Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

1/125 sec, f/4.5, ISO400

67


THECANONCONVERSATION

02

02 TRAINSPOTTING, 1996

Lorenzo’s career took off after shooting the publicity images for the cult ďŹ lm – all the main actors were shot individually Lens

70mm (equivalent to 35mm on an SLR)

Exposure

1/200 sec, f/5.6, ISO400 (on Kodak Tri-X film)

03 CLIVE OWEN, JAEGER LECOULTRE WATCHES

The actor was photographed for an advertising campaign on one of the top oors of The Shard building in London Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/6.3, ISO800

04 EMMA WATSON

Lorenzo shot the Harry Potter star outside on a dark, overcast day, increasing the ISO on his EOS 5DS without loss of quality Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/125 sec, f/3.5, ISO640

Professional photographers said, ‘don’t bother doing a degree, just work as an assistant’ painter. I went to art school in Lowestoft, 6XIIRONZKHUHSKRWRJUDSK\ZDVSDUWRI WKHFXUULFXOXP,IRXQG,UHDOO\HQMR\HG it and wanted to do a degree in SKRWRJUDSK\%XWZKHQ,FDPHGRZQWR London and met with a few professional SKRWRJUDSKHUVWKH\DOOVDLGÂśGRQ¡WERWKHU

68

03

GRLQJDGHJUHHMXVWZRUNDVDQDVVLVWDQW¡ That’s how I got into the business.

loved doing. In the end it was fashion DQGSRUWUDLWVEXWSULPDULO\SRUWUDLWV

+RZORQJGLG\RXDVVLVW" ,GLGLWIRUDERXWVL[\HDUVDQGDVVLVWHG DZKROHEXQFKRISHRSOH,GLGSUHWW\ PXFKHYHU\WKLQJIURPVWLOOOLIHIRRG cars, landscapes and architecture to people and fashion. It taught me a lot. ,HYHQKDGDIHZGD\VZRUNLQJZLWK 1RUPDQ3DUNLQVRQ+HDOZD\VKDGD SHUPDQHQWFUHZRISHRSOHEXWLQYDULDEO\ RQDELJJHUMREWKH\ZRXOGSXOOLQRWKHUV OLNHP\VHOI,ZDVLQP\HDUO\VZKHQ ,ZRUNHGIRUKLPDQGLWZDVOLNHœZRZ WKLVJX\¡VDWWKHKLJKHVWOHYHODQLFRQLF photographer’. It was great to have all WKDWH[SHULHQFHXQGHUP\EHOWDQGLWJDYH PHWKHFKDQFHWRÀQGRXWZKDW,UHDOO\

:DVLWGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRWXUQSUR" Yes, the transition from being an assistant WREHLQJDSKRWRJUDSKHULVQHYHUHDV\<RX have to put a portfolio together, which is FRVWO\DQGWLPHFRQVXPLQJWKHQ\RX¡YH got to go out and get some work. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hardest bit, when people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know ZKR\RXDUH6RWKDWWRRNDOLWWOHZKLOH ,VWDUWHGE\GRLQJVWLOOOLIHZRUN,ZDV EHJLQQLQJWRPDNHPRQH\IURPLWEXW ,FRXOGQ¡WVHHP\VHOI\HDUVGRZQWKH line being stuck in a studio shooting still OLIH1RGLVUHVSHFWWRWKHJX\VWKDWGRLW EXWLWMXVWZDVQ¡WIRUPH,ZDQWHGWR WUDYHODQGPHHWSHRSOH²QRWQHFHVVDULO\ celebrities, that all came later. www.digitalcameraworld.com


LORENZO AGIUS

I was the only photographer Vanity Fair have given a cover to as their ďŹ rst job :KDWZDVWKHMRE" 7KH\ZHUHGRLQJDNLQGRIÂś&RRO%ULWDQQLD¡ issue because it was all happening in %ULWDLQDWWKHWLPHWKHZKROHLQYDVLRQRI SHRSOHOLNH2DVLVDQG%OXUDQG$OH[DQGHU McQueen. All the greatest talent shaping WKLQJVZDVFRPLQJRXWRI%ULWDLQ7KH\ wanted me to shoot the cover image with /LDP*DOODJKHUDQG3DWV\.HQVLWDVZHOO as doing some shoots for inside. I was the RQO\SKRWRJUDSKHUVanity Fair have ever JLYHQDFRYHUWRDVWKHLUĂ&#x20AC;UVWMRE6RWKDW ZDVERWKĂ DWWHULQJDQGDORWRISUHVVXUH ,FRXOGQ¡WPHVVLWXS,WHQGHGXSDYHU\ VXFFHVVIXOFRYHUDQG\RXFRXOGQ¡WWXUQ a corner in England without seeing it. <RX¡YHVWD\HGZLWKSRUWUDLWXUH SKRWRJUDSK\HYHUVLQFH'R\RX WKULYHRQWKHLQWHUDFWLRQ" ,WKLQNVR\HVEXWORRNLQJEDFN,KDG DOZD\VEHHQPRVWLQVSLUHGE\WKRVH photographers who did pictures of people. I loved fashion too, because that was also DERXWSHRSOH,GLGQ¡WZDQWWRGRLWMXVW WRPHHWFHOHEULWLHVRUDQ\WKLQJOLNHWKDW EHFDXVHWKHSHRSOH,SKRWRJUDSKHGDWĂ&#x20AC;UVW ZHUHQ¡WHYHQWKDWIDPRXV7KH\ZHUHDW the beginning of their career. As time ZHQWE\,JRWNQRZQIRUVKRRWLQJDORW RIWKHFRROHU\RXQJHUWDOHQWWKDWZDV coming up. 04

:HUH\RXUSXEOLFLW\VKRWV IRUWKHPRYLHTrainspotting DPDMRUWXUQLQJSRLQW" Things were starting to change before I did Trainspotting, but that was the thing WKDWUHDOO\SXWPHRQWKHPDSELJWLPH :HGLGWKHVKRRWLQDQGWKHĂ&#x20AC;OP FDPHRXWWKHIROORZLQJ\HDU,WZDVQ¡WD ELJEXGJHWELJQDPHĂ&#x20AC;OPVRWKDWDOORZHG DFHUWDLQDPRXQWRIIUHHGRPIRU'DQQ\ %R\OHWRGLUHFWDQGIRUPHWRVKRRWWKH SXEOLFLW\SLFWXUHV7KHLGHDVZHUHSUHWW\ much mine and the art directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and ZHMXVWGLGZKDWZHZDQWHGWRGRZKLFK doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen so often. It has become VXFKDQLFRQLFĂ&#x20AC;OPEXWQRQHRIXVNQHZ LWZRXOGEHVRELJDWWKHWLPHZHMXVW GLGZKDWZHHQMR\HGGRLQJ,WZDVJUHDW to be a part of it. The Canon Magazine

:KDWKDSSHQHGDIWHUWKDW" I went to New York to have some meetings with magazines, which Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d QHYHUGRQHEHIRUH,ZDV\RXQJDQGYHU\ QDLYHDQGLQDZD\WKDWZRUNHGLQP\ IDYRXUEHFDXVH\RXWKLQNHYHU\WKLQJ¡V SRVVLEOH,HVSHFLDOO\ORYHGVanity Fair and I managed to get an appointment there. When I started out, I used to EX\WKDWPDJD]LQHDQGVLWLQP\IULHQG¡V EHGVLWLQ&KLVZLFNDQGVD\ÂśZRXOGQ¡W LWEHDPD]LQJWRZRUNIRUWKHP"¡7KH\ RQO\KDGDIHZSKRWRJUDSKHUVZKRVKRW WKHLUFRYHUVDWWKDWWLPH%UXFH:HEHU +HUE5LWWVDQG$OEHUW:DWVRQ%XWWKH PDJD]LQH¡VHGLWRUVDZP\ZRUNRQ Trainspotting and how big that was and said he wanted to use me, which was a dream come true.

'R\RXUHVHDUFKEHIRUHDVKRRW" I do a little bit of research sometimes RQDSHUVRQ¡VEDFNJURXQGMXVWWRVHH LIWKH\¡YHJRWDQ\KREELHVRULQWHUHVWV %XWLWGRHVQ¡WPDNHWRRPXFKGLIIHUHQFH RQDVKRRWZKDWLQIRUPDWLRQ\RXOHDUQ from it. I quite like going into a shoot ZLWKRXWUHDOO\NQRZLQJDQ\WKLQJPXFK about them. I take people at face value. 'R\RXORRNDWKRZWKH\¡YH SUHYLRXVO\EHHQSKRWRJUDSKHG" I sometimes look at other photographersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SLFWXUHVRIWKHPEHFDXVH,WU\WRJHW a feeling of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been done before and then do something a bit different. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DOZD\VDJRRGZD\LQWRDVKRRWWRVD\ WRVRPHRQH\RX¡YHEHHQSKRWRJUDSKHG LQVRPDQ\ZD\VEXWOHW¡VWU\VRPHWKLQJ different. It makes the shoot more interesting for them.

69


THECANONCONVERSATION 05 VINCE VAUGHN, CIGAR AFICIONADO, 2015

06

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funnily enough, Vince had actually given up smoking before we did this shootâ&#x20AC;? Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/5, ISO400

06 JACK NICHOLSON, BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was only supposed to have a half-hour shoot but it ended up being ďŹ ve hours. He was charming and it was great funâ&#x20AC;? Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/125 sec, f/4, ISO400

07 SHARON STONE, S MODA, 2015

Shot for a fashion feature in Spanish mag S Moda, Lorenzo took a number of shots of Stone moving around and combined three images for a mag spread Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/8, ISO200

05

$UHVRPHRI\RXUVXEMHFWV GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRZRUNZLWK" ,¡YHZRUNHGZLWKDORWRIYHU\ accomplished people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t SDUWLFXODUO\QLFHRUSOHDVDQWEXW,¡YH also worked with others that are. I treat HYHU\RQHWKHVDPHDQGH[SHFWWREH WUHDWHGWKHVDPHZD\7KHUH¡VQRURRP for being enamoured of someone or being DIDQEHFDXVHWKDWMXVWJHWVLQWKHZD\ People often ask me what it was like

Nine times out of ten actors are just regular people with irregular lives 70

photographing particular actors or performers, but nine times out of ten WKH\¡UHMXVWYHU\UHJXODUSHRSOHZLWK LUUHJXODUOLYHVDQGMREV6RIRUPHLW¡V about relating to them on a human level. +RZGR\RXGHDOZLWKFHOHEULWLHV ZKHQ\RX¡UHRQDVKRRW" 7KH\ZLOODOZD\VSXWXSDIDFDGHVRWR JHWVRPHWKLQJGLIIHUHQW\RXKDYHWRJHW EH\RQGWKDW,¡PWU\LQJWRFDSWXUHWKH essence of a person, to make something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memorable and iconic, and to do WKDW\RX¡YHJRWWRGLJDOLWWOHGHHSHU <RXFDQ¡WMXVWWDNHDSUHWW\SLFWXUHRI someone. When Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m shooting a portrait ,JRLQDQGKDYHWRJDXJHYHU\TXLFNO\ ZKHUHWKH\DUHDWLQWKHLUKHDGVSDFH then I can kind of manipulate that mood. 0\DSSURDFKLVWRDOZD\VEHRSHQZLWK

WKHP,I\RX¡UHRSHQDVDSKRWRJUDSKHU WKH\¡UHRSHQ,QHYHUIHHOOLNHLW¡VDJDPH of wits and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no room for ego. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MXVWDERXWPDNLQJSHRSOHFRPIRUWDEOH 7KHUH¡VVRPXFKPRUHWRLWWKDQMXVW WDNLQJDSLFWXUHDQGWKDW¡VZK\,HQMR\ VKRRWLQJSRUWUDLWVPRUHWKDQDQ\WKLQJ :KHQGLG\RXVWDUWXVLQJ&DQRQ" $ERXWHLJKW\HDUVDJR,QP\SURIHVVLRQDO FDUHHU,KDGXVHGSUDFWLFDOO\HYHU\Ă&#x20AC;OP FDPHUDDYDLODEOHLQFOXGLQJDQ[ 6LQDUD[/LQKRIĂ&#x20AC;HOGFDPHUD +DVVHOEODGV1LNRQVDQG0DPL\D5= cameras. Then Canon approached me and DVNHGLI,¡GIDQF\XVLQJVRPHWKHLUGLJLWDO cameras and I said Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d give it a go. I was DELWUHOXFWDQWDWĂ&#x20AC;UVWEHFDXVH,GLGQ¡W WKLQN,ZDVUHDG\WRJLYHXSĂ&#x20AC;OP%XW using digital was like being able to run www.digitalcameraworld.com


07

DIWHUDOO\RX¡YHHYHUGRQHLVZDON1RZ ,GRQ¡WKDYHDQ\WKLQJDSDUWIURP&DQRQ :KDWDUH\RXUPDLQ FDPHUDERGLHVWKHVHGD\V" ,XVHWKH&DQRQ(26'0DUN,,,DQGWKH (26'67KH'6LVMXVWLQFUHGLEOH<RX FDQVHWLWWR,62DQGVKRRWLQDQ\ lighting condition. Coming from a EDFNJURXQGRIĂ&#x20AC;OPZKHUH\RXFRXOGQ¡W SXVKĂ&#x20AC;OPEH\RQGDFHUWDLQOHYHOEHIRUH LWJRWUHDOO\JUDLQ\RUVWDUWHGWREUHDNXS itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantastic to be able do to that. I swear E\WKDWFDPHUD,IHHO,FDQEHLQDQ\ situation and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get the shot. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slower to use, but for me it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to be IDVW,W¡VDERXWTXDOLW\ :KDWOHQVHVGR\RXDOZD\V KDYHZLWK\RXLQ\RXUNLWEDJ" ,WDNHWKH&DQRQ()PPI/PP I/PPI/PPI/ DQGPPI/,XVHDOORIWKHP and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to have a bunch of lenses to SOD\DURXQGZLWK,DOVRKDYHD6SHHGOLWH (;,,Ă DVKJXQEXW,UDUHO\XVHLW EHFDXVHLI,¡POLJKWLQJ,SURIHVVLRQDOO\ light a situation with much more powerful and controllable lights. 'HSHQGLQJRQWKHMRE,PLJKWXVHVWXGLR Ă DVKXQLWVRU.LQROLJKWVZKLFKDUHWKH continuous strip lights used in movies. The Canon Magazine

STORY BEHIND THE SHOT

Cover story Lorenzo Agius looks back at shooting Liam Gallagher and Patsy Kensit for the March 1997 cover of Vanity Fair â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vanity Fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editor wanted to do a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cool Britanniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; issue and asked me to photograph Liam Gallagher with his girlfriend Patsy Kensit. They wanted me to use the Union Jack in the picture. I knew Oasis were into the Beatles in a big way, so I thought I might do a take on Annie Leibovitzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rolling Stone cover of John Lennon and Yoko Ono together on a bed. We went to Liam and Patsyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house and I put the idea to them, and said to make it purely British weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have the Union Jack on the duvet. They loved the idea. I wanted Patsy to be naked, but she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that. With hindsight I think that was a good thing because it might have been too close to Leibovitzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picture. The shoot was fraught with issues and Patsy had a bra on that was see-through, so we had to have the nipples taken out before it went on the cover. But we got there in the end and it worked really well.â&#x20AC;?

71


THECANONCONVERSATION 08

08 JUDE LAW & EWAN MCGREGOR, 2003

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were reluctant to be in bed together, but agreed when they understood it was tongue-in-cheek British humourâ&#x20AC;? Lens

70mm (equivalent to 35mm on SLR)

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/5.6, ISO100 (on Fuji film)

09 TOM CRUISE, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE III, 2007

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted him holding a gun, but it was too controversial, so I shot him through a sheet of Perspex with a bullet holeâ&#x20AC;? Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/200 sec, f/8, ISO 400

10 MADONNA AND THE MOUSE, 2005

Madonna published a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book about forest animals: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a whole array of stuffed animals, including several miceâ&#x20AC;? Lens

70mm (equivalent to 35mm on SLR)

Exposure

1/200 sec, f/4, ISO200

7KH\JLYHDYHU\VRIWDQGSDLQWHUO\OLJKW I also sometimes use natural light, which can be the best light to use. $UH\RXJLYHQDVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FEULHI ZKHQVKRRWLQJPDJD]LQHFRYHUV" <HVVRPHWLPHVEXWXVXDOO\WKH\¡UHSUHWW\ open. I collaborate with an art or fashion director to bring out the best of the VXEMHFW0RVWFRYHUVWHQGWRKDYHDYHU\

There arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t many bad moments, but there have been millions of good ones 72

09

SODLQEDFNJURXQGEHFDXVHWKH\SXWVR PXFKW\SHRQWKHFRYHUDQG\RXGRQ¡W UHDOO\VHHPXFKRIWKHSLFWXUH,ILW¡VD IDVKLRQVKRRWRUDFHOHEULW\ZLWKIDVKLRQ WKH\¡OOZDQWWRVHHFHUWDLQRXWĂ&#x20AC;WVEXWLW¡V kind of up to me to do it. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of IUHHGRPWRGRZKDW\RXZDQWWRGRDQG LWFDQEHYHU\UHZDUGLQJ

what I shoot. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less creative, FRQFHSWXDOO\IRUWKHSKRWRJUDSKHU <RX¡UHEDVLFDOO\JHWWLQJEULHIHGLW¡VOLNH DQDGMREDQG\RXJLYHWKHPZKDWWKH\ ZDQW%H\RQGWKHVKRRWLWVHOI\RXUDUHO\ JHWLQYROYHG7KH\¡OOWDNHWKHSLFWXUHV DQGSOD\DURXQGZLWKWKHPWRFUHDWH WKHSRVWHUWKH\ZDQW

$UHPRYLHSXEOLFLW\VKRWVPRUH WLJKWO\FRQWUROOHGWKDQPDJD]LQHV" <HV%DVLFDOO\DUWGLUHFWRUVDQGGHVLJQ DJHQFLHVZLOOFRQFHSWDQLGHD7KH\ZLOO KDYHVHHQDURXJKFXWRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;OPDQGUHDG WKHVFULSWVRWKH\NQRZWKHORRNDQGIHHO RIWKHĂ&#x20AC;OP7KH\ZLOOEHDVNHGWRSXW WRJHWKHUDZKROHORDGRILGHDVPD\EH LGHDVWKHQWKHĂ&#x20AC;OPFRPSDQ\SLFNV EHWZHHQĂ&#x20AC;YHDQGWHQLGHDVDQGWKDW¡V

'R\RXVSHQGPXFKWLPHZLWK WKHFHOHEULWLHV\RXSKRWRJUDSK" Yes, quite often I get a decent amount RIWLPHPD\EHDQKRXURUDIHZKRXUV DQGXSWRDGD\2FFDVLRQDOO\,¡OOJHW PRUHWKDQDGD\EXWWKDW¡VXQXVXDO )RUH[DPSOH,MXVWGLGDELJVKRRWIRU D:DUQHU%URVĂ&#x20AC;OPSuicide Squad, which is coming out in the summer. I had to photograph 11 cast members, www.digitalcameraworld.com


LORENZO AGIUS

PROFILE

Lorenzo Agius

Celebrity portrait photographer Agius was born in Colchester in 1962. His father was in the army and the family moved frequently, but settled on the east coast of England in 1972. After attending art school in Lowestoft and working as photographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistant in London, he became a freelance pro in 1989 and shot a wide variety of subjects, before specializing in portraits and fashion. He has become established as one of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top celebrity and fashion photographers. His commercial clients include 20th Century Fox, Warner Bros and HBO, and his editorial clients include Elle, Esquire, Vanity Fair and Harperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bazaar.

10

including Will Smith, Jared Leto and 9LROD'DYLV7KDWWRRNIRXUGD\VWRVKRRW DVWKH\KDGWRRUFKHVWUDWHWKHLUVFKHGXOHV 2QRQHGD\ZHKDGIRXUDFWRUVDQGWZR hours with each of the actors. :KDWKDYHEHHQ\RXU EHVWDQGZRUVWPRPHQWV" ,QDOOWKH\HDUV,·YHEHHQGRLQJLW I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been in a situation where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EHHQEDGIRUWXQDWHO\7KHUHDUHORWVRI people involved and these shoots are WKRXJKWRXWGD\VZHHNVRUHYHQPRQWKV LQDGYDQFH7KH\FRVWDORWRIPRQH\²WKH ELJFRPPHUFLDOVKRRWVFDQFRVWÂ&#x2026; RUÂ&#x2026;RUPRUH7KRVHSUHSDUDWLRQV all build to that moment where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on. 6RWKHUHDUHQ·WXVXDOO\PDQ\EDG moments, but there have been millions The Canon Magazine

Next issue: British-born, New York-based fashion and beauty photographer Lara Jade

of good ones. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good moment or DIXQQ\PRPHQWRQHYHU\VKRRW7KHUH DUHDQQR\LQJPRPHQWVWRREXWWKHUH DUHDOZD\VWRQVRIJUHDWPHPRULHV

<RXUZRUNVHHPVLQFUHGLEO\ JODPRURXV'R\RXIHHOWKDWLWLV" For most people that have regular GD\WRGD\MREVLQVKRSVDQGIDFWRULHV \HDKLW·VGHÃ&#x20AC;QLWHO\DORWPRUHLQWHUHVWLQJ %XW,ZRXOGQ·WQHFHVVDULO\VD\WKDWLW·V :LOO\RXEHVKRRWLQJSLFWXUHV JODPRURXV,WFDQEHYHU\KDUGZRUNDQG IRUWKHTrainspottingVHTXHO" sometimes thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of pressure and 1R,GRQ·WWKLQN,ZLOO,QDIXQQ\VRUW stress to deal with. At other times I will RIZD\,·PUHOXFWDQWWREHLQYROYHG,GLG DJRRGMRERQWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWÃ&#x20AC;OPDQG,ZDVULJKW EHVRPHZKHUHUHDOO\H[RWLFDQGLWZLOOEH MXVWIDQWDVWLFWKHZHDWKHUZLOOEHJUHDW for it at the time, but now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s someone and the shoot will be great and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel HOVH·VWXUQ7KHLPDJHVZLOOFHUWDLQO\EH YHU\IRUWXQDWHWKDW,·PGRLQJLW%XW more controlled this time and I know, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever take it for granted. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a LI,GLGLWDJDLQWKH\ZRXOGQ·WOHWPHGR blessing to be successful at something, what I wanted. So is it worth losing that and to do what I love doing. DUWLVWLFLQWHJULW\",GRQ·WZDQWSHRSOH FRPLQJXSWRPHDQGVD\LQJWKDWLWZDVQ·W DVJRRGDVWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWRQH,·GUDWKHUWKH\VD\ 7RVHHPRUHRI/RUHQ]R·VZRUN that to someone else! JRWRZZZORUHQ]RDJLXVFRP

73


PHOTOSTORIES Photo essays from PhotoPlus readers and up-and-coming pro photographers PROJECT INFO

JOIN IN THE FUN! One of the great things about photography is being able to share your view of the world. This issue we showcase Britain’s most scenic benches (no, really) and reveal Montreal’s famous Olympic Stadium in a whole new light. We want your photos and stories! For your chance to show off your images in PhotoPlus, send three-five high-resolution JPEGs, along with a brief synopsis – explain why you took the shots, the location, whether they’re part of an ongoing project or a one-off shoot, and anything else unusual or interesting. Also include Canon DSLR, lens and exposure details. Email photoplus@futurenet.com Online www.facebook.com/photoplusmag www.twitter.com/photoplusmag Post PhotoPlus: The Canon Mag Future, The Ambury Bath BA1 1UA, UK

74

NAME: Dave Fieldhouse LOCATION: UK MISSION: A side project using benches in the landscape to either complement the scene or create an interesting foreground KIT: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM II, Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II, Manfrotto CX055 Tripod and head, Lee ND grad filters www.davefieldhouse photography.com

01

Best seat in the house We all lead hectic lives these days, and sometimes we just need to stop, rest our legs and appreciate what’s in front of us… ore often than not, landscape photography requires early starts and skipping breakfast. Therefore at some point, usually towards the end of a shoot, I like to take advantage of a strategically placed bench where I can open the Thermos

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ÁDVNDQGVLPSO\HQMR\WKH view that lies before me. Recently the benches have found their way into my photographs. I like to think that when a person views one of my images they want to take a minute to look around. Some landscapes require a wandering path, a drystone wall, a leading line of some

description to show the way. 2WKHUVMXVWQHHGDVHDW a starting point to let your eyes roam around the frame. The Buttermere and Friars Crag benches are two of my favourites in the whole of the Lake District – maybe even England. Both of them were photographed when on the way back to the car after www.digitalcameraworld.com


YOUR PHOTO STORIES

02

The benches were not what I set out to photograph on any of these mornings HQMR\DEOHVXQULVHVKRRWV7KH Buttermere circuit is seldom busy this early in the morning, whereas the close proximity of the Friars Crag bench to Keswick town centre makes it a popular spot for walkers, and when conditions are as JRRGDVWKLV\RXGRQ·WÀQG it vacant for long. Other times the bench ends up being the star of the show, as was the case when I visited Martinsell Hill in Wiltshire. I had arranged to meet a friend at this location, renowned for its misty sunrises, but as we walked from the car park it became obvious that the strong wind meant this was not going to be one of those days. A hazy murk does not The Canon Magazine

make an interesting image, but fortunately, the bench was angled perfectly to catch the light. Once the sun had cleared the low cloud, the highlights, shadows and the detail in the lichen-covered wood made the bench a VXEMHFWVWURQJHQRXJKWRWDNH your eye away from the disappointing background. The benches were not what I set out to photograph on any of these mornings. They’re either a plan B, as was the case in Wiltshire, or a bonus, as they were in the Lake District. ,JXHVV,MXVWKDYHDVRIWVSRW for them. Long may thoughtful people continue to place them in such wonderful parts of the FRXQWU\VLGHIRUDOOWRHQMR\

03 01 FRIARS CRAG, DERWENT WATER

Shot handheld before the crowds arrived using a fast shutter speed Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II

Exposure

1/350 sec, f/13, ISO800

02 BUTTERMERE, CUMBRIA

I spent a lot of time changing my shooting position to adjust the angle of the bench before I was happy with the composition Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM II

Exposure

1/10 sec, f/11, ISO50

03 MARTINSELL HILL, WILTSHIRE

A narrow aperture created an interesting starburst effect from the sun Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II

Exposure

1/45 sec, f/19, ISO800

FEEDBACK lar genre, it’s always With landscape photography being such a popu hes is a fantastic idea great to see something different. Including benc enjoy the view. and makes the viewer feel they can sit down and t set yourself a rigid Sometimes the best shots come by chance. Don’ if it doesn’t work. By ed point plan on location shoots as you’ll be disap shots you’ll often end of ty varie going with an open mind and trying a up with something totally unexpected.

75


PHOTOSTORIES

01

PROJECT INFO

A whole new vision A journey to show a well-photographed landmark in a new light – by visiting during antisocial hours…

NAME: Benoit Larochelle LOCATION: Montreal, Canada MISSION: To find a different view of the Montreal Olympic Stadium KIT: Canon 7D Mark II, Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM, Manfrotto tripod, Markins Q-Ball Q20i head, Lee Big Stopper ND filter www.benoitlarochelle.com

76

he Olympic Stadium is one of the most popular landmarks in Montreal. There are plenty of photographs of it, but almost all of them look the same. With this in mind I decided to try a different approach to capture some more interesting pictures. 0\ÀUVWWULSZDVHDUO\RQH morning, to capture the cloudy sky. I then went a second time at night to take DGYDQWDJHRIWKHDUWLÀFLDO

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lighting. It was interesting to see that, before 9am and after 9pm, the hordes of visitors disappear and the place is almost deserted. This makes taking photographs much HDVLHUWKHUHDUHQRSHRSOHWR contend with and it’s peaceful. I originally set out to show all the photos in monochrome, but later decided on this conversion only for shots taken during the day, keeping colour in the night shots to make the most of the lighting. I have to admit that the colour

really added to the mood of the pictures at night. One thing that I always do religiously is use a sturdy tripod. Not only does it reduce the risk of having motionblurred images, it is very important for allowing me time to think about the composition of the scene. In addition to that, the use of /LYH9LHZDW[PDJQLÀFDWLRQ allows me to focus accurately and, as the mirror is locked up in this mode, it ensures the sharpest image possible. www.digitalcameraworld.com


YOUR PHOTO STORIES

02 04

01 CURVES AND CONCRETE

Early-morning clouds beneďŹ t from a black-and-white conversion Lens

Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM

Exposure

1/160 sec, f/8, ISO100

02 Ă&#x2030;CHEC ET MAT!

A close-up view reveals detail at the top of the tower Lens

03

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM

Exposure

1/40 sec, f/8, ISO100

03 THE FLYING SAUCER

The lights come on at night to illuminate the front of the stadium Lens

,WRRNĂ&#x20AC;YHH[SRVXUHVIRU each image, at -2, -1, 0, +1 and +2EV increments. I tend to do this with a lot of my photos as LWJLYHVPHWKHĂ H[LELOLW\WR combine the best portion of each image to get optimum results. I also use this technique to add brightness to a dark scene. The photo of the tower (number 4) is a good example, when I used an

overexposed shot to add highlights to the right. One of the main decisions I make when trying to capture something a bit different is using a wide angle lens to give an unusual perspective of a VXEMHFWWKDWWKHKXPDQYLVLRQ doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have. I love wide-angle YLHZVDQGWKHPDMRULW\RI these images were taken between 10 and 20mm.

It was interesting to see that, before 9am and after 9pm, the hordes disappear and the place is almost deserted The Canon Magazine

Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM

Exposure

8 secs, f/8, ISO400

04 MONTREAL TOWER BY NIGHT

Montreal Tower sits between two buildings of the new Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium; a blended exposure reveals both bright and dark details Lens

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM

Exposure

5 secs, f/8, ISO400

FEEDBACK is usually at The best time to photograph a popular landmark this will ally, antisocial times, when no-one else is about. Typic . night be first thing in the morning and last thing at exaggerating the Wide and ultra-wide angle lenses are great for stand out. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re perspective of buildings to make your shots really some drama then not worried about distortion and you want to add theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excellent for experimenting with.

77


OUT NOW!

Master your Canon D-SLR today! myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/photo


Your ultimate photographic reference guide to the complete Canon EOS DSLR system DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS

PAGE 80

We take a closer look at long lenses for everything from sports to landscape photography, and check out the advantages and disadvantages of going telephoto.

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS

MARCUS HAWKINS PHOTO EXPERT Marcus has been passionate about photography for more than 25 years. A former editor of our sister publication Digital Camera, he has written about photography for Canon and Jessops, and uses a Canon EOS 5D Mk III.

PAGE 84

Digital Photo Professional is the powerful imageediting program that comes free with your Canon camera, and this issue take a look at its powers for selectively adjusting the colours in your shots to give ’em some zing.

EOS S.O.S This issue, Brian explains how to use flash to overpower bright daylight and how to optimize your EOS for your preferred style of photography, plus more of your queries answered.

WITH

WITH

GEORGE CAIRNS EDITING EXPERT George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network newsletter.

PAGE 86

WITH

BRIAN WORLEY CAMERA EXPERT Brian has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge after working for Canon for over 15 years. He now works as a freelance photographer and photo tutor in Oxfordshire.

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CANONSCHOOL

DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS This issue we take a closer look at telephoto lenses, for bringing far-off scenes within reach of your camera

MARCUS HAWKINS PHOTO EXPERT Marcus has been passionate about photography for more than 25 years. A former editor of our sister publication Digital Camera, he has written about photography and cameras for a wide range of clients, including Canon and Jessops, and uses a Canon EOS 5D Mk III.

Make the most of telephoto lenses How longer focal lengths can literally take your photography farther ith the power to pull distant details closer and isolate a subject from its surroundings, a telephoto lens is the perfect lens for capturing the world in a dramatic new way. ,W¡VWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWFKRLFH ZKHQ\RXFDQ¡WJHWSK\VLFDOO\ FORVHWRWKHDFWLRQVRWKHLU QDWXUDOKRPHLVLQWKHNLW EDJVRIZLOGOLIHDQGVSRUWV SKRWRJUDSKHUVEXWDORQJ OHQVLVPXFKPRUHYHUVDWLOH WKDQWKDWDQGFDQEHXVHG WRVKRRWHYHU\WKLQJIURP SRUWUDLWVWRODQGVFDSHV 8QOLNHZLGHDQJOHOHQVHV ZKLFKVXFNVRPXFKRIWKH ZRUOGLQLWFDQEHHDVLHU WRIUDPHFOHDQVKRWVWKDWDUH IUHHRIGLVWUDFWLRQVDQGWKDW WHOHSKRWRVDSSHDUWRFRPSUHVV WKHHOHPHQWVZLWKLQDSLFWXUH

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DQGPHOWDZD\EDFNJURXQGV PDNHVWKHPSHUIHFWIRU Ă DWWHULQJKHDGVKRWV 7KHPDLQSUREOHPZLWK WKHVHELJJXQVLVKRZWR KDQGOHWKHPWKH\FDQJHW YHU\KHDY\YHU\TXLFNO\ SDUWLFXODUO\LI\RX¡UHXVLQJ DÂśIDVW¡OHQV²RQHWKDWKDV DODUJHPD[LPXPDSHUWXUH WKDWOHWVLQORWVRIOLJKW(YHQ &DQRQ¡VSRSXODUSURIHVVLRQDO WHOHSKRWR]RRPWKH() PPI/,6,,860 FDQIHHOOLNHDEULFNLQDVKRUW VSDFHRIWLPH -XVWOLNHXVLQJDWHOHVFRSH LWWDNHVDOLWWOHSUDFWLFHWRĂ&#x20AC;QG WKHVXEMHFWDQGNHHSLWLQWKH IUDPHZKHQ\RX¡UHZRUNLQJ DWYHU\KLJKPDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQV EXWWKHÂśSURIHVVLRQDO¡VKHHQ WKDWDWHOHSKRWROHQVFDQDGG WR\RXUSLFWXUHVPDNHVLWZHOO ZRUWKSHUVHYHULQJ

800mm 3.5° 500mm 5° 300mm 8.2° 100mm 24°

600mm 4.1° 400mm 6.1° 200mm 12° 70mm 34°

50mm 46°

The three degrees ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE angle of view of a lens that determines how much â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or in this instance, how little â&#x20AC;&#x201C; of a scene that a lens takes in. On a 35mm ďŹ lm camera, or a full-frame DSLR, 50mm is considered the standard focal length because it gives approximately the same angle of view as the human eye (approximately 47 degrees). A lens that features a focal length beyond 50mm is referred to

80

as telephoto and offers a narrow angle of view. The longer the focal length, the narrower the angle of view, so a lens with a focal length of 600mm â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;seesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; less than one with a focal length of 200mm. As the angle of view shrinks, the subject appears magniďŹ ed, as does any movement or vibrations. As a result, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more challenging to get a sharp picture or to track an active subject.

Comparing lenses from 50mm to 800mm, you can see how the angle of view decreases as the focal length increases

www.digitalcameraworld.com


ALL ABOUT TELEPHOTO LENSES COMPRESS PERSPECTIVE

Bring distant subjects closer together Take advantage of the way that you can tighten up a composition with a telephoto ne of the traits of a telephoto lens is that it appears to compress a scene, bringing foreground, subject and background closer together. In fact it has more to do with the distance you have to stand from the subject when you’re using a telephoto lens rather than the focal length of the lens. In contrast, when you move closer to fill the frame with a wide-angle lens, perspective is extended; objects close to the lens appear much larger than objects farther away. This is why a moderate telephoto lens is often a good choice for portrait photography, as the person’s features will appear more in proportion; with a close-up portrait shot using a standard or shorter focal length, their nose, forehead and other nearby features will appear exaggerated in size.

O

The compression effect made possible by longer focal lengths is a useful creative option when you’re shooting landscapes, too. In addition to picking out interesting patterns and details in the landscape,

you can make rolling hills and trees in a forest appear more densely packed. The same trick can be used when shooting a cityscape, with buildings appearing to be stacked within inches of each

other. The narrow angle of view can create a more dramatic sense of scale too: the longer the focal length, the larger a feature in the background will appear in relation to those in the foreground.

200mm

70mm

Zoom in

A 70-200mm zoom proves a versatile option whether you’re shooting landscapes or portraits

Blurring the background Create soft backgrounds with ease using a longer focal length enses that have long focal lengths appear to offer a much shallower depth of field than those with shorter focal lengths. In reality, there really isn’t much in it; photograph a subject so that it appears the same size in both a telephoto shot and a wide-angle one and the degree of sharpness and blur is pretty similar. The reason that a telephoto shot seems to have a greater degree of blur is because

L

The Canon Magazine

longer focal lengths isolate a much smaller part of the background relative to the subject, and consequently blurred areas appear magnified too. You can exploit this effect to make a subject really stand out; the longer the lens, the larger the aperture, the closer you focus and the farther the background is from the subject, the softer it will appear. It’s another reason why telephoto lenses are well-suited to portrait photography;

distracting backgrounds can be made to appear softer and more diffuse, keeping all attention on the person. The greater magnification also makes it easier to find a clean backdrop for your shots, as all it takes is a micromovement of the camera to dramatically shift the position of the backdrop – a handy thing to know when you’re photographing animals at the zoo and looking to disguise their enclosure.

The closer the foreground and more distant the background, the more blurred those areas appear

81


CANONSCHOOL PRIMES VS ZOOMS

A fixed or floating focal length? Should you choose a long lens that offers one focal length or one that covers a range of them? elephotos are available as both prime lenses and zooms. Primes have a fixed focal length and typically have faster apertures than the equivalent zoom, making them the preferred choice when fast

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shutter speeds are required to freeze moving subjects or in low light. But this comes at a price, in terms of both cost and weight: Canon’s EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM lens has an RRP of over £11,000 and tips the scales at almost 4kg.

Telephoto zooms give you a range of magnifications without the hassle of switching lenses – a particularly useful aspect when you’re recording video. The majority of telephoto zooms extend as they’re zoomed, which can

Prime lens

The front elements of super-telephotos are too big for filters, so you need to use special drop-in ones

make them more difficult to handle, and they tend to have ‘floating’ apertures; as the lens is zoomed towards the subject, the maximum aperture gets smaller; this can result in slower shutter speeds that may lead to blurred photos.

Zoom lens

r ring and foot A tripod adapto balancing the is essential for telephotos weight of larger

The largest aperture on a zoom is often small so you may need to bump up the ISO to combat camera shake

Long zooms often have a lock switch to prevent the focal length from changing when the lens is aimed up or down

Going the distance What to do when you need more magnification THE LONGEST telephoto lens included in Canon’s current line up is the EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM lens, but even that doesn’t offer enough reach in some situations. Fortunately, there are a number of ways in which you can achieve an even bigger image size from a telephoto lens. The easiest is to use an EOS camera with a APS-C sensor (eg 700D or 70D). These sensors are 1.6x smaller than a full-frame sensor and effectively crop the image projected by the lens. The result is that smaller subjects appear larger in the frame. A teleconverter (or Extender, as Canon calls them) is the next best option. This is a small adapter that fits between the rear of the lens and the lens mount on the camera and optically magnifies the centre of the

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image. Manufacturers produce teleconverters that are matched to specific lenses; Canon currently offers two, a 1.4x and a 2x. These increase the effective focal length of the lens by the respective factor – so a 500mm lens with a 2x adaptor attached gives the same angle of view as a 1000mm lens. The downside is that you lose one stop or two stops of light (slowing shutter speeds), may lose AF functionality, and image quality can suffer. Telephoto lenses often have fairly restrictive close-focusing distances, which can reduce the magnification they’re capable of achieving. A set of extension tubes can reduce the minimum focusing distance, although the longer the lens, the greater the extension you need.

With 2x Extender attached With 1.4x Extender attached

1.4x Extender

2x Extender www.digitalcameraworld.com


ALL ABOUT TELEPHOTO LENSES IMAGE STABILIZATION

Stay sharp at slower shutter speeds How to handle a long lens for maximum sharpness t can be more challenging to take a sharp image using a telephoto lens compared with a wide-angle or standard lens. Heavier and bulkier, telephotos are harder to hold still during an exposure, increasing the chances of blurred photos caused by camera shake. The choice of shutter speed is crucial. Going by the general rule of thumb that the shutter speed should be at least equivalent to the reciprocal of the focal length for sharp handheld pictures, this means that the shutter speed shouldn’t drop below 1/500 sec for a 500mm lens fitted on a full-frame camera. Use the same lens on an EOS DSLR with a 1.6x crop sensor, or add a teleconverter to the lens, and the effective focal length changes, so you need to factor this in; the ‘safe’ handheld shooting speed for a 500mm lens on an 80D is 1/800 sec (500mm x 1.6 = 800mm). When light levels are low, achieving these sort of speeds can be a problem, and you may have to increase the ISO and open the aperture to its widest setting. ‘Fast’ telephoto lenses – those with larger maximum apertures – can give you the edge, but these are much

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heavier and more unwieldy for handheld photography. If the subject is stationary, image stabilization (IS) can really help. Canon’s latest telephotos can stabilize an image at up to four stops slower than recommended, meaning that instead of shooting at 1/500 sec with a 500mm lens, you could get away with 1/30 sec. Of course, for maximum stability and long exposures, you can’t beat a tripod along with a remote release and Mirror Lockup activated…

IS Mode 1

Set this for general photography, as the IS system will stabilize the image vertically and horizontally

IS Mode 2

Use this when panning to follow a moving subject. Canon’s Hybrid IS system does this automatically

IS Mode 3

Available on high-end lenses, this acts like Mode 2, but kicks in when you take a shot, saving battery life

School tip The focus limiter Speed up the time it takes a long lens from locking on BIG telephoto lenses typically have a long ‘focus throw’ – the amount you have to rotate the focus ring between focus distances – and this can cause problems when autofocusing, too. If the camera doesn’t initially find a subject to lock on to, it will hunt backwards and forwards until it does, which can be a very slow The Canon Magazine

process if it has to go through the full focusing range. To reduce this time, you can set the focus limiter switch on the lens to restrict the range available to the camera. For instance, if you know the subject is likely to stay at some distance, you can prevent the lens focusing all the way back its to closest point.

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CANONSCHOOL SCHOOL

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS Get to grips with Canon’s free Raw image organizing, editing and sharing software – Digital Photo Professional 4

GEORGE CAIRNS IMAGING EXPERT George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network – a newsletter for Canon pro kit users.

Adjust colour selectively Creatively adjust the hue, saturation and lightness of individual colours ne way to make photographs stand out from the crowd is to use Digital Photo Professional 4 to boost their saturation, producing a more eye-catching range of colours. This can be especially useful if you’re trying to promote your work amongst a sea of competing thumbnails on social media platforms, such as Twitter or

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Flickr. However, if you boost the colours in a shot you may end up with garish, oversaturated photos that bear little resemblance to what you saw with the naked eye when you triggered your camera’s shutter button. Some areas in the image, such as a pale blue sky, might suit a particular boost in saturation to give them more impact. However, Caucasian skin tones can end up looking far too orange.

Fortunately, Digital Photo Professional 4 has a handy Color Adjustment panel that enables you to selectively boost colour saturation to suit the needs of different parts of the picture. You can give skin tones a subtle boost in saturation while providing a bigger boost for other objects or areas. The Color Adjustment panel also enables you to adjust the lightness of individual colours. This is

particularly useful when giving a weak blue sky a bit more atmosphere. Many of Digital Photo Professional 4’s tools are designed to work only with 5DZÀOHVIURPDVSHFLÀFUDQJH of Canon cameras. However, the good news is that if you shoot in JPEG format you can enjoy selectively editing colours from any Canon camera, using the Color Adjustment panel.

STEP BY STEP MAKE CREATIVE HUE ADJUSTMENTS Create an analogue cross-processed look by tweaking selective colour hues

01 BROWSE TO START FILE

02 CREATE CYAN SKIES

03 ADD A MAGENTA HUE

Open CrossProcess_start.jpg in Digital Photo Professional 4’s Folder view. Click its thumbnail, then the Edit Image button, so the shot fills the workspace. Click the Color Adjustment panel’s tab to access its colour-adjusting tools.

Drag the Blue channel’s Hue slider left to -16. This gives the ordinary blue sky a more stylized Cyan hue. There’s some Aqua colours in the sky too, so drag that channel’s Hue slider left to -4 to complete the sky’s Hue adjustment.

You can target and tweak specific areas, such as the red brickwork. Drag the Red channel’s Hue slider left to -20 to add a magenta tint to the building on the left. Drag the master Saturation slider left to produce a more subtle wash of colours.

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IDEO VIEW THE V VIDEO ALSO ONLINE

COLOUR ADJUSTMENTS

http://bit.ly/pp_114_9 CANON DPP 4

HOW IT WORKS ADJUST COLOUR PROPERTIES Use Digital Photo Professional 4’s Color Adjustment panel to tweak hue, saturation and lightness

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GLOBAL ADJUSTMENTS

SEEING RED

ENHANCE THE SKY

Dragging the master Saturation slider right boosts all the colours in the shot equally. This can make weaker colours look better but may over-saturate more vibrant ones. You can also adjust the Hue of all colours at once with the master Hue slider.

Thanks to selective saturation adjustments we can make some objects become more prominent than others. By boosting the Red channel’s Saturation slider to 4 we can draw attention to the steam engine driver’s red glove without over-saturating it and creating out-of-gamut colours.

Our image was captured with the camera set to the Neutral picture style, which helps avoid producing over-saturated or unprintable colours. However, the sky looks a little bland and uninteresting. It’s a mix of blue and aqua colours, so we’ve boosted the Saturation of the Aqua channel to 5 and Blue to 2. We’ve also dropped the Lightness of Aqua and Blue to selectively darken the sky a little. This technique can help other details, such as white clouds pop out to give your sky more textural variety.

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COLOUR RANGE Each colour slider affects a particular range of colours. This gradient preview bar enables you to discern precisely which range of colours will be adjusted by the adjacent slider. 03

EMPHASIZE SEASONS By boosting the oranges in the photo we can tease out remaining hints of autumnal colours clinging to the trees in our spring-sourced shot. A boost of the Orange channel’s Saturation slider also helps the gold window frame pop out a little in contrast with the green engine. The Canon Magazine

05

ADJUST HUE To enhance the steam engine’s pale paintwork we’ve boosted the Green channel’s Saturation slider to 10. We’ve also created a cooler and more contrasting version of the green by dragging the Hue slider to the right to 17. If we dragged this slider to the left the green paint would look warmer and merge with the warmer colours of the track and trees. The hue adjustment produces subtle results in this instance. For more creative hue adjustments, check out our three-step walkthrough.

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RESET Feel free to experiment with different adjustments. If things don’t work out you can always click this button to reset the image to its original colours and start again from scratch. You can also reset individual colour channels by clicking the reset icon below their gradient preview bar.

JARGON BUSTER OUT OF GAMUT If you push a saturation slider too far, the colours may be too garish and impossible to reproduce in print. Colours that are beyond a printable range are ‘out of gamut’. SPECTRUM The Color Adjustment panel breaks all of the colours in the image down into eight editable ranges – from red at one end of the rainbow spectrum to magenta at the other.

Can I use DPP 4? DPP 4 works with most recent Canon EOS DSLR models, but for older cameras you may have to use a previous version. Download it from http://bit.ly/get_dpp but you’ll need your serial number. Check the website to see if your DSLR is compatible with DPP 4.

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CANONSCHOOL

EOSS.O.S Our technical guru is here to help. No Canon conundrum is too big or small. Get in touch today at EOSSOS@futurenet.com

BRIAN WORLEY CANON PRO Brian is a freelance photographer and photo tutor, based in Oxfordshire. He has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge, after working for Canon for over 15 years, and is on hand to answer all your EOS and photographic queries

I have a Canon EOS 760D and EOS 100D and shoot Raw, but want to know why Windows 10 can’t recognize the Raw files from the EOS 760D? Don Boyd, Liverpool BRIAN SAYS… The Raw files from the two cameras share the same .CR2 extension, but the content is different. Each different model of Canon camera needs different processing to turn the Raw data in to a picture. Windows 10 can show images as a single image or slideshow for some kinds of files, but not all. Microsoft used to update the Raw converter in the operating system with each

new camera but has not done so for some time. This means the older EOS 100D Raw files are handled by the Windows operating system, but the newer EOS 760D files aren’t. Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software, that comes with the 760D, can read the Raw files from either camera. You can download the very latest version from Canon, if needed, from: http://bit.ly/get_dpp GPS continually uses power when it is activated so that it can accurately tag the location information in each image

Is it possible to turn off the GPS function on the EOS 6D and EOS 7D Mark II to increase battery life, and is there a downside to doing so? Michael Nicholls, Devon

Windows 10 can’t display all Raw files, even though they have the same .CR2 file extension; use DPP as an alternative to browse Raw images

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BRIAN SAYS… The GPS system on both cameras is switched off by default, and switching it on will decrease battery life. To check the GPS is turned off, go to the GPS option in the menu and check that it’s set to Disable. A downside of deactivating the GPS completely is that it will take a bit more time to reacquire the satellites and work out the camera location

when the system is reactivated. This is much the same as a satellite navigation system that takes longer to determine its position if it has been unused for some time. The cameras also have a GPS logging function that will regularly write the camera position to a GPS track file on the memory card. This function will get through batteries much faster. www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS S.O.S

I’ve seen lots of examples where the flash overpowers the ambient sunlight. How do I get similar results myself? Amanda Lewis, Anglesey BRIAN SAYS… Correct exposure in daylight conditions often requires a shutter speed faster than the camera sync speed. If you want to add flash to fill in the shadows or light your subject you need to use high-speed sync to prevent overexposure from the ambient light. High-speed sync will allow your camera and flash to sync at shutter speeds faster than

Three flashes lit this motocross rider, while 1/2000 sec at f/5.6 darkens the sky and background

the camera sync speed. However the effective flash power reduces each time the shutter speed increases, so it’s quite easy to run out of flash power. There are two solutions to the problem; reduce the ambient light to allow the shutter speed to fall below the sync speed, or obtain more light from the flash. You can use a neutral density filter to reduce the ambient light, although it also affects the flash, or you can add more flashes working together. If you use Canon optical or radio wireless control then high speed sync flash is possible – it also works with a number of third-party radio triggers too. To get more flash power you need to group two flashes

1/4000 sec at f/2.8 was necessary to darken the ambient light on this bright morning; two flashes working together in a softbox lit the model

together; this doubles the power, giving one stop more. Adding a further two flashes gives another stop of power. Set the flashes in the same group and they will work together. You may also need to use an extra bracket to hold multiple flashes together, and there are many available.

I often use two or more flashes on location with a softbox to light my portraits to counter ambient light. I have also used multiple flashes working together to light action sports to similarly reduce the ambient light and cause my subject to jump out from the background. Get critiqued!

RATE MY PHOTO

Email photos to EOSSOS@ futurenet.com with the subject ‘Rate My Photo’

Skateboard Sunset by Fergus Green FERGUS SAYS… I was photographing the crowds of people gathered at St Kilda beach, Melbourne, Australia, at sunset. I had decided to capture the scene with the people and skateboarder in nearsilhouette and, right as I hit the shutter, the cyclist rode into the frame. I think that she adds more mood to the image as she looks on curiously. I used Adobe Camera Raw to process my picture. BRIAN SAYS… I was firstly drawn to the colours in the picture; the sky looked great and I wanted to see more. Then the combination of the cyclist and skateboarder elevated the shot from just another sunset at the beach. The composition is good, with the cyclist and the skateboarder being almost perfectly on the rule of thirds, and several points connecting the lower

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/1600 sec, f/5 ,ISO1600

part of the frame to the brightly coloured sky. Studying the picture closely in Photoshop, I did see a couple of areas that made me wonder if you had used dodging and burning to get the end result; there’s quite a bit of

noise for an EOS 6D image at ISO1600. Big exposure adjustments and pulling detail from shadows can increase this. The green bag on the back of the bike looks a little bright, considering it’s backlit with the sunset.

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CANONSCHOOL

Shooting movies requires SD cards with a good sustained – rather than peak – writing speed to avoid the recording to stop prematurely

Why does my 70D stop recording video on a Lexar 150MB/s card but not with a slower Sandisk 40MB/s card? Adrienne Ticehurst, UK BRIAN SAYS… Shooting video creates a constant stream of data. With the EOS 70D shooting at 1920x1080 using ALL-I compression, files are 685MB per minute. Movie recording requires SD cards have a suitable sustained writing speed, where stills make use of a card’s peak writing speed. Different cards and makers take different approaches to the balance of peak and sustained writing speeds. Personally I have found Canon cameras work well with Sandisk cards. If a card is too slow recording video, a ‘thermometer’ display on the LCD indicates the camera buffer is being filled, indicating the card is unable to sustain the necessary write speed. Once the scale reaches the top video recording stops.

Auto White Balance gives good colour most of the time, so why do my indoor pictures look too warm? Dan Perkins, Chatham BRIAN SAYS… Canon’s Auto White Balance (AWB) setting gives good colours in a wide range of conditions, but many photographers find the colours too warm under tungsten lights. In recent cameras – the Canon EOS-1D X Mk II, 5DS/R, 80D and 1300D – there is a second AWB setting that reproduces white tones more accurately. While it’s always been possible to switch to Tungsten white balance, this isn’t ideal if several light sources are in a scene. AWB: White Priority is able to cope with different colour temperatures better. (See page 59 for more info on AWB setup.)

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Can my EOS 7D remember different AF points for portrait and landscapeoriented shots?

A 400mm lens in conjunction with a crop sensor will make wildlife bigger in the picture

What camera and lens should I get for wildlife?

Sally Revell, Wigan

Anne Pardington, Winchester

BRIAN SAYS… Custom Function III-12 is activates orientation-linked AF points, so the camera switches AF point and pattern based on the camera position. Three positions are recognized; landscape, portrait grip up and portrait grip down.

BRIAN SAYS… The new EOS 80D is a useful step up from your 650D in terms of picture quality, speed and focus performance. It would also work with all your existing lenses, as it is a crop-sensor camera. For longer reach you might want to consider the EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM. It is a little bit longer than the 75-300mm lens you have now, but not so heavy for the range it gives. The optical performance is great and it has a useful 4-stop Image Stabilizer.

What’s the small button on the side of the lens mount for? Gary Collins, Maidenhead BRIAN SAYS… This is the Depth of Field Preview button. Pressing it closes the lens aperture to the one selected, enabling you to see the depth of field a shot will have. It darkens the viewfinder as a result, though, and can be easier to simply take a picture and review it on the LCD.

Should I shoot in AdobeRGB or sRGB for the best results when I shoot in Raw? Richard Thomas, Watford BRIAN SAYS… It doesn’t matter. A Raw file has no colour space until it’s processed, and the rear LCD can’t show the extra colours in an AdobeRGB image. If you choose AdobeRGB, the first character of the filename will be an underscore, e.g. _MG0001.CR2. I use sRGB for this reason alone.

EOS iTR managed to keep selecting the right AF point to maintain critical focus on this owl

I photograph birds in flight. Would an 7D Mark II make things easier? James Madden, Buxton BRIAN SAYS… The EOS 7D Mark II has a significantly updated AF system compared to your EOS 7D. Apart from 65 AF points covering much more of the frame, EOS iTR uses the 150k pixel exposure-metering sensor to give a low-resolution image. Combined with appropriately tuned AF settings, this will keep the AF point on your subject more consistently, switching between AF points automatically to do so.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS S.O.S CUSTOM CONTROLS Custom Controls can be configured for video, with aperture and ISO much more readily accessible

Ask Brian! Confused with your Canon DSLR? Email EOSSOS@ futurenet.com

Your camera, your way Optimize your camera to get fast access to features to suit your own style of photography ets explore the possibilities of Custom Controls that were first seen on the old EOS 7D. The traditional back buttons for focus gain extended capabilities so that they can also predetermine the specific focus point or registered AF point to use for focusing. Some cameras allow specific AF cases, AF points or zones, and the selection of AI Servo or One-Shot AF, in addition to focus start and stop. These buttons also allow access to exposure lock with hold, to keep the same exposure for a series of frames. The Depth of Field Preview button is often underused. With Custom Controls it can be assigned to other functions, such as Auto Exposure Lock (AEL) or as a means to rapidly select an alternate AF configuration, stop focus or switch to Raw+JPEG recording. Cameras with an M.Fn button usually allocate Flash Exposure Lock to it, but if

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The Canon Magazine

flash photography is not your priority, then you are free to customize it for other exposure purposes. Landscape photographers may choose to use it as a shortcut to display the electronic level. If you have already selected the back buttons for AF, then you can move AEL to the M.Fn button. The Set button, within the Quick Control dial, is largely unused when not navigating the menu; it, too, can be programmed for a number of features. With the EOS 5D Mark III, the zoom button changed to the left side of the LCD, but with Custom Controls I could also access the display zoom using the thumb of my right hand. Custom Controls allows shutter speed and aperture to be controlled differently. When shooting movies I set aperture to the Main dial and ISO to the Quick Control dial, since shutter speed is largely unchanged with movie modes.

Quick changes of focus point is what the multi-controller is designed for, and Custom Controls allows it to move the selected AF point without pressing any other buttons. Custom Controls are ideal for tailoring your camera to the kind of photography you specialize in, you can also combine them with Custom shooting modes.

Reconfigure the Depth of Field Preview button to access more useful features of your EOS

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Mini Test Compact and bridge cameras

Gear update Shiny new kit for your EOS

The latest Canon DSLR and photo gear tested. Independent advice to help you buy smarter PAGE 102

WIDE-ANGLE PRIMES

Angela Nicholson Head of testing angela.nicholson@futurenet.com

Welcome... I’M A firm believer that the best camera is the one you have with you. And with that in mind, this issue’s Mini Test looks at a selection of Canon’s compact and bridge cameras. They may not offer you absolutely everything that your EOS DSLR does, but when you need to travel light they’re a really good stand-in – and they’re leaps and bounds ahead of the camera in the average smartphone. In a way we’ve got a lot to thank smartphones for, because pressure from that end of the market has encouraged Canon to make compact cameras better and better. If you’ve not used one in a while, you may be surprised by their image quality. We also review Canon’s entry-level EOS 1300D. This replaces the 1200D and, while it doesn’t make huge strides forward, it offers a few extra perks. It could make an excellent first ‘serious’ camera for someone who’s new to photography. Alternatively, it could be your smaller, lighter travel DSLR – or a convenient second body that saves you swapping lenses at busy events.

The Canon Magazine

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NEW! CANON EOS 1300D

TESTS & AWARDS WHEN IT comes to testing Canon DSLRs, lenses, photo gear and services in PhotoPlus, we tell it like it is. We’re 100% independent and we use our in-depth lab tests to find out how kit really performs and compares. Here are our main awards…

Buy for the best combination of quality and value

Only the best of best win our coveted award

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UPDATE 01

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Our round-up of the latest digital photography must-haves 05

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NEW CANON-FIT KIT

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Lee Filters Super Stopper

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Vanguard Veo 42

Capture long exposures in the midday sun £103 / $150

Carry it all in this lightweight travel pack £54 / $79

www.leefilters.com

www.vanguardworld.co.uk

IF YOU want to extend exposure times in order to capture smooth water or clouds under the midday sun, then you’ll need a strong neutral density filter. Lee Filters already produces the excellent Big and Little Stoppers at 10 and 6 stops respectively, and these are now joined by the 15-stop Super Stopper. The filter is available in 150mm, 100mm and Sev5n sizes (for CSC cameras), and ships in a protective metal case. You can expect to see exposure times increase from 1/250 sec to two minutes, so you can capture those long exposures, even on the sunniest of days, with only a minimal colour cast. (Learn how to use 10-stop ND filters to capture blur in water and skies in your landscape shots – see page 52.)

FEATURING a side pocket and strap to hold a travel tripod, the Veo 42 backpack splits into two sections, with a top cavity that has enough space for a day’s supplies and room for a light jacket. Camera kit is held in the bottom section, and this is accessed through the front of the bag. Kit is protected by a removable padded insert that has enough space to hold a mid-range Canon DSLR fitted with a standard lens, along with a second lens or accessory, making it a good travel option.

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Peak Design Shell

Like a second skin for your camera £28 / $40 www.peakdesign.com 06

THE Shell is designed to work in harmony with Peak Design’s Capture Clip system, which attaches your camera to a belt or bag strap. The stretchy neoprene sleeve slips over your Canon lens and body for added protection, and a drawstring cord is used to tighten the Shell around the base and lens in order to create a snug fit. A couple of sealed slots enable your camera’s strap pass through the top.

Manfrotto 190 Go! Carbon Fibre Tripod Kit with Ball Head 03

Lightweight, travel-friendly tripod £360 / $470 www.manfrotto.co.uk

THE 190 Go! develops Manfrotto’s popular 190 series by being more travel friendly, but without sacrificing stability. Carbon fibre legs keep weight down to 1.8kg, yet will stand strong under 6kg of Canon kit. Lightweight twist locks enable the foursection legs to pack down to 56cm or, with the centre column extended, reach up to 157cm. The centre column can also be swung into a horizontal position, and it’s topped off by a simple-but-effective ball head with friction adjustment.

The Canon Magazine

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Manfrotto Spectra 2

The baby of pocketable light panels £155 / $220 www.manfrotto.co.uk

IF YOU’RE after ultimate portability for video lighting, Manfrotto’s most affordable new hotshoe-mountable light panel takes some beating. At 153x93x45mm and 225g, it’s noticeably lighter and more compact than the company’s Croma 2 and MicroPro 2 panels, yet it still packs a healthy 650 lux punch of daylightbalanced light. As with its siblings, the Spectra 2’s LEDs are selected for high colour accuracy, and their output is fully adjustable, with no flickering.

Laowa 105mm f/2 Smooth Trans Focus 06

Beautiful bokeh lens designed for portraits £679 / $699 www.venuslens.net

A GOOD portrait lens is a specialist in its design, featuring element configurations that help to enhance portraits, such as focus and bokeh. The new Laowa 105mm f/2 features a wide aperture and long focal length in order to ensure that your subject’s background is beautifully defocused and the viewer’s attention is drawn to the subject. What really makes this manual focus lens stand out is the inclusion of the built-in ‘apodization’ filter, which helps create a smooth transition of bokeh towards the edges of the frame while maintaining excellent central sharpness.

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DSLRTEST

CANON EOS 1300D (EOS Rebel T6)

The EOS 1300D replaces the twoyear-old 1200D as Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most affordable entry-level EOS

Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entry-level model isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just for beginners, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a bargain backup EOS for more serious photographers anonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest entry-level DSLR, the EOD 1300D (Rebel T6 in North America), replaces the two-year-old 1200D (Rebel T5), and offers great value for WKRVHORRNLQJIRUWKHLUĂ&#x20AC;UVW DSLR. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a good choice as a second camera for those who already own something more advanced. While it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t represent a major overhaul over the previous generation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it has the same 18-million-pixel sensor, for example â&#x20AC;&#x201C; there are a couple of useful new features and tweaks that make it very appealing, while still keeping it as an affordable proposition for the budget-conscious photographer. 7KHPRVWVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWXSJUDGH is the addition of Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity. This means that you can control the camera remotely from your smartphone or tablet,

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or transfer images to social media websites and the like. The free Canon Camera Connect app is intuitive and easy to use, and can be used with both Apple iOS and Android devices. Canon has also included a Digic 4+ processor, a slight upgrade over

The overall impression of detail is fantastic in this shot, with ďŹ ne detail in the feathers well resolved when viewed at 100%

the Digic 4 found in the 1200D, while the rear LCD has seen a bump in resolution up to 920,000 dots (the 1200Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s screen had 460,000). 2WKHUVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQVDUHODUJHO\ identical to those on the 1200D, including Full-HD video recording, a 500-shot battery life, an optical YLHZĂ&#x20AC;QGHUWKDWRIIHUV coverage, and the same metering system, ISO performance, autofocus FRQĂ&#x20AC;JXUDWLRQDQGLPDJHUHVROXWLRQ

Build and handling

Canon has stuck with the same overall design for the body as the 1200D, with near-identical dimensions. It features a textured coating on the chunky front grip and the rear thumb rest, which gives the camera a feeling of quality that belies its entry-level price point. The grip itself is nicely contoured WRĂ&#x20AC;W\RXUPLGGOHĂ&#x20AC;QJHUZKLOH\RXU LQGH[Ă&#x20AC;QJHUUHVWVRQWKHVKXWWHU release. Switch to the back of the camera and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a full complement of buttons that will be very familiar if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using this as your second EOS camera, or easy WRJHWWRNQRZLILW¡V\RXUĂ&#x20AC;UVW'6/5 Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no touchscreen, unlike some of the other cameras in Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s range. This means that www.digitalcameraworld.com


FULL TEST EOS 1300D

While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a camera that many existing EOS users will upgrade to, the 1300D is ideal as a ďŹ rst-time DSLR

every setting needs to be changed via the physical controls. Luckily, despite the 1300D being Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheapest camera, there are still quite a few direct-access buttons, so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to delve too deep WRĂ&#x20AC;QGZKDW\RX¡UHORRNLQJIRU Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dedicated button to change the 1300Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s autofocus point, for example. There are only nine to choose from, however, with just the central point being a more sensitive cross-type point. As these other points are reasonably centralized LQWKHIUDPH\RX¡OOSUREDEO\Ă&#x20AC;QGLW more convenient to focus with the central point and recompose for shots in which the subject appears towards the edge of the frame. If action or sports photography is your thing, then the 1300Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3fps maximum frame rate may not be too enticing. The buffer depth has increased since the 1200D, though â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the 1300D can now take 1110 JPEG images, rather than 69, before VORZLQJGRZQEXW5DZVKRRWLQJLV much more modest, with six shots Ă&#x20AC;OOLQJWKHEXIIHUDVZLWKWKH' /LNHWKH'WKHYLHZĂ&#x20AC;QGHU RQO\VKRZVDĂ&#x20AC;HOGRIYLHZDW PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQZKLFKPD\OHDG to unwanted objects creeping into the edge of a frame. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something The Canon Magazine

you learn to compensate for, but may be trickier to judge if you are used to a more upmarket camera WKDWRIIHUVDĂ&#x20AC;HOGRIYLHZ

Performance

Image quality directly from the 1300D is impressive, particularly to those making the leap from smallersensor compact cameras. Anyone XVHGWR'6/5VKLJKHUXSLQ&DQRQ¡V OLQHXSVKRXOGĂ&#x20AC;QGWKDWWKHLPDJHVFDQ compete with what they already have. That makes it a good choice as a second camera that you attach a lens to for grabbing extra shots when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not practical to swap lenses. You may also want to consider the 1300D as your travel camera, thanks to its lighter build and construction than some of Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more advanced magnesium alloy-bodied models. The 18-million-pixel sensor in the 1300D has proven itself in many

The most signiďŹ cant upgrade is the addition of Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity

A new Food mode enhances colour and brightness to make shots of cuisine look more appetising

established EOS models, and it produces a good level of detail, especially when prints are kept to A3 or below. Low light is not the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forte, however, as although ISO6400 produces usable images at A4 or below, the expansion setting of ISO12,800 is best avoided unless absolutely necessary, or you only intend to make very small prints. On the whole, the all-purpose metering does well, but as with other Canon EOS cameras, it can be a little skewed if the subject underneath the active point is particularly bright or dark, so \RXPD\Ă&#x20AC;QG\RXUVHOIGLDOOLQJ in exposure compensation at times. The automatic white balance functionality is good, coping ZHOOZLWKDUWLĂ&#x20AC;FLDOOLJKWVSURGXFLQJ a slightly warmer tone than is accurate, but still pleasing enough. In terms of processors, the Digic 4+ is a few generations old now and looking a little underpowered â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the

95


DSLRTEST FEATURES

1300D vs 1200D

01

RAW* SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO

01 Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

This dial alters aperture or shutter speed. Hold down the Av +/- button to switch between the two in Manual mode. 02

50 40 30 20 10 EOS 1200D ISO100

200

400

EOS 1300D 800

1600

3200

6400 12800

The 1300D just beats the 1200D; this is probably down to the superior Digic 4+ processor’s noise-reduction capabilities

The viewfinder is bright and clear, but only offers 95% coverage, so be mindful of this when composing in case of distractions creeping into the edge of the frame.

RAW* DYNAMIC RANGE Dynamic range (EV)

14

02 03

Live View is useful when focusing manually, you can zoom in by a factor of 5x or 10x to check critical sharpness.

03

12 10 8 6 4 2 ISO100

EOS 1200D 200

400

EOS 1300D 800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Dynamic range is improved slightly, but the difference is a little less marked when compared with the 1200D 04

04

RAW* RESOLUTION (AT ISO200)

Press the Q button to quickly change a variety of different common settings, such as image quality, picture styles, white balance and ISO.

EOS 1200D

26

EOS 1300D

26

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

The 1300D puts in a decent performance in terms of detail resolution, which is, unsurprisingly, identical to the 1200D

05

COLOUR ERROR 05

06 EOS 1200D

3.6

EOS 1300D % (closer to 0 is better)

06

If you have an NFC enabled device simply place the two together to form a Wi-Fi connection without having to enter a passcode.

4.4 -2

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

The 1300D appears to be slightly less accurate according to our labs test, but still puts in a good overall performance

ISO100

07

The camera comes with a kit lens as standard in North America, while in the UK there’s also a body-only option.

96

ISO12800 There’s significantly more noise and less detail at ISO12,800 than at ISO100

07

www.digitalcameraworld.com

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

The resolution of the rear LCD is double the 1200D, at 960,000 pixels.


FULL TEST EOS 1300D

THE VERDICT It’s not revolutionary, but the 1300D offers excellent value ith the same sensor, AF system, viewfinder, metering and video performance, the 1300D doesn’t offer a huge advancement in functionality over the existing 1200D – unless you’re keen for wireless connectivity, which is undeniably useful in certain situations. There have been a couple of other tweaks – such as the slightly faster processor and the higher-resolution rear screen – which are nice to have, but not exactly revolutionary. These relatively small improvements won’t warrant an upgrade if you’re already using a 1200D, but for a first DSLR, or for an inexpensive second body, the 1300D is a pretty well-specced little camera for the money. Image quality is great, while the camera itself is easy to use – especially if you’re already au fait with the EOS layout.

W

latest version available is Digic 7. That lack of power is beginning to show, where it takes a couple of seconds for images to be displayed on screen if you take quite a few in quick succession. It would be nice if Canon had been able to equip the 1300D with something a little newer and with more grunt, but by using older, established technology, the price is kept down. Autofocusing speeds are generally very quick, but are dependent on the lenses you’re using with the FDPHUD$,6HUYRLVÀQHIRU reasonably slow-moving subjects, but it’s safe to say that the 1300D is not really a camera for action and sports photography.

The 1300D’s new higher resolution screen is excellent when shooting still life subjects in Live View mode

Colours are beautifully saturated in JPEG images direct from the 1300D

1300D SPECIFICATIONS

1200D SPECIFICATIONS

SENSOR 18Mp APS-C CMOS (22.3x14.9mm) IMAGE PROCESSOR DIGIC 4+ AF POINTS 9 (f/5.6 cross type at centre) ISO RANGE 100-6400 (12,800 exp) MAX IMAGE SIZE 5184x3456 METERING ZONES 63-zone SPC HD VIDEO 1920x1080 (30, 25, 24fps) VIEWFINDER 95% coverage, 0.80x magnification pentamirror MEMORY CARD 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD Fixed, 3-inch, 920k-dot TFT TOP-PLATE LCD No MAX BURST 3fps (1110 JPEG, 6 Raw) WI-FI/GPS/NFC Wi-Fi & NFC SHUTTER SPEEDS 30-1/4000 sec, Bulb SIZE 129x101.3x77.6mm WEIGHT 485g (inc battery and memory card) WEB www.canon.co.uk STREET PRICE £289 (body only), £329/$499 (with 18-55mm kit lens)

SENSOR 18Mp APS-C CMOS (22.3x14.9mm) IMAGE PROCESSOR DIGIC 4 AF POINTS 9 (f/5.6 cross type at centre) ISO RANGE 100-6400 (12,800 exp) MAX IMAGE SIZE 5184x3456 METERING ZONES 63-zone SPC HD VIDEO 1920x1080 (30, 25, 24fps) VIEWFINDER 95% coverage, 0.80x magnification pentamirror MEMORY CARD 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD Fixed 3-inch, 460k-dot TFT TOP-PLATE LCD No MAX BURST 3fps (69 JPEG, 6 Raw) WI-FI/GPS/NFC None SHUTTER SPEEDS 30-1/4000 sec, Bulb SIZE 129.6x99.7x77.9mm WEIGHT 480g (inc battery and memory card) WEB www.canon.co.uk STREET PRICE £219 (body only), £250/$399 (with 18-55mm kit lens)

VERDICT PROS: Low price; Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity; textured coating; highresolution 960k-dot screen CONS: Fixed, non-touch-sensitive screen; viewfinder coverage only 95%; slow focusing in Live View WE SAY: Those hoping for a major improvement over its predecessor may find the 1300D a little underwhelming. Canon has filtered down its established technology in order to offer a great value product rather than offering anything The Canon Magazine

particularly exciting. A better processor that could have increased frame rate and general operational speeds would have been nice. The addition of Wi-Fi and NFC is the standout feature, but it’s not worth upgrading from the 1200D unless you’re desperate for that connectivity.

FEATURES BUILD & HANDLING IMAGE QUALITY VALUE OVERALL

NEXT ISSUE: CANON EOS-1D X MARK II

97


MINITEST

Canon compact & bridge cameras Need a more portable travel camera? We test six of the best from Canon’s PowerShot range HERE will be times when carrying a DSLR and a full complement of lenses just isn’t practical. But that doesn’t mean that you have to stop taking photos. In fact, it can be in those situations – travelling, holidays, or just going about everyday life – that the most interesting subjects can appear. To make sure you don’t miss a moment, it’s a good idea to have a more convenient camera. It makes sense to stick with Canon since menu systems will be

T

familiar, and for the cameras that offer it, your existing software should be FRPSDWLEOHZLWK5DZÀOHV Canon has a range of PowerShot compact, travel zoom and bridge cameras in its lineup, which cater to a variety of different needs. Generally speaking, bridge cameras offer a more DSLRlike experience while also offering a large zoom range, whereas compacts have the DGYDQWDJHRIÀWWLQJLQD pocket. We’ve selected six to establish which could be your next travel companion.

FIVE THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR Sometimes your DSLR can’t be with you – here are some things to think about when choosing a backup camera 01

Zoom range

A camera that has a large zoom range offers the same kind of flexibility as carrying several DSLR lenses, minus the bulk and weight. 02

Sensor size

Generally speaking, a larger sensor size equates to better image quality, but there are always compromises to be made. Usually, a larger sensor means you can’t also have a long zoom. 03

Viewfinder

If you’re used to shooting with a DSLR it’s very likely you’ll enjoy composing with a viewfinder – not all compact cameras have them, while those that do vary in quality. 04

Screen

A high-resolution screen is better for looking at images, while touchsensitivity can help with various functions. A tilting or articulating screen is also useful for awkward shooting angles. 05

Wi-Fi connectivity

With Wi-Fi you can use your phone to control the camera remotely. Uploading shots online or to social media is also easier – something you’re likely to want to do when travelling.

98

Canon PowerShot G3 X £660/$849 www.canon.co.uk WITH ITS one-inch sensor – the same as in some of Canon’s other G-series compacts – image quality from the G3 X is superb. Although the G3 X’s relatively large size makes it the bulkiest in the group, a 25x 24-600mm f/2.8-5.6 optical zoom gives you the kind of flexibility you’ve only dreamed about with your DSLR. There are plenty of other specifications that make the G3 X a joy to use. There’s the usual familiar Canon shooting modes, which match those on your EOS, the ability to shoot in Raw format, and a full complement of dials and buttons. The screen tilts, and is touch-sensitive. The biggest problem is there’s no viewfinder – if you want one you’ll have to splash out an extra

£200/$205 for the Canon EVF-DC1 that slots into the hotshoe.

VERDICT PROS: 24-600mm f/2.8-5.6; high ISO performance; tilt/touch-screen CONS: No built-in viewfinder; not pocketable; fixed screen WE SAY: Suits a variety of subjects without needing a bag full of lenses

Canon PowerShot SX720 £270/$379 www.canon.co.uk CURRENTLY THE longest ‘travel zoom’ on the market, equivalent to 24-960mm, the SX720 is arguably the most versatile camera in the group. It offers huge reach, but slips into a pocket so it’s always with you. What’s more, all the familiar shooting modes are here, including Manual, Aperture Priority (Av) and Shutter Priority (Tv). Of course there are downsides – with a smaller sensor than Canon’s ‘G’ cameras and a narrower f/3.3-6.9 maximum aperture, which translates into a less than perfect low-light performance. There’s also no viewfinder, and you can’t set a specific AF point. That said, image quality when shooting in good light – which is

likely to be the case for many travel shots – is impressive, with vibrant colours and bags of detail.

VERDICT PROS: Huge zoom range; pocket friendly; full manual control; Wi-Fi CONS: No Raw, touch-screen or viewfinder; can’t change AF point WE SAY: A couple of tweaks could make it the ultimate travel compact www.digitalcameraworld.com


CANON POWERSHOTS

Canon PowerShot SX60HS

Canon PowerShot SX540

£298/$449 www.canon.co.uk

£277/$349 www.canon.co.uk

THE SX60HS bridge camera features the largest zoom range here, starting at a useful wide angle 21mm for landscapes to a whopping 1365mm. It’s the most comparable, in terms of body shape, to a DSLR, so you should feel at home using it. There are the same shooting modes as your EOS, including Manual, and you can also shoot in Raw format. The screen articulates, which is great for shooting from awkward angles. A viewfinder is handy when bright light prevents you from using the screen. On the downside, you have to switch on the viewfinder every time you want to use it. The SX60 has a small sensor, and a narrow f/3.4-6.5 maximum

IF YOU want something a little smaller (and cheaper) than the SX60, the SX540 bridge camera could be a good choice. You’ve still got a very flexible 24-1200mm zoom range, although the lens doesn’t start at such a wide position. The rear screen is fixed and non-touchsensitive, and there’s also no built-in viewfinder – and with no hotshoe there’s no option to add one. You can’t shoot Raw quality images, either. On the plus side, the buttons are large and clear, and you’ll find all the familiar modes you’re used to seeing on your EOS. Image quality is good, but again, it’s best to keep to bright light with a camera like this – the sensor is

aperture, so it’s best used in good light for optimum image quality.

VERDICT PROS: Huge zoom range; full manual control; Raw; Wi-Fi/NFC CONS: Bulky; screen not touchsensitive; viewfinder not automatic WE SAY: The long zoom range makes this ideal for safari holidays

Canon PowerShot G5 X

VERDICT PROS: Large zoom range; Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity; good value CONS: No Raw format shooting; fixed screen; no viewfinder WE SAY: Good value, but a few features missing for DSLR users

Canon PowerShot G9 X

£579/$699 www.canon.co.uk

£357/$399 www.canon.co.uk

THE G5 X represents a great compromise for those who don’t need a huge zoom. The 4.2x 24-100mmequivalent range is flexible for most situations, but won’t help much if you’re on safari. However, image quality is top-notch, thanks to a 20-megapixel one-inch sensor and lens that boasts a wide maximum aperture of f/1.8-2.8. The G5 X has an inbuilt high-resolution 2.36 million-dot electronic viewfinder, which automatically activates when you lift the camera to the eye. You can shoot in all your familiar EOS modes, and there’s Raw format recording available, too. The high-resolution 1.04-million-dot screen on the rear is both fully articulating and touch-sensitive.

FOR THOSE who want something truly pocket-friendly, but also boasting high image quality, the G9 X compact could be just the ticket. While not as flexible as others in this group test, it packs an awful lot of power into a portable package. Despite its diminutive dimensions, the G9 X has a large, (one-inch) sensor which produces lovely images, with vibrant colours and lots of detail. The 28-84mm equivalent zoom range is modest, but it’s very similar to the focal length you might be used to using with your DSLR and kit lens, so it should suit a good variety of situations. There’s no viewfinder and few buttons, so most operation takes

The Canon Magazine

small and, at f/3.4-6.5, the maximum aperture is narrow.

The only slight downside is that you won’t be able to fit the G5 X into a trouser pocket – a jacket pocket should do nicely though.

VERDICT PROS: Large sensor; fast lens; touch-sensitive screen; Wi-Fi CONS: Fairly short zoom range; not pocket friendly WE SAY: Traditional controls, good viewfinder and great image quality

place via the touch-screen – think of it like a smartphone but with much, much better image quality.

VERDICT PROS: Very small size; Wi-Fi; large sensor; touch-sensitive screen CONS: Few physical buttons; short zoom; f/4.9 aperture at max zoom WE SAY: A lot to like, but touchscreen reliance won’t suit everyone

99


FLASHGUNTEST 01

04

05 02 6 03

METZ MECABLITZ 44 AF-2 The new Mk II edition of Metzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mid-range ďŹ&#x201A;ashgun aims to add a constant attraction for shooting video he 44 AF-2 sits on the third rung down of Metzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ladder RIGHGLFDWHGĂ DVKJXQV EHQHDWKWKHĂ DJVKLS $)DQG$)ERWKRIZKLFK ZHUHYLHZHGLQLVVXH¡V6XSHU Test. As such, it lacks a few frills â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and even some of the basic features â&#x20AC;&#x201C; of the pricier Metz guns, but adds an LED lamp thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handy for constant lighting in short-range video shooting.

T 100

While the addition of an LED lamp is the main upgrade over the 44 AF-1, the new model retains a disarmingly simple interface. A green illuminated on/off button at the centre of the rear panel also VHUYHVDVDĂ DVKUHDG\ODPSDQGLV surrounded by four other buttons, this time for TTL, Manual, Slave and the new LED mode. These L-shaped buttons are colour coded orange, red, blue and white,

FEATURES 01

The head includes a 24-105mm motorized zoom, 12mm wide-angle diffuser and pull-out reďŹ&#x201A;ector card. 02

The lower front section includes a red autofocus assist lamp as well as the constant LED lamp. 03

The mounting foot is metal, rather than plastic, and overall build quality is high.

respectively. In wireless slave mode, WKHĂ DVKJXQLVSHUPDQHQWO\VHWWR Group A (all four channels) and can be triggered remotely by the current crop of Canon cameras whose SRSXSĂ DVKFDQEHFRQĂ&#x20AC;JXUHG as a wireless master. A glaring omission from the back panel is that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no LCD screen IRUYLHZLQJĂ DVKVHWWLQJV,QGHHG VLPSOHIXQFWLRQVOLNHĂ DVKH[SRVXUH compensation can only be adjusted from the host camera. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too much of a pain, because the Quick Control menu makes for quick-andHDV\Ă DVKFRPSHQVDWLRQW\SLFDOO\ by up to +/- two or three stops. The Metz also includes a motorized zoom head, equivalent to focal lengths of 24-105mm (15-66mm on APS-C). Setting the zoom position manually again relies on adjustments being made from www.digitalcameraworld.com


METZ MECABLITZ 44 AF-2

OFF-CAMERA FLASH

DIRECT FLASH

POWER OUTPUT 40

Power (Gn)

35 30 25 20 15 10 5

SPECIFICATIONS MAX CLAIMED GN (ISO100, METRES) 44 BOUNCE (DEGREES) 0 to 90 degrees SWIVEL (LEFT/RIGHT) 150 / 180 degrees ZOOM RANGE 24-105mm (auto) WIDE-ANGLE DIFFUSER 12mm REFLECTOR CARD Yes AUTO METERING E-TTL / E-TTL II FLASH EXPOSURE COMP Via camera MANUAL POWER SETTINGS 1/1 to 1/32 AF-ASSIST BEAM Red lamp SECONDARY LAMP Constant LED WIRELESS MASTER/SLAVE Slave only ADDITIONAL FLASH MODES HSS, RC TTL FLASH EXP ERROR 0EV FULL POWER RECYCLE (NIMH/ALKALINE) 4.4/5.5 seconds FLASH INFO LCD No SUPPLIED ACCESSORIES None DIMENSIONS (WxHxD) 73x130x106mm WEIGHT (EXCL BATTS) 306g TARGET PRICE ÂŁ159/$220

The Canon Magazine

HLWKHUĂ DVKRUFRQVWDQW/(' OLJKWLQJ+RZHYHUPDQXDOĂ DVK settings are limited to full, 1/2, 1/8 and 1/32 power, with 1/4 and 1/16 unavailable, even from the host cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flash Function menu. Each jump from 1/2 to 1/8, and from 1/8 to 1/32 power levels equates to two full f-stops. This gives much less precision than is available from PRVWĂ DVKJXQVZKLFKFDQXVXDOO\ be adjusted in increments of just one-third of an f-stop.

Performance

The 44 AF-2 packs quite a punch and, in our tests, matched the higher-rated Metz 52 AF-1 for output power throughout its zoom range. Recycling speeds are about 1.5 seconds slower than in the Canon 430EX II and III-RT 6SHHGOLWHVDIWHUDIXOOSRZHUĂ DVK but a plus point is that TTL accuracy LVH[WUHPHO\JRRG

24mm Zoom

50mm Zoom

LL FU

105mm Zoom

Maximum power output is impressive, although manual steps can be large

RECYCLE SPEED

FEATURES 8

04 7

Only four manual power settings are available for the ďŹ&#x201A;ash: full, 1/2, 1/8 and 1/32 power. 05

The simple rear panel layout relies on in-camera menus for all adjustments, apart from manual power settings of the ďŹ&#x201A;ash and the LED lamp. 06

As with the Manual button, repeated pressing of the LED button cycles through the four available power output levels.

6 5 4 3 2

NiMH Alkaline

1 0

As usual, Ni-MH batteries enable faster recycling, but speeds are a little slow

TTL ACCURACY 0.8

E-TTL Accuracy (+/-EV)

the host camera. This time, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a more long-winded process that involves delving into the Shooting> )ODVK&RQWURO!([WHUQDO)ODVK Function Settings submenu. The same process is required for VHOHFWLQJUHDUFXUWDLQĂ DVKRU high-speed sync (HSS) modes. Worse still, these functions can only be accessed in the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative Zone modes, such as P, Av, Tv and M, and are unavailable in Basic Zone and scene modes like Auto, Portrait and Landscape. At least you can select manual output levels directly on the Ă DVKJXQ5HSHDWHGSUHVVLQJRIWKH M or LED buttons cycles through the four power settings available for

The 44 AF-2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple slave mode enables easy wireless triggering for off-camera ďŹ&#x201A;ash, and results that look much more three-dimensional

Seconds

When mounted in the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hotshoe, the fairly central position of the ďŹ&#x201A;ash can give rise to two-dimensional portraits that lack modelling

1/ 2

1/

32

1/ 8

0

0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 -0.2 -0.4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0.6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0.8

Accuracy of TTL ďŹ&#x201A;ash metering is better than other Metz ďŹ&#x201A;ashguns weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tested

VERDICT The 44 AF-2 is quick and easy to use in basic auto and slave modes, and its LED lamp is a bonus for video, but manual adjustments lack precision and rely on long-winded in-camera menu settings.

While the ďŹ&#x201A;ashgun is well built, it can be ďŹ ddly to change settings manually

FEATURES BUILD & HANDLING PERFORMANCE VALUE OVERALL 101


SUPERTEST

THE CONTENDERS

Canon EF 20mm Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM f/2.8 USM £455/$600 £385/$540

Canon EF 28mm Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM f/2.8 IS USM £380/$600 £390/$550

Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM A £630/$900

Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A £600/$850

Tamron SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD £500/$600

Zeiss Milvus 2.0/35 ZE £830/$1120

102

www.digitalcameraworld.com


WIDE PRIME LENSES

WIDE-ANGLE

PRIMES For a better view on the world, Matthew Richards tests the top prime lenses for landscape photography

ast month’s Super Test featured our favourite wide-angle zoom lenses for shooting landscapes. There was a good mix of APS-C format designs for cameras like the 750D, 80D and 7D Mark II, as well as full-frame compatible lenses to suit bodies like the 6D and 5DS. Zoom lenses rule for convenience, but they’re not necessarily the sharpest tools in the box. That said, some top-quality zooms, like the Sigma 24-35mm f/2 DG HSM A, can deliver extraordinarily good image quality with a fast available aperture, a bit like having three popular focal lengths of prime lenses wrapped up in one package. Even so, many photographers prefer the purity of a prime lens. Advantages can include reductions in distortion and colour fringing, as well as greater resistance to ghosting and flare. One thing you won’t really find is a wide-angle prime for APS-C format cameras, although there are a couple of landscape-friendly options that we’ll touch on later. Instead, the market is mainly for full-frame compatible lenses that typically have a focal length of between 20mm and 35mm. Some add high-tech frills, like image stabilization, while others major on optical simplicity and might not even include autofocus. We’ve rounded up some of the most attractive options that aim for excellence in image quality while also being sufficiently compact and lightweight to be manageable when you’re out trekking to the perfect vantage point to shoot scenic splendour or on a city break.

L

The Canon Magazine

103


SUPERTEST

CANON EF 20mm f/2.8 USM ÂŁ385/$540

01

01

The EW-75II lens hood isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t supplied with the lens.

Short and wide, this lens gives a big viewing angle without being overly large, but is an old design

W

The 72mm attachment thread makes it easy to ďŹ t and use ďŹ lters.

02

03

Ring-type ultrasonic autofocus is typically quick and quiet, with full-time manual override.

Performance

Good corner-sharpness is a big ask for such a wide-angle lens and, sure enough, images do tend to look a little soft around the edges. Centre-sharpness is good and very consistent between f/2.8 and f/8. Distortion is more noticeable than the lab results would suggest, with a moustacheVKDSHGSURĂ&#x20AC;OHDQGFRORXU fringing is more evident than from most other lenses on test.

04

Depth of ďŹ eld markings are shown on the focus scale.

03

05

04

The aperture is poorly rounded, based on just ďŹ ve aperture blades.

05

VERDICT

2500

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

HOW WE TEST We combine real-world shooting with rigorous lab tests to arrive at our ratings

104

02

Another bonus is that WKHPPĂ&#x20AC;OWHUDWWDFKPHQW thread makes regular screw-in RUVTXDUHUHFWDQJXODUĂ&#x20AC;OWHUV HDV\WRĂ&#x20AC;W

Sharpness

hereas all the other lenses in the group are thoroughly modern designs, this one is a 24-year-old veteran. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly not an old dog, but it lacks new tricks like image stabilization, featured in all the other Canon lenses on test. In its favour, the combination of a 20mm focal length and f/2.8 widest aperture enables a very wide viewing angle of 94 degrees (measured on the diagonal) while retaining a reasonably small and lightweight build. Indeed, the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 lens is nearly twice as long and almost 2.5 times heavier. Despite its age, the lens includes aspherical and Super UD (Ultra-low Dispersion) elements, ring-type ultrasonic autofocus and Super Spectra coatings. Although originally GHVLJQHGIRUĂ&#x20AC;OPFDPHUDVWKH coatings make the lens very viable for digital cameras, ZKHUHJKRVWLQJDQGĂ DUHLV more of a problem due to the image sensor being more UHĂ HFWLYHWKDQDIUDPHRIĂ&#x20AC;OP

FEATURES

VALUE f/4

f/5.6

f/8

Centre

f/11

f/16 f/22

o test real-world performance, we use lenses in all sorts of lighting conditions, for indoor and outdoor shooting scenarios. We check for good build quality and handling, smooth and precise operation of all controls, and we test the speed and accuracy of autofocus. We typically test full-frame compatible lenses on a range of full-frame and APS-C format bodies, whereas lenses that are designed speciďŹ cally for APS-C format bodies are only tested on cameras like the 80D and 7D Mark II. In-camera corrections

T

OVERALL

Edge

for chromatic aberrations and peripheral illumination (where available) are disabled throughout all testing, to better reveal the true performance of each lens. We also run a full range of lab tests under controlled conditions, using the Imatest Master and DxO Analyser suites. Photos of test charts are taken across the range of apertures and zoom settings (where available), then analysed for sharpness, distortion and chromatic aberrations (colour fringing). A summary of results is shown on the following pages. www.digitalcameraworld.com


WIDE PRIME LENSES

CANON EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM £455/$600

01

FEATURES 01

Super Spectra coatings reduce ghosting and flare.

Small, lightweight and entirely manageable, it’s a smart 24mm choice for handheld shooting 02

03

Image stabilization is activated with a simple on/off switch.

Performance

Stabilization lives up to its claims, while sharpness is pretty good across the whole frame at apertures of between f/5.6 and f/16. Lab scores for barrel distortion are worse than from the Canon 20mm lens, but they’re of a more uniform shape and easier to correct when editing images. Colour fringing can be noticeable in the extreme corners of the image, of the same order as from the Canon 20mm lens.

04

More rounded than the Canon 20mm’s aperture, based on seven, rather than five, blades.

03

05

04

VERDICT

2500

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

OVERALL

The Canon Magazine

Ta m ro n

35 m m Ze f/ iss 1.8 35 m m f/ 2

f/ 1.4

f/ 1.4 Si gm a

24 m m

f/ 2

20 m m

35 m m

Si gm a

20 m m Ca no n 0

All wide primes exhibit barrel distortion to some extent

–0.5

-0.57 -0.77

Distortion

quick glance at the lab results would suggest that the Canon 20mm delivers the least amount of barrel distortion. However, distortion from this lens is irregular in shape that makes for greater severity away from the extreme edges of the frame. It’s actually the Sigma 24mm lens that is most impressive for control over distortion, which is no mean feat considering that its focal length is shorter than some other lenses in the group. The Sigma 20mm gives the worst lab score but this is in keeping with its ultra-wide viewing angle, and its distortion is more uniform than from the Canon 20mm lens.

f/ 2. 8

Edge

Ca no n

Centre

f/16 f/22

f/ 2. 8

f/11

28 m m

f/8

Ca no n

f/5.6

f/ 2. 8

f/4

24 m m

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

VALUE

DISTORTION A

As with other Canon and Sigma lenses, the mounting plate isn’t weather-sealed.

05

Ca no n

M

track to shoot landscapes and don’t want to weigh yourself down with a tripod.

Sharpness

uch smaller and less than half the weight of Canon’s latest 24mm f/1.4 lens, this one can easily squeeze into a spare corner of your gadget bag, or even in a spare coat pocket. Although small in size, it’s still big in viewing angle at 84 degrees. As you’d expect, that’s about halfway between the viewing angles of the 28mm and 20mm lenses on test, and considerably wider than a 35mm lens. This lens isn’t from Canon’s L-series stable and, as such, it doesn’t have weather-seals and isn’t supplied with a hood, which you’d need to buy separately for about £50/$50. On the plus side, the lens costs less than half the price of Canon’s new L-series 24mm f/1.4 and adds image stabilization, which is altogether absent on the pricier lens. It’s a lategeneration edition of stabilizer as well, with a four-stop EHQHÀWLQEHDWLQJFDPHUD shake. That’s an advantage if you’re heading off the beaten

02

The same optional EW-65B lens hood is used for this and the Canon 28mm lens.

–1

–1.5

-1.15

-0.81 -1.16

-1.28

-1.67

–2

–2.5

-2.51

–3

Negative results of higher values indicate greater barrel distortion

105


SUPERTEST

CANON EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM ÂŁ390/$550

01

FEATURES 01

The optical path has nine elements in seven groups.

The littlest and lightest lens in the group, this diminutive lens deďŹ nitely wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t weigh you down

S

Even so, the longer focal length of the 28mm coupled with the same f/2.8 aperture makes it a bit easier to blur the background when shooting close-ups.

02

03 04

Performance

The 28mm lens has two fewer optical elements than the 24mm but overall image quality is extremely similar. Our lab tests reveal that centre-sharpness is slightly better at apertures of f/4 to f/5.6, while edge-sharpness is marginally worse at f/5.6. The 28mm lens also gives very slight reductions in colour fringing and barrel distortion.

Like the Canon 24mm and 35mm lenses, depth of ďŹ eld markings are given for f/11 and f/22 apertures. 04

Ring-type ultrasonic autofocusing is swift and very quiet. 05 03

The aperture is based on a seven-blade diaphragm.

05

VERDICT

2500

Sharpness

hedding a few millimetres and grams compared with the Canon 24mm, this is the outright smallest and lightest in the group, at 68x52mm and just 260g. Even so, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only 20g lighter than the 24mm, and both lenses have the same PPĂ&#x20AC;OWHUWKUHDGDQGWDNH the same optional EW-65B hood. Further similarities include fully internal focus mechanisms, ring-type ultrasonic autofocus systems and the same late-generation image stabilizer with a four-stop rating. They also share the same widest aperture of f/2.8.  7KHRQO\VLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQW difference is that the 28mm gives a narrower angle of view, at 75 degrees instead of the 24mm lensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 84 degrees. <RXPLJKWĂ&#x20AC;QGWKDWPPLV a preferable focal length when shooting landscapes. Another slight difference is that the 28mm lens has a longer minimum focus distance of 0.23m compared with the 0.2m of the 24mm.

02

The ďŹ lter thread is 58mm and EW-65B hood is optional.

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

VALUE f/4

f/5.6 Centre

f/8

f/11

f/16 f/22

OVERALL

Edge

THE WIDE VIEW Just how wide are these prime lenses? ll of the lenses on test are full-frame compatible, and best suited to landscape photography on a full-frame body. That said, the 1.6x crop factor of APS-C cameras means that a 20mm lens gives an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;effectiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; focal length of 32mm and a 24mm lens becomes equivalent to 38.4mm. This series of shots shows how viewing angles compare at various focal lengths, including the 50mm of a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;standardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lens.

A

106

20mm

24mm www.digitalcameraworld.com


WIDE PRIME LENSES

CANON EF 35mm f/2 IS USM £380/$600

01

01

The EW-72 hood will set you back about £50/$50.

This is the narrowest Canon lens in the group, but with an f/2 maximum aperture, it’s also the widest

W

28mm The Canon Magazine

02

IURQWHOHPHQWDQGPPÀOWHU attachment thread. The optional EW-72 hood is also correspondingly larger.

02

Centre-sharpness is excellent, even at the widest aperture of f/2, while edge-sharpness becomes very good at f/4. In fact, sharpness in the edges and corners of the frame beats that of any of the other Canon lenses on test, throughout the aperture range. Colour fringing is also better controlled than in the other Canon lenses. Barrel distortion is marginally more noticeable, but still fairly minimal.

The 67mm filter thread is larger than Canon’s 24mm and 28mm lenses.

03 03

The front element neither rotates nor extends during focusing.

Performance

04

Switches on the lens barrel give access to AF/M focusing and on/off stabilization.

04

05

05

The eight-blade diaphragm is more rounded than in other Canon lenses.

VERDICT

2500

SHARPNESS

ith the joint longest focal length of any lens in the group, this 35mm gives the narrowest viewing angle of any Canon lens on test, at 63 degrees. However, it also has the widest available aperture among the Canon lenses, f/2 being a full f-stop faster than the other lenses’ f/2.8. It still features image stabilization, which is of the same lategeneration and four-stop rating as those of the Canon 24mm and 28mm lenses. Physically a little wider and heavier than the Canon 24mm and 28mm lenses, at 78x63mm and 335g, this is still a relatively small and light lens. It’s also noticeably smaller than the Tamron 35mm f/1.8 lens on test, which, like this one, also features image stabilization. As well as a narrower viewing angle of 63 degrees, this lens has an additional aperture blade than the Canon 24mm and 28mm, with a well-rounded eight-blade diaphragm. It also has a bigger

FEATURES

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

VALUE f/4

f/5.6 Centre

35mm

f/8

f/11

f/16 f/22

OVERALL

Edge

50mm 107


SUPERTEST 01

SIGMA 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM A £630/$900 A bit of a whopper, the world’s widest aperture 20mm lens dwarfs all of the Canon optics in the group

R

01

Internal focusing ensures that the front element remains stationery.

02 03

02

The bulbous front element is protected by the hood.

is nearly twice as long as the Canon 20mm f/2.8 lens, and almost 2.5x heavier. The permanently attached, built-in lens hood also precludes the XVHRIUHJXODUVFUHZLQÀOWHUV RUÀOWHUKROGHUV

03

Removing the slip-on cap reveals a built-in petal shaped hood. 04

Performance

Ring-type ultrasonic autofocusing has the usual full-time manual override.

For such an ultra-wide-angle lens, sharpness is superb across the whole frame. It’s very noticeably better than the Canon 20mm lens in this respect, while colour fringing is also much better controlled. The barrel distortion lab score is worse, but distortion is more uniform in shape and easier to correct during image editing.

05

04

The aperture is controlled by a well-rounded nine-blade diaphragm.

VERDICT

2500

Sharpness

ecent Sigma ‘Art’ series prime lenses include popular focal lengths of 24mm, 35mm and 50mm, all with fast available apertures of f/1.4. We’ve given them glowing reviews over the months. The new 20mm lens goes extra-large on viewing angle (95 degrees), while retaining the hallmark f/1.4 DSHUWXUH,W·VDFWXDOO\WKHÀUVW ultra-wide lens to achieve this, by using a large-diameter double aspherical element that SRVHVDVLJQLÀFDQW manufacturing challenge. The optical path includes WZRÁXRULWHJUDGH)/' HOHPHQWVDQGQROHVVWKDQÀYH SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements, aiming to deliver excellent sharpness and contrast, with minimal colour fringing. Build quality is excellent although, as with other Sigma Art lenses, it doesn’t have weather-seals. There’s no getting away from the fact that the wide viewing angle and wide aperture result in a big build. At 91x130mm and 950g, this

FEATURES

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

VALUE

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

f/4

f/5.6 Centre

f/8

f/11

f/16 f/22 Edge

OVERALL 05

BIG GUNS How do the Canon and Sigma 35mm f/1.4 top-spec lenses compare? he Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM is one of the best 35mm lenses on the market and, at £600/$900, is just a third of the price of the Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM in the UK (half the price in the States). At 80x106mm and 760g, the Canon is bigger and heavier than the Sigma (77x94mm and 665g) but its main claim to fame is that it’s the first lens

T

108

to feature Canon’s newly developed BR (Blue spectrum Refractive) optics. This organic optical material is engineered at molecular level reduce chromatic aberrations and produce greater sharpness and contrast. Even so, performance differences between the two lenses in our lab tests were marginal at best, making the Sigma much better value. www.digitalcameraworld.com


WIDE PRIME LENSES

SIGMA 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A ÂŁ600/$850

01

01

Super Multi-Layer Coatings are applied to reduce ghosting and ďŹ&#x201A;are.

Wider but just as impressive as one of our previous Sigma wide-angle prime Super Test winners

04

Edging ahead of all competing lenses in this group, the lens delivers the best sharpness across the image frame, from the centre to the extreme edges. Contrast is excellent, even at f/1.4, and it tops the lab charts for control of colour fringing and barrel distortion. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simply spectacular.

As with other Sigma Art lenses, the mounting plate lacks a weather-seal ring.

03

05

A nine-blade diaphragm ensures that the aperture is well-rounded. 04

05

VERDICT

2500

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

f/11

f/16 f/22

Centre

Lower values represent less fringing, and therefore better performance

Fringing

4

3

2

f/8 Edge 1

f/ Ze 1.8 iss 35 m m f/ 2

f/ 1.4 Ta m ro n

35 m m

f/ 1.4 Si gm a

24 m m

f/ 2

20 m m

35 m m

Si gm a

f/ 2. 8

Ca no n

20 m m

f/ 2. 8

0

Ca no n

olour fringing, or lateral chromatic aberration, shows up as red, green or blue lines around high-contrast edges in a scene, especially towards the corners of the image frame. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s caused by a lensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inability to focus different wavelengths of light at exactly the same point. All lenses in this test group do quite well to suppress colour fringing, but the standout performers are both Sigma lenses and the Canon 35mm. The Canon 20mm and 24mm are the least impressive.

OVERALL

Edge

f/ 2. 8

f/8

28 m m

f/5.6

Ca no n

f/4

24 m m

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

VALUE

The lowdown on those troublesome fringes

The Canon Magazine

03

The manual focus ring is large and very smooth in operation.

Performance

COLOUR FRINGING C

Unlike the Sigma 20mm lens, this can accommodate ďŹ lters via a 77mm thread.

02

Ca no n

T

02

Up-market glass includes three FLD (Fluorite-grade Low Dispersion) elements and four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements, as well as two aspherical elements, while Super Multi-Layer Coatings FRPEDWJKRVWLQJDQGĂ DUH

Sharpness

he Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art lens was a worthy winner in our Super Test of wide-angle primes, back in issue 100. It also bears up well in comparison to Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest 35mm f/1.4, which is a pricier proposition. This 24mm lens is barely any bigger and exactly the same weight as the 35mm, tipping the scales at 665g, although WKHIURQWHOHPHQWDQGĂ&#x20AC;OWHU attachment thread are larger, the latter being 77mm. The design of the two lenses is very similar, with excellent build quality, a fast ring-type ultrasonic autofocus V\VWHPVPRRWKDQGĂ XLG feeling manual focusing, and the usual focus distance scale beneath a viewing window. A minor difference is that the PPOHQVKDVGHSWKRIĂ&#x20AC;HOG markings for f/8 and f/16, rather than just at f/16 in the 35mm lens. Again, there are no weather seals but the lenses are both compatible with Sigmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s optional USB Dock, IRUDSSO\LQJĂ&#x20AC;UPZDUHXSGDWHV and customization.

FEATURES

109


SUPERTEST

TAMRON SP 35mm $600 f/1.8 Di VC USD £500/

01

FEATURES 01

A fluorine coating on the front element repels moisture and aids cleaning.

This high-quality wide prime lens marks something of a new – and welcome – departure for Tamron

U

02

Low Dispersion), LD (Low Dispersion) and aspherical elements, along with eBAND and BBAR nano-technology coatings to reduce ghosting DQGÁDUH$PXFNUHSHOOHQW ÁXRULQHFRDWLQJLVDOVRDGGHG to the front element. Contrast and sharpness across the frame are impressive but not quite as outstanding as from the Sigma lenses. The Tamron also lags slightly behind the Canon 35mm for sharpness. Colour fringing and barrel distortion are well controlled and, overall, the lens is a very good performer.

The lens comes with a petal shaped hood. 03

Four-stop Vibration Compensation aids handheld shooting. 04

The weather-sealed construction includes a rubber ring around the mounting plate.

Performance

03

05

04

Like the Sigma and Zeiss lenses, the aperture has a nine-blade diaphragm.

05

VERDICT

2500

Sharpness

ntil recently, the only primes manufactured by Tamron were macro optics. That all changed with the advent of 35mm, 45mm and 85mm f/1.8 lenses in recent months. While Sigma has concentrated on f/1.4 prime lenses in its ‘Art’ lineup, Tamron has gone for a slightly narrower aperture that enables a smaller build, but also includes VC (Vibration Compensation), lacking in Sigma’s lenses. As with the stabilized Canon lenses in the group, Tamron’s system gives DEHQHÀWRIDERXWIRXUVWRSV in reducing camera-shake. From the SP (Super Performance) stable, this 35mm lens is smartly turned out with a high-quality feel, a comfortably large and smoothly operating manual focus ring, and a fast ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system. It also beats all of the Canon and Sigma lenses in the group by having a weather-sealed construction. Further attractions include XLD (eXtra

02

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

VALUE f/4

f/5.6

f/8

Centre

f/11

f/16 f/22

OVERALL

Edge

CROP-SENSOR PRIMES Not many primes are produced for APS-C bodies rime lenses that are designed exclusively for APS-C format EOS DSLR bodies are few and far between, but one popular option is the Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM pancake lens. It’s remarkably small and lightweight at just 68x23mm and 125g, yet delivers good image quality and is very affordable at £125/$150. A more high-spec option is the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM A, which produces superb image quality, gives an effective focal length of 48mm (equivalent to a standard lens) and costs £300/$500.

P

110

www.digitalcameraworld.com


WIDE PRIME LENSES

ZEISS MILVUS 2.0/35 ZE £830/$1120

01

01

Zeiss’s legendary T* coatings reduce ghosting and flare.

It’s a classically designed Zeiss lens that, being manual focus-only, lets your left hand join in the fun

W

SWITCHING TO MANUAL Zeiss isn’t the only manufacturer of manual-focus lenses for the digital age

The Canon Magazine

02

The inner barrel extends when focusing, but the 58mm filter thread doesn’t rotate.

02

extending as you twist from LQÀQLW\WRVKRUWHUIRFXV settings. Crucially, however, the front element and 58mm ÀOWHUDWWDFKPHQWWKUHDGGRQ·W rotate during focusing.

03

Most of the outer barrel rotates to enable comfortable manual focusing.

Performance

There’s plenty of sharpness on tap, especially in the f/4 to f/8 sector of the aperture range, where impressive sharpness extends across the whole image frame. Even so, the Zeiss isn’t quite a match for the Sigma 24mm lens that’s also on test. The lens also lags a little behind the Sigma for control over colour fringing and barrel distortion.

04

Focus distances and a depth of field scale are printed on the outer barrel.

03

05

04

05

Top build quality includes weathersealed metal barrels.

VERDICT

2500

Sharpness

ith autofocusing, light metering and shutter-release all being controlled by WKHÀUVWÀQJHURQ\RXUULJKW hand, your left hand can feel a bit left out of the action. That’s not the case with this Zeiss lens, which completely lacks autofocus and, instead, relies purely on manual focusing. In this respect, it’s similar to the rather less expensive Samyang 35mm (see below). Solidly engineered with metal barrels, the Zeiss is only slightly larger than the Canon 35mm f/2 lens on test, but more than twice the weight at 702g. Like the Tamron, it features weather-seals that include a rubber ring around the mounting plate. Almost the entire outer barrel rotates with silky smoothness when manual focusing, enabling excellent precision. Even so, WKHYLHZÀQGHUVRI'6/5V aren’t entirely well suited to manual focus, lacking a split screen and microprism ring. The focusing system itself results in the inner barrel

FEATURES

2000

FEATURES

1500

BUILD & HANDLING

1000

IMAGE QUALITY

500

VALUE

f/1.4-f/2 f/2.8

f/4

f/5.6 Centre

f/8

f/11

f/16 f/22

ess well-known than some lens manufacturers, the Korean Samyang outfit has nevertheless been going about its business for more than 40 years. It makes a range of manual-focus lenses for Canon cameras, but most are more manual than you’d hope for. This is because they feature no electronics at all, so the aperture can’t be controlled from the host camera body. You therefore

L

OVERALL

Edge

need to stop the lens down manually using the lens’s aperture ring, at which point the viewfinder becomes darker, making manual focusing even more difficult. This isn’t a problem with the newer edition of the Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS UMC (£400/$400), which includes all the electronics needed to control the aperture in P, Av, Tv and Basic Zone shooting modes. Build and image quality are good as well.

111


SUPERTEST COMPARISON TABLE CANON EF 20mm f/2.8 USM

CANON EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM

CANON EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM

CANON EF 35mm f/2 IS USM

SIGMA 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM A

SIGMA 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A

TAMRON SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD

ZEISS Milvus 2.0/35 ZE

WEB

www.canon.co.uk

www.canon.co.uk

www.canon.co.uk

www.canon.co.uk

www.sigmaimaging-uk.com

www.sigmaimaging-uk.com

www.tamron.co.uk

www.zeiss.co.uk

FULL-FRAME COMP

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

EFFECTIVE FOCAL LENGTH (APS-C)

32mm

38.4mm

44.8mm

56mm

32mm

38.4mm

56mm

56mm

IMAGE STABILIZER

No

4-stop

4-stop

4-stop

No

No

4-stop

No

ANGLE OF VIEW – DIAGONAL

94 degrees

84 degrees

75 degrees

63 degrees

95 degrees

84 degrees

63 degrees

62 degrees

MINIMUM APERTURE

f/22

f/22

f/22

f/22

f/16

f/16

f/16

f/22

ELEMENTS/GROUPS

11/9

11/9

9/7

10/8

15/11

15/11

10/9

9/7

DIAPHRAGM BLADES

5 blades

7 blades

7 blades

8 blades

9 blades

9 blades

9 blades

9 blades

MINIMUM FOCUS DISTANCE

0.25m

0.2m

0.23m

0.24m

0.28m

0.25m

0.2m

0.3m

MAX MAGNIFICATION 0.14x FACTOR

0.23x

0.2x

0.24x

0.14x

0.19x

0.4x

0.19x

AUTOFOCUS ACTUATOR

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

Ultrasonic (ring-type)

None

FULL-TIME MANUAL FOCUS OVERRIDE

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

N/A

INTERNAL FOCUS

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Partial

No

FILTER SIZE

72mm

58mm

58mm

67mm

77mm

77mm

67mm

58mm

HOOD

EW-75II

EW-65B

EW-65B

EW-72

Fixed, built-in

Included

Included

Included

DIMENSIONS (DIA x LENGTH)

78x71mm

68x56mm

68x52mm

78x63mm

91x130mm

85x90mm

80x81mm

75x80mm

WEIGHT

405g

280g

260g

335g

950g

665g

480g

702g

TARGET PRICE

£385/$540

£455/$600

£390/$550

£380/$600

£630/$900

£600/$850

£500/$600

£830/$1120

FEATURES BUILD & HANDLING IMAGE QUALITY VALUE OVERALL

THE WINNER IS... SIGMA 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A This is the prime target when choosing a landscape lens he Sigma 24mm delivers the best sharpness on test, from the centre to the extreme corners. Contrast is similarly excellent, while colour fringing and distortion are superbly well controlled. It’s great value, considering that it has a fast f/1.4 aperture. The Sigma 20mm f/1.4 is also impressive, although the lack of a filter attachment thread is a drawback.

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112

Of the 35mm lenses, the Canon is the best value, although the Tamron has superior build quality and adds weatherseals. The Zeiss is capable of lovely image quality, but lacks autofocus and is relatively poor value. If you want to go wider than 35mm, but not spend too much, the Canon 24mm and 28mm lenses are similar in build, stabilization and image quality. www.digitalcameraworld.com


DON’T MISS NEXT ISSUE

NEW

THE CANON EOS-1D MK II TESTED!*

GREAT CANON SKILLS!

The Really Wild Show Canon pro Andrew Fusek Peters shows you how to capture brilliant wildlife photos, from your car, garden and shed! Andrew Fusek Peters

FREE VIDEOS! In the next Canon Skills chapter… QUnderwater portraits QFruity flash photography Q Bluebell wood scenes QAdd sparkle to portraits Q Change light QRetouching

PLUS ALL THIS... QTalented fashion photographer Lara Jade talks Canon cameras and shooting Stateside QThe Apprentice: learn how to take great portraits of pet dogs QCanon School: wide-angle lens tips QSuper Test: filter kit systems

ISSUE 115 ON SALE 28 JUNE * Content subject to change – but next issue we really will have the EOS-1D X Mk II full test! Sorry it couldn't feature in this issue.

Lara Jade


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116


LANDSCAPE & TRAVEL WORKSHOPS 06

CHRIS HEPBURN PHOTOGRAPHY

www.chrishepburn.co.uk

CHRIS Hepburn is a professional landscape and travel photographer with over five years’ experience, leading one-to-one and small group workshops in the Peak District National Park. Whether you’re a complete beginner or a long-time hobbyist, he will guide you to stunning locations and help you get the most from your camera. Chris also runs urban architecture workshops at Salford Quays, Manchester, and his friendly, informal workshops have been featured on BBC’s Midlands Today.

05

PHOTO TRAINING OVERSEAS

www.pto-uk.com

JOIN the annual Photo Training Overseas training and networking event for its 30th year in one of the most exciting countries in the world – Cuba, in January 2017. The programme will feature leading landscape/seascape photographer John Miskelly, Romanian wedding guru Marian Sterea, Photoshop expert Guy Gowan, street photography and creative people pictures by Richard P Walton, social media covered by Jenny Johnston, and newborn photography by Daniela Sterea.

08

TIM WILCOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

www.timwilcock.com

THE Isle of Skye is one Britain’s most photogenic locations. Join local photographer Tim Wilcock on one of his workshops or let him arrange a bespoke one-to-one or group tuition session for you, tailored to your learning requirements. With Tim’s local knowledge of the area, you’ll visit locations to suit your fitness levels with guidance on the ‘art’ of photography, aimed at achieving your own quality images.

07

LAKELAND PHOTOGRAPHIC HOLIDAYS

www.lakelandphotohols.com

LAKELAND Photographic Holidays is the longest-running residential photographic centre in the UK, operated by John and Gail Gravett since 1999. Workshops use the amazing Lake District as the subject, and include four- and six-night landscape workshops, a black-and-white workshop, a Photoshop for landscape photographers workshop and a four-night residential young persons’ workshop for students aged 16-21. Recommended by BBC’s Countryfile.

117


BUYERS’ GUIDE

quid to With prices ranging from a couple of hundred ryone, several thousand, Canon has a DSLR to suit eve pro… from the complete beginner to most demanding

What to look for Canon EOS DSLRs Canon splits its EOS lineup into entry-level, enthusiast and professional ranges, and the fewer digits the more upmarket the camera; so the new 1300D is the most basic, the 750D/760D for intermediates, while the new 80D is for more advanced enthusiasts. Expect greater ease of use (with thumboperated scrollwheels replacing cumbersome cursor keys), more robust build quality (with weather-sealing and tough magnesiumalloy shells), more advanced functionality, and full-frame (rather than smaller APS-C) image sensors with more expensive EOS models.

DSLR/CSC prices quoted are body-only unless stated

CANON EOS 1300D (REBEL T6)

TESTED IN ISSUE 114 PRICE: £289/$499 (US PRICE WITH KIT LENS)

CANON’S entry-level, budget-friendly EOS DSLR gets up a minor upgrade over its predecessor with added Wi-Fi and NFC to make it easy to instantly share images online. A basic 18Mp sensor, ISO6400 and 3fps are all specs ideal for a beginner’s first ‘proper’ camera.

CANON EOS 100D (REBEL SL1) IT’S SMALLER than any other Canon DSLR but is big on features and is something of a step up in sophistication from the 1200D, with a newergeneration image processor, high-res touchscreen and ‘hybrid CMOS AF’ for effective continuous autofocus during movie capture.

ENTRY LEVEL

CANON EOS 700D (REBEL T5i) WITH A faster continuous drive rate than the 100D, better AF and the bonus of a vari-angle touchscreen, the 700D is more versatile for shooting from extreme angles or around corners. It’s a lovely lightweight camera but is now outclassed by the newer 750D.

CANON EOS 750D (REBEL T6i) HEADLINE attractions include a new 24.2Mp high-resolution image sensor and DIGIC 6 processor, plus a 19-point autofocus system. It beats the older 700D in all these respects, and adds Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity for easy image sharing and printing.

CANON EOS 760D (REBEL T6s) BUILDING on the impressive features of the 750D, the 760D adds a secondary info LCD on the top and Quick Control Dial on the rear. This improves handling and makes it feel more like an ‘enthusiast’ model, rather than an entry-level DSLR, and is worth the extra outlay.

118

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.8x, 95% 100-6400 (12,800 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) Fixed, 3-inch, 920k-dot TFT 3fps (6 Raw/1100 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 105 PRICE: £279/$399 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.87x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) 3in touchscreen, 1040K dots 4fps (7 Raw/28 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 105 PRICE: £359/$649 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.85x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (6 Raw/22 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 105 PRICE: £459/$749 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 75 PRICE TESTED IN ISSUE 108 PRICE: £549/$849 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

www.digitalcameraworld.com


BUYERS’ GUIDE CAMERAS CANON EOS M10

CANON EOS M3

Sensor ISO AF

TESTED IN ISSUE 102 PRICE: £429/$479 Sensor ISO AF

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) Hybrid CMOS AF II & 49 AF points

CANON EOS 80D

TESTED IN ISSUE 113 PRICE: £999/$1450 THE 80D builds upon its 70D predecessor with 25% more pixels, 45 cross-type AF points, improved ISO performance and retains the ability to capture 7fps bursts. It can record movies at double-speed 50/60fps for slow-motion, and has NFC data transfer in addition to Wi-Fi.

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.95x, 100% 100-16,000 (25,600 expanded) 45-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 7fps (25 Raw/110 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 108 PRICE: £1179/$1499 HERE’S the king of action-packed APS-C format cameras. A long-overdue revamp of the original 7D, it has 65-point AF with advanced tracking, 10fps continuous drive, dual DIGIC 6 processors and GPS, all wrapped up in a tough, weathersealed magnesium alloy shell.

CANON EOS 6D

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, APS-C (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 1.0x, 100% 100-16,000 (51,200 expanded) 65-point (all cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 10fps (31 Raw/unlimited JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

ENTHUSIAST

CANON EOS 7D Mk II

TESTED IN ISSUE 108 PRICE: £1119/$1399 AMAZINGLY good value for a full-frame EOS DSLR in a medium-sized body, the 6D combines a respectable 20.2Mp sensor with super-high sensitivities of up to ISO102,400. Image quality is excellent and there’s built-in Wi-Fi and GPS, but the 6D has a fairly basic AF system.

CANON EOS 5D Mk III

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, full-frame (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.71x, 97% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 11-point (1 cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 4.5fps (17 Raw/1250 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 61 PRICE: £2179/$2499 REMARKABLY compact and lightweight for a fully pro and weather-sealed full-frame body, the 22Mp 5D Mk III boasts the same top-notch AF system as the 1D X and delivers stunning image quality, even under very low lighting. The big, bright viewfinder is brilliant.

Sensor

22.3Mp, full-frame (5760x3840 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 6fps (18 Raw/16,270 JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 103 PRICES: £2699/$3699 (£3199/$3899)

THE world’s first 50Mp full-frame DSLR delivers huge and amazingly detailed hi-res images. The higher-cost 5DS R adds a ‘low-pass cancellation filter’ for marginally sharper shots. As expected with such a high-res sensor, max ISO and drive rate are lower than with the 5D Mk III.

Sensor

50.6Mp, full-frame (8688x5792 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer)

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-6400 (50-12,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 5fps (14 Raw/510 JPEG)

Memory card

CANON EOS-1D X

CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

TESTED IN ISSUE 66 PRICE: £4199/$4599 CANON’S flagship full-frame pro-level EOS DSLR boasts ultra-fast 14fps shooting and super-high ISO, along with sublime handling. Body build quality is rock-solid, yet image resolution is relatively modest, especially compared with the 5DS/R. NEW EOS-1D X Mk II TESTED NEXT ISSUE

Sensor

18.1Mp, full-frame (5184x3456 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.76x, 100% 100-51,200 (50-204,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 12–14fps (38 Raw/180 JPEG) 2x CompactFlash

119

PROFESSIONAL

() CANON EOS 5DS (5DS R)

The Canon Magazine

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) Hybrid CMOS AF III & 49 AF points

CSC

TESTED N/A PRICE : £269/$499 (with lens)


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Choosing lenses Key factors to watch out for THE MAIN factors to consider in a lens are its focal length, maximum aperture, and whether or not it’s full-frame compatible. We’ve categorized lenses by focal length range – from wide-angle to telephoto. The larger a lens’s maximum aperture, the ‘faster’ it’s considered to be – allowing you to control depth of field more, and offering better options in low light. Zooms are more flexible than primes, but tend not to have such fast maximum apertures. Full-frame lenses will also work with ‘crop-sensor’ EOS D-SLRs, but crop-sensor lenses aren’t compatible with full-frame cameras.

n

d

0.15m 0.22m 0.24m 0.28m 0.28m 0.28m 0.28m 0.24m 0.24m 0.28m 0.28m 0.28m 0.24m 0.28m 0.14m 0.3m 0.25m 0.28m 0.28m

0.34x 0.15x 0.17x 0.16x 0.22x 0.23x 0.24x 0.13x 0.15x 0.16x 0.23x 0.23x 0.2x 0.2x 0.39x 0.09x 0.2x 0.19x 0.21x

None 67mm 77mm None 82mm 77mm 77mm None 82mm None 72mm 82mm 77mm None None 77mm 77mm None 82mm

7 7 6 9 7 9 7 7 7 6 9 9 7 9 6 9 9 9 9

90 113 113 101 104 113 113 113 113 113 90 113 113 113 87 87 87

TELEPHOTO ZOOMS

O

d

O

we

£200/$300

No

4.5x

Yes

f/4-5.6

375g

0.85m

0.29x

58mm

7

107

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM

£1500/$2000

Yes

2.9x

Yes

f/2.8

1490g

1.2m

0.21x

77mm

8

107

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x Samyang 650-1300mm MC IF f/8-16 Sigma 50-500mm f4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro Sigma APO 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM S Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM S Sigma 200-500mm f/2.8 EX DG Sigma 300-800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD Macro

£945/$1250 £795/$1150 £440/$600 £340/$650 £880/$1350 £1090/$1400 £190/$200 £220/$180 £1800/$2100 £8600/$11,000 £265/$240 £760/$1510 £750/$1150 £100/$150 £150/$150 £2600/$3600 £800/$990 £1250/$1800 £12,700/$26,000 £5500/$8000 £475/$770 £930/$1500 £90/$165

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.9x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x 4.3x 4.3x 4.0x 4.0x 4.0x 2.8x 2.0x 10.0x 2.9x 4.3x 4.3x 2.5x 4.0x 4.0x 2.5x 2.7x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x

No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No

f/2.8 f/4 f/4 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4 f/8-16 f/4.5-6.3 f/2.8 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/2.8 f/5-6.3 f/5-6.3 f/2.8 f/5.6 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/4-5.6

1310g 760g 705g 630g 1050g 720g 480g 480g 1640g 3620g 2000g 1970g 1430g 545g 550g 3390g 1930g 2860g 15,700g 5880g 1320g 1470g 458g

1.5m 1.2m 1.2m 1.5m 1.2m 1.4m 1.5m 1.5m 0.98m 2.0m 5.0m 0.5-1.8m 1.4m 0.95m 0.95m 1.5-2.5m 2.8m 2.6m 2.0-5.0m 6.0m 0.95m 1.3m 0.95m

0.16x 0.21x 0.21x 0.26x 0.21x 0.19x 0.25x 0.25x 0.31x 0.15x 0.2x 0.32x 0.13x 0.5x 0.5x 0.12x 0.2x 0.2x 0.13x 0.14x 0.32x 0.13x 0.5x

77mm 67mm 67mm 58mm 67mm 58mm 58mm 58mm 77mm 52mm 95mm 95mm 77mm 58mm 58mm 105mm 95mm 105mm 72mm 46mm 77mm 77mm 62mm

8 8 8 8 8 6 7 7 9 9 0 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

64 107 96 107 107 90 15 70 100 77

+++ +++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++ ++++ +++ +++ +++ ++++ +++++

94 107 110 96 98

++++ ++++ +++ +++ ++++

106

+++++

64 107 96

+++ ++++ +++ ++++ +++++

Tamron SP AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

£240/$450

Yes

4.3x

Yes

f/4-5.6

765g

1.5m

0.25x

62mm

9

107

Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD

£800/$1090

Yes

4.0x

Yes

f/5-6.3

1951g

2.7m

0.2x

95mm

9

94

ds ar Aw

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Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

120

O

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Fil

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Ma

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++++ ++++ +++ +++++ ++++ +++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++++ +++++ +++ +++++ +++ +++ +++

ar

540g 240g 385g 1180g 640g 615g 500g 555g 520g 670g 810g 940g 406g 1100g 350g 550g 530g 950g 600g

Aw

Is s

f/4 f/4.5-5.6 f/3.5-4.5 f/4 f/2.8 f/4 f/4 f/4.5-5.6 f/3.5 f/4.5-5.6 f/1.8 f/2 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/4

tin

Iri

No Yes No No No Yes No No No No No No No Yes No No No No No

TELEPHOTO ZOOMS

g

re

Fil

1.9x 1.8x 2.2x 2.2x 2.2x 2.2x 2.4x 2.0x 2.0x 2.0x 1.9x 1.5x 2.4x 2.0x 1.7x 1.5x 2.3x 1.8x 2.1x

Ra

Ma

Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes No Yes No No No Yes Yes

ds

vie

es lad

Mi

£900/$1250 £180/$280 £380/$650 £2650/$3000 £1050/$1500 £685/$1000 £500/$700 £500/$700 £330/$450 £530/$950 £610/$800 £700/$1000 £350/$500 £850/$1200 £430/$510 £365/$450 £405/$450 £580/$560 £430/$450

te

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sb

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xm

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Ma

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ic a

ta dis

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ti o

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ti o iz a b il

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es

Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 II DG HSM Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM A Sigma 24-35mm f/2 DG HSM A Tamron SP AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II LD Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tokina 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 AT-X DX Fisheye Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO DX II Tokina 12-28mm f/4 AT-X Pro DX Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO FX Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X PRO FX

ion

Im

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WIDE-ANGLE ZOOMS

WIDE-ANGLE ZOOMS

Pr

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KEY: O BEST VALUE AWARD O BEST ON TEST AWARD

iz e

Rs, With over 150 lenses available for Canon DSL Here’s picking the best for the job can be a minefield. glass the lowdown on all currently available EOS-fit

O

O O

www.digitalcameraworld.com


BUYERS’ GUIDE LENSES n

we

d

ti o

ds

g

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ar

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ar Aw

g

Is s

ds

iew rev

es Iri

O O

None 77mm 72mm 77mm 58mm 52mm 82mm 58mm 58mm 72mm 72mm 67mm None None None None None None 77mm 77mm 82mm 77mm 122mm None None None None 77mm 77mm 62mm 67mm 67mm 52mm 52mm 95mm 82mm 82mm 67mm 58mm 72mm 58mm 58mm

6 8 5 8 7 7 8 7 7 8 9 8

6 6 7 6 8 8 8 8 6 6 7 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

g

rev

90 114

+++++ +++

114 110

++++ ++++

67 114

+++ ++++

108 114

+++++ ++++

74

+++

90 100

++++ ++++

87 87 87 44 114 114 100 100 114

++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++++ +++++ ++++ +++++ ++++

44

+++++

114

++++

ar

0.15x 0.14x 0.14x 0.17x 0.23x 0.27x 0.34x 0.18x 0.2x 0.18x 0.21x 0.24x 0.13x

Aw

0.2m 0.25m 0.25m 0.25m 0.2m 0.16m 0.21m 0.25m 0.23m 0.3m 0.28m 0.24m 0.22m 0.3m 0.3m 0.25m 0.2m 0.28m 0.2m 0.25m 0.2m 0.3m 0.15m 0.14m 0.14m 0.14m 0.15m 0.28m 0.25m 0.3m 0.3m 0.2m 0.2m 0.22m 0.25m 0.3m 0.22m 0.25m 0.24m 0.3m 0.3m 0.3m

tin

645g 820g 405g 650g 280g 125g 780g 310g 260g 580g 760g 335g 400g 630g 435g 600g 530g 560g 590g 680g 680g 660g 1560g 470g 400g 475g 370g 950g 665g 435g 665g 480g 240g 230g 820g 510g 720g 600g 580g 850g 570g 702g

ds

iew

ed

f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/1.8 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/2 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2 f/1.4 f/3.5 f/1.4 f/4.5 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2 f/2 f/1.4 f/2 f/2

Ra

Iri

No No No No Yes No No No Yes No No Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes No No No No No No No No No No

ue

Fil

None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None

Is s

Ma

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

te

Min

sb

rs

lad

iz e

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a ti o ific

We ig

xm

agn

dis us

Ma

£1530/$2100 £1450/$2150 £385/$540 £1100/$1550 £455/$600 £130/$150 £1480/$1900 £345/$510 £390/$550 £960/$1100 £1800/$1800 £380/$600 £250/$215 £290/$290 £210/$250 £330/$400 £370/$470 £270/$290 £270/$360 £430/$530 £650/$775 £430/$430 £4980/$8290 £580/$900 £615/$900 £480/$600 £475/$610 £630/$900 £600/$850 £360/$500 £630/$900 £500/$600 £505/$500 £440/$480 £2100/$2950 £1090/$1395 £1300/$1845 £1270/$1700 £980/$1285 £1300/$1845 £840/$1120 £830/$1120

ge

O

O

O

O O O

O

121

WIDE-ANGLE PRIMES

WIDE-ANGLE PRIMES

Ima

fo c

+++++ ++++ +++ ++++

Ma

ht

pe

92 110 92 92

Fu ll

xa

+++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++++

n

ce tan

re r tu

s at b ili

92 92 6 92 92

Pr

sta

7 6 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 9

Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L (tilt & shift) Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II (tilt & shift) Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Peleng 8mm f/3.5 Fisheye Peleng 17mm f/2.8 Fisheye Samyang 8mm f/3.5 IF MC CSII DH Circular Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Diagonal Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC Samyang T-S 24mm f/3.5 ED AS UMC (tilt & shift) Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS UMC AE Schneider 28mm f/4.5 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 4.5mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM Circular Fisheye Sigma 8mm f/3.5 EX DG Circular Fisheye Sigma 10mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM Diagonal Fisheye Sigma 15mm f/2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM A Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Tamron 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Voigtlander 20mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar SL II Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 Color-Skopar Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 18mm f/3.5 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 25mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 28mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 35mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 35mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Milvus 2.0/35 ZE

The Canon Magazine

tin

67mm 72mm 77mm 62mm 62mm 72mm 67mm 62mm 62mm 62mm 67mm 62mm

N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S 0.16x 0.17x 0.22x 0.11x 0.26x 0.14x 0.19x 0.15x 0.19x 0.4x N/S N/S 0.11x 0.08x 0.2x 0.17x 0.21x 0.2x 0.19x 0.19x

O

ed

0.28x 0.24x 0.30x 0.33x 0.34x 0.33x 0.34x 0.25x 0.27x 0.26x 0.29x 0.34x

Ra

0.39m 0.45m 0.7m 0.39m 0.35m 0.39m 0.39m 0.49m 0.45m 0.49m 0.49m 0.49m

ue

480g 595g 1760g 430g 470g 585g 540g 400g 405g 450g 540g 435g

sb

Fil

f/3.5-5.6 f/3.5-5.6 f/3.5-5.6 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3 f/3.5-6.3

m

lad

iz e rs

Ma

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No

oo

++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++++ ++++ +++++ +++

te

Min

7.5x 11.1x 10.7x 11.1x 13.9x 16.7x 18.8x 11.1x 11.1x 15.0x 10.7x 10.7x

xz

93 84 84 93 85 84 93 57

a ti ific agn

We ig

xm

Ma

No No Yes No No No No No No No Yes Yes me

++++ +++++ +++ ++++ +++++ +++++

on

ce us fo c

xa

ht

pe

dis

r tu

tan

re

ion z at b ili sta age Im

£295/$550 £355/$700 £1795/$2450 £255/$400 £300/$350 £370/$580 £400/$630 £170/$250 £115/$180 £270/$450 £530/$850 £320/$400

ion

Ma

xz

oo

m

me -fr a Fu ll

Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Sigma 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro Tamron 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DI II VC Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Macro Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD Tamron AF 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di LD Macro

-fr a

84 84 110 110 72 93

SUPERZOOMS

SUPERZOOMS

Pr

ic e

7 7 6 7 9 9 7 8 7 7 9 9 7 9 7

Aw

72mm 77mm 58mm 58mm 82mm 77mm 77mm 77mm 77mm 72mm 82mm 82mm 72mm 82mm 67mm

tin

0.21x 0.17x 0.34x 0.36x 0.21x 0.7x 0.3x 0.23x 0.2x 0.36x 0.19x 0.22x 0.21x 0.2x 0.26x

Ra

0.35m 0.35m 0.25m 0.25m 0.38m 0.38m 0.4m 0.45m 0.28m 0.22m 0.38m 0.45m 0.29m 0.38m 0.33m

ue

575g 645g 200g 205g 805g 600g 525g 670g 565g 465g 790g 885g 570g 825g 510g

sb

rs

f/3.5-5.6 f/2.8 f/3.5-5.6 f/3.5-5.6 f/2.8 f/4 f/3.5-5.6 f/4 f/2.8 f/2.8-4 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8

te Fil

Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No

ic e

lad

iz e

nif ag Ma

xm

Mi

5.7x 3.2x 3.1x 3.1x 2.9x 2.9x 4.4x 4.4x 2.9x 4.1x 2.9x 4.4x 2.9x 2.9x 2.7x

nf

We ig

No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes

vie

ic a

tan oc

ht

pe Ma

xa

us

r tu

dis

re

a ti iliz t ab es Im

£510/$800 £505/$880 £130/$200 £170/$250 £1400/$1800 £675/$850 £375/$600 £640/$1000 £310/$420 £330/$400 £600/$800 £650/$900 £330/$500 £680/$1300 £320/$500

ag

Ma

xz

oo

m

me -fr a Fu ll

Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 IF EX DG HSM Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM A Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II VC Tamron SP AF 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di

STANDARD ZOOMS

STANDARD ZOOMS

Pr

ic e

ce

on

KEY: O BEST VALUE AWARD O BEST ON TEST AWARD


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Contacts

52mm 72mm 72mm 58mm 49mm 77mm 90mm 77mm 77mm 67mm 52mm 58mm 77mm

g

re

ds

es Iri

Is s

++++

103 103 110

++++ ++++ ++++

103 110

+++++ ++++

 OO

d

O

we

0.95m 0.85m 0.5m 0.9m 0.9m 1.9m 1.5m 2.0m 1.5m 2.7m 3.3m 3.5m 3.7m 4.5m 6.0m 1.0m 0.8m 2.0m 1.7m 3.5m 0.57m 0.85m 2.5m 4.0m 7.0m 1.0m 0.8m

0.11x 0.13x 0.29x 0.14x 0.19x 0.12x 0.16x 0.18x 0.24x 0.17x 0.13x 0.12x 0.15x 0.15x 0.14x N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S 0.25x 0.12x 0.13x 0.13x 0.11x 0.1x 0.25x

72mm 58mm 58mm 58mm 72mm 52mm 72mm 52mm 77mm 52mm 52mm 77mm 52mm 52mm 52mm 72mm 77mm 95mm 72mm 30mm 104mm 77mm 46mm 46mm 46mm 72mm 77mm

ds

g

re

Iri

Is s

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 9 9 8 8 9 0 0 0 6 9 9 9 9 9 9

103 103

++++ ++++

46

+++++

98 98 54 64 54

+++++ ++++ +++++ ++++ +++++

94

++++

103 98

+++++ ++++

21

++++

ar

1025g 425g 565g 460g 750g 2520g 765g 2400g 1190g 3850g 2100g 1250g 3190g 3920g 4500g 513g 830g 705g 320g 870g 1110g 725g 2400g 3150g 4.9kg 670g 930g

tin

f/1.2 f/1.8 f/2.8 f/2 f/2 f/2 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/4 f/5.6 f/4 f/4 f/5.6 f/1.4 f/2 f/6.3 f/6.3 f/8 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/4.5 f/5.6 f/1.4 f/2



0.5x 1.0x 5.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 0.5x 0.5x

52mm 52mm 58mm 58mm 67mm 72mm 62mm 72mm 86mm 55mm 55mm 58mm 72mm 55mm 67mm 67mm

Is s

50 102 50 102 102 69 102 102 102 102 102 102 69 50

+++ +++ ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ +++++ ++++ ++++ +++ +++ ++++ +++ +++

50

++++

ds

g

re

es Iri

6 7 6 8 9 8 9 9 9 7 9 9 7 9 9 9

ar

0.23m 0.20m 0.24m 0.31m 0.3m 0.48m 0.31m 0.38m 0.47m 0.23m 0.29m 0.3m 0.47m 0.3m 0.24m 0.44m

Aw

280g 335g 710g 600g 625g 1090g 725g 1150g 1640g 350g 400g 550g 985g 540g 570g 680g

tin

f/2.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2 f/2

Ra

No No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No No No No

ue

None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None

sb

rs

Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

te Fil

£230/$300 £305/$470 £755/$1050 £375/$550 £620/$850 £1050/$1400 £380/$770 £670/$1100 £1185/$1700 £300/$525 £290/$500 £350/$750 £590/$740 £330/$380 £940/$1285 £1300/$1545

122

lad

iz e

nif ag xm Ma

Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon MP-E65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro USM Sigma Macro 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 150mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 180mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Tamron SP AF 60mm f/2 Di II LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro VC USD Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di Macro Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO Macro Zeiss Makro Planar T* 50mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Makro Planar 100mm f/2 T* ZE

vie

ic a

we

d

ti o

ce tan us Min

fo c

We ig

ht

dis

r tu Ma

xa

sta Im

age

pe

b ili

m oo xz Ma

-fr a Fu ll

MACRO

MACRO

Pr

ic e

me

z at

re

ion

n

Ra

No No No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No

ue

None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None

sb

Fil

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Aw

es lad

iz e rs

Ma

£1500/$2000 £240/$370 £1100/$1400 £360/$500 £680/$1000 £4400/$5700 £570/$750 £4700/$6100 £960/$1350 £7700/$10,000 £7000/$6900 £890/$1250 £6900/$9000 £8895/$11,500 £9900/$13,000 £230/$270 £360/$530 £125/$150 £105/$110 £170/$190 £2805/$3180 £650/$970 £2280/$3400 £3760/$5000 £4300/$6700 £980/$1285 £1600/$2125

te

Min

xm

We ig

Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM Samyang 85mm f/1.4 IF MC Samyang 135mm f/2 ED UMC Samyang 500mm MC IF f/6.3 Mirror Samyang 500mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Samyang 800mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Schneider 90mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 300mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 500mm f/4.5 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Zeiss Planar T* 85mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE

vie

a ti ific agn

dis us fo c

Ma

ht

pe xa

110

on

ce tan

re r tu

z at b ili sta Im

age

Ma

xz

oo

m

me Fu ll

TELEPHOTO PRIMES

TELEPHOTO PRIMES

Pr

-fr a

7 8 8 8 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9

ar

0.18x 0.16x 0.15x 0.15x 0.21x N/S 0.11x 0.14x 0.18x 0.29x N/S 0.15x 0.15x

Aw

0.3m 0.4m 0.45m 0.45m 0.35m 0.45m 0.65m 0.5m 0.4m 0.29m 0.38m 0.45m 0.5m

tin

130g 645g 580g 290g 160g 575g 1400g 520g 815g 540g 250g 380g 1030g

Ra

f/2.8 f/2.8 f/1.2 f/1.4 f/1.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.8 f/2 f/1.4 f/1.4

ue

Fil

No No No No No No No No No Yes No No No

sb

Ma

None None None None None None None None None None None None None

te

Mi

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

ic e

lad

iz e rs

xm

We ig

£120/$150 £1100/$1400 £995/$1350 £235/$350 £100/$125 £280/$350 £2820/$3365 £300/$500 £630/$950 £530/$600 £445/$450 £530/$725 £2700/$3990

vie

we

ic a nif ag

us oc

Ma

nf

ht

d

ti o

nc ta dis

re r tu pe xa

es

Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC Schneider 50mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Tamron 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Voigtlander 40mm f/2 Ultron Zeiss Planar T* 50mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4

ion

Im

ag

n

e

n ti o b il ta

m oo Ma

xz

Fu ll

STANDARD PRIMES

STANDARD PRIMES

Pr

-fr a

me

iz a

KEY: O BEST VALUE AWARD O BEST ON TEST AWARD ic e

Sigma www.sigma-imaging-uk.com Tamron www.tamron.co.uk Tokina www.tokinalens.com Voigtlander www.robertwhite.co.uk Zeiss www.zeiss.co.uk

Canon www.canon.co.uk Peleng www.digitaltoyshop.co.uk Samyang www.samyang-lens.co.uk Schneider www.linhofstudio.com

OO

www.digitalcameraworld.com


YOURVIEW

FOCUSPOINT Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to hear your thoughts on the mag and all things photographic! Email us at photoplus@futurenet.com

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Passion for pooches

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Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been a subscriber since being introduced to PhotoPlus at The Photography Show. I especially enjoy reading the Photo Stories and ,QVSLUDWLRQVVHFWLRQVDQGĂ&#x20AC;QG them really inspiring. For many years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been a full-time carer/home educator to my son who has autism. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now 18 years old, and this has enabled me to pursue my passion for photography. I have always loved and owned animals myself, and it was this love that drew me to the pet photography market. I use a Canon 5D Mark III, and my favourite lens is my Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L. When shooting dogs, I always spend time getting to know their character. Being armed with treats, squeaky toys and shedloads of patience helps me get the dogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention for the split second I need to capture that PRPHQW,DOVRĂ&#x20AC;QGWKHZD\WR getting a great pet photo is to go

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down to their level, though it can be tricky to capture all the details of a black dog like Tommy (above). Katrina Wilson, Bedford, London

Reuben Wu/Fiilex

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Flash in the bath pan How to shoot abstract photos of water at home, with ďŹ&#x201A;ash and a bath. www.digitalcameraworld.com

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