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APR 2011

reduce reuse recycle:

how clothing swaps can revitalize your wardrobe

resin roots:

building jewelry from the ground up

organic coffee earth-friendly festivals vermicomposting hippie vs hipster

dream green


editor-in-chief

jaremy ediger kevan hannah veronica neufeld albertine watson

layout editor

kevan hannah albertine watson

additional layout

veronica neufeld jarmey ediger

photo editor

albertine watson

cover model

alana ollinger

cover makeup

brett visca for v artistry

additional models

richard neufeld amie seier veronica neufeld

photography

veronica neufeld kevan hannah albertine watson jaremy ediger sander van der wel brian goldschmeid bert luit rĂŠjean brandt

special thanks to

kitty bernes at berns & black salon & spa lisa pointon-reico and sean reico at dconstruct jewelry dave elmore and sylvie herbert at the green action centre darryl reid at green bean coffee imports the winnipeg folk festival sew dandee the pancake house garth hilderman kenton larsen steve vogelsang al guzzi karen press kent gulbrantson tiffany lachuta


06

ed letter

07

rethink resin

a local duo is reshaping the way jewelry is made.

11

spring 2011 mixing and matching.

12

tit for tat

how clothing swaps can work wonders for your wardrobe.

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

15

BURLAP is published monthly by Jaremy Ediger, Kevan Hannah, Veronica Neufeld, and Albertine Watson at The Roblin Centre, Red River College. 160 Princess St, Winnipeg, MB, R3B 1K9.

organic and fair trade roasters are challenging the way you think about coffee.

small wonders

18

growing greener

year by year, the winnipeg folk festival gets a little more sustainable.

22

warming up to wrigglers getting cozy with worms and the vermacomposting craze.

25

hippie vs hipster an indie-style retrospective


letter from the editor

hi there SPRING. That magical time when Winnipeggers look forward to sunshine, sangria, and strappy sandals. We at Burlap would like to see one more term added to that slew: sustainable. We’re thrilled about the growing popularity of hippiehaute trends like bamboo ball gowns, vegan vests and hemp high-heels. The days when “green” and “eco” meant bare feet and greasy hair have been left in the dirt. Just ask Lisa and Sean Pointon-Reico, founders of dconstruct jewelry. Their bangles and baubles, gracing the style section of our premier issue, echo Earth’s eclectic elegance, proving that fast-fashion doesn’t have to be a part of our fast-food culture. Fashion changes with the seasons, and so should your wardrobe. And while we’re all about clothes that grow on trees, we realize that money doesn’t. Enter: clothing swaps. As if sharing cocktails with the girls wasn’t fun

enough already, a swap’s your chance to get your hands on your friend’s killer belted trench – the one you’ve been eyeing up all season – and pass on the oldies taking up valuable closet space. Of course, you wouldn’t be a Winnipegger if you didn’t enjoy great local music and a cuppa dark roast over a heated discussion of public transit. Well, your caffeine rush is now available in organic and fair trade, thanks to the growing green bean movement, and you can enjoy your local music while reducing your carbon footprint with the Folk Festival’s new shuttle bus initiative. Welcome to the new green. VERONICA NEUFELD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


rethinking

resin this page, from left to right: model alanna wears regency gold necklace, banana fibre cuff, lasso coal cuff, swept silver earrings, by dconstruct. ring: model’s own.

common building material is now one of the hottest styles around thanks to a brilliant local duo. written by albertine watson


of resin and concrete as strong industrial building materials, Lisa PointonReico and Sean Reico see them as a foundation for modern jewelry designs. “We think it’s important to try out new materials for our designs - things you may not think of using in mainstream jewelry,” said Sean, who explains that their designs are inspired by their love for minimalist design and modern architecture. Dconstruct Jewelry is a Winnipegbased company that uses concrete and eco-friendly resin to produce highquality, fashionable accessories with a modern edge. accessories so stylish that they’re going to be included in the 2011 Academy Awards gift baskets. The baskets are chock full of unique, luxury gifts given to celebrities who walk the red carpet. The couple hopes the baskets will help promote Dconstruct Jewelry. “It’s kind of amazing. One day we’re just tinkering around in the garage for fun, the next we’re traveling, selling our designs when we get a call from a distributor telling us our stuff will be at the Academy Awards. It’s surreal,” gushed Lisa. It all started when they were building their dream home in 2007. They used a large concrete slab for an island countertop in their kitchen and ended up with some extra material. Not long after, Sean experimented with the material to create a stainless steel and concrete

this page from left to right: migration saffron cuff, ting ting cuff, seaweed cuff, by dconstruct.

pendant necklace for Lisa as a gift. “I got so many compliments on the necklace that we started making them for friends and family, and then I had a store owner ask me about the necklace I was wearing and say that she would carry them if we made them. That’s how it all started,” said Lisa. It was at this point that the couple realized this could be a business and began experimenting with other materials like eco-resin infused with organics such as bamboo and seaweed. Resin is actually a secretion of many plants, particularly coniferous trees. Valued for its use in the production of varnishes, adhesives, and food-glazing agents, it’s also an important source of raw materials and is used in the creation of incense and perfume. In the modern world, the term “resin” has been applied to nearly any component of a liquid that will set into a hard lacquer or enamellike finish. This includes synthetic resins derived from plastics. Dconstruct Jewelry uses synthetic resin made from a minimum of 40 per cent post-consumer recycled material. The eco-resin meets LEED certification, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, an internationally recognized green building certification system. The couple started out selling their products from home and online. Now, Dconstruct Jewelry is sold in boutiques


across Canada including the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Ontario Art Gallery, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Alberta Art Gallery, and the National Gallery of Canada. Pieces are priced between $29 and $49. Sean and Lisa Pointon-Reico have recently completed a successful season of shows at the One of a Kind Show in Toronto, Vancouver, and Chicago where they won third place in the One of a Kind Green competition with eco-resin vases. They have also entered U.S. markets as of January 2011. They manage to do all of this out of their home studio in Winnipeg.As their business continues to grow, Lisa and Sean are looking at ways

to expand their line of designs. “We really want to continue working with the eco-resin, but with different materials inside. We’re also interested in creating housewares,” said Lisa. They aren’t the only ones in town to create ecologically-conscious fashion. Winnipegbased duo Jake + Cleo use reclaimed silver to create their pieces. The silver starts out as a pat of precious metal clay, which contains 100 per cent reclaimed silver. After that, all scraps, filings and dust are captured to be used in future designs. The aesthetic focuses on whimsy, clean lines, and free thinking. Local jewelry shop Vintage Bling is also part of the eco-chic fashion scene in Winnipeg. Founder and designer Dayle Goertzen seeks out

worn, vintage, and broken jewelry to create distinctive pieces. This reduces her business’ impact on the planet and gives the old jewelry a new life. Vintage Bling jewelry has been featured in Chatelaine magazine’s online Style Desk blog, Wedding Bells magazine, and Elle Canada, among others. Ocean’s Thirteen actress Elena Levon was even spotted wearing a large Vintage Bling necklace on the Golden Globes Red Carpet in 2007. Goertzen explains her passion for vintage-sourced jewelry. “I’ve never understood how women could just throw away their jewelry, even if it’s cheap. You can always make something new out of something old. The best part is that it looks better than the original version once I’m done.”

i’ve never understood how women could just throw away their jewelry, even if it’s cheap


n e e b s He’

‘stached

.

Have you? Berns & Black Salon & Spa wants you to look and feel like Manitoba’s greatest. We create avant-garde looks that make you look and feel like you can take over the town. Berns & Black is devoted to creating a calm, eco-friendly environment that treats our earth and clientele with the care they and their moustaches deserve.


spring 2011

this spring is all about mixing and matching different styles to create your own funky look. Florals are edgy, cardis have gone sheer, and accessories reign king. There’s no one theme or style to follow. Switch it up.

sheer asymetric cardigan, $198 by Liis. available at Dolci Trame or at dolcitrameshop.com

‘Folklore’ print top, $700 by Alexander McQueen. available at Feathers, feathersfashion.com, or at alexandermcqueencom

brown leather belt, $42 by American Vintage. available at welikefashion.com

high waisted 70s skinny jean, $64 by Topshop. available at topshop.com

‘Corley’ boot, $54 by Steve Madden. available at nordstrom.com

green w/floral sunglasses, $12 by ModCloth. available at modcloth. com

‘Weave It To Me’ bag, $145 by ModCloth. available at modcloth.com

decadent swanky ring, moonstone, $120 by Nashelle. available at charmandchain.com

80-page steno pad, $10 by Field Notes. available at fieldnotes.com


tit for tat she’s got style, she’s got grace, and it’s cluttering her closet space. clothing swaps are a new way for you to restyle yourself for a sustainable for spring. written by veronica neufeld


give+ take

Part of lightening up your wardrobe for spring means dumping the dead winter weight cluttering your closet, and clothing swaps are a great way to make the process interactive and Earth-friendly. Andee Penner, owner of Osborne Village’s Sew Dandee, began hosting clothing swaps at her store after attending those hosted by her friends. “I partly like clothing swaps for the environmental aspect,” she says, “but also because I’m a bit unorthodox. I’d rather find something old that I can re-work than go shopping for a whole new outfit.” Penner, who makes her living re-working peoples’ throwaway fashions, promotes clothing swaps for their practicality, and recommends seeing them as a way to revamp your style and un-cramp your wardrobe. “My rule is that every time I see something I have to have, something comes out of my own closet.” Clothing swaps have been growing in popularity over the past several years, and can be public or private. The general ground rules, either way, tend to remain the same. “No items that are stained, ripped, or beyond repair,” says Penner. It’s also considered good manners to ensure all clothing items are washed before bringing them into someone else’s home (you wouldn’t want to go home carrying someone else’s bedbugs).

Kerry Lang hosts clothing swaps regularly in her West Broadway home. “It’s nice to get the girls together once every season or so to trade our old clothes over a few cocktails,” she says. “Since we’re all friends, we tend to kind of like the same things. Our styles are different, but mesh well.” Lang’s usual swap set-up has the ladies in attendance arranging their pieces in separate piles on chairs and furniture around her living room. “Once everything’s arranged, we each pick a pile and then go around the circle. The rule is we’re each only allowed to pick one item at a time. That way we don’t have some people walking out with fifty items, while others only walk out with five.” Public swaps, like those hosted by Sew Dandee and Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art (MAWA) include a small cover charge for the swap. MAWA began hosting public clothing swaps in 2010. For these events, $10 gets you all the gently used clothing you can wear walking out, whether or not you bring your own contributions. When everything’s been divvied up and the ladies’ s appetites for style have been sated, leftover clothing may be donated to the closest second-hand store. Consignment stores are also often happy to offer store credit for your more new or unique items.


Get Cut get conditioned get shaped get toned Give your hair the same body you give your body Give it the intensive treatment and the little indulgences Give your hair a break now and then, so you can look and feel at the top of your game Keep up with the latest trends, and never, ever let routine get the better of you.


small wonders


organic and fair trade beans are making a big splash in the conventional world of coffee. written by kevan hannah


millions of people

Each day, millions of people around the world drink a cup of coffee. Sometimes, they drink even more. Coffee beans are one of the most sought-after crops worldwide, and in order to meet the demand, global farmers have tended to resort to using chemicals and artificial means to speed up the growth of beans, producing coffee that is big in quantity, but small in quality. Fortunately, a rising trend is giving coffee lovers an alternative, letting them get the most out of their favourite beverage: organic coffee. Coffee is labeled organic when it is grown without pesticides, synthetic hormones, toxic fertilizers, antibiotics, or genetic engineering, according to the Organic Coffee Collaboration, a project of the Organic Trade Association (OTA). Organic food is also minimally processed and without artificial ingredients or preservatives, the Massachusetts-based group said. The response to this new coffee in North America has been nothing short of huge. A survey conducted by the Committee on Sustainability

Assessment valued the organic coffee market at more than $1.4 billion in 2009, and found that imports of organic coffee into the Canada and the U.S. exceeded 93 million pounds for the year. With an average annual growth rate of 21 per cent, as documented by the committee from 2004 to 2009, organic coffee dwarfed the estimated one percent annual growth of the conventional coffee industry, and continued to grow despite a worldwide economic downturn. The greater demand comes as consumers increasingly adopt all things “green,” and coffee roasters work with retailers to create a variety of blends to suit a wide range of tastes. In Manitoba, the demand for a greener coffee is just as much on the rise. With companies like Green Bean Coffee Imports, a Clandeboye, Manitoba-based business, local shops and restaurants have even greater access to organic beans from all four corners of the world. Green Bean operates as Manitoba’s only organic roaster, and has grown its customer list to 32 locations in the province in the mere three years since they opened for business, including all Sobeys locations in Winnipeg. Combined with other national roasters, nearly every independently owned coffee shop in southern Manitoba now carries organic options. This surge in popularity is no wonder—the words “organic coffee” have become synonymous with quality. According to the results of the 2010 Cup of Excellence awards, a prestigious roasting award given out annually by the Alliance for Coffee Excellence, organic coffees held the top five rankings, the winner scoring more than highest ranked conventional coffee blend by

more than 20 per cent. The benefits to drinking organic coffee are numerous, not only in terms of what it does (and doesn’t) do for your body, but also how it impacts the environment. Organic coffees are packed with a variety of antioxidants that work to protect your cells from long-term damage, preventing disease and premature aging. Environmentally speaking, organic coffee replenishes and helps maintain fertile soil without the aid of fertilizers. This works to lower toxins in the air, soil, and local water supply. It also helps to build a better biological system with diversity in crops and production of plants and trees. But one of the biggest benefits to organic coffee isn’t in the nutritional value or taste. As of 2008, 70 per cent of all organic coffee sold to roasters in Canada was “fair trade,” according to TransFair Canada. Fair trade is the concept that farmers or field labourers should receive a fair share of the eventual selling price of products, and not to be exploited by manufacturers, brokers, or distributors. They should receive a large enough share to support their families and invest in the necessary equipment, fertilizers and other goods necessary to keep their farms active. This allows those in developed nations to use their buying power as consumers to keep struggling farmers afloat. “The fair trade movement really started in small health food and specialty shops,” said Michael Zelmer, Director of Communications for TransFair Canada in Ottawa, “but consumers everywhere are starting to demand fair-trade goods.” But fair trade has been slow to gain strength in Canada, he noted. “Here it is only 10 per cent of what it is in the U.K. We’re well behind Europe in that regard.”


the winnipeg folk festival is doing morecoffee and more trending: eachorganic year to improve sustainability- without abandoning their roots. written by jaremy ediger

millions of people

around the world drink a cup of coffee every day. Sometimes, they drink even more. Coffee beans are one of the most sought-after crops worldwide, and in order to meet the demand, global farmers have tended to resort to using chemicals and artificial means to speed up the growth of beans, producing coffee that is big in quantity, but small in quality. Fortunately, a rising trend is giving coffee lovers an alternative, letting them get the most out of their favourite beverage: organic coffee. Coffee is labeled organic when it is grown without pesticides, synthetic hormones, toxic fertilizers, antibiotics, or genetic engineering, according to the Organic Coffee Collaboration, a project of the Organic Trade Association (OTA). Organic food is also minimally processed and without artificial ingredients or preservatives, the

Massachusetts-based group said. The response to this new coffee in North America has been nothing short of huge. A survey conducted by the Committee on Sustainability Assessment valued the organic coffee market at more than $1.4 billion in 2009, and found that imports of organic coffee into the Canada and the U.S. exceeded 93 million pounds for the year. With an average annual growth rate of 21 per cent, as documented by the committee from 2004 to 2009, organic coffee dwarfed the estimated one percent annual growth of the conventional coffee industry, and continued to grow despite a worldwide economic downturn. The greater demand comes as consumers increasingly adopt all things “green,” and coffee roasters work with retailers to create a variety of blends to suit a wide range of tastes. In Manitoba, the demand for a greener coffee is just as much on the rise. With companies like Green Bean Coffee Imports, a Clandeboye, Manitoba-based business, local shops and restaurants have even greater access to organic beans from all four corners of the world. “Organics are definitely some of the most popular blends we sell,” said Robert Krul, whose family runs Cornelia Bean Ltd. on Academy Road. “It’s been more and more popular each year with customers. At first no one really touched it, I don’t think they really knew what it

was. But now there are people who go out of their way to come in to the store, just to get organic coffee.” Green Bean Coffee Imports, which operates as Manitoba’s only organic roaster, has grown its customer list to 32 locations in the province in the mere three years since they opened for business, including all Sobeys locations in Winnipeg. Combined with other national roasters, Krul says, nearly every independently owned coffee shop in southern Manitoba now carries organic options. This surge in popularity is no wonder—the words “organic coffee” have become synonymous with quality. According to the results of the 2010 Cup of Excellence awards, a prestigious roasting award given out annually by the Alliance for Coffee Excellence, organic coffees held the top five rankings, the winner scoring more than highest ranked conventional coffee blend by more than 20 per cent. The benefits to drinking organic coffee are numerous, not only in terms of what it does (or doesn’t) do for your body, but also how it impacts the environment. Organic coffees are rife with a variety of antioxidants. These antioxidants work to protect your cells from longterm damage, preventing disease and premature aging. However, environmentally-speaking, organic coffee replenishes and helps maintain fertile soil without the aid of fertilizers. This works to lower toxins in the air, soil, and local water supply. It also helps to build a better biological system with diversity in crops and production of plants and trees. But one of the biggest benefits to organic coffee isn’t necessarily in the nutritional value or taste. As of 2008, 70 per cent of all organic coffee sold to roasters in Canada was “fair trade,” according to TransFair Canada. Fair trade is the concept that

growing greener


green efforts are “primarily centred around alternative transportation.” In 2010 they held their first ever Green Ride to Bird’s Hill Park. With help from Manitoba Public Insurance, The Winnipeg Foundation and Olympia Cycle & Ski, Folk Fest arranged to provide a safe environment for festivals goers to ride their bikes out to the site without worrying about carrying all of their camping gear. Koshinsky estimates 70 people took part in the ride, which offered priority entry to the campground as incentive. In 2011, the frequency of shuttle buses running from the campground to the festival site will be doubled, from once an hour to once every half hour. Organizers hope that this will encourage patrons to leave their cars parked in the campground parking lot rather than drive them to the main grounds. They are also undergoing a large campaign to try to get people to bring their bikes for transportation to and from the campground. In coming years, there will be a major redevelopment on the site, which will assist the festival in its efforts to be sustainable. This will include continuing to plant trees and improve drainage, as they have done for the past decade. Most importantly, it will include a bus loop, which can take festival goers right up to the gate. Currently, Winnipeg Transit provides hourly round-trip service from downtown Winnipeg, but it only goes to the outskirts of the festival grounds, leaving passengers with a 15-minute hike to the gate. Koshinsky says this bus loop is “definitely one of the major advancements for our sustainability.” The demand for a greener festival site has caused Folk Fest to greatly increase the size of their environment crew. In 2010, of the 65 volunteer crews, environment was among the five largest. Over 400 people volunteered to spend a portion of their weekend collecting trash bags, picking out

weekend of every July since 1974 thousands of music lovers from across North America (and even a few from overseas) have gathered at Birds Hill Provincial Park for the Winnipeg Folk Festival, a stereotypical weekend of peace, love, music and now, preserving the environment. Dreadlocked women in earth-toned dresses blow bubbles and twirl hula-hoops, men with large beards muck up their sarongs and hemp pants by dancing in the mud, all while a massive crew of volunteers works hard to ensure that waste is properly dealt with. Music wafts through the air, mixing with reefer smoke as the sun sets behind a ridge of trees and a large compost heap breaks down backstage. Of course not everyone spends the weekend in a drug-induced haze, a large percentage of the crowd is there for the music, rather than the indulgence. The festival has grown steadily since its humble beginning as a free, 4-stage event held to celebrate Winnipeg’s 100th anniversary, which attracted an estimated 22,000 people over three days. In 2010, the festival featured around 250 performers on seven stages, and drew over 70,000 people across five days. But of course with more people comes more garbage, more total distance travelled to and from the site, more greenhouse gas emissions, more waste and, in the end, a much greater stress on the environment. Like all music festivals, Folk Fest has to carefully plan a way to deliver a quality event while minimizing its carbon footprint. With the festival’s growing popularity throughout the 80s, it began to implement new greening initiatives yearly. The biggest step to date was in 1997, when the reusable plate program began. The festival estimates that it saves 77,000 paper plates from the landfill each year, which now totals around one million since the program began. It was in that same year that Folk Fest became the first event of its kind to be deemed a “green event” by Canada’s Environment Choice program. Winnipeg Folk Festival’s manager of marketing & communications, Margaret Koshinsky, says their current

you can’t just eliminate travel or, say, cups for beer

waste piles like this one from Bonnaroo 2010 pose a problem for festival organizers. much of what ends up in landfills could have been recycled or composted.


recyclables, tending to the backstage compost heap and doing anything else in their control to ensure the site remains clean. That is more than 12 times the number of volunteers than the 30 they had on the environmental crew when David Ediger was last their coordinator in 1985. Their duties were also drastically different than they are now. “We had two jobs; pick up the garbage and put it in bags, and disinfect the dirty little outhouses they had at the time,” Ediger recalls. They definitely weren’t sifting through the waste to find recycling in those days. “Garbage was garbage.” Stopping waste from reaching landfills is a major concern at all music festivals, and many large festivals boast about their diversion efforts. The Folk Fest diverts about 40 per cent of its waste away from landfills, a number which grew significantly in 2008, when they introduced compostable cups at all the beer gardens on site. The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee, which drew 75,000 attendees per day in 2010, diverts 60 per cent of its total waste from landfills.

To give an idea of just how much waste is generated at a large festival, Bonnaroo’s website says that the diverted 60 per cent included “101 tons of commingled recycling, 23 tons of cardboard, 21 tons of scrap metal, 45 tons compostable material and 5 tons of cooking oil.” “Overall consumption is the biggy, from fan travel to artist travel to supplies shipped on site,” Bonnaroo sustainability coordinator Laura Sohn writes in an e-mail. “You can’t just eliminate travel or, say, cups for beer, so you have to come up with different solutions that are good for the environment and maintain a positive fan experience.” Festivals often look to each other for ideas on being sustainable. The compostable cups have been appearing at more and more festivals each year, and the latest trend appears to be on-site compost heaps, which both Folk Fest and Bonnaroo have. Koshinsky says that Folk Fest began to do these sorts of things before many of the festivals, but could have introduced new initiatives at a quicker rate. “I don’t feel like we are the leader, but we are one of them,” Koshinsky says. “In 1997, yeah, we definitely lead the pack, and others followed suit.”

> The 2011 Winnipeg Folk Festival will take place from July 6-10. Lineup and ticket information is available at: www.winnipegfolkfestival.ca


warm up to

wrigglers

get cozy with creepy crawlies, and join the vermicomposting craze that’s wiggling into homes this spring. written by veronica neufeld


Got worms? Winnipeg’s environmental activity is on the up-and-up, and many Winnipeggers are becoming more aware of the importance and accessibility of sustainable waste disposal. For the eco-aware among us, composting plays just as important a role in leading a greener lifestyle as reducing, reusing and recycling. In November of 2010, the City of Winnipeg began a sixmonth $350,000 evaluation of the city’s garbage disposal system. As of right now, no municipal home composting program exists, which puts us behind cities like Toronto and Brandon, all of which have recently implemented city-wide public composting systems. “Composting is important for a variety of reasons,” says the city’s solid waste manager Darryl Drohomerski.“We can use compost in gardens and save on excavating topsoil, reduce emissions of greenhouse gasses, and we can save landfill space. About 90,000 tons of organic waste is thrown in the landfill every year. That’s almost 50 per cent of the city’s total annual waste.” For many people, especially urban apartment dwellers, composting can seem an intimidating, complicated and altogether icky alternative to tossing leftovers in the trash. Sylvie Herbert and Dave Elmore spearhead the composting program at Winnipeg’s non-profit Green Action Centre (GAC), working to bring composting into homes, schools and workplaces, hosting composting workshops and educating Winnipeggers about the importance of the practice. “Forty to seventy per cent of our kitchen waste is compostable,” says Herbert, “but for many people, they don’t understand the process, or are afraid of it, and that keeps them

a variety of composting options exist for people

living downtown

whether or not they can access an outdoor bin.

from doing it. Our role is to make it simple for people.” A variety of composting options exist for people living downtown, whether or not they can access an outdoor bin. For apartment dwellers, Herbert and Elmore recommend vermicomposting, an odourless indoor composting method that uses red wriggler worms to break down organic waste. The GAC hosts free vermicomposting workshops, complete with free bins and detailed instructions, and several outlets in Winnipeg sell and deliver the wrigglers. The idea of getting close to worms may make some people squeamish, but the whole thing is relatively hands-off. The composting process involves placing a half pound of red wrigglers in a composting bin and covering them with moist shredded paper. Keeping them in a cool dark space, like under a sink or in a closet, you may begin giving the wrigglers your leftover organic waste. The worms, which are vegetarian, will break down the food into odourless compost (read: worm poo) which you may later harvest. Crystal Weber, 27, has been vermicomposting in her thirdfloor Corydon Avenue suite for three years. “At first I really didn’t know what I was doing, and it smelled just terrible,” she grins, standing in her apartment amid a veritable forest of spider plants. “There were fruit flies everywhere. But I attended a workshop and learned how to do it properly. Now there’s no smell or anything. The trick is to keep moving the compost around. My plants are thriving” The harvesting process is also fairly hands-off, and may begin two or three months after composting has begun. There are several methods of harvesting, including the light process, wherein you simply expose the surface of your compost to bright light, which will cause the worms to migrate to the bottom of the bin, allowing you to scrape up the compost. Harvested compost may be used as a plant fertilizer in a variety of ways. Because it’s so rich in nutrients, you don’t need to use as much of it as you would regular compost when


adding it to soil, and you may also brew “compost tea,” a nourishing liquid you feed to your plants or spray directly on their leaves to prevent diseases. Drohomerski anticipates a city-wide composting program will be available to all Winnipeggers in the next few years, and encourages ‘Peggers to visit garbage.speakupwinnipeg.com to have a say in the direction the city’s taking with regard to composting, recycling and organic waste disposal. “The stuff we used to throw away, we can sell it, and we can reuse it. We want to see if people are willing to alter their habits and embrace the change.”

WHAT’S ALL THIS ABOUT WRIGGLERS? > What are wrigglers?

> Where can I buy them?

consume greater amounts of organic waste, and prefer to dine closer to the

may be bought, usually for around $30 per half-pound.

living in small, damp containers. Herbert and Elmore recommend starting off by

Red Wriggler Haven

Nature’s Perfect Plant Food

www.redwrigglerhaven.com

(204) 837-4190

Red wrigglers are similar in size and shape to earthworms, but are able to

surface, whereas earthworms like to burrow.. They are vegetarian, and content

buying a hal pound of wrigglers, as they will quickly reproduce to about a pound.

> What can I feed them?

The GAC recommends feeding your wrigglers plenty of fruit and vegetable

scraps, tea leaves and bags. Because the worms are unable to handle much

acidity, you should be careful about the amount of citrus scraps, bread, rice, pasta and coffee grounds that goes into the bin. You should not compost meat, fish, bones and oily foods.

There are several places in Manitoba where worms

Winnipeg: (204) 275-0253

Wriggler Wranch

Winnipeg: (204) 589-0241 www.redwormpower.com

Winnipeg: 220 Rita Street

email: nppf@mts.net


> dreads: the hippie wears his hear in dreads as a symbol

of his free spirit. dreads occur naturally in uncombed hair, and can be decorated with coloured beads to add to the hippie’s individuality. dreads are often accompanied by a headband to hold them in place.

> poncho: way back in the 60s, the

hippie started to wear a poncho as a sign of rebellion. Ponchos often accompanied tie-dyed clothing, which was worn to set the hippie apart from the white t-shirts of the corporate world.

> bell bottoms: initially worn only by rich women, the hippie started wearing bell bottoms when all his favourite artists like Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix began to wear them on stage. The flare at the bottom on bell bottoms help to add to the hippie’s flowing look.

hippie


> glasses: big nerdy glasses are so 80s and the

hipster loves anything from the days of yesteryear, from the original Nintendo to Pokemon. He feels as though intentionally wearing ugly clothes is ironic, which sets him apart from most people. It's all about individuality.

> striped shirt: a plain old striped shirt

is a way to escape from over-designed, overpriced brand name t-shirts. Stripes never caught on in the mainstream, and the hipster loves it.

> ipad: despite his love for the

past, the hipster thrives on being the early adopter. When all his friends are picking up their iPad 2, he already that thing like the back of his hand. He takes great pride in saying "I was into that before it got popular."

> tight jeans: no one knows why the

hipster wears tight jeans. It's one of the great mysteries of the universe.

hipster



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