Issuu on Google+

3$%/2 $7&+8*$55<

0$7(5,$/Å&#x;(7+(5($/


PABLO  ATCHUGARRY MATERIAL  &  ETHEREAL First  print  run  of  1500  catalogues September  2016   London,  UK       Texts  by  Till-­Holger  Borchert   Translations  by  Caleidos  Translations  S.  L. Graphic  design  by  Arch.  Alessio  Gilardi Photography  by  Daniele  Cortese Nicolas  and  Lorena  Vidal Aurelio  Amendola  (pp.  128  -­  141) Printed  by  Campisi  S.r.l.


PABLO  ATCHUGARRY MATERIAL  &  ETHEREAL OCTOBER  6TH  -­  29TH  2016  


CONTENTS 7

MATERIAL  &  ETHEREAL,  BETWEEN  HISTORY  AND  PRESENT

15

THE  STUDIO

53

PLATES

91

MONUMENTAL  SCULPTURES

129

BIOGRAPHY  &  EXHIBITION  HISTORY


6


7

MATERIAL  &  ETHEREAL BETWEEN  HISTORY  AND  PRESENT


8


MATERIAL  &  ETHEREAL,  BETWEEN  HISTORY  AND  PRESENT

9

Pablo   Atchugarry’s   current   sculptures   are   both   pleasant   and  pleasing.  Because  of  their  highly  refined  aesthetical   appearance  they  blend  perfectly  into  any  environment  –   that  being  a  gallery,  a  natural  resort  or  a  city.  Even  if  not   intentionally  so,  they  thereby  add  –  as  it  would  seem  at  first   sight  –  a  highly  decorative  quality  to  the  space  surroun-­ ding  them.  Being  of  an  entirely  non-­figurative  character,   they  are  neither  confronting  nor  disturbing,  nor  do  his  wor-­ ks  provoke.  For  many  critics  of  contemporary  art,  used  to   conceptualism,   this   makes   Atchugarry   and   his   work   so-­

réalisations  –  the  artist  is  competing  in  his  works  with  nature   itself.  This  competition  is  not  of  an  exclusively  mimetic  cha-­ racter,  since  the  artist  attempts  to  surpass  nature  itself  with   his  creations  and  to  overcome  the  physical  restrictions  im-­ posed  by  nature  by  means  of  his  own  art.  Such  a  compe-­ titive  attitude  is  not  –  and  never  really  has  been  –  uncom-­ mon  among  artists.  It  is  not  at  all  a  sign  of  artistic  hybris   when  painters  and  sculptures  were  and  are  creating  their   own   “artistic   universe”.   In   fact,   such   an   attitude   reaches   well   beyond   nineteenth   century   conception   about   l’art  

mewhat  suspicious.  But  at  the  same  time,  Pablo  Atchugar-­ ry’s   sculptures   are   eminently   paradoxical   and   could   be   perceived  as  subliminally  confusing:  his  sculptures  are  –  on   the   one   hand   –   made   out   of   precious   marble   to   which   they  owe  –  on  the  other  hand  –  their  seemingly  weightless     and  almost  immaterial  appearance.  The  intrinsic  physical   nature  of  his  sculptures  contrasts  fundamentally  with  their   expressive  metaphysical  qualities  that  one  might  associa-­ te  with  bio-­morphological  structures  or,  to  use  a  somewhat   simpler  metaphor,  with  frozen  thoughts  and  petrified  inspi-­ ration.   Whatever   the   associations   are   that   they   evoke,   surface  and  form  of  Atchugarry’s  sculpted  works  are  not   only  obviously  in  complete  denial  of  their  actual  material   existence,  but  intentionally  transcend  beyond  their  mate-­ riality,  or  –  it  would  seem  –  even  beyond  the  laws  of  gravi-­ ty.   Although   being   carved   out   of   large   stone-­blocks,   Atchugarry’s  works  are  fragile,  soft,  airy,  liquid,  floating,  ca-­ scading,  textile,  cellular,  organic  –  in  short  they  appear  to   be   everything   but   solemmn,   heavy,   crystalline,   static   or   non-­organic.   In   ever   changing   variations   of   what   we   perhaps  should  consider  as  Atchugarry’s  continuous  quest   for  an  approximation  of  the  perfect  shape,  the  archetypi-­ cal   figure,   or   the   ideal   form   –   in   that   sense   his   working   method   seems   surprisingly   reminiscent   of   Paul   Cézanne  

pour  l’art  (art  for  art’s  sake)  and  the  hermetic  creations  of   Klee,  Tinguely,  Miró,  Calder  and  so  forth.  It  draws  on  ideas   that  are  deeply  rooted  in  the  world  and  thoughts  of  artists   of  the  antiquity  which  –  if  we  are  to  believe  the  anecdotes   compiled  by  Pliny  the  Younger  about,  for  example,  Zeuxis   and  Parrhasios  –  were  remarkable  in  consciously  rivalling   with  fellow  artists,  with  different  artistic  genres  (such  as  lite-­ rature,  painting,  sculpture),  as  well  as  with  nature  itself.  This   meant,  no  doubt,  to  add  a  fundamentally  self-­referential   quality   to   their   work,   which,   in   turn,   provided   an   artistic   challenge  to  the  great  artists  and  writers  of  the  Renais-­ sance.  In  fact,  the  motif  of  the  paragone  –  as  this  often   rhetorical  competition  was  referred  to  in  humanistic  Quat-­ tro  and  Cinquecento  prose  –  became  one  of  the  thriving   forces   of   artistic   innovation:   Manetti   explicitly   used   the   term  paragone  when  he  recorded  the  famous  competi-­ tion  between  Lorenzo  Ghiberti  and  Filippo  Brunelleschi  for   the   commission   of   the   bronze   reliefs   of   the   doors   of   the   Baptistery  of  Florence,  and  Vasari’s  accounts  of  the  lives   and  works  of  the  most  famous  painters,  sculptors  and  ar-­ chitects  –  Le  Vite  –  repeatedly  evoke  metaphors  of  artistic   rivalry  and  competitive  mimesis  when  speaking,  for  exam-­ ple,  of  Leonardo  (who  in  his  writings  often  referred  to  the   concept  of  the  paragone),  Bandinelli  or  Michelangelo.  In  


10

this   perspective,   the   ambivalent   attitude   of   Atchugarry   towards  nature,  material  and  immaterial  form  that  manifests   itself  in  the  inherent  paradoxical  character  of  his  works  en-­ tails   in   fact   also   a   deeply   humble   attitude   towards   the   great  sculptors  of  the  past,  which  are  a  source  of  uncon-­ ditioned   admiration   and   forceful   inspiration   to   the   South-­American  born  artist.  In  more  than  one  way,  Atchu-­ garry  is  deeply  rooted  in  the  traditions  and  history  of  Eu-­ ropean  sculpture.  The  choice  of  material  bears  a  tremen-­ dous  significance  for  the  works  of  Pablo  Atchugarry,  and  it  

rence  for  Carrara  marble  chains  his  creations  to  the  very   history  of  European  sculpture.  This  material  creates  an  irre-­ vocable  bond  with  history  that  itself  is  part  of  the  artistic   intention.  Born  a  South-­American,  Pablo  Atchugarry  is  ta-­ king  pride  in  the  strong  ties  that  exist  between  his  work  and   the  important  cultural  links  with  the  great  tradition  of  We-­ stern   sculpture   –   in   both   a   severe,   respectful   and   so-­ mewhat  naïve  manner  that  is  often  found  with  contempo-­ rary  artists  who  grew  up  outside  of  Europe  or  the  United   States.   Atchugarry’s   interest   in   the   European   sculptural  

even  is  of  equal  importance  to  their  form.  For  several  de-­ cades  now,  Atchugarry  almost  exclusively  uses  marble  for   his  creations;;  it  is  not  just  any  marble,  but  marble  of  extra-­ ordinary   pictorial   quality.   More   often   than   not,   he   works   with  the  exclusive  white  marble  from  the  quarries  of  Carra-­ ra,  near  the  Tuscan  town  of  Pisa.  This  very  choice  carries   important   implications,   since   the   marble   from   Carrara   –   more  than  marble  from  anywhere  else  in  the  world  –  entails   far-­reaching   connotations   for   any   sculptor   and   historian   alike.  The  marble  from  Carrara  was  the  preferred  material   used  by  the  most  eminent  sculptors  from  antiquity  to  mo-­ dern   times   for   their   greatest   accomplishments:   from   anti-­ que  monuments  and  sarcophagi  to  Nicola,  Giovanni  and   Andrea  Pisano,  Arnolfo  di  Cambio,  Jacopo  della  Quer-­ cia,  to  Donatello,  Michelozzo,  Verrocchio,  Francesco  Lau-­ rana,  to  Michelangelo,  to  Bandinelli,  to  Gianlorenzo  Ber-­ nini,  to  Pierre  Puget  and  to  Antonio  Canova  –  a  history  of   European  sculpture  could  be  rather  sufficiently  written  by   taking   into   consideration   only   examples   of   works   made   from  marble  of  Carrara.  Like  a  modern  painter  who  deci-­ des  to  paint  a  triptych  would  instantly  have  to  face  the   vast  cultural  connotations  borne  by  his  decision  –  his  work   being  instantly  placed  into  a  referential  framework  of  litur-­ gical  altarpieces  from  ancient  times  –  Atchugarry’s  prefe-­

tradition  is  especially  obvious  in  some  of  his  works  from  the   early  1980’s,  at  the  time  when  he  had  recently  discovered   the  marble  from  the  quarries  of  Carrara  as  medium  for  his   newly   found   artistic   vocation,   when   he   subsequently   al-­ most   entirely   abandoned   painting,   and   when   he   deci-­ ded  to  move  to  Lecco  at  Lake  Como  in  Italy.  Under  the   compelling  impression  of  no  other  than  Michelangelo  he   sculpted,  from  1982  to  1983,  a  monumental  Pietà  out  of  a   single  block  of  Carrara  marble  of  12  tons  weight.  His  Pietà,   today  in  Lecco,  must  be  interpreted  as  a  humble  homage   to   Michelangelo,   whose   early   masterly   Pietà   in   Rome’s   Saint  Peter  of  1499-­1500  –  made  of  Carrara  marble  –  cle-­ arly   was   Atchugarry’s   point   of   departure.   He   translated   the  ingenious  artistic  language  of  the  famous  Renaissan-­ ce  Master  into  his  own  idiom  that  he  had  brought  with  him   from  South  America  and  that  combined  formal  post-­con-­ structivist  elements  with  spiritually  charged  elements  deri-­ ved  from  his  interest  in  ancient  “primitive”  civilizations  of  the   Americas.   The   same   can   be   said   about   Atchugarry’s   equally   impressive   and   monumental   Redemptoris   Mater,   finished  in  1987.  The  sculptor  was  inspired  by  another  one   of  Michelangelo’s  masterpieces,  namely  the  uncompleted   Rondanini  Pietà  (Milan,  Castello  Sforzesco).  It  was  his  re-­ markable   artistic   sensitivity   and   conviction   that   allowed  


11

Atchugarry  to  convincingly  create  his  own  interpretation   of  the  unfinished  masterpiece  from  which  the  great  Renais-­ sance   master,   in   the   last   weeks   of   his   life   in   1564   had   “hacked  away  the  marble  till  nothing  but  a  skeleton  survi-­ ved”   (John   Pope-­Hennessy).   Atchugarry’s   unconditional   admiration  for  Michelangelo  and  his  own  spiritual  expe-­ rience  enabled  him,  however,  to  recreate  a  work  of  con-­ vincing  and  entirely  credible  pathos  (in  the  sense  of  Mi-­ chelangelo’s  sculpture  possess  a  highly  pathetical  quality)   while  carefully  avoiding  the  pitfall  of  producing  kitsch  vis-­

(painting)   and   sculptura   (sculpture),   attempted   to   outli-­ ne  fundamental  differences  between  both  artistic  media   and   thereby   had   coined   the   observation   that   painting   is  lit  from  the  inside,  while  sculpture  is  lit  from  the  outside.   Hardly  nowhere  can  this  statement  be  better  verified  than   in  Bruges,  where  two  uncontested  masterpieces  of  two  of   the  greatest  artists  of  mankind  –  Jan  van  Eyck’s  Madonna   of  Joris  van  der  Paele  and  Michelangelo’s  Madonna  and   Child  –  can  be  compared  within  a  distance  of  a  few  hun-­ dred  meters.  While  Van  Eyck’s  panel  possesses  an  intrinsic  

à-­vis  the  utterly  tragic  moments  of  the  dying  Michelangelo. Atchugarry   found   a   similarly   complex   balance   between   pathos  and  kitsch  in  some  of  the  more  abstract  sculptu-­ res  that  he  was  starting  to  produce  from  about  the  same   period  on.  At  that  time,  he  had  not  yet  completely  aban-­ doned  the  habit  to  title  his  work,  and  his  sculptures  of  the   period  –  although  increasingly  abstract  in  shape  –  bore   highly  symbolic  titles  like  La  Lumière,  Anima,  Liberi  nell’uni-­ verso  –  titles  which  both  alluded  to  specific  elements  of   the  abstractions  reminiscent  to  other  forms  as  well  as  to   their  fundamentally  spiritual  and  metaphysical  character.   These  sculptures,  too,  seem  to  convey  Atchugarry’s  artistic   reaction  to  an  overwhelming  experience  of  Old  Master   sculpture   that   he   was   confronted   with   after   his   move   to   Italy.  Although  this  response  might  have  been  far  less  con-­ scious   than   in   the   case   of   Michelangelo   and   certainly   was  paired  by  equally  strong  influences  of  both  “primitive   art”  and  modernist  sculptures  –  by,  for  example,  Constantin   Brancusi  –,  it  is  obvious  that  at  least  one  particular  aspect   of  his  work  from  this  period  (and  later  on)  touched  upon   one  of  the  most  fundamental  issues  of  traditional  Europe-­ an  sculpture,  namely  the  issue  of  light.  No  other  than  Le-­ onardo  da  Vinci  had,  while  elaborating  in  his  theoretical   writings  on  the  topic  of  the  paragone  between  pictura  

glow  based  on  the  reflectivity  of  his  paint,  Michelangelo’s   sculpture   –   the   only   sculpture   of   the   artists   that   left   Italy   during  Michelangelo’s  lifetime  –  fundamentally  changes  its   appearance   during   the   course   of   the   day,   depending   on  the  position  of  the  sun.  But  neither  Van  Eyck  nor  Miche-­ langelo  (nor,  for  that  matter,  Leonardo  himself)  integrated   the  fundamental  difference  of  light  in  painting  or  sculpture   into  their  artistic  conception.  The  first  realization  of  the  full   potential  of  this  dissimilarity  for  means  of  artistic  expression   was  left  to  later  generations,  in  particular  to  Caravaggio   and  Bernini.  The  first  was  instrumental  in  exploring  the  dra-­ maturgical  possibilities  of  light  in  the  media  in  painting,  the   second   was   of   similar   importance   for   the   theatrical   use   of   light   in   the   medium   of   sculpture.   Gianlorenzo   Bernini’s   famous  Ecstasy  of  Saint  Teresa  in  the  Cornaro  Chapel  of   Sta.  Maria  della  Vittoria  in  Rome  is  conceived  with  a  clear   idea  about  the  light  situation  in  mind,  and  the  changing   of  light  during  the  day  is  an  integral  part  of  this  masterpie-­ ce’s  artistic  intention.  Less  explicitly,  but  not  necessarily  in   a  less  fundamental  way  than  in  responding  to  Michelan-­ gelo’s  work,  Pablo  Atchugarry’s  abstract  sculpture  seem  to   owe  much  to  Bernini.  The  receding  cascades  of  varying   depth  and  the  network  of  stereometrical  patterns  crea-­ te  a  dynamic  labyrinth  of  shades  that,  together  with  the  


12

highly   polished   surfaces   create   a   structure   of   reflection   and  absorption  of  light  that  parallels  the  flowing  textures   of  Bernini’s  figures.  And  also  the  use  of  the  coloured  mar-­ ble  of  Portugal,  which  Atchugarry  uses  alternatively,  seems   reminiscent  of  the  more  colourful  creations  of  great  Baro-­ que  genius.  Even  Atchugarry’s  most  abstract  works  have   a   remarkable   affinity   to   baroque   sculpture,   underlining   once   again   the   artist’s   deep   involvement   with   tradition.   At  least  one  last  aspect  deserves  our  attention  when  ad-­ dressing   Atchugarry’s   work   and   its   close   ties   to   the   tra-­

cess  of  invention  –  of  an  emotion,  expression  or  pure  form   –  is  instantly  shaped  in  an  inner  vision  of  a  three-­dimen-­ sional  object  and  is  directly  transferred  onto  the  material   that  will  become  the  medium  of  his  creation.  Like  the  me-­ dieval  masons  of  the  Gothic  cathedrals,  whose  prepara-­ tory  drawings  are  often  found  drawn  or  incised  in  stone,   Atchugarry  can  afford  to  omit  intermediary  stages  –  sets   of  preparatory  drawings  on  paper  in  which  the  final  sha-­ pe  is  conceived  by  numerous  subsequent  drawings.  Since   the  vision  he  is  about  to  create  is  in  his  mind,  these  pre-­

dition  of  Western  sculpture,  and  that  is  his  craftsmanship.   Atchugarry’s  perfection  in  execution  and  his  mastery  of  the   material  witness  his  technical  abilities  that  enable  him  to   realize   his   artistic   visions:   these   criteria,   however,   play   a   secondary  role  in  today’s  prevailing  discourse  of  contem-­ porary  art,  if  they  play  a  role  at  all.  Concept,  originality   and  invention  triumph  today  above  adequate  technical   knowledge,   mastery   and   ability   to   shape   artistic   visions.   For  Atchugarry,  on  the  other  hand,  technical  mastery  and   craftsmanship  remain  preconditions  of  his  artful  expression.   The  physical  efforts  it  takes  to  shape  large  blocks  of  mar-­ ble  are  the  labours  of  actually  creating  form  from  imagi-­ nation.  The  artistic  vision  of  Atchugarry  is  uncompromising   in   that   sense   that   only   the   perfect   technical   execution   can  be  considered  an  adequate  approximation  of  the   ultimate  idea. Like  his  admired  sculptors  from  the  past,  Atchugarry  is  both   a   craftsman   and   an   artist   –   someone   who   uses   his   own   hands  for  his  work,  someone  who  is  willing  to  sacrifice  a   great  deal  of  his  own  physical  power  and  strength  in  the   process  of  creative  creation.  He  combines  a  great  sen-­ sibility   for   plasticity   and   three-­dimensionality   that   allows   him  to  apply  his  preparatory  drawings  immediately  on  the   marble  blocks  in  his  atelier  in  Lecco.  The  intellectual  pro-­

paratory  drawings  are  no  more  than  highly  idiosyncratic   guidelines   or   rough   indications   for   activating   memory.   It   would  be  virtually  impossible  for  any  assistant  to  produce   a  work  adequate  to  Atchugarry’s  artistic  imagination  from   those   preparatory   drawings   on   stone.   Sure   enough,   his   atelier  in  Lecco  resembles  the  workshop  of  an  Old  Master   since  he  has  assistants  to  help  him.  But  the  participation  of   his  assistants  –  all  of  them  are,  like  in  older  times,  members   of  his  family  –  is  restricted  to  the  non-­artistic  aspect  of  his   lobour  like  the  preparation  of  the  blocks,  the  maintenan-­ ce  of  the  artist’s  tools.  The  process  of  creation  and  reali-­ zation  is  the  exclusive  work  of  the  artist/sculptor/craftsman   Pablo  Atchugarry. [From  T.-­H.  Borchert,  Between  material  and  immaterial,  amidst  history   and  the  present  -­  some  remarks  on  the  sculptures  of  Pablo  Atchugar-­ ry,  in  A  journey  between  matter  and  light.  Pablo  Atchugarry,  exhibi-­ tion  catalogue,  Groeninge  Museum  +  Forum  plus,  Bruges  2006]


13


14


15

THE  STUDIO


16


17


18


19


20


21


22


23


24


25


26


27


28


29


30


31


32


33


34


35


36


37


38


39


40


41


42


43


44


45


46


47


48


49


50


51


52


53

PLATES


54

UNTITLED  -­  2015 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 72  x  10.6  x  10.6  in (183  x  27  x  27  cm)


55


56


57

UNTITLED  -­  2016 PINK  PORTUGAL  MARBLE 13.4  x  13  x  6.5  in (34  x  33  x  16.5  cm)


58

UNTITLED  -­  2016 BRONZE  WITH  AUTOMOTIVE  PAINT,  ED.  OF  8  +  1  AP 20.1  x  6.5  x  5.7  in (51  x  16.5  x  14.5  cm)


59


60

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 11.8  x  7.9  x  5.9  in (30.5  x  20  x  15  cm)

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 21.9  x  7.9  x  4.3  in (55.5  x  20  x  11  cm)


61


62

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 16.9  x  7.9  x  5.5  in (43  x  20  x  14  cm)


63


64

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 11.8  x  15.4  x  7.7  in (30  x  39  x  19.5  cm)

UNTITLED  -­  2016 BRONZE  WITH  AUTOMOTIVE  PAINT,  ED.  OF  8  +  1  AP 14.6  x  7.7  x  2.8  in (37  x  19.5  x  7  cm)


65


66

UNTITLED  -­  2016 CARRARA  MARBLE 29.7  x  15.7  x  9.6  in (75.5  x  40  x  24.5  cm)


67


68

UNTITLED  -­  2016 POLISHED  STAINLESS  STEEL 48  x  18.9  x  11.8  in (122  x  48  x  30  cm)


69


70

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 16.9  x  7.7  x  7.3  in (43  x  19.5  x  18.5  cm)


71


72

UNTITLED  -­  2016 PINK  PORTUGAL  MARBLE 44.1  x  18.5  x  10.2  in (112  x  47  x  26  cm)


73


74

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 40.2  x  12.2  x  8.3  in (102  x  31  x  21  cm)


75


76

UNTITLED  -­  2016 BRONZE  WITH  BLACK  PATINA,  ED.  OF  8  +  1  AP 14.6  x  7.7  x  2.8  in (37  x  19.5  x  7  cm)

UNTITLED  -­  2014 BRONZE  WITH  AUTOMOTIVE  PAINT,  ED.  OF  8  +  1  AP 58.3  x  16.5  x  15  in (148  x  42  x  38  cm)


77


78

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 19.7  x  7.1  x  3.9  in (50  x  18  x  10  cm)


79


80

UNTITLED  -­  2016 BLACK  BELGIAN  MARBLE 29.5  x  6.3  x  3.9  in (75  x  16  x  10  cm)

UNTITLED  -­  2016 GREY  BARDIGLIO  MARBLE 25.6  x  8.3  x  6.5  in (65  x  21  x  16.5  cm)


81


82

UNTITLED  -­  2016 PINK  PORTUGAL  MARBLE 19.7  x  12  x  8.3  in (50  x  30.5  x  21  cm)


83


84


85

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 11.6  x  6.9  x  6.7  in (29.5  x  17.5  x  17  cm)


86

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 23.3  x  4.3  x  4.3  in (59  x  11  x  11  cm)


87


88

UNTITLED  -­  2016 BLACK  BELGIAN  MARBLE   15.9  x  9.8  x  5.1  in (40.5  x  25  x  13  cm)

UNTITLED  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 18.5  x  8.1  x  5.5  in (47  x  20.5  x  14  cm)


89


90


91

MONUMENTAL  SCULPTURES  


92

EUSKADI  -­  2016 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 98.8  x  18.1  x  11.8  in (251  x  46  x  30  cm)


93


94

CARIATIDE  -­  2006 BRONZE  WITH  GREEN  PATINA 90.9  x  25.6  x  23.2  in (231  x  65  x  59  cm)


95


96

LIFE  AFTER  LIFE  -­  2015 OLIVE  WOOD 212.6  x  ø  47.2  in (540  x  ø  120  cm)


97


98

VIA  CRUCIS  -­  2014/15 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 50.8  x  31.5  x  7.9  in (129  x  80  x  20  cm)


99


100

MOVEMENT  IN  THE  WORLD  -­  2014 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 328.7  in (835  cm)


101


NEST  OF  DREAMS  -­  2013 COR-­TEN  METAL  ALLOY 460..6  in (1170  cm)


103


104

LIGHT  OF  SOUTH  -­  2013 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 159.4  x  60.6  x  32.3  in (405  x  154  x  82  cm)


105


106

OLIMPIC  SPIRIT  I POLISHED  STAINLESS  STEEL 230.3  x  ø  86.6  in (585  x  ø  220  cm)


107


108

OLIMPIC  SPIRIT  II POLISHED  STAINLESS  STEEL 200.8  x  ø  86.6  in (510  x  ø  220  cm)


109


110

COSMIC  EMBRANCE  -­  2005/11 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 338.6  x  62.6  x  57.5  in (860  x  159  x  146  cm)


111


112

LIGHT  AND  ENERGY  OF  PUNTA  DEL  ESTE  -­  2009 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 196.9  in (500  cm)


113


114

LIGHT  OF  THE  SOUTH  -­  2008 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 141.7  x  97.4  x  27.6  in (360  x  95  x  70  cm)


115


116

UNTITLED  -­  2006 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 118.9  x  16.9  x  10.6  in (302  x  43  x  27  cm)


117


118


119


120

IN  THE  WAY  OF  LIGHT  -­  2006 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 326.8  in (830  cm)


121


122

DREAMING  OF  PEACE  -­  2003 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE  AND  GREY  BARDIGLIO  MARBLE Group  of  eight  sculptures  created  for  the  50th    Venice  Biennale


123


124

UNTITLED  -­  2003 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 108.3  x  18.9  x  16.5  in (275  x  48  x  42  cm)


125


126

MONUMENTO  ALLA  CIVILTA’  E  CULTURA  DEL  LAVORO  LECCHESE  -­  2002 STATUARY  CARRARA  MARBLE 244.1  in (620  cm)


127


128


129

BIOGRAPHY  &   EXHIBITION  HISTORY


130


BIOGRAPHY Pablo  Atchugarry  was  born  in  Montevideo,  Uruguay,  on   23  August  1954.     His  parents,  Maria  Cristina  Bonomi  and  Pedro  Atchugarry   Rizzo,  passionate  art  enthusiasts,  identified  Pablo’s  artistic   talent  and  interest  when  he  was  still  a  child  and  encou-­ raged  him  to  pursue  a  career  as  an  artist.  In  his  earliest   works,  he  expressed  himself  through  painting,  gradually  di-­ scovering  other  materials  such  as  cement,  iron  and  wood. In  1971,  his  first  cement  sculpture  was  entitled  Horse;;   this   was  followed  by  other  cement  and  iron  sculptures  inclu-­ dingEscriturasimbólica   (1974),   Estructuracósmica   (1974),   Metamorfosisprehistórica   (1974),   Maternidad   (1974)   and   Metamorfosisfemenina  (1974). In  the  late  1970s,  after  taking  part  in  several  exhibitions   in  Montevideo,  Buenos  Aires,  Puerto  Alegre  and  Brasilia,   Atchugarry   made   a   number   of   trips   to   Europe   to   study   and   perfect   his   art.   He   travelled   to   Spain,   France   and   Italy,   where   he   mounted   his   first   solo   exhibition   in   Lecco   in   1978.     His   paintings   were  subsequently   exhibited  in  a   variety  of  European  cities,  including  Milan,  Copenhagen,   Paris,  Chur,  Bergamo  and  Stockholm. After  experimenting  with  a  range  of  different  materials,  in   1979   Atchugarry   discovered   the   extraordinary   elegan-­ ce  of  marble  and  he  carved  his  first  sculpture  in  Carrara,   entitled  La  Lumière.  His  first  monumental  sculpture  carved   from  Carrara  marble  was  completed  in  1982.  That  same   year,  the  artist  settled  permanently  in  Lecco,  working  on   the  sculpture  La  Pietà,  carved  from  a  single  block  of  mar-­ ble  weighing  12  tonnes.  In  1987,  he  held  his  first  solo  sculp-­ ture  exhibition  in  Bramantino’s  Crypt  in  Milan,  curated  by   Raffaele  de  Grada. Late   1996   saw   the   installation   of   the   sculptureSemilla   de  la  Esperanza  in  the  monumental  sculpture  park  in  the   grounds  of  Uruguay’s  government  building.

131

In  1999,  the  artist  founded  the  Museo  Pablo  Atchugarry  in   Lecco  to  house  works  spanning  his  entire  career  alongsi-­ de  bibliographical  documentation  and  an  archive. Twenty  years  after  his  arrival  in  Italy,  the  Province  of  Milan   organised   a   retrospective   of   Atchugarry’s   work   entitled   “The  Infinite  Evolutions  of  Marble”  at  the  Palazzo  Isimbardi   in  Milan.  In  the  same  year,  he  sculpted  his  first  monumental   work  entitled  the  Obelisk  of  the  Third  Millennium,  a  six-­me-­ tre-­high   Carrara   marble   sculpture   for   the   Italian   town   of   Manzano   (Udine).   He   also   won   the   competition   to   cre-­ ated  Lecco’s  Monument  to  theCulture  and  Civilisation  of   Work,   a   sculpture   in   white   Bernini   marble   also   six   metres   high  and  weighing  in  at  30  tonnes. In   2002,   Pablo   Atchugarry   was   awarded   the   “Miche-­ langelo”  prize  in  Carrara  in  recognition  of  his  career  as   an  artist.  He  was  also  committed  to  a  range  of  projects   that  year,  including  the  Idealssculpture,  which  stands  on   Avenue  Princesse  Grace  in  Monaco  and  was  created  to   commemorate  the  50th  anniversary  of  the  coronation  of   Prince  Rainier. In  2003,  he  participated  in  the  50th  Venice  Biennale  -­   International   Art   Exhibition   with   the   sculpture   Soñando   la  paz,  a  work  consisting  of  eight  pieces,  five  in  Carrara   marble  and  three  in  Bardiglio  della  Garfagnana  marble.   Also  in  2003,  he  sculpted  Ascension  for  the  Fundació  Fran   Daurel  in  Barcelona. In  2004,  he  carved  Vital  Energy,  a  Portuguese  pink  mar-­ ble  sculpture  for  the  BellinsonCenter  in  Petah  Tikva,  Isra-­ el,   and   the   following   year   the   National   Museum   of   Fine   Arts  in  Buenos  Aires  staged  an  exhibition  of  his  work.  From   June  to  November  2006,  the  Groeningemuseum  in  Bruges,   Belgium   held   a   major   retrospective   exhibition   of   the   ar-­ tist’s  career,  including  works  from  international  private  col-­ lections;;  in  the  same  year,  the  MuseuColeçãoBerardoin  


132

Portugal  acquired  Vital  Path. In  early  2007,  Atchugarry  opened  the  Fundación  Pablo   Atchugarry  in  Manantiales,  Uruguay,  with  the  aim  of  pro-­ viding   a   stimulus   for   the   arts   and   creating   a   place   for   artists  of  all  disciplines  to  meet  in  an  ideal  location  that   combines ��nature  and  art.  In  the  same  year,  he  completed   an  eight-­metre-­high  monumental  work  In  the  Light,  carved   from  a  single  48-­tonne  block  of  marble,  for  the  Collezione   Fontana  in  Italy. In   2007-­2008,   a   retrospective   exhibition   dedicated   to   his   work   entitled   The   Plastic   Space   of   Light   was   held   in   Brazil,   accompanied   by   a   critical   text   written   by   Luca   Massimo  Barbero.  Initially  staged  at  the  Banco  do  Brasil   Cultural  Centre  in  Brasilia,  the  exhibition  travelled  to  the   MuBe   (MuseuBrasiliero   da   Escultura)   in   São   Paulo   and   the  Museu  Oscar  Niemeyer  in  Curitiba.  In  2008,  the  Mu-­ seo  Nacional  de  ArtesVisuales  in  Montevideo  dedicated   a  retrospective  exhibition  to  Atchugarry’s  work  of  the  pre-­ ceding  15  years.   In   2009   Atchugarry   created   the   work   Luz   y   Energía   de   Punta  del  Este,  carved  from  a  single  five-­metre-­high  block   of   Carrara   marble,   for   the   hundredth   anniversary   of   the   city  of  Punta  del  Este. In  2011,  after  seven  years  of  work,  he  completed  Cosmic   Embrace,  carved  from  a  56-­tonne,  8.5-­metre-­high  block   of  marble,  and  the  same  year  the  Hollis  Taggart  Galleries   in  New  York  organised  a  solo  show,  curated  by  Jonathan   Goodman.  In  March  2012,  the  Times  Square  Alliance  as-­ sociation   selected   Dreaming   New   York   to   be   exhibited   in  Times  Square  during  The  Armory  Show  Art  Fair  in  New   York  City. In  April  2014,  the  8.35-­metre-­high  Carrara  marble  sculp-­ ture  Movement  in  the  World  was  installed  in  the  town  of   Kallo-­Beveren,  Belgium.  

In  late  2013,  MondadoriElecta  published  the  Catalogo-­ Generale  della  scultura,  two  volumes  edited  by  Professor   Carlo   Pirovano   cataloguing   every   sculpture   produced   by  the  artist  between  1971  and  2013. From  July  to  September  2014,  the  MuseuBrasiliero  da  Escul-­ tura  in  São  Paulo,  Brazil  dedicated  a  major  retrospective   to  the  artist’s  work,  entitled  “A  Viagem  pela  matéria”. The  exhibition  “Eternal  City,  eternal  marbles”,  featuring  40   sculptures,  was  exhibited  at  the  Museo  dei  Fori  Imperiali   -­  Mercati  di  Traiano  in  Rome  from  22  May  2015  to  7  Fe-­ bruary  2016.  The  same  year  in  June,  the  sculpture  “Endless   Evolution”   was   inaugurated   in   the   sculpture   park   of   the   Perez  Art  Museum  Miami.   Pablo   Atchugarry’s   works   have   also   been   exhibited   at   the  following  museums  and  public  institutions:  Museo  Na-­ cional   de   ArtesVisuales,   Montevideo;;   Museo   del   Parco,   Portofino;;   Museo  Nacional  de  BellasArtes,  Buenos  Aires;;   Museo   Lercaro,   Bologna;;   Collezione   della   Provincia   di   Milano  a  Palazzo  Isimbardi;;  Collezione  della  Provincia  di   Lecco;;   Fundació  Fran  Daurel,  Barcelona;;   Groeningemu-­ seum,   Bruges;;   MuseuColeçãoBerardo,   Lisbon;;   Pérez   Art   Museum,   Miami;;   The   Patricia   &   Phillip   Frost   Art   Museum,   Miami;;   Chrysler   Museum   of   Art,   Norfolk;;   Museo   Brasilero   da  Escultura,  São  Paulo.   Atchugarry  currently  lives  and  works  between  Lecco  and   Manantiales,  where  he  oversees  the  development  of  the   Fundación  Pablo  Atchugarry  and  the  international  monu-­ mental  sculpture  park,  as  well  as  teaching  and  promoting   art.


133


134


135


136


137


138


139


140


141


142


143


144


145


146


147


148


149


150


151


152


153


154


155


156


157


158


159


160


161


162


163


164

SELECTED  SOLO  EXHIBITIONS 2016       2015          

               

Boon  Gallery       Hollis  Taggart  Galleries    

2014            

         

   

   

Knokke  -­  Heist New  York

Mercati  di  Traiano:  Musei  dei  Fori  Imperiali     Expo  2015,  Uruguayan  Pavillion       Paulo  Darzé  galeria  de  arte         Costantini  Art  Gallery           Art  Stage  Singapore          

         

         

Roma   Milano     Salvador Milano Singapore  

Palazzo  del  Parco         Bologna  Fiere  SH  Contemporary     Museu  Brasileiro  da  Escultura       Arte  Fiera           Albemarle  Gallery        

         

         

         

Diano  Marina   Shanghai   São  Paulo   Bologna London  

2013            

Fundacion  Pablo  Atchugarry       Hollis  Taggart  Galleries         Museo  MIIT          

     

     

     

Manantiales   New  York   Torino

2012    

Albemarle  Gallery    

 

 

 

 

 

London  

2011      

Holllis  Taggart  Galeries      

 

 

 

 

New  York

2010          

Albemarle  Gallery     Bienvenu  Gallery    

   

   

   

   

London   New  Orleans  

2008          

Albemarle  Gallery         Museo  Nacional  de  Artes  Visuales    

   

   

   

London   Montevideo

2007            

         

Museu  Oscar  Niemeyer         Museu  Brasileiro  da  Escultura       Centro  Cultural  Banco  do  Brasil     Lagorio  Arte  Contemporanea       Frey  Norris  Gallery        

         

         

         

Curitiba   São  Paulo   Brasilia   Brescia   San  Francisco

2006          

       

Albemarle  Gallery     Groeninge  Museum     Galeria  Sur         Gary  Nader  Fine  Art    

       

       

       

       

London   Bruges   Punta  del  Este  -­  La  Barra   Miami  

2005              

Museo  Nacional  de  Bellas  Artes     Park  Ryu  Sook  Gallery         Gary  Nader  Fine  Art        

     

     

     

Buenos  Aires   Seoul   Miami  

2004          

Galeria  Tejeria  Loppacher     Galleria  Rino  Costa       Villa  Monastero       Albemarle  Gallery      

       

       

       

Punta  del  Este  -­  Uruguay   Valenza   Varenna   London  

       

   

       

   

       

   


165

2003          

       

Fondation  Veranneman             50°  Biennale  di  Venezia  -­  Padiglione  dell’Uruguay     Fondazione  Abbazia  di  Rosazzo         Galleria  Les  Chances  de  l’Art          

       

Kruishoutem Venezia Rosazzo  -­  Udine   Bolzano  

2002      

Ellequadro  Documenti      

 

 

 

 

Genova  

2001              

Palazzo  Isimbardi     Albemarle  Gallery     Fondazione  Il  Fiore    

     

     

     

     

     

Milano   London   Firenze  

2000      

Galerie  Le  Point    

 

 

 

 

 

Monte  Carlo  

1999    

Inter-­  American  Development  Bank    

 

 

 

Washington  

1998              

Ellequadro  Documenti         Fondation  Veranneman         Valente  Arte  Contemporanea      

     

     

     

Genova   Kruishoutem   Finale  Ligure  

1997      

Centro  Fatebenefratelli      

 

 

 

 

Valmadrera  

1994      

Galleria  Nuova  Carini      

 

 

 

 

Milano  

1992    

Galerie  L’Oeil      

 

 

 

 

 

Bruxelles  

1991      

Galleria  Carini      

 

 

 

 

 

Milano  

1989      

Biblioteca  Civica  di  Lecco    

 

 

 

 

Lecco  

1988          

Galleria  Carini         Museo  Salvini  Coquio      

   

   

   

   

Milano   Trevisago  

1983      

Villa  Manzoni      

 

 

 

 

 

Lecco  

1982              

Galeria  Felix       Galleria  Visconti     Galleria  Comuale    

     

     

     

     

     

Caracas   Lecco   Monza  

1981            

Ibis  Gallery         Galerie  L’  Art  et  la  Paix       Galeria  la  Gruta      

     

     

     

     

Malmo   Paris   Bogota  

1979      

Maison  de  l’  Amerique  Latine      

 

 

 

Paris  

1978          

Galleria  Visconti       Galleria  La  Colonna      

   

   

   

   

Lecco   Como  

1974      

Galeria  Lirolay      

 

 

 

 

 

Buenos  Aires  

1972      

Subte  Municipal    

 

 

 

 

 

Montevideo


166

GROUP  EXHIBITIONS 2016   Art  Rio         Seattle  Art  Fair     Point  Art  Monaco     Art  Cologne     Sp-­arte         Tefaf         The  Armory  show       Arte  Fiera       Art  Stage  Singapore     Este  Arte        

                   

                   

Rio  de  Janeiro   Seattle Monaco   Koln   São  Paulo   Maastricht   New  York   Bologna Singapore   Punta  del  Este

2015   Art  Basel           Art  Miami       Fiac         Art  Toronto       Art  Bo         Art  Rio         Art  International       Point  Art  Monaco     Art  Marbella       Art  Miami  New  York     Sp-­arte         Parc         Art  Cologne       Mi  Art         Art  Basel         The  Armory  show       Tefaf         Arte  Fiera      

                                   

                                   

Miami   Miami   Paris   Toronto   Bogotà   Rio  de  Janeiro   Istanbul   Monaco   Marbella   New  York   São  Paulo   Lima   Koln Milan   Hong  Kong   New  York   Maastricht   Bologna  

2014       Art  Basel           Art  Miami       Fiac         Art  Bo         Art  Rio         Arte  Ba         Parc         SP  Arte         Art  Basel         Black  -­  Galleria  Dep  Art   Mi  Art         The  Armory  show       Tefaf         Arte  Fiera      

                           

                           

Miami   Miami   Paris   Bogota   Rio  de  Janeiro   Buenos  Aires   Lima   Sao  Paulo   Hong  Kong   Milano   Milano   New  York   Maastricht     Bologna

2013   Art  Basel         Art  Miami       Pinta         FIAC         Expo  Chicago       Art  Bo         HFAF         Art  Rio         FIA         Art  South  Hampton     Art  Brussels       Arte  Ba         SP  Arte        

                         

                         

Miami   Miami New  York   Paris   Chicago   Bogota   Houston   Rio  de  Janeiro   Caracas   South  Hampton   Brussels   Buenos  Aires   Sao  Paulo  

 

The  Armory  show         Bianco  Italia  -­  Tornabuoni  Art     Art  Basel           Tefaf           Arte  Fiera        

         

New  York   Paris   Hong  Kong   Maastricht   Bologna

2012     Art  Basel       Art  Miami     Expo  Chicago     HFAF       Art  Rio       SP  Arte       ArteBa       The  Armory  show     Tefaf       Arte  Fiera    

                   

                   

                   

Miami   Miami   Chicago   Houston   Rio  de  Janeiro   Sao  Paulo   Buenos  Aires   New  York   Maastricht   Bologna

2011   Art  Basel  Miami     Fiac       ArteBa       SP  Arte       Legacy  Gallery     Tefaf       Arte  Fiera    

             

             

             

Miami       Paris   Buenos  Aires   Sao  Paulo   Panama       Maastricht   Bologna

2010       Fiac       SP  Arte       Tefaf       Arte  Fiera    

       

       

       

Paris   Sao  Paulo   Maastricht   Bologna

2009   Fiac       ArteBa       Arte  Fiera    

     

     

     

Paris   Buenos  Aires   Bologna

2008     Arco      

 

 

 

Madrid  

     

     

Bologna   Madrid   Punta  del  Este

       

       

New  York   Bologna   London   New  Orleans

   

2007   Art  First         Arco         Galeria  Sur         2006     Hollis  Taggart  Galleries     ArteFiera         Art  London       Gallery  Bienvenu       2005   ArteFiera       Art  Basel      

   

   

   

Bologna   Miami

2004       Art  London     Mi  Art       Arco       Arte  Fiera    

       

         

       

London   Milano   Madrid   Bologna


167

2003   Arco       $UWH͆HUD

  

  

  

Madrid   %RORJQD

2002       Galerie  Le  Point     Tefaf       Arco       $UWH͆HUD

1987     Esibizione  Internazionale  di  sculture       Esibizione  di  Arte  Sacra  -­  San  Francesco     Esibizione  Internazionale  “Como  Illustrazioni”     7a  Esibizione  d’  Arte  Sacra  -­  S.  Sempliciano    

Castellanza   Como   Como   Milano

      

      

      

Monte  Carlo   Maastricht   Madrid   %RORJQD

1984   XIX  Esibizione  Internazionale  di  Scultura     1a  Esibizione  di  piccole  sculture      

Legnano   Castellanza

2001       Tefaf       Arco       $UWH͆HUD

    

    

    

Mastricht   Madrid   %RORJQD

1983       3a  Esibizione  d’Arte  Sacra  -­  S.  Sempliciano    

WWMilano

1980       Taormina  concorso  (1º  Premio)    

Taormina

2000       Xenobio  Exhibition   (a  cura  di  Idehiro  Ikegami)   Tefaf         Arco         $UWH͆HUD 

      

      

Bologna   Mastricht   Madrid   %RORJQD

1999       Orion  Art  Gallery     Art  Basel     Tefaf       Arco       $UWH͆HUD

        

        

Bruxelles Basel   Mastricht   Madrid   %RORJQD

        

1998       Biennale  di  Aldo  Roncaglia       Scultura  98         Castle  of  Bourglinster       $UWH͆HUD  

      

San  Felice  S.  P.   Sondrio   Luxembourg   %RORJQD

1997       Gildo  Pastor  Center     $UWH͆HUD 

  

Monte  Carlo   %RORJQD

1996       Palazzo  Ducale       1995       Ellequadro  Documenti    

    

 

 

1979     “Alessandro  Volta“  Pittura  internazionale    

Como

1977       XL  Salón  Nacional  -­  Premio  Adquisicion     International  Exhibition   of  Applied  Arts  Bella  Center        

Montevideo  

1976   Galeria  Aramayo       Salón  de  Miniescultura    

   

Montevideo   Montevideo

1975       XVI  International  Salón  Paris  -­  Sud    

 

Juvisy

1974       XXII    Salón  Municipal       XV  International  Salón  Paris  -­  Sud    

   

Montevideo   Juvisy

   

Copenhagen

1973       XXVI    Salón  Nacional  de  Artes  Plásticas    

Montevideo

1972       XXVI    Salón  Municipal  de  Artes  Plásticas    

Montevideo

Genova 1965       IGE  Salón  de  Artes  Plásticas  para  la  juventud     Montevideo

 

 

Genova

1994       4a  Biennal  de  Sculpture  Contemporain    

Passy

1992 Palazzo  Crepadona       9°  Salon  d’  Art  Contemporain    

   

Belluno   Bourg  en  Bresse

1991       Contemporary  Art  International    

 

Milano

1990       Simposio  di  sculture  -­  Castello  di  Nelson    

Bronte

1989       IX  Bienal  de  Arte  Internacional  Chile      

Valparaiso



Pablo Atchugarry - Material & Ethereal