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MAGAZINE

ALBANYLAW

With Doors Opened Wide, The Largest Firms Vie for Albany Law’s Students, pg. 26

FA L L

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I N S I D E : D.A. alums blanket N.Y.; Law Schools on track for $175,000 tuition; Professor-student face-off in court; New diversity office; Students following parents’ path; Capital improvements upgrade campus; and more.


ALBANY LAW SCHOOL BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CHAIRMAN

E. Stewart Jones Jr., Esq. ’66 Troy, N.Y.

Larry P. Schiffer, Esq. ’79 New York, N.Y.

VICE CHAIR

Eugene M. Sneeringer Jr., Esq. ’79 Albany, N.Y.

Mary Ann McGinn, Esq. ’83 Albany, N.Y.

Victoria M. Stanton, Esq. ’87 Glenmont, N.Y.

SECRETARY

Robert B. Stiles, Esq. ’76 Rochester, N.Y.

Robert C. Miller, Esq. ’68 Clifton Park, N.Y. TREASURER

Hon. Erik E. Joh, ’70 Boynton Beach, Fla.

Dale M. Thuillez, Esq. ’72 Albany, N.Y. Johnna G. Torsone, Esq. ’75 Stamford, Conn.

MEMBERS

Hon. Randolph F. Treece ’76 Albany, N.Y.

Stephen C. Ainlay, Ph.D. Schenectady, N.Y.

Allen J. Vickey, Esq. ’05 New York, N.Y.

William A. Brewer III, Esq. ’77 Dallas, Texas

Donna E. Wardlaw, Esq. ’77 Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Hon. Anthony V. Cardona ’70 Albany, N.Y.

Stephen P. Younger, Esq. ’82 New York, N.Y.

Barbara D. Cottrell, Esq. ’84 Albany, N.Y.

EX OFFICIO

Benjamin D. Gold, Esq. ’06 New York, N.Y.

Thomas F. Guernsey President and Dean Albany, N.Y.

J. K. Hage III, Esq. ’78 Utica, N.Y.

EMERITI

Susan M. Halpern, Esq. ’83 Denton, Texas Harold Hanson, Esq. ’66 Bonita Springs, Fla. James E. Kelly, Esq. ’83 Garden City, N.Y. Peter C. Kopff, Esq. ’75 New York, N.Y. Betty Lugo, Esq. ’84 Brooklyn, N.Y. Hon. Bernard J. Malone Jr. ’72 Albany, N.Y. Jacqueline Mecchella, Esq. ’07 Albany, N.Y. Thomas J. Mullin, Esq. ’76 Rochester, N.Y. William F. Pendergast, Esq. ’72 Washington, D.C. James T. Potter, Esq. ’80 Albany, N.Y. Rory J. Radding, Esq. ’75 New York, N.Y. Richard A. Reed, Esq. ’81 Albany, N.Y. Harry L. Robinson ’65 Cohoes, N.Y. Hon. John L. Sampson ’91 Albany, N.Y. Thomas M. Santoro, Esq. ’72 Miami, Fla.

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Hon. Richard J. Bartlett Glens Falls, N.Y. Charlotte S. Buchanan, Esq. ’80 Glenmont, N.Y. Harry J. D’Agostino, Esq. ’55 Colonie, N.Y. Donald D. DeAngelis, Esq. ’60 Albany, N.Y. Robert V. Gianniny, Esq. ’53 Rochester, N.Y.

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Jonathan P. Harvey, Esq. ’66 Albany, N.Y. Stephen M. Kiernan, Esq. ’62 Voorheesville, N.Y. Matthew H. Mataraso, Esq. ’58 Albany, N.Y. Hon. Thomas J. McAvoy ’64 Binghamton, N.Y. Frank H. Penski, Esq. ’74 New York, N.Y. Peter M. Pryor, Esq. ’54 Albany, N.Y. William E. Redmond, Esq. ’55 Albany, N.Y. Edgar A. Sandman, Esq. ’46 Naples, Fla. David S. Williams, Esq. ’42 Slingerlands, N.Y. John J. Yanas, Esq. ’53 Albany, N.Y.

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MAGAZINE

ALBANYLAW

FALL 2007

F E AT U R E S

PRESIDENT AND DEAN

Thomas F. Guernsey

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Law in the Family: Today’s Students Following their Parent’s Footsteps The depth of the school’s family legacies run more than a century deep and reflect a startling commitment to the school. Today we have 22 students currently attending whose parents also graduated from the school, marking yet another generation beginning or extending their family’s tradition.

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New York’s District Attorneys: The Albany Law School Connection Among the D.A.s currently serving in the state’s 62 counties, 13 of them are Albany Law School graduates. This high number is more than mere coincidence.

VICE PRESIDENT OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Helen Adams-Keane EDITOR

David Singer CONTRIBUTOR

Nicole Soucy MAGAZINE DESIGN

2k Design, Clifton Park, N.Y. REPORT OF GIFTS DESIGN

Kris Ross DIRECTOR, ALUMNI AFFAIRS

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With Doors Opened Wide, the Largest Firms Vie for Albany Law’s Students The nation’s top ranked law firms hire routinely from Albany Law School as part of their annual recruitment strategy, coming to campus to interview students, as well as meeting them in New York. Learn why senior partners make the effort to recruit from Albany.

D E PA R T M E N T S

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In Brief

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Campus Improvements

31

Faculty Notes

34

Alumni News

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Class Notes

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In Memoriam

Christina Sebastian AlbanyLaw Magazine is published twice a year. 80 New Scotland Avenue Albany, N.Y. 12208-3494 518-445-3211 www.albanylaw.edu Photography: Christopher Butt, Kris Qua, Lantern Light Productions, and Paula Swift. Cover: From left, front row: Jeffrey Compton ’05, Lynelle Bosworth ’06, Isaiah Juste ’05, Abigail Nitka ’05, Anthony Sciarra ’07, Jonathan Pall ’05, Courtney Merriman ’06. Back row: Daniel Thomas ’07, Curtis Johnson ’07, Mark Kaplowitz ’06.

Correction In an article in the Spring ’07 issue titled “Jones ’03 Gains INC. 500 Status with Online Business,” the article incorrectly called Kristopher Jones the SBA president. Jones was class president for each of the three years he attended. 1


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M E S S A G E

F R O M

T H E

D E A N

How Long Before Student Debt Exceeds $200,000? Dan Rosenberg started his second year at Albany Law School this fall. He takes out a loan each year to the tune of 8% above tuition. He will accumulate more than $100,000 in debt by the time he graduates. He will not be alone. Across the country there are thousands more like him. The cost of higher education is the number one issue confronting all of higher education and particularly legal education. There are a limited number of ways for an individual school to contain tuition increases: 1) reduce expenditures; 2) increase class size to gain increased economies of scale; 3) diversify the product line (offer Masters and advanced law degrees such as LL.M.s); and 4) increase all forms of financial assistance. Scope of the Problem

Nationally, the average law student at a private school graduates with debt between $83,181 and $90,000, depending on whose numbers you use. Public school grads carry an average debt of $55,000. These numbers do not include undergraduate debt or consumer debt such as credit cards, cars, etc. The average starting salary for a law school graduate in the public sector or public interest is around $40,000. For a private lawyer, the numbers are closer to $80,000. There has been much in the media about how debt load has kept graduates from taking public interest jobs. As law schools continue to get more expensive, 2

the time will come when this will affect the public sector generally. The best and brightest will avoid public service, including New York State government service. Consider a typical graduate. An Albany Law School graduate with an average debt load of $80,000 will pay approximately $1,000 a month over a 10-year period to repay the loans. If that graduate takes an average paying public sector job, the monthly take-home pay will be, after federal taxes, approximately $2,600. That leaves the graduate with $1,600 each month. You can probably rent a decent, though certainly not lavish, apartment in Albany for $800, leaving you $800 to pay for such things as food, a car, clothes, insurance, and state and local taxes. You can’t, however, live in New York City. With modest studio apartments running more than $2,000 per month, the graduate is already $400 in the hole before buying groceries. The solution?

Specific actions that I think should take place would end up filling this entire magazine. In general, though, the solution has to be more than reducing expenditures or increasing tuition. At Albany Law School we are trying our best to decrease expenditures. In my first two years here at the law school we reduced non-academic operating budgets by 10 percent. We continue to keep costs as low as possible. Increasing expenditures for financial aid is as problematic as decreasing expenditures. For law

schools in general, the cost to educate a student is 18% more than tuition. The 18% is covered through scholarships and grants. In some markets, in an attempt to appeal to the most attractive applicants, schools discount tuition by as much as 26%. And, absent a very large endowment, that money is raised by having tuition 26% higher than the actual price of educating a student. To cut tuition by, say, $5,000 per year for 650 students would require an endowment of $65 million dollars to generate $3,250,000 annually. That’s about $40 million more than we currently have. The average private law school, according to ABA data, has an endowment of $34.9 million. Law schools have a more difficult time raising money than undergraduate schools. Nationally, only 14% of all lawyers donate money to their law school on an annual basis. Albany Law School has an incredibly supportive alumni base—24% last year— but $65 million would have to come from one or two donors who would like to make a transformative gift. Any solution must, of course, rely on the legal profession stepping up and supporting their law schools. Just as obviously, any real solution requires state and national change. There are some collective actions that have taken place. The ABA Committee on Government Relations and Student Financial Aid of the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar currently

lobby Congress to pass a meaningful loan repayment assistance program for professionals going into public interest work. Law schools must do a much better job of educating public officials as well as private business leaders around the importance of keeping a healthy, legal education system. The fact is, for example, that New York has 13 private and two public law schools. Albany Law School alone has more than 900 alumni as State of New York employees, including 80 in the attorney general’s office. Unlike other states where the government is populated by graduates of state law schools, Albany Law School actually serves as the feeder school for New York state government. Rather than the state supporting us, however, in a real sense Albany Law School students subsidize the state’s work force training through higher tuition. There are a myriad of issues to deal with, numerous solutions to pursue, but all must be done collectively, and not individually. In 10 years I hope a first-year student doesn’t look back on envy at Dan Rosenberg for carrying debt of only $100,000.

Thomas F. Guernsey


INBRIEF

Some Celebrating, Some Roasting, Much Debating Dershowitz’ Work Scholars came from around the country to honor, rib, and challenge the work of Alan Dershowitz for two days last spring. The event culminated in a thorough keynote address by the honoree, detailing the thread and shortcomings that have driven his scholarship. Dershowitz told a humorous story that he said “might explain” why Gov. Eliot Spitzer pursued prosecuting over defending: A witness during the Claus von Bülow case insisted on meeting Dershowitz in a gay bath house

Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center, included panelists from the academic and legal communities who talked about Israel, civil liberties, the First Amendment, Judaism, fiction writing, torture, and the O.J. Simpson case. Dershowitz’ work served as the center of the lectures. While most speakers praised and supported the Harvard Law professor’s thinking, some picked it apart, and a few disagreed outright with his approach, trig-

But no one was as hard on Dershowitz as Dershowitz, who identified and detailed “a failing in my life’s work….” to insure no wiretaps. Dershowitz called on two assistants—Spitzer and Jim Cramer, host of CNBC’s “Mad Money”—to arrive before him and behave as if they were “into each other” so that they could hear the sauna conversation. “So that was Eliot’s entry into the rough and tumble area of law,” Dershowitz said. Dershowitz’ delivery was neither intense nor intimate. Instead he spoke conversationally, rarely using notes, and stringing together simple thoughts that led to complex positions a lay person could easily follow. The two-day conference, organized by Albany Law School Professor Paul Finkelman, President William McKinley

gering hearty debate. But no one was as hard on Dershowitz as Dershowitz, who identified and detailed “a failing in my life’s work . . . . A failing to articulate criteria for when it’s good to have criteria, and when not.” Calling himself one who always pushes hard for articulated criteria and “never likes to operate on an ad hoc basis,” his upcoming project will seek to define his philosophy with criteria, “an important empirical test of my own philosophy.” Speakers included: The Hon. Irwin Cotler, Canada’s former Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, and currently a member of the Canadian Parliament; Prof. Akhil Reed

Dershowitz addresses the audience. Below, Dershowitz (from left) speaks with President and Dean Thomas Guernsey and Professor Paul Finkelman, who coordinated the conference.

Amar, Yale Law School; Prof. Martin Belsky, University of Tulsa College of Law; Garrett Epps, University of Oregon School of Law; John Perry, Lewis and Clark College of Law; Renee Redman, American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut; Nicholas Rostow, University Counsel and Vice Chancellor

for Legal Affairs, SUNY; and Prof. Abraham Wagner, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University. Governor Eliot Spitzer sent a long testi-monial letter, which Professor Finkelman read as part of his introduction to Dershowitz’ keynote. — David Singer 3


INBRIEF

School Opens New Diversity Office; Wilkins Named Director Increasing the number of students from underrepresented populations is our ultimate goal.” “I have a unique opportunity to not only recruit, but to work with students of color during their three years here,” explained Wilkins. Through the mentoring program Wilkins created, firstyear students of color are paired with second and third-year students who will provide guidance and support during the rigorous first-year of law school. A similar program exists for second and third-year students, where they are matched with alumni and local attorneys and judges. Wilkins, a Jamaican native who earned her citizenship last year, noted that the school already surpasses most of the nation’s law schools in its diverse population. “But I don’t think that’s the perception among prospective law students. So one thing I expect to do fairly quickly is create a marketing plan to help prospective students accurately

Pershia Wilkins to drive campus-wide diversity efforts.

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aggressive recruiting strategies to increase applications from students of color. “I look forward to working with alumni as partners, who can be our most effective recruiters when they host and attend yield events and contact prospective students through phone or email.

National Magazine Shows Students at Equality Rally

Doug Meszler, courtesy of Empire State Pride Agenda

Albany Law School’s first director of diversity is a familiar face around campus. Pershia Wilkins was previously the assistant director for student and recent graduate relations in the Career Center and has worked with the law school for 13 years. She will develop, implement, and promote diversity education and awareness on campus. “The mission of this Office is to engage all students, staff, and faculty to enhance our community of inclusion,” she said. “We are not only focusing on promoting diversity among students but also through our faculty and staff. A more diverse faculty and staff give our students the opportunity to be exposed to a wider range of ideas, and experiences.” Wilkins will partner with the admissions office to build upon

understand the character of our diverse campus.” Seven years in the Career Center has helped Wilkins prepare for the position. “I am very familiar with our students and alumni. I know our commitment to diversity and our need to recruit and ensure success of underrepresented students,” explained Wilkins. “The creation of this office exemplifies Albany Law’s commitment to diversity. In a very informal way I have been assisting international students transition into the community, as well as advising student group leaders. I intend to make those activities the formal responsibility of the Diversity Office.” Wilkins came to the United States 19 years ago, earning a B.A. in economics from the University at Albany. She is on the board of The Legal Project (Capital District Women’s Bar Association) and is affiliated with many local organizations.

Albany Law students Kristen Wilson ’09 and Matthew Skinner ’09 are featured in a full-page photo in the June 18 issue of The Advocate. They are shown attending an Albany, N.Y., rally to support Gov. Spitzer’s effort to legalize same-sex marriage. The word “outlaw” at the bottom of Wilson’s sign refers to the School’s student group for gay, lesbian and bisexual students and faculty. The group coordinates academic and social events around issues that affect the community. The magazine, with 150,000-plus readers across the country, is considered one of the largest gay news and entertainment magazines.


State Bar Awards Two Albany Law Students for Pro Bono Work

Clinic Professor Gets “Community Leader of the Year” Award Assistant Clinical Professor Bridgit Burke ’89 has won the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council’s “Community Leader of the Year” award for 2007. Burke, who directs the Civil Rights & Disabilities Law Clinic in Albany Law School’s Clinic & Justice Center, was chosen for her commitment to supporting and increasing opportunity for individuals—and their families—with developmental disabilities.

Bridgit Burke ’89

Kestner ’08 Published in the Fordham Environmental Law Review

Nix and Baer’s work caught the attention of the media, including Metroland, the alternative weekly newspaper in Albany, N.Y., which featured the pair in a three-page article. A few weeks before their commencement ceremony last year, Olivia T. Nix ’07 and Willow F. Baer ’07 received The New York State Bar Association’s President’s Pro Bono Service Award for creating Albany Law School’s first Pro Bono Society. Since its inception two years ago, the Pro Bono Society has helped to increase pro bono services in the Capital Region, establish a “help desk” at the Albany County Family Court to help individuals, collaborate with the Legal Project to staff a clinic to help clients with divorce paperwork, and partner with the Legal Aid Society to help with landlord-tenant cases. They also coordinated an auction that raised $17,000 for Albany Law’s Loan Repayment Assistance Program.

Written as a second-year student at Albany Law, Cory Kestner’s paper that examines the New Jersey Highlands Act, specifically questioning the zoning authority of the state, will be published in the Fordham Environmental Law Review. “This is a notable achievement for any student, let alone a second-year student,” said Connie Mayer, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. “Students rarely get published in scholarly journals, Cory Kestner ’08 especially journals outside their own school.” Kestner titled his paper “SCOTUS + SCONJ + TDRs= New Jersey Highlands Act Litigation Outcomes: Will it all Add Up to a Fair Outcome for Property Owners?” “I spent my summer working for New Jersey Supreme Court Justice Virginia Long, composing memoranda, and performing legal research and writing for Justice Long’s opinions which involved novel issues before the Court,” Kestner said.

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INBRIEF

Annual Fund Tops $1 million, First Time Ever The 2006-2007 Annual Fund closed with a historic high of $1,045,000—the first time the Law School has surpassed the $1 million mark in its 156-year history. The number represents a 13 percent increase over last year. Equally historic is the 24 percent alumni participation rate. Nationally, only 14 percent of alumni give to their law school’s annual fund. “Albany Law School alumni are some of the most loyal alumni in the country. This kind of commitment shows a wonderful vote of confidence about the direction of the School,” said Mary Ann McGinn ’83, a trustee and this year’s Annual Fund chair. Participation rates for faculty and staff surpassed all previous highs with 92 percent of the School's faculty and 68 percent of staff contributing. Once again, the Board of Trustees led the way with 100 percent participation. “We should all be proud of this unprecedented support from alumni, friends, faculty and staff,” said Thomas F. Guernsey, President and Dean. He also commended McGinn and the many alumni, faculty and staff volunteers who contributed time and resources on behalf of the Albany Law School Fund.

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E. Stewart Jones Jr. to Chair Albany Law Board; Three New Trustees, Officers Elected

E. Stewart Jones Jr.

Johnna G. Torsone

Larry P. Schiffer

Jacqueline Mecchella

The Albany Law School Board of Trustees elected new officers, each for a one-year term, and appointed new board members at its May 2007 meeting. The Board voted E. Stewart Jones Jr., Loudonville, N.Y., Chairman. Jones is head partner of The E. Stewart Jones Law Firm, PLLC, in Troy. He received a B.A. from Williams College and a J.D. from Albany Law School. He has served on

the Law School Board of Trustees since 1992. Vice chair is Mary Ann McGinn, Albany, N.Y. She earned a B.A. from University of Vermont and a J.D. from Albany Law School. She has served on the Law School Board of Trustees since 1999. Robert C. Miller, Clifton Park, N.Y., is Secretary. Miller is CEO and general counsel of the Windsor Development Group,

Inc., in Clifton Park. He earned a B.B.A. from Siena College, a J.D. from Albany Law School and an LL.M. from New York University Law School. Hon. Erik E. Joh, Boynton Beach, Fla., is Treasurer. Joh has a private practice in Boynton Beach. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Albany Law School. He has served on the Law School Board of Trustees since 1998. Johnna G. Torsone, Stamford, Conn., was elected to serve a five-year term as a new term trustee. Torsone is the senior vice president and chief human resources officer at Pitney Bowes Inc. in Stamford. She received a B.A. from Vassar College and a J.D. from Albany Law School. Larry P. Schiffer, East Rockaway, N.Y., was elected to serve a four-year term as an alumni trustee. Schiffer is a partner at LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae L.L.P., in New York. He received a B.A. from Brooklyn College and a J.D. from Albany Law School. Jacqueline Mecchella, Albany, N.Y., was elected to a three-year term as a graduate trustee. Mecchella received a B.A. from Syracuse University and a J.D. from Albany Law School in May 2007.


Professor, Former Student Face-Off in Opening Case For Appeals Division Holding Court at Albany Law

Prof. Bowmar Retires after Three Decades Professor Robert H. Bowmar retired from Albany Law School this year after 31 years on the faculty. Bowmar taught Property for most of his years and nearly all the commercial law classes. Most recently he taught Secured Transactions, and Mortgages and Liens. Before Albany Law, Bowmar served on the law faculty of the University of Houston and practiced law in Boston. He graduated Boston University (A.B. and M.A.) and received his J.D. from Northwestern University. He has published extensively, both books and articles, including recently Lien Priorities in New York (West 2nd ed. 2007), Mechanics Liens in New York (West 2nd ed. 2007) and The Effect of Transfers to a U.C.C. Article 9 “New Debtor” – Special Perfection and Priority Rules, in the Uniform Commercial Code Law Journal 53 (2005).

The New York State Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Third Department, opened its session last semester at Albany Law School with a case that put Albany Law Professor Michael Hutter against former student Brett M. Knowles ’05. “Admittedly, I was a bit nervous about the argument for several reasons,” said Knowles. Reasons he noted included a few “sticky” issues in the case, it was his first argument for the District Attorney’s Office, and it was at his former law school. “That being said, if I survived this argument, everyone at the office told me I could survive any argument. Having argued numerous cases since that case, I agree with my colleagues.” Hutter, who occasionally accepts assignments by the Third Department to keep his teaching and research sharp, as well as to satisfy his pro bono urges, was representing a defendant serving two consecutive 25-year terms for attempted murder of two police officers. The Court affirmed the defendant’s conviction. “Brett was a solid student and is now a talented attorney,”

From left to right, Justices John A. Lahtinen, D. Bruce Crew III, Presiding Justice Anthony V. Cardona, Edward O. Spain, and Anthony T. Kane. Hutter said of his former student. “It’s inevitable that when you teach, you can expect to one day face your students in Court. It’s a gratifying experience.” The Appellate Division, Third Department, hosted its first session at the Law School in 1995, marking the first time in 85 years that the Court sat at a location other than its home courtroom. Since that time, the Court has held annual sessions every year at the School, as well as

“It’s inevitable that when you teach, you can expect to one day face your students in Court.” —Prof. Hutter

the 28 counties that make up the Court’s geographic jurisdiction. Hutter said that the decision left some room for him to appeal further, which he will pursue, likely leading to another face-off between professor and student. “I cannot say enough good things about Professor Hutter,” Knowles said. “In the classroom, Professor Hutter was adept at mixing abstract legal principles with everyday situations. This is one of the many reasons why he also makes an excellent appellate attorney. I’m looking forward to the next time I have the opportunity to argue a case against Professor Hutter.” —DS

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INBRIEF Challenging the International Laws and Scholarship that Dominate Third World Voices

Prof. Gathii, conference director. International law provides privileges to North American and European voices, marginalizing Third World people, said Makau Wa Mutua to open the three-day international law conference focused on Third World perspectives. Mainstream international scholarship has helped reproduce structures that marginalize and dominate Third World peoples, continued Mutau, the Floyd H.

and Hilda L. Hurst Faculty Scholar and Distinguished Professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. “It is no surprise that Third World international legal scholars gather in the United States to address the unfortunate prevailing trends of the current world order,” said Albany Law School’s James Thuo Gathii, Governor George E. Pataki Professor of International Commercial Law and the conference director. “We’re here to work toward democratizing international law scholarship, which has played a part in marginalizing the struggle of Third World people.” Harvard Law School hosted the first TWAIL conference in 1997. TWAIL III, directed by Gathii, sought to revive the initial momentum sparked by the gathering of Third World international scholars from around the world. Scholars participating came from places such as Kenya, India, Colombia, Italy and Australia.

School Purchases 2000 Building and Surrounding Land

Albany Law School increased the size of its campus by 4.2 acres, purchasing the 2000 Building as well as surrounding land for parking and open space. The land purchase came as part of a larger agreement, favorable to the School, that resolved a dispute between the University Heights Association (UHA) and the Marty and Dorothy Silverman Foundation. “We were very pleased with the court rulings throughout the proceedings,” said Thomas F. Guernsey, President and Dean. “Along with benefiting the school, UHA can now pursue further plans to develop a broader neighborhood consortium as Mr. Silverman called for in his original vision.”

Scholars participating in TWAIL III came from places such as Kenya, India, Colombia, Italy and Australia. 8


School Gains New Faculty and Clinic Program Director Christine Sgarlata Chung has been named assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Securities Arbitration Clinic. Chung will teach and manage the clinical legal studies program which represents low-income or other underserved investors who have been victimized by abusive investment brokers. Previously Chung was a partner at Goodwin Procter LLP in Boston. She practiced in the areas of white collar crime, securities litigation, SEC enforcement and government investigations. She has a B.A. from Amherst College (magna cum laude) and a J.D. from Harvard Law School (cum laude). Chung’s ties to Albany Law School include two family members who graduated from the school: her father Philip J. Sgarlata ’59 and her sister Lisa Ann Wikinson ’92. Other new faculty members include: Visiting Assistant Professor Raymond H. Brescia, Visiting Professor Anthony P. Farley, Visiting Assistant Professor Maria Grahn-Farley, Visiting Assistant Lawyering Professor Paul Grosswald, Visiting Associate Professor Michael Hayes, Visiting Assistant Lawyering Professor Dorothy E. Hill, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law Annette I. Kahler, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law Bennett Liebman and Visiting Assistant Lawyering Professor Rosemary Queenan. Professor Brescia was the former associate director of the Urban Justice Center in Manhattan, a nonprofit legal clinic. Brescia earned a B.A. from Fordham University and a J.D. (summa cum laude) from Yale Law School. Professor Farley is an associate professor of law at Boston College

TECH IN THE CLASSROOM

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Terabyte one

Christine Sgarlata Chung, director, Securities Arbitration Clinic Law School. He received a B.A. from the University of Virginia and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Professor Grahn-Farley is an S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School. She completed the LL.M. program (degree waived) at Harvard Law School in 2005 and holds an LL.M. from the Gothenburg University School of Economics and Commercial Law in Sweden. Professor Paul Grosswald is an adjunct instructor of legal writing at Brooklyn Law School. He has a B.A. from Hofstra University and a J.D. (magna cum laude) from Brooklyn Law School. Professor Michael Hayes comes to Albany Law from the University of Baltimore School of Law where he served as associate professor of law and director, Summer Abroad Program in Comparative Law in Aberdeen, Scotland. He has a B.S. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Virginia. Professor Dorothy E. Hill is the former assistant attorney general, labor counsel, for the Commonwealth of the Northern

Mariana Islands. Hill earned a B.A. from Vassar College and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin Law School. Professor Annette I. Kahler, director of the Science & Technology Law Center, has been named visiting assistant professor of law. She is teaching Patents and Trade Secrets. Professor Bennett Liebman, coordinator of the Racing and Gaming Law Program at the Government Law Center, has been named visiting assistant professor of law. Liebman will also serve as acting director of the Government Law Center during the Fall 2007 semester while director Patricia Salkin is on sabbatical. Professor Rosemary Queenan was previously assistant general counsel for the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, Inc. She also served as an adjunct professor at New York Law School. Queenan received a B.A. from the University of Maryland and a J.D. (magna cum laude) from New York Law School.

You can teach a 35-year veteran new tricks. Professor Daniel Moriarity uses “clickers” to teach his freshman Criminal law class. Students use the wireless clicker to record their responses to questions that they had previously answered for homework. Prof. Moriarity projects on the screen a graphical representation of the responses as well as the correct answer, letting all the students share their responses instantaneously. This graph sparks discussion, and the clicker system— formally called Classroom Performance System (CPS)— encouraged more than usual class participation. “The system lets us all hear from everyone anonymously without spending a lot of time.”

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Terabyte two Professor Norman T. Deutsch runs his Contracts and Constitutional law classes through a customized system that lets students send comments to his laptop screen, giving him the option to share comments with the class anonymously on the wall screen. The system permits more students to actively participate and allows the professor to acknowledge good answers, and pursue responses that demonstrate an understanding of the assigned material or show a lack of analytical skill.

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INBRIEF Albany Law in the News New York Times

“N.Y.R.A., whether it’s due to skill or serendipity, does have, on the whole, the top racing in the country.” Bennett Liebman, coordinator of the Racing & Gaming Law Program, in an article titled “Governor’s Plan on Horse Racing Draws Criticism From Republicans” Sept. 13, 2007. USA Today

“When you look at the most successful presidents, many of them have been lawyers.” Professor Paul Finkelman in the article titled “For next president, USA likely to call on lawyer,” Sept. 6, 2007. Washington Post

When Law and Liberty Collide The Muslim Law Students Association held a forum last semester titled, “Know Your Rights: Are There Conflicts Between Civil Liberties and Law Enforcement?” Albany County District Attorney David Soares ’99 discussed with Khurrum Wahid, of Wahid, Vizcaino & Maher, New York, the line where laws overstepped people’s rights. Wahid has helped represent hundreds of people detained on material witness warrants and immigration holds. He also defended three medical students falsely accused of terrorism in Florida on the anniversary of “9/11.” (photo from left: Taiymoor Naqi ’09, Muhammad Umair Khan ’09, Soares, and Firdos Abdul-Munim ’08.) The Association has monthly meetings, educational and religious events, and regular social activities. The group strives to provide a forum for the discussion of issues, both legal and non-legal, pertinent to Muslims and relevant to the general Albany Law community. The MLSA coordinates activities with other student groups, works to foster greater dialogue, and educate the school’s community on Islam.

“Hardly a week goes by without a decision by a court on a RLUIPA case.” Associate Dean Patricia E. Salkin in an article titled “Church Sues Calvert In Zoning Dispute,” August 12, 2007. New York Times

“We shouldn't throw the baby out with the bath water. We should make sure that it's a fair playing field for everybody.” Associate Dean Salkin in an article titled “Now You Own It, Soon You Don’t?” July 31, 2007. New York Times

“The law of New York is not categorical or clear about how it would resolve this type of dispute.” Professor Stephen E. Gottlieb in the article titled “Block an Investigation? Bar Would Be High, Experts Say,” July 26, 2007. ABA Journal

“Clergy sexual abuse litigation is probably the most powerful example today of how civil lawsuits can enhance policy-making. These lawsuits put the issues on the agendas of church officials, law enforcement and state legislatures.” Professor Timothy D. Lytton in the article titled “Collaring the Clergy,” June 2007. Los Angeles Times

“If you are using anti-psychotic drugs as a means of controlling people who do not need to be controlled, then the medical people are violating their own oaths as physicians and nurses and violating federal law by administering these drugs.” Professor Paul Finkelman in the article titled “Immigration officials allegedly drugged deportees,” May 9, 2007. Newsday

© 2007 Mort Gerberg from cartoonbank.com. All rights reserved.

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“For all its talk about states’ rights, this has been a very nationalist court—so much so that its frequent mention of federalism often seemed hypocritical. But the realignment taking shape on the John Roberts court suggests that the court’s ‘liberals’ are going to be in the driver’s seat on many issues where state and national power conflict.” Professor Gottlieb in an op-ed article titled “Roe’s not done yet,” April 23, 2007.


156th Commencement Celebrates Graduates, Faculty and Staff

Connors Awarded for Service and Teaching, Finkelman for Scholarship

At the 156 Commencement, 234 people received their J.D.

Joseph Connors, Clinical Professor and Director of the Health Law Clinic, was awarded the 2007 Distinguished Educator for Excellence in Service for his work with students that led to significant results for Clinic clients during the past year. While exiting the Saratoga Performing Arts Center stage after receiving his award during Commencement ceremonies, President and Dean Thomas F. Guernsey called back Connors to award him the 2007 Distinguished Educator for Excellence in Teaching Award, an award that recognizes his commitment to the students. Paul Finkelman was awarded

the 2007 Distinguished Educator for Excellence in Scholarship. Finkelman, the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center, has earned numerous awards for his latest books: Encyclopedia of African American History and A History of Michigan Law. He recently spoke at a Harvard Law School conference on the 150th anniversary of Dred Scott v. Sandford and served as conference director for “Congress & Slavery in the District of Columbia,” an all-day, Washington, D.C., symposium on slavery, televised live on C-SPAN.

Judge Kaye urging students to use their degree to improve the world. Albany Law School graduates, faculty, staff, friends and families gathered Friday, May 18, 2007, at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center for the School’s 156th Commencement. Of the 238 graduates, 234 received the Juris Doctor, three the Master of Law and Letters, and one the Master of Science in Legal Studies. The Hon. Judith S. Kaye, Chief Judge of the State of New York, gave the key address, where she urged graduates to use their degree to make the world a more just place, as well as raise the perception of the legal profession. Kaye also received the Trustees’ Gold Medal Award— the Law School’s highest honor—in recognition of her distinguished service to the School and the community.

Jonathan A. Grippo, class president, presented The Friend of the Class of 2007 award to Nicole Bedford, a Business Office employee. Grippo said the Class of 2007 chose Bedford for her hard work, patience and friendship for the past three years, describing her as “always ready to answer a question, help out a student, and most of all, she is always smiling.” Jennifer R. Sunderlin presented the record-breaking Class Gift—$7,100—that went toward benches in front of the 1928 Building, as well as a memorial for classmate Stevenson Kim, who fell ill with cancer and passed away September 2006. Fifty-four percent of the graduating class contributed to the gift, the highest percentage in 12 years.

Prof. Connors receiving his second award of the day.

Prof. Finkelman accepts his award from Dean Guernsey.

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INBRIEF Alums Meet at Beijing Law School They missed each other by several years in the halls of the 1928 Building, but Andrew Schrafel ’06 made sure to meet Wai Zee ’87 when they criss-crossed at Tsinghua Law School in Beijing, China. They met when Zee, Chief Counsel, Levi Strauss Asia-Pacific Division, was presenting on trademark protection at the school where Schrafel is earning his LL.M. on Chinese Law. After the presentation, the two met to talk about law, opportunities and Schrafel’s purpose for attending school in China. “Given the increasing importance of U.S. and Chinese relations, I thought it would be good to live and get educated in China,” Schrafel explained. “I worked in the paper industry for several years before law school and I have seen the evolution of international trade. Tsinghua’s program has given me deeper insight.” With his concentration in intellectual property, Schrafel expects to use his knowledge to practice law both in China and North America.

Wai Zee ’87, Chief Counsel, Levi Strauss Asia-Pacific Division, stands with Andrew Schrafel ’06 (right) at Tsinghua Law School, Beijing, China. The statute represents Xie Zhi, a mythical beast that can determine right from wrong. When it observed two people in conflict, it pushed the person in the wrong with its horn.

Third Consecutive Year Albany Law Student Wins N.Y. Bar Scholarship

Lenahan, Who Helped Establish Library’s Web Presence, Retires

Robert F. Manfredo ’08, of New Hartford, N.Y., has been chosen as the 2007 recipient of the Judge Bernard S. Meyer Scholarship administered by The New York Bar Foundation. This is the third consecutive year for a student from Albany Law School to receive the $5,000 writing scholarship. Previous recipients are Jessica C. Satriano ’06 and Kathryn E. Basal ’07. Manfredo’s paper, “Public Use & Public Benefit: The Battle for Upstate New York,” discusses federal and state cases relating to eminent domain law, with a focus on the construction of a high-voltage transmission line in New York.

After more than 20 years of assisting students, faculty and staff with legal research, Nancy Lenahan, electronic services librarian, has retired. Lenahan, more than anything else, helped give Schaffer Law Library and its myriad documents a public face online. “In the very early 90s I realized that we needed to be able to extract information from the Internet and become a presence there,” she recalls. “When I first started using the Internet, there was no commercial presence and Web browsers had not yet been implemented,” Lenahan says. “Everything was text based.” Today Schaffer is a full member of the New England Law Library Consortium, an online resource sharing organization comprised of the most

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Robert F. Manfredo ’08 The Judge Bernard S. Meyer Scholarship was established in 2004 by Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein, P.C., Garden City, N.Y. The award is given to a second-year law student in New York state who exhibits excellence in legal writing.

Lenahan poses in her Albany Law School chair presented to her at her retirement party. prestigious law libraries in the world. As well, the library’s catalog is available online for both on- and off-campus users. In 2006, Lenahan was presented the Cornerstone Award, one of the highest honors for the school’s staff. Lenahan and Tom, her husband of 46 years, hope to finally take a trip to Paris to inaugurate her retirement. The couple lives in Clifton Park, N.Y.


While the Loan Repayment Assistance Program might not be enough to inspire everyone to pursue public service law, for some it’s their tipping point, sparking the tenacity to work in service despite the loans they face. For others who dove into public service without financial fear, it allows them to extend their time in service. “It’s definitely been helpful for me,” said Kelly Drago ’06, a public defender in Olean, N.Y., for Cattaraugus County. “I just bought a house out here. I’m planning to do this for a long time.” For Nellie R. Halloran ’05, LRAP has let her increase monthly loan payments. “I knew this was the kind of work I wanted to do, and LRAP was always in the back of my mind.” The money helped her relocate from Minerva, N.Y., to Lake George, N.Y., where she’s an assistant public defender for Warren County. “It’s helped me relocate with this new job, find an apartment, and furnish my new place. It’s been great.” This year 11 awards up to $10,000 were given out to each graduate. Next year, with the

help of an auction that raised $17,000 organized by the student Pro Bono Society, the funding will rise to $60,000. Typically, explained Andrea Wedler, Director of Financial Aid, students who qualify are sent a check. They must stay at the qualifying job through a certain amount of time or they pay it back. To qualify, a student can only be out of school for less than three years, have more than $20,000 to pay back on a school loan, and qualify under asset and income limits. This year the average amount of individual law school debt nationally is $85,000. “Students come in frequently asking about LRAP,” said Wedler. “From talking to them, I think it’s a selling point; it helps them commit to that public service job. Obviously we’re looking to expand the program.” “I look forward to the day when I can give back to the program,” said Halloran. If interested in financially contributing to LRAP, please contact James Kellerhouse, Director of Development at 518-445-3219 or jkell@albanylaw.edu.

“It’s helped me relocate with this new job, find an apartment, and furnish my new place. It’s been great.” – Nellie R. Halloran ’05, assistant public defender, Warren County, N.Y.

? Who are they?

Tilting the Scales toward Public Service with Loan Repayments

The first five alumni to correctly name anyone in either photo win an Albany Law School cap. The first two to correctly name all alumni in either photo, including graduation year, each win a Law School sweatshirt. Submit your answers to Christina Sebastian, Director of Alumni Affairs, at 518-445-3361 or cseba@albanylaw.edu.

Who are they? Answers for the Spring ’87 issue. Top photo: Ian S. MacDonald ’99, Colleen Fane Diaz ’99, David G. Drexler ’99, Jeffrey H. Pearlman ’00 and Susan D. Bulbulkaya ’99. Bottom photo: William F. Schwitter ’83, Andrea Morano Quercia ’83, Martin Scully ’83, Katherine A. Day ’83 and Charles I. Schachter ’83. Spring ’07 Contest Winners: Amanda Avery ’00, Albany, N.Y.; Scott R. Boesel ’00, Rochester, N.Y.; Colleen Fane Diaz ’99, Somerset, N.J.; Donald S. DiBenedetto ’83, Syracuse, N.Y.; David G. Drexler ’99, Albany, N.Y.; Peter C. Friedman ’82, Washington, D.C.; Hon. Julie A. Garcia ’99, Elizabethtown, N.Y.; Andrew D. Goldsmith ’83, Washington, D.C.; Dianna M. Goodwin ’99, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; Ian S. MacDonald ’99, Fishkill, N.Y.; Florence Richardson Mastro ’83, Albany, N.Y.; Edward F. McArdle ’83, Camillus, N.Y.; Torrance L. Schmitz ’99, Binghamton, N.Y.; Peter S. Wilson ’83, Chapel Hill, N.C. 13


INBRIEF Congresswoman Describes Her Political Vision and Life in D.C.

Kirsten Gillibrand U.S. Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand, the first woman to serve New York’s 20th Congressional District, spoke to Albany Law students last semester about her life in D.C. as a newcomer. Relaxed and optimistic, Gillibrand detailed her personal goals in Congress, eagerly answered questions and invited students to work on legislative projects with her. She noted her inspirational sources including her mother, Albany Law alumna Peggy Noonan Rutnik ’66, and her grandmother, Polly Noonan, who founded the region’s first Womens’ Democratic club.

New Law Journal to Examine Government and Public Policy This winter Albany Law School will launch its new law journal, Albany Government Law Review. The student-edited journal will bi-annually publish articles from distinguished legal scholars on significant issues relating to government law and public policy. Editor-in-chief Monique Mazza ’08 said that both the prominence of the Government Law Center and the location of the School in the state capital made it logical for the School to develop the new journal. Each issue will focus on a single subject. The inaugural issue, set for January, will center around campaign finance reform. Articles from its first symposium in the fall on gun control and the Second Amendment will appear in the second issue. Associate Dean and Director of the Government Law Center

Patricia Salkin, who serves as a faculty co-advisor to the Albany Government Law Review, said this publication provides students with a rare opportunity to explore in depth a wide variety of law and public policy issues. “There are very few scholarly publications that focus exclusively on this area of law,” said Salkin, “and we believe that this specialty law review will quickly earn a national reputation.” Professor Paul Finkelman, President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow, Government Law Center, will also co-advise the publication. To subscribe, call 518-472-5863, or email govlawreview@albanylaw.edu. For more information, visit www.albanygovernmentlawreview.org.

Student Critique on Bridal Gown Issues Wins Top State Prize Copyright law was written to protect artists, not bridal gown designers, argues Jayme Majek Torelli ’07 in her prize-winning paper “Here Comes the Bride... And There Goes the Copyright.” Applying copyright laws to protect gown designs produce unfair and inconsistent results, creating a lot of waste for the industry. Based on this thinking, Majek’s paper won first place in the New Jayme Majek Torelli ’07 York Intellectual Property Law Association’s (NYIPLA) Honorable William C. Conner Intellectual Property Law Writing Competition. Torelli was honored at NYIPLA’s annual dinner in New York City. Torelli is an associate at Hoffman, Warnick & D’Alessandro LCC, Albany, N.Y. She was the managing editor for lead articles at the Albany Law Journal of Science & Technology. 14

Statewide LEO Fellows Spend a Day at Albany Law Twenty-two college graduates who began law school this fall spent a day at Albany Law School as part of a six-week summer preparation course established by Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye’s New York Legal Education Opportunity Program. The students are attending schools across the state, including Albany Law, as part of Judge Kaye’s effort to ensure a diverse legal community by promoting academic success for individuals under-represented in the legal profession. The LEO program helps under-represented minority college graduates acquire the skills necessary to succeed in law school. The school’s Diversity Office organized the day and hosted the group.


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F R O M

The New Chairman of the Board It is an honor to serve as Chairman of the Board of Albany Law School during this period of unprecedented success. The advancement of Albany Law School under Dean Guernsey’s leadership and that of my predecessor, Harry Robinson, is significant. Our students are academically strong, our faculty is energized and productive, and we are achieving record-breaking fundraising totals. The 2006-2007 Annual Fund reached a historic high of $1,045,000— the first time the Law School has surpassed the $1 million mark in its 156-year history. The number represents a 13 percent increase over last year. Equally historic is the 24 percent alumni participation rate. Nationally, only 14 percent of alumni give to their law school’s annual fund. In addition, faculty and staff demonstrated their support for the direction of the school by participating in record numbers. We are grateful for your support, and you should feel confident that your contributions are being put to good use. One of the most important roles of the Board of Trustees is stewardship of the Law School’s resources. This includes making sound investment decisions that will ensure the long-term viability of the Law School. Over the past four years, with good investments and successful fundraising, Albany Law School’s endowment has increased by $7.5 million to $24.1 million. We are proud of this growth but we also know there is work still to do. To compete for the best faculty and students, we must increase our endowment. More specifically, we need to focus on endowing faculty positions. Endowed professorships and chairs are the hallmark of academic quality and are vital to recruiting and retaining scholars with exceptional records of achievement. Excellent faculty improves the applicant pool, the student body and ultimately the placement of our students. As I meet many of you during my tenure as Chair, and occasionally correspond through various vehicles, I will continue to beat the drum for endowment support. Never has Albany Law School been better positioned to move to the next level but getting there depends on continued and new support from alumni and friends. I hope you will join me in this worthy endeavor. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, thank you to all who have given generously this year. Your gifts are critical to our students’ success and our school’s continued progress. I look forward to working together with you to keep Albany Law on the course to becoming an excellent New York law school with a national reputation.

To compete for the best faculty and students, we must increase our endowment. More specifically, we need to focus on endowing faculty positions.

E. Stewart Jones Jr., Esq. Chairman of the Board 15


CAMPUSIMPROVEMENTS

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Face Lift for Campus Front A new granite block with the Albany Law School logo etched into its rock sits boldly in front of the 1928 Building, impossible for any New Scotland Ave. traveler to miss. A new walkway leads from the school’s arched entrance to the 1928 Building’s front doors. Granite pavers displaying the names of donors to the Realize the Future Campaign make up a portion of the walkway. The new benches that line the walkway are gifts of the Class of ’07 in memory of Stevenson Kim ’07.

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MARK UPGRADED CAMPUS Moot Courtroom Gets a Makeover Anyone who has sat through a lecture or event in the Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom may have heard voices from the floor below. No longer. Significant renovations to the DAMC—including a complete interior overhaul—has closed off the open auditorium. New chairs and carpet, and a state-of-the-art sound and video system were put in this summer. Professors regulate lighting, screens and electronic shades from the podium. Every seat is wired for power and Internet connection, and the room provides wireless access. The judge’s bench and jury box remain untouched, as do chairs and tables dedicated by the Class of 1977.

Offices Merge to Streamline Student Services The Business Office, Financial Aid, Human Resources and the Registrar moved into a shared office that will let students take care of all related business in one stop. “For a student to take a workstudy position, for example, has always required a lot of signatures and office visits,” said Victor Rauscher, Vice President for Finance and Business. “Now we’ll have one front desk staffed with a team of people who can help students with most of their school business-related needs.” 17


Law in the Family: Today’s Students Following Parent’s Path By Nicole Soucy

The depth of the school’s family legacies run more than a century deep and reflect a startling commitment to the school. Today we have 22 students currently attending whose parents also graduated from the school, representing yet another generation beginning or extending their family’s tradition.

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CURRENT STUDENTS A N D T H E I R PA R E N T S

Vida McCarthy-Cerrito ’08 Hon. D. Vincent Cerrito ’35

“Albany Law has definitely been good to the Caseys,” exclaimed John R. Casey ’70, a partner with Hiscock & Barclay in Albany whose daughter, Shannon, expects to graduate May 2008. Shannon is the fourth Casey to attend Albany Law and follows Brian ’93, who is also a partner at Hiscock & Barclay in Albany, and John B. ’94, an attorney at Dreyer Boyajian in Albany. Brian’s wife Susan Ciani ’99 and John B.’s wife Kristen Goussous ’00 are also graduates of Albany Law. For Jean MacAffer ’08, daughter of Duncan S. MacAffer ’59, there was never a choice about which law school she would attend. “I am interested in a career in government law: it was Albany Law School or no law school.” Duncan, who is retired after practicing law for 45 years, says he and his brother Kenneth S. MacAffer Jr. ’55 were inspired by their father, Kenneth S. MacAffer ’20, to attend Albany Law. Jean is not the only current student to possess the same fierce loyalty of her elders. “If my future children express an interest in a legal career, I will absolutely encourage them to attend my alma mater,” said Lauren Selchick ’06, whose brother Brian belongs to the class of ’09. Their father, Jeffrey M. Selchick, an arbitrator of labor and employment law disputes at his own Albany practice, graduated law school 22 years ago.

Katherine Persing ’08 Daniel Persing ’81 Shannon Casey ’08 John Casey ’70 John Dall Vechia ’08 John T. Dall Vechia ’69 Katherine Hentneik ’08 Daniel J. Persing ’81 Ryan Keleher ’08 Thomas D. Keleher ’79 Justin Kelton ’08 Michael S. Kelton, ’77 Adrienne Kepner ’08 Kevin R. Kepner ’86 Jean MacAffer ’08 Duncan MacAffer ’59 ---Andrew Russell ’09 William E. Russell ’72 Morgan Ruthman ’09 Rex Ruthman ’67 Brian Selchick ’09 Jeffrey Selchick ’75 Sebastian Vaneria ’09 John Vaneria ’73 ---Joshua Abramson ’10 Gilbert Leigh Abramson ‘85 Marie Aveni ’10 John Aveni ’77 Benjamin Bodner ’10 Frederic L. Bodner ’75 Sara Cirba ’10 Lee Richard Cirba ’79 Joseph Clyne ’10 Donna Clyne ’83

Opposite page: Ryan P. Keleher ’08 with his dad Thomas D. Keleher ’79, chair of the litigation department at Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC, in Syracuse, N.Y. Top: Joseph Clyne ’10 with his mother Donna Clyne ’83, a governmental affairs associate at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker in Albany. Joseph’s two uncles, three second cousins and grandfather all graduated from Albany Law. Bottom: Justin Kelton ’08 with his father Michael S. Kelton ’77, a partner at Lippman Krasnow & Kelton LLP, New York, N.Y.

Brian Hughes ’10 Thomas P. Hughes ’77 Mary Langan ’10 Terence A. Langan ’81 Alexandra Moser ’10 Margaret Holbritter ’82 Joel H. Moser ’83 Lorraine Netter ’10 Robert E. Netter ’67

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BACKTHEN

Benjamin’s Fiction Writing Helped Inspire a Stronger Navel Fleet to Defeat Spain

His “End of New York” depicted in vivid terms an 1881 New York City defenseless before an aggressive Spanish fleet, armed with innovative balloon bombs.

The people in New York saw the balloons as they successively rose from the four vessels, and wonderingly watched their progress. They saw the first of them gently sail toward the city until about over the Cathedral on Fifth Avenue. Then a dark object seemed to fall from the car, the lightened balloon shot upward, the object struck the roof of the cathedral, there was a fearful explosion, a trembling of the earth as if an angry volcano were beneath, and the crash of falling buildings followed. Through the great clouds of dust and smoke it could be seen that not only was the cathedral shattered, but that the walls of every building adjacent to the square on which it stood were down…. A second balloon dropped its charge into the receiving reservoir in Central Park, luckily doing no damage, but throwing up a tremendous jet of water. The third and fourth balloons let fall their dejectiles, the one among the tenements near Tompkins Square destroying an entire block of houses simultaneously; the other on High Bridge, completely shattering that structure, and so breaking the aqueduct through which the city obtains its water supply. The Spanish admiral now ceased firing voluntarily and sent a message by flag-of-truce announcing his intention to continue the throwing of balloon torpedoes into the city until it capitulated…. The situation was, in truth, one of sadness—of bitter humiliation. The Empire City had fallen, and lay at the mercy of a foreign foe. From, THE END OF NEW YORK, 1881

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So wrote Park Benjamin, Albany Law School class of 1870, in his sensational short story “The End of New York,” first published in 1881.1 Benjamin (1849-1922) was one of the few Albany Law alumni to venture into fiction;2 but he drew on a highly specialized background in writing the story, and he did so with a highly didactic purpose. Having graduated from Annapolis and serving under Admiral Farragut before resigning from the Navy to attend Albany Law, Benjamin possessed both legal acumen and technical engineering knowledge of a high order. This combination soon brought him to the head of the New York City patent bar. Despite his intellectual property practice, Benjamin found time to serve as associate editor of The Scientific American and chief editor of Appleton’s Cyclopedia of Applied Mechanics, as well as writing five books, subjects as diverse as electrical engineering and the history of the U.S. Naval Academy. Benjamin wrote that the 1880s U.S. Navy was so weak, its vessels obsolete, its budget grossly inadequate, that it constituted a serious threat to national security. His “End of New York” depicted in vivid terms an 1881 New York City defenseless before an aggressive Spanish fleet, armed with innovative balloon bombs. With their modern equipment, the Spaniards swept aside the pathetic, antiquated hulks of the American Navy and devastated the metropolis of North America. The story attracted a great deal of attention; it was part of the movement, later led by Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge, that led to the creation of the American fleet that largely won the SpanishAmerican War a decade later. Benjamin, himself, was instrumental in the creation of the U.S. Naval Reserve. Benjamin remained active, both as a patent attorney and as a writer on technical and naval affairs, up through World War I. He collected a valuable library on these subjects that he donated to Annapolis. —Robert Emery, Associate Director & Head of Reference, Library

Republished in Short Stories by American Authors (Scribners, 1884), which also contained one of Henry James’s early stories. Another example is Jack Casey (class of 1987), best known for his historical novel The Trial of Bat Shea (1994).


New York’s DISTRICT ATTORNEYS:

The Albany Law School Connection B Y PAU L G RO N D A H L

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H E R K I M E R C O U N T Y • L EW I S C O U N T Y • M O N TG O M E RY C O U N T Y • N I AG A R A C O U N T Y •

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When you study the biographies of New York’s district attorneys, an interesting fact emerges: among the D.A.s currently serving in the state’s 62 counties, 14 of them are Albany Law School graduates. The high number is more than mere coincidence. The road from a classroom at Albany Law to election as a district attorney is a natural route, according to those who have made the journey. They cited a number of factors during the years at Albany Law that helped them reach their goal of prosecutor: skilled and inspiring professors; a strong list of useful law clinics; abundant internship opportunities in county district attorney offices; and practical legal experience through a wide array of internships in state government agencies and courts in New York’s capital. Although the path taken is unique among each of the 14 Albany Law School alumni who are currently county district attorneys across New York—as well as more than 150 additional alumni who work in D.A. offices statewide—there are common themes that bind these prosecutors together. Those underlying motifs are revealed in their stories. 21


David Soares ’99, Albany County’s first African-American District Attorney ALBANY COUNTY

“I’ve found that students from Albany Law are much better prepared to come in and work hard without the need for a lot of supervision.” –P. David Soares ’99

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lbany County District Attorney P. David Soares ’99 sent shock waves and made front-page news across New York when his office won a guilty plea in February against former state Comptroller Alan Hevesi for defrauding the government. The scandal was dubbed “Chauffeurgate” for Hevesi’s use of staff members to work as drivers and servants for his ailing wife. Hevesi resigned his position and was ordered to pay more than $200,000 in restitution and a $5,000 fine. Two months prior to Hevesi pleading guilty, Soares’ office won a conviction in the most widely followed murder case on record in the Capital Region against 23-year-old Christopher Porco, who was sentenced to 50 years to life for murdering his father and attempting to kill his mother. A glowing New York Times profile and a cascade of favorable publicity accompanied Soares’ back-to-back victories. “That was a very difficult and challenging stretch but our entire organization shined,” Soares said. Soares never set out to become a prosecutor. “My goal going into Albany Law was to

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become a corporate attorney,” he said, but an internship with the Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York, a stint in the law school’s AIDS clinic and a couple of inspiring professors caused him to change direction. Soares recalled taking Professor Robert Tymann’s Contracts class and delighting at Tymann’s thrust and parry style of discussion and his memorable turns of phrase, such as this reference to parole evidence: “There are fewer things that are as dark and yet so full of subtle difficulties.” Soares said he catches himself delivering that Tymann quote almost daily, particularly in his work running a public integrity unit. Soares was elected D.A. in an

upset in 2004, running as an insurgent in a county known as a bastion of Democratic machine politics. He became the first African-American D.A. elected in the Capital Region. Soares and his wife have two children. He oversees an office of 39 attorneys and 15 support staff. He makes a point of providing meaningful internships to Albany Law School students, such as the ones he had at the Albany County Airport Authority and in the office he now runs. “We don’t have interns filing and running for coffee,” Soares said. “I’ve found that students from Albany Law are much better prepared to come in and work hard without the need for a lot of supervision.”


“It means a lot to me to be able to give back to my community—being a prosecutor is one of the rare jobs where you can practice law simply for the public good.” –Robert Carney ’78 S C H E N E C TA DY C O U N T Y chenectady County District Attorney Robert Carney ’78 remembers being amused and inspired by Professor Daniel Moriarty’s lectures. “He’s a character and a great storyteller who loves the common law and the roots of criminal law and he instilled that in me,” said Carney, who credits an internship with the Legal Aid Society as an influence on his path to prosecutor. He soon landed a job in the Schenectady County D.A.’s office shortly after graduation and tried his first felony case a month after he was admitted to the bar. “I was young, so they gave me a case they were sure I couldn’t lose, an escapee from the jail who turned himself in after being out for a weekend, but refused to plead guilty,” recalled Carney, who managed to win that first conviction. Since being first elected in 1989, Carney’s office has handled thousands of cases—including the prosecution and conviction of more than 70 murder cases— and in 2003, he was honored by the New York State Bar Association for “Outstanding Delivery of Prosecutorial Services.” A Schenectady native who has been re-elected five times, Carney

Nicole Duve ’90, St. Lawrence County’s first woman D.A., poses with her family at the swearingin ceremony. From left: husband Bill Mitchell, Olivia, Jacob and Owen.

S T. L AW R E N C E C O U N T Y icole Duvé ’90 is the first woman elected as St. Lawrence County District Attorney. She took office last year and oversees a staff of seven attorneys. In the first case Duvé tried upon assuming office, she led the prosecution in a sevenweek murder trial that resulted in the conviction of a man who beat an acquaintance to death with a baseball bat. “This is the most rewarding job I’ve ever had. I love the challenges of administering the office and overseeing the prosecution of cases knowing that you’re working for the public good,” she said. Professor Kenneth Melilli’s courses on evidence and criminal law at Albany Law, along with an internship in the Rensselaer County D.A.’s office, turned her attention to becoming a prosecutor. “I was intrigued by Melilli’s stories of cases he handled and the internship solidified my choice,” said Duvé. After a year in private practice defending insurance companies, she was convinced she wanted to be prosecuting cases in court, but there were no openings. She took a job in St. Lawrence

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Robert Carney ’78, Schenectady County District Attorney is married and has four children. During his 17-plus years as D.A., Carney has hired 32 Albany Law alumni, including nine who served as law clerks before being hired as assistant district attorneys and some of whom, like him, left private practice for public service. “I tell the interns that as a prosecutor, you are able to practice law in a pure sense, liberated from all its business aspects,” Carney said. “I grew up in Schenectady. My family’s roots are here. It means a lot to me to be able to give back to my community—being a prosecutor is one of the rare jobs where you can practice law simply for the public good.”

“This is the most rewarding job I’ve ever had.” – Nicole Duvé ’90 County’s newly created public defender’s office in 1991, where she worked until 1996, when she was hired as an assistant D.A. That led Duvé, who is married and the mother of three, to jobs as Court Attorney for Franklin County Judge Robert G. Main Jr. ’76, and as Potsdam Town Justice. “The exposure I’ve had by working in all aspects of the criminal justice system has helped me become a better prosecutor,” said Duvé. St. Lawrence County is home to a number of Albany Law School grads, many of whom have spent time working in the D.A.’s office over the years. “Albany Law students have a strong New York focus, they’re well prepared for the bar and what lies beyond, and that excellent preparation has been carried on from my time at the school until today,” she said.

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“I expected to return to defending after a year or two. Turns out I liked prosecuting too much and I’m still here.” –James “Jed” Conboy ’79

Louise Kauffman Sira ’93, District Attorney of Fulton County, makes a closing argument for a case last year.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY ames “Jed” Conboy ’79 expected a career in tax law. After almost 25 years in the Montgomery district attorney’s office—11 of them as D.A.— he can still remember precisely how things shifted on him. “Working at my father’s firm, I was assigned to do a murder defense. This was about the time I was getting comfortable defending clients. After that case, the A.D.A. quit and they asked me if I wanted the job, so I took it.” But Conboy took it thinking it would make him a better defense lawyer by learning the trade of the prosecutor. “I expected to return to defending after a year or two. Turns out I liked prosecuting too much and I’m still here.” With experience on both sides of a criminal case, he recalls Professor Allen Redlich introducing the art of managing both sides of an argument. “He started to debate the whole class on one side of an issue. Midway through class we realized he had reversed positions with us. Since then I understand the value of arguing each side equally well.” Conboy’s number one all time influence is his father. “I had

“Albany Law creates an environment where you can tailor your education to your future career plans and that made all the difference for me.”

J

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F U LT O N C O U N T Y

– Louise Kauffman Sira ’93 “

James “Jed” Conboy ’79, Montgomery County D.A. such an advantage to have access to an experienced practitioner.” Conboy said he went to Albany Law School because of its reputation of a “nuts and bolts” school. “The school was known for teaching students how to practice law. But when you come out of school, it’s a whole different world.” Citing one example, Conboy was faced with writing a motion for a judge. Not sure which direction to take on the motion, “my father told me to pick up the phone and call my adversary and work it out over the phone. So I called, and we worked it out. As a young lawyer, I was lucky to have that guidance.”

othing good ever comes out of a bar,” Fulton County District Attorney Louise Kauffman Sira ’93 finds herself telling young lawyers when negotiating a case involving crimes committed when the victim, perpetrator and witnesses were all intoxicated. When she utters that stock phrase, she hears the voice of Albany Law School Professor Peter Preiser ringing in her ears. She took his Criminal Procedure, Advanced Criminal Procedure and 4th, 5th and 6th Amendments classes. “I knew I was going to go into criminal prosecution at a very early age and I realized those classes were going to be necessary to me career-wise,” Sira said. Sira recalled Preiser’s classes as both very challenging and captivating because he described real-life situations from his time as an assistant D.A. for New York

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County. “He taught me a lot of lessons that I apply to my work today,” said Sira, who was recently re-elected to her second term. Sira grew up in Syracuse, where a favorite childhood game involved playing a private investigator and she dressed up as a detective on Halloween. The play was more than youthful folly and as soon as she could, Sira volunteered to work as an office helper in the D.A.’s office while an undergraduate at Syracuse University. “I was re-organizing and collating files for the prosecutors and took the opportunity to read through them and I knew for sure that’s what I wanted to be doing,” she recalled. Sira completed an internship with the Albany County D.A.’s office as a law student and was assigned to work on cases in City Court. She also finished an


“We sometimes talk about Professor Preiser’s classes because they had an impact on all of us.” –Julie Garcia ’99

ESSEX COUNTY ssex County District Attorney Julie Garcia ’99 is a single parent raising her two nieces and they’ve come up with a motto for their house: “Girl Power…Girls Rule…And don’t you forget it!” She worked as a bartender and waitress to pay her way through college as she earned a bachelor’s degree in social work over the course of a decade. She continued to waitress and bartend while attending Albany Law School, which she entered with a vague notion about helping society through the practice of law. That experience helped her land her first job in the District Court Bureau of the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office. “It is great to have a social work background because so many of the skills transfer to being a prosecutor,” she said. In the Essex County District Attorney’s Office, Garcia is one of three full-time attorneys, all of whom are Albany Law School alumni. “We sometimes talk about Professor Preiser’s classes because they had an impact on all of us,” she said. Garcia recently won a first degree assault conviction against

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a man who beat up another man with a baseball bat. She’s also been prosecuting a rising number of drug cases. “Drug dealers are coming up to the Adirondacks to sell drugs because it’s easier money than selling in Albany or Troy,” Garcia said. “We’ve only had one arrest relating to a meth lab so far, but we’re keeping our eyes open for it.”

Linda Dolly Photography

internship in the counsel’s office of Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and that helped Sira land her first job as an assistant D.A. in Fulton County. Today, she oversees a staff of four attorneys and chooses to handle highprofile cases herself, including winning a murder conviction using DNA evidence against a parolee and convicted drug dealer who sexually assaulted and murdered a 14-year-old girl. “A benefit of serving in a rural community is that I actually get to work cases and that’s kept me sharp as a litigator” she said. Sira and her husband have two young boys and she’s a stepmother to his teenage son. Sira needs no convincing about the value of an Albany Law education. Her first hire as D.A. was Melissa Kahn-Johnson ’02. Sira’s predecessor, Polly A. Hoye, the first woman elected Fulton County District Attorney, is also an Albany Law alumna. “Albany Law creates an environment where you can tailor your education to your future career plans and that made all the difference for me,” Sira said.

Julie Garcia ’99, Essex County District Attorney

Current N.Y. District Attorneys who graduated from Albany Law School Class

District Attorney

County

1974

The Honorable Francis D. Phillips II

Orange

1977

The Honorable Matthew J. Murphy III

Niagara

1977

The Honorable Michael F. Young

Lewis

1978

The Honorable Robert M. Carney

Schenectady

1978

The Honorable Donald A. Williams Jr.

Ulster

1979

The Honorable James E. Conboy

Montgomery

1980

The Honorable Terry J. Wilhelm

Greene

1982

The Honorable John H. Crandall

Herkimer

1983

The Honorable Richard D. Northrup Jr. Delaware

1990

The Honorable Nicole M. Duve

St. Lawrence

1993

The Honorable Louise Kauffman Sira

Fulton

1994

The Honorable Patricia A. DeAngelis

Rensselaer

1999

The Honorable P. David Soares

Albany

1999

The Honorable Julie A. Garcia

Essex 25


COVERSTORY

With Doors

OPENED WIDE,

The Largest Firms Vie for Albany Law’s Students Dewey Ballantine hired 54 associates for this past summer. They came from 24 schools with names like Duke, Columbia, NYU and Chicago. Three came from Albany Law School. This past year Tania Magoon ’07 received offers from all seven law firms that interviewed her. This fall she started working at Morrison & Foerster. Several other ’07 grads also received offers from all the firms that interviewed them. The nation’s top ranked law firms hire routinely from Albany Law School as part of their annual recruitment strategy, coming up to campus to interview students, as well as meet them in New York. Responsible for the institutionalized hiring of Albany Law 26

grads are senior partners in these large firms who have used their influence to bring in Albany Law students years ago. What started as a few alumni decades ago scattered through the powerhouse firms, today they proliferate into the middle and upper reaches of the most prestigious law firms largely centered in New York City. The reasons are numerous, and often distinct, but making the effort to lure Albany Law graduates has become commonplace in the larger firms. “It’s been my experience that Albany Law School’s top students are as good as any school’s top students,” said James N. Benedict ’74, Chairman of the Litigation Department at Milbank Tweed. Benedict

personally traveled to Albany for over a decade to interview students in the 1970s and 1980s, while a member and/or Chairman of the Employment Committee at Rogers & Wells. “We’ve found that people who do very well at Albany Law School do very well here,” said James Clark ’79, a partner at Cahill Gordon and a member of the firm’s executive committee. “At this firm Albany Law School has a great reputation. People have become very comfortable with Albany Law students because of their history here. It feeds on itself.” More than grades, said James “Tony” Fitzpatrick ’74, a partner at Dewey Ballantine who stepped down this year after six years as chair of the firm’s hiring


Dianne Phillips ’88, a partner at Holland & Knight, surrounds herself with current and former Albany Law students at the firm’s Boston office. From left, summer associate Ari Zivyon ’08, associate Chris Hemstead ’05, associate Brad Van Buren ’99, partner David Scott Sloan ’85 and senior partner Harry Potter ’73. 27


Rory Radding ’75 with Tania Magoon ’07 at Morrison & Foerster’s New York, N.Y., office.

“It’s been our experience that Albany Law School’s top students are as good as any school’s top students.” –James Benedict ’74, partner, Milbank Tweed.

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committee, “we look for people who will fit in, and will work well in our environment.” Stephen Younger ’82 has been driving up to personally interview students every year for more than a decade. “The key thing with Albany Law students is that they come ready to work. They bring their lunch pails and you know they’re going to deliver,” said Younger, a partner at Patterson Belknap and a trustee on the Albany Law School board. “Students from Albany Law never take these opportunities for granted,” said Robert DeJoy ’80, a partner at Baker & McKenzie, who recently started hiring from his alma mater. “I’m learning that they come out of school and are ready to work hard.” Harvard, Columbia, NYU, Albany Law?

These prestigious, profitable white-shoe firms can choose the cream-of-the-crop from across the country. Yet for two decades now they spend the time and energy traveling to Albany with a team of lawyers in search of the next future partner.

“Skadden has always sought to hire from a diverse group of law schools,” said David Hepp ’98, a partner at Skadden, Arps. “We’ve been hiring Albany Law students for a number of years. For the past five years I’ve been personally interviewing candidates. The students we’ve hired from Albany Law have been excellent attorneys and have enjoyed their time at Skadden.” “We’re always looking for good people, it’s a never-ending search,” said Ron Gross, a partner at Jones Day who taught as an adjunct professor at Albany Law before joining the firm. As co-chair of the recruiting committee in New York, Gross said they recruit throughout the country to find the right people. “When you’re familiar with a school and its faculty, it gives you a level of confidence in the students. I know that what’s taught at Albany Law meshes well with what we want here at the firm. The work ethic and character of the students also make them great additions to the firm.” Dianne Phillips ’88 was the first Albany Law School summer associate at Sherburne, Powers & Needham, the Boston office predecessor to Holland & Knight. At the time, there were only a handful of alums at Boston firms. “When no one from Albany is in there to champion you, it’s hard to break through,” said Phillips, now a partner with the firm who was valedictorian of her law class. “I’m here

because Sandy Mans, Assistant Dean of the Career Center, arranged for me to get in the door by having my resume hand-delivered by Harry Potter [’73, senior partner]. For that I remain loyal to the school and work hard to open the door for other Albany Law grads.” “Once a firm can see with their own eyes the quality of associates that come from Albany Law School, then the door opens to that school,” said Benedict, who opened the door at Rogers & Wells as the first associate from Albany Law in 1974. Benedict says his current firm now has two partners, a counsel and six associates from Albany. “I feel responsible for our associates. From their success, momentum builds for the school.” “I hold the associates from Albany Law to a very high standard,” said Clark. “I want to be proud of who we bring in from Albany, so I take a keen interest in them.” Clark’s quick to mention that one of the people he recruited to the firm was Michael Garcia ’89, who is now the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Rory Radding ’75, a partner and head of IP for Morrison & Foerster’s New York office, sees Albany Law students as “intelligent, motivated and success-driven,” a set of traits he counts on from the new recruits. “Those are things I expect from our Albany Law students.” The Double Lure

With 97% of last year’s grads working, against the national


Top 50 Highest Grossing Firms that Hire Albany Law School Graduates Skadden Arps

“We’ve found that people who do very well at Albany Law School do very well here…. People have become very comfortable with Albany Law students because of their history here. It feeds on itself.” – James Clark ’79, partner, Cahill Gordon.

Latham & Watkins Baker & McKenzie Jones Day Sidley Austin White & Case Kirkland & Ellis Mayer, Brown Weil, Gotshal Greenberg Traurig DLA Piper Morgan, Lewis WilmerHale McDermott Will

average of 91%, a little more than 50% of the school’s graduates work in law firms. One-third of the recent graduates work in New York City. “What’s changed over the last several years is the breadth of firms that come up to our campus to spend the day, often interviewing more than 20 students,” said Sandy Mans, Assistant Dean of the Career Center. Last year Dewey Ballantine sent its entire New York City recruiting team to host a reception on campus. “That kind of hospitality occurs because these firms are competing with each other for the top candidates,” said Mans. “They see Albany Law School as a great source for recruiting their associates.” Mans said second-year students often get multiple offers, and the firms are very aware of this. “Students want the best jobs; the firms want the best students.” While grades come first, firms also look at other experiences that might include a specific skill, like an IP technical background or writing ability. “We look for generally

excellent lawyers,” said Gross. “We’re too big to search for specific slots,” though there are some exceptions in a few areas like biochemistry, pharmaceuticals and similar burgeoning fields if the candidate’s expertise is exceptional, like a Ph.D. in Botany, for example.” “All of the top firms in the nation are looking for the same basic qualities,” said Benedict, rattling off a slew of soft skills beyond the measurable ones. “You know it when you see it.” Phillips calls the H&K interview process very rigorous. “I have to be very selective about who I bring to the firm for interviews. The school’s success depends upon how they do once they’re here.” Phillips adds that the Albany Law School students who succeeded through the selection process proved to be superstars. This past summer H&K’s Boston office had 10 summer associates—two from Harvard, one from Albany Law, and the others from Boston College, Boston University and University of Connecticut.

Shearman & Sterling Paul, Hastings Cleary Gottlieb Gibson, Dunn Simpson Thacher Morrison & Foerster Hogan & Hartson Dechert Akingump Bingham McCutchen Foley & Lardner Orrick Davis Polk

William F. Pendergast, Senior Counsel, Paul Hastings, spent a day this fall interviewing students for the firm's New York and Washington, D.C., offices. Pendergast helped lead the school's Career Center Committee in the late 80s to rally alumni at the nation’s top firms to recruit Albany Law students.

Reed Smith Ropes & Gray Holland & Knight Winston & Strawn Fulbright & Jaworski Paul, Weiss King & Spalding Debevoise & Plimpton Cadwalader Cravath Milbank, Tweed Vinson & Elkins

Younger, as a hiring partner for Patterson Belknap for four years, saw students from all over the country. “There are a lot of schools out there with bells and whistles whose graduates expect to receive privileges. The Albany Law students we get work hard.

Proskauer Rose LeBoeuf, Lamb Heller Ehrman Goodwin Procter Willkie Farr Kirkpatrick & Lockhart source: The American Lawyer

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Recent grads gather on Park Ave. for a lunch-time photo. From left, back row: Daniel Thomas ’07, Jonathan Pall ’05, Simon Pedrotty ’06, Jeffrey Compton ’05, Mark Kaplowitz ’06. Front row: Tamer Yalav ’06, Stephen Gruberg ’07, Curtis Johnson ’07, Mindy Kim ’06, Farrin Dunn ’07, Dana Salazar ’05, Abigail Nitka ’05, Isaiah Juste ’05, Anthony Sciarra ’07, Lynelle Bosworth ’06, Courtney Merriman ’06, Matt Truax ’06.

“Students from Albany Law never take these opportunities for granted.” – Robert DeJoy ’80, partner, Baker & McKenzie.

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I take it upon myself to mentor them, and to be their advocate to help them through our system.” Younger recently invited some 20 Albany Law students to his firm, where he arranged for a panel of New York City lawyers to talk about the range of legal careers in New York City. While Benedict says his firm can receive 5,000 applications for 50 spots, they still feel the competition from other firms for the top candidates. For this reason Gross says Jones Day “cares care very much about one-on-one personal time with the candidates.” Like many of the firms, they’ll spend 20 minutes with a dozen or so candidates in Albany, then invite the high-scoring ones back to the firm for a half-day meeting with everyone. “We need to be sure

we like them and they feel good about us.” Gross himself works on finance and transactional issues and is occasionally partial to candidates with similar interests. “When we’re making an investment in someone, we also want to know that they will enjoy living in or around New York City,” said Fitzpatrick. “In 1974 I thought I’d be here for two years, like many do when they come to the City. Here I am 33 years later.” Mans said that many of the firms have influential alumni who have secured for Albany Law a permanent place on their recruitment list. Other firms may not have leadership at the partnership level over several decades, but have consistently interviewed and hired from the school. She named some top

law firms who have shown a long term interest in the school, like Weil Gotshal, Paul Hastings, Proskauer Rose, Nixon Peabody and White & Case. “While these firms might not be considered pioneers for hiring Albany Law, they’re very much on board today and value the kind of students that come out of Albany Law.” Mans knows well the law firm side of recruiting, having worked there many years before coming to Albany Law. She emphasized that students who seek to work at the large firms is one of many career paths that the Center supports. Bent on treating every student special, she likes to say: “Today’s student is tomorrow’s recruiter.” — By David Singer


FACULTYNOTES {

Publications Professor Ira Bloom submitted his manuscript “Powers of Appointment Under the Restatement (Third) of Property” to the Ohio Northern Law Review for publication in its symposium issue on trusts and estates. His revised chapter on charitable disposition was published in Klipstein and Bloom, Drafting New York Wills. His revised chapter on GST taxation will also be published this fall. Professor Vincent M. Bonventre’s article “Changing Roles: The Supreme Court and the State High Courts in Safeguarding Rights” was published in the spring 2007 issue of the Albany Law Review. Professor Melissa Breger has published an article with Professor Theresa Hughes, St. John’s University School of Law, in the University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform entitled “Advancing The Future of Family Violence Law Pedagogy: The Founding of a Law School Clinic.” Professor Patrick Connors’ regular New York Practice column in the January 17 edition of The New York Law Journal discussed Arons v. Jutkowitz, the first Appellate Division decision on the application of HIPAA to the CPLR’s disclosure rules. In his column appearing in the May 21 issue of the New York Law Journal, Connors discussed Seth

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Rubenstein, P.C. v. Ganea, the first Appellate Division decision interpreting Part 1215, New York’s Letter of Engagement Rule. Professor Paul Finkelman has published the following: “Kermit L. Hall: A Life in Legal History and Scholarship,” 57 Syracuse Law Review 357 (2007); and “Scott v. Sanford: The Court’s Most Dreadful Case and How it Changed History,” Chicago-Kent Law Review (2007). Professor Peter Halewood’s article “On Commodification and Self-Ownership” will be published in 20 Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities (2008); and “Whiteness Studies in Law” will be published in the Oxford Encyclopedia of African American History (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2007). Professor Timothy Lytton published “Clergy Sexual Abuse Litigation: The Policymaking Role of Tort Law” in the Connecticut Law Review. Professor Alicia Ouellette has published an article with Professor Beverly Cohen and Jacob Reider in the American Journal of Bioethics entitled “Practical, State, and Federal Limits on the Scope of Compelled Disclosure of Health Records.” The Hastings Center Report, the leading peer-reviewed journal in bioethics, is publishing a paper Ouellette wrote with co-authors titled “Federalism and Bioethics: States and Moral Pluralism.”

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Associate Dean Patricia Salkin’s article, “Ensuring Continuing Community Amenities Through Golf Course Redevelopment,” was published in the 35 Real Estate Law Journal 628 (spring 2007). Salkin’s paper “What More Can We Do? Progress Towards Sustainable Development in Other States” was published in a special symposium issue of the Widener Law Journal. She also contributed the article “Act Now: Accessory Dwelling Units Can Aid in Intergenerational Housing” for the inaugural issue of Capital Commons Quarterly, a publication of the Albany Guardian Society that focuses on the dynamics of aging and our communities. Professor Donna Young’s article “The Racial Impact of Hurricane Katrina” will be published in the Oxford Encyclopedia of African American History (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2007).

Awards and Achievements Professor Michael Hutter was presented with the “President’s Award” by the New York Academy of Trial Lawyers at a recent ceremony of the Academy attended by the judges of the N.Y. Court of Appeals. The award was given in recognition of his continuing efforts in educating law students and trial lawyers in the law of evidence

and related trial issues. Associate Dean Patricia Salkin was presented the “Distinguished Member Award” by the Capital District Women’s Bar Association at their annual dinner in June. Salkin was appointed to the Comprehensive Plan Oversight Committee by Bethlehem Town Supervisor Jack Cunningham. Kathryn Grant Madigan ’78, president of the New York State Bar Association, appointed Salkin as chair of a special association task force on town and village justice courts.

Presentations Professor Ira Bloom attended drafting sessions on the Restatement of Trusts and Principles of the Law of NonProfit Organizations. He will attend a drafting session on the Restatement of Property this fall. As an Academic Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC), Bloom presented a paper to the State Laws and Legal Education Committees on powers of appointment. He also served as coordinator of ACTEC’s national law student writing competition. Bloom currently serves as Secretary of the Trusts and Estates Law Section of the New York State Bar Association. Professor Vincent M. Bonventre delivered a presentation at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government called “The 31


FACULTYNOTES {

Court of Appeals of New York State: The Judges, The Selection Process, & Making the Current Court” on March 14. At the Albany Law Review symposium called “A Second Class Right?: Free Exercise and the Current State of Religious Freedom in the United States,” he delivered the opening presentation titled “The Development of Free Exercise of Religion Jurisprudence: From ‘No Law’ to Compelling Interests to Any Legitimate Reason” on March 29. Professor Melissa Breger was a panel moderator at the University of Michigan’s Child Advocacy Law Clinic 30th Anniversary Symposium in March. She was the guest speaker at the Saratoga County Bar Association’s annual Law Day luncheon on May 1. The theme was “Empowering Youth, Assuring Democracy.” Breger spoke about the importance of students using their futures to help others. She was also a panelist at a public forum on family court presented by the New York County Lawyer’s Association and Columbia Law School in July. Professor Patrick Connors and Professor David Siegel presented “New York Practice Updates” to the justices and law clerks of the Appellate Division, Third Department on May 7 and to the Onondaga County Bar Association on June 8. Connors and Adjunct Professor Thomas F. Gleason ’78 presented a 32

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program on Part 221 of the Uniform Rules, which governs conduct at depositions in New York state actions, to the law clerks of New York state judges on February 9 at the New York Court of Appeals. Connors also presented the following: An ethics program for the Young Lawyers Section of the New York State Bar Association at its annual meeting in New York City on January 26; a New York Practice Update to the Federation of Bar Associations of the Fourth Judicial District in Montreal, Canada, on April 28; and an ethics seminar for governmental lawyers to the New York State Attorney General’s Office in Albany and New York City on May 10 and 11th. Professor Paul Finkelman presented the closing address at Washington University Law’s three-day symposium entitled “Dred Scott Case and its Legacy: Race, Law, and the Struggle for Equality” on March 3. He delivered a public lecture—Are The Ten Commandments the Moral Foundation of American Law?—at the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio, on March 7. He also addressed several classes at Youngstown State University on March 8 and 9. As author of the legal history book The History of Michigan Law, he spoke at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School’s community forum about Michigan’s legal history on March 16. Finkelman presented

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“Was Dred Scott Decided Correctly: Rethinking Slavery, the Constitution and the Coming of the Civil War” at Cleveland State University ClevelandMarshall College of Law on March 21. He was a panelist at a public lecture at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids, Mich., called “Slavery on Trial: The Federal Government and the Cries of the Unhappy Race,” on March 28. On April 1, Finkelman gave his commentary about slavery and freedom in the antebellum Midwest at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians in Minneapolis. In conjunction with the Government Law Center, Finkelman presented a two-day conference on April 5–6, celebrating the career of defense attorney and Harvard Law School professor Alan Dershowitz at Albany Law School. Finkelman participated in a Harvard Law School conference about the 150th anniversary of Dred Scott v. Sandford on April 6 and 7. Finkelman was the keynote speaker at the Central Pennsylvania Consortium’s Africana Studies Conference at Gettysburg College where he presented “Dred Scott: The Decision that made Lincoln President.” He presented the seventh annual Buck Franklin Memorial Lecture entitled “A Covenant with Death: The Constitution, Slavery, and the Problem of Equality in America”

as part of the University of Tulsa’s Presidential Lecture Series on April 18. He served as conference director for Congress & Slavery in the District of Columbia, an all-day, Washington, D.C., symposium on slavery, held by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society on April 27. The event was broadcast live on C-SPAN. On July 19, Finkelman delivered a presentation at the Gloucester Summer Legal Conference in Gloucester, England called “Suppressing the African Trade: The Limits and Possibilities of Social Change through Legislation.” Professor James Thuo Gathii, in conjunction with the Robert H. Jackson International and Comparative Programs Committee of Albany Law School, presented a two-day conference called The Third World and International Law (TWAIL) on April 20–21 at Albany Law School. The conference brought together a diverse group of scholars, practitioners and others engaged in third world international legal scholarship and practice. Professor Michael Hutter presented several “Update on Evidence” seminars conducted by the Albany County Bar Association, Nassau County Academy of Law, Suffolk Academy of Law, and the N.Y. State Judicial Institute.


FACULTYNOTES {

Professor Katheryn D. Katz participated in a panel discussion on hospital mergers and reproductive rights at Albany Law School on April 11. During the discussion, she also gave a presentation on religion and reproductive rights. She also presented a paper “Obstacles to the Success of Women in the Workplace” to New York Women in Communications, Inc., on May 21. Professor Mary Lynch was invited to speak on two different panels at this year’s AALS Clinical Legal Education Conference in New Orleans. In her role as clinic co-director, she presented as a panelist on the topic of “Dealing with External Challenges to Clinical Education” on May 2 at the director’s workshop. In her role as a clinical faculty member, she presented as a panelist on “Challenging Assumptions about Business as Usual in Legal Education” on May 4 at a concurrent session to an audience of clinical law professors across the nation. Professor Timothy Lytton spoke at Brooklyn Law School’s faculty workshop on clergy sexual abuse litigation in April. He was quoted in the National Catholic Reporter (March 2007) on clergy sexual abuse litigation and in the Ladies’ Home Journal (June 2007) on gun litigation. Professor Alicia Ouellette presented the paper called “Sizing, Sculpting, and Shaping Children: A Call for Restraint

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on Parental Choice” at a health law professors conference hosted by the American Society of Law Medicine and Ethics. She spoke about the “Ashley Treatment” at The Alden March Bioethics Institute’s Bioethics Summer Camp, a three day gathering of leading bioethics scholars in Lake George, N.Y. She also participated in a panel discussion, with John Robertson of the University of School of Law and George Annas of the Boston University School of Public Health, at the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities’ annual meeting on the moral and legal implications of human egg donation in October. Professor Jeffrey Pearlman spoke about IRS collection procedures at Albany Law School’s Tax Law Society’s symposium titled “Coping with Major New Changes in the Tax Law: All You Need to Know” on April 30. Associate Dean Patricia Salkin addressed a group of elected officials and municipal attorneys throughout Rockland County on the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act on March 27. She spoke at Howard University School of Law about environmental justice and local land use planning and zoning on March 29 and 30. She also delivered presentations during the annual meeting of the American Planning Association on regulating home based businesses, environmental justice, ethics,

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and hot topics for planning commissioners. On April 23, she delivered a presentation on the government attorney-client privilege for the International Municipal Lawyers Association in Washington, D.C. On May 16, Salkin delivered a presentation on government ethics at the annual meeting of the New York State Association of Counties. On June 27, Salkin moderated the American Planning Association’s annual land use law national audio conference. She was on a panel during the August Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association in San Francisco where she spoke about the pending release of the new Model State Administrative Procedures Act. Salkin also served on the faculty for the August ALI-ABA Land Use Institute in San Francisco where she delivered presentations on: Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act, ethics and land use, community benefit agreements, environmental justice and land use, and a federal legislative update on proposals that impact local land use planning and zoning. Professor Laurie Shanks was a keynote speaker at the New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association’s seminar on child witnesses on June 8.

at a health law professors conference hosted by the American Society of Law Medicine and Ethics. They also presented a paper titled, “A Marriage of Necessity: Developing Facts Necessary for Effective Analysis and Argument through Case Law Study” at the Rocky Mountain Legal Writing Conference in Las Vegas, Nev., on March 10. Professor Donna Young presented a paper titled “The Comfort of Home: Children as Domestic Workers” at the 30th International Congress on Law & Mental Health at the University of Padua in Padua, Italy, on June 25. She also presented “Domestic Violence and the Spread of HIV/AID Among Married Women,” at the International Conference of Law and Society at the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, on July 26. Professor Young was also a panelist at the International Conference of Law and Society. She addressed the topic of “Comparative Perspectives on Race, Slavery, and Social Exclusion: Thoughts on the 200th Anniversary of the End of the Slave Trade.”

Professor Jenean Taranto and Professor Evelyn Tenenbaum presented their commentary “BODY WORLDS, Dignity, and the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act” 33


ALUMNINEWS {

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Albany Law School Alumni Events Alumni gather throughout the country to speak with the Dean, as well as meet and mingle with other alumni, faculty and staff. Current and prospective students who attend these events witness firsthand the strength of your alumni network.

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Capital District Recent Graduate Reception March 20, 2007 Albany Law School

Contact Christina Sebastian, Director, Alumni Affairs, to get involved in your area. cseba@albanylaw.edu; 518-445-3361.

Professor, Alumns Gather at Trial Lawyers Meeting

Professor Patrick Connors, center, who spoke on ethics and N.Y. practice at the State Bar Association Trial Lawyers Section Summmer meeting, poses with: Kathryn Grant Madigan ’78, N.Y. State Bar Association president, and partner with Levene Gouldin & Thompson, Binghamton; and Peter C. Kopff, Esq. ’75, an Albany Law Board of Trustee and partner with Kopff, Nardelli & Dopf LLP, New York, N.Y.

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Barrett D. Mack ’04, Molly J. Slingerland ’03, Helmut S. Philipp ’03, Bob Inkhamfong ’04, Charles Z. Feldman ’04, Marie B. Beckford ’04.

Kevin K. O’Brien ’05, Larissa C. Wasyl ’06, Sonya Smelyansky ’06, Aaron E. Connor ’06. The National Alumni Association (NAA) Recent Graduate Committee is interested in hearing from you. The newly established committee, co-chaired by Clorisa Cook ’04 and Peter Glennon ’04, focuses on coordinating activities and events specifically for recent graduates of Albany Law, which are defined as alumni who have graduated in the past 10 years. Send your ideas to: pglennon@nixonpeabody.com, clorisa_7@hotmail.com, or alumni@albanylaw.edu.


ALUMNINEWS {

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Rochester Area Alumni March 28, 2007 Constellation Brands, Fairport, N.Y.

Hudson Valley Area Alumni April 10, 2007 Ship Lantern Inn, Milton, N.Y.

Erika Duthiers ’97, Christopher C. Simmons ’97, Trustee Robert B. Stiles ’76.

Ian S. MacDonald ’99, Carol C. Pierce ’99.

Adriana Formos ’06, Teodoro J. Siguenza ’06.

Michael D. Kranis ’80, Elisabeth A. Roosa ’84, Ralph L. Puglielle ’98.

U.S. Supreme Court Group Admission • May 19, 2008 A detailed brochure will be mailed in January 2008.

Contact the Office of Alumni Affairs (alumni@albanylaw.edu or 518-445-3220) for additional information.

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ALUMNINEWS {

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Summer Fun with Albany Law

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An Evening with the Tri-City Valley Cats, July 12, 2007 The Tri-City Valley Cats, an affiliate of the Houston Astros, took on the Brooklyn Cyclones, an affiliate of the New York Mets, splitting a doubleheader, 3-6 and 7-3. Dean Guernsey threw out the first pitch for the second game.

11th Annual Day at the Races, Saratoga Race Course, August 19, 2007

Ian G. MacDonald ’58, William R. Holzapfel ’58, Frances Holzapfel and Joanne MacDonald.

Adam W. Silverman ’08 and Lorraine R. Jenkins ’05.

Best Hat winner Mary Beth Danner-Conboy ’92 and Best Tie winner Larry P. Schiffer ’79.

Albany Law alumni, faculty, staff and guests join owner Charles F. Engel, trainer Barclay Tagg and jockey Cornelio H. Velasquez, riding False I.D., in the Winner’s Circle for the Albany Law School Race.

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CLASSNOTES {

Connect Online with Classmates Stay connected to your classmates and friends and Albany Law School; register by visiting www.albanylaw.edu/alumni, and click on Online Alumni Community. Register and gain access to: • Search for your friends, classmates and alumni who live in your area • Update your contact information • Submit class notes • Register for Albany Law alumni events • Make a gift to the Albany Law School Fund online • And more Want online help?

Contact Ariane Putnam, Alumni Affairs Associate at 518-445-3220 or aputn@albanylaw.edu

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1963

1974

Hon. Edward T. Feeney, Kingston, N.Y., city judge, retired on March 31, 2007. Judge Feeney has overseen the Ulster County Regional Drug Treatment Court for many years. In his retirement, Feeney plans to read more and write more poetry.

John L. Rizzo was appointed in-house legal counsel and vice president to Five Star Bank at its Warsaw, N.Y., headquarters. He also serves as a Genesee County attorney and has been in private law practice in LeRoy, N.Y., for more than 30 years.

1965

Peter V. Coffey was the 2007 recipient of the Law Day Attorney Award presented by the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York. 1966

Woodrow J. Maxwell has received the rank of Professor Emeritus at Hudson Valley Community College, Troy, N.Y. 1967

Jerome Ostrov joined the firm of Kozusko Harris Vetter Wareh LLP, located in Washington, D.C., in July 2007. 1970

Michael J. Tommaney joined Tully, Rinckey & Associates in Colonie, N.Y., as of counsel. He will concentrate his practice in the areas of corporate and transactional law, estate and gift tax, estate planning and administration, and commercial and residential real estate. Previously, he was a member of an Albany area law firm for more than 35 years representing many Capital Region businesses.

1975

Daniel Green has joined the law firm of Begos Horgan & Brown LLP, in Westport, Conn., as an of counsel member. His practice concentrates on commercial litigation, employment counseling and litigation, real estate transactions and divorce. He was previously employed at Jackson Lewis LLP and at Ackerly & Ward, both based in Stamford, Conn. He is a former professor of real estate and landlord-tenant law at the Peoples Law School, which was sponsored by the Connecticut Bar Association.

Jeffrey J. Sherrin has been named president of the firm O'Connell and Aronowitz in Albany, N.Y. His practice areas include Health Care Law and Litigation. Val E. Washington has been selected as Deputy Commissioner for the N.Y. State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). She will be responsible for the DEC’s Divisions of Solid and Hazardous Materials, Environmental Remediation and Mineral Resources. Most recently, she served as Senior Policy Analyst for New Partners for Community Revitalization,

Inc. (NPCR), a not-for-profit organization that assists community organizations in neighborhood revitalization efforts. 1976

Carol M. Hoffman Santemma is senior partner in charge of Jaspan Schlesinger Hoffman LLP’s education and municipal law practice group in Garden City, N.Y. She concentrates her practice in the representation of public school districts, public libraries and other municipal entities. Frank L. Messa was elected chairman of Union College’s Board of Trustees in June 2007. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees since 1994, and served as general counsel to the board. Judith Rea Heck joined Reed Smith LLP, as of counsel on the Wealth Planning Team within its Tax, Wealth Planning and Benefits Group in Chicago, Ill. David I. Rosenberg, senior partner at the Garden City, N.Y., law firm of Rosenberg & Fortuna LLP and vice chair of the Suffolk County Industrial Development Agency, was a lecturer in a forum entitled “How to Obtain Good Title in Real Estate Transactions.”

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Crafting a Legacy on Land and Sea It’s been six years since New York’s Twin Towers dropped. To date, no memorial of any kind exists at Ground Zero—but one. “We did something no one else could do,” said Brian Starer ’72, senior partner, Holland & Knight, looking at the 56-foot, 7,000-pound bronze bas-relief sculpture etched with the names of 343 firefighters who died Sept. 11, 2001, and visual images of the efforts of the firefighters that day. “My wife and I walked by this spot at midnight one night recently and we saw 20 people standing there, silent…. Come by any time of the day and watch the visitors for an hour; you’ll understand why this memorial was important to do.” Maneuvering through the New York City political landscape is foreign land to Starer. He’s more familiar with the maneuvers of an oil tanker through the Straits of Gibraltar. Licensed to captain the largest vessels in the world, Starer is occupied lately as lead counsel to the Kingdom of Spain involving a sunken ship that spilled 2.5 times the amount of oil that the Exxon Valdez did. “It’s probably the most important maritime case in the world right now,” said Starer. For starters, Starer is going after the ship’s inspector for $1 billionplus, a Houston-based company that certified the ship as safe for transporting oil. “That’s just the tip of the damage iceberg,” Starer said, rattling off a long list of damages including decimated mussel fields and a lost fishing industry second to none in Europe, as well as a damaged tourism industry off the northern coast of Spain. 38

Brian Starer, a legal maritime expert, led the effort to install the first Ground Zero memorial in New York City. In the course of this case, where impromptu flights to Madrid can occur at any time, Starer managed to help raise the money and coordinate the Ground Zero memorial, where the unveiling featured former N.Y. Mayor Rudolph Guiliani, and videotaped messages from Pres. Bush, Gov. Pataki and Mayor Bloomberg. Holland & Knight’s New York office is only one block from Ground Zero, where the firm lost a partner, Glenn Winuk, also a volunteer fireman who rushed to help that day. The wall, a bronze bas-relief sculpture, believed to be the largest in North America, stands on the side of Fire House 10, directly across from Ground Zero about 200 feet from what used to be the South Tower of the World Trade Center. “It’s a million dollar memorial that didn’t cost a million because of so many volunteers,” Starer said, quick to note that 1,176 Holland & Knight lawyers, staff and friends contributed to the funding.

“It’s important for people to see this themselves,” Starer said, gazing at the steady flow of visitors coming and going before heading into the fire station to talk with the fire chief about an upcoming event. Maritime Life

During his second year at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., Starer traveled around the world twice. “After that, I knew I needed a career that would let me travel,” he said. “Then I saw these well dressed men come onboard one of my ships one time, kind of inspecting things, and I thought this was so cool.” These men were lawyers from Haight Gardner. Nine years later, while attending Albany Law, Haight Gardner hired Starer as a summer associate and eventually an associate. “I was a kid from upstate New York [Oriskany], a graduate from Albany Law School, at this New York ‘white shoe’ firm where everyone was from Harvard, Yale or Columbia for the past 150 years,” said Starer.

“That’s why it was so special when Chester Hooper ’70 and I made partner. Now look at us.” Hooper and Starer hold offices 10 feet from each other, and Starer said he and Hooper continue to discuss the law all day long just like they have been for the past 35 years. In the early ’90s Starer, as managing partner, led Haight Gardner’s merger with Holland & Knight. For three decades before and after the merger he’s been meeting with ship captains and crews from around the world dealing with collisions, sinkings, explosions, strandings and oil spills. Starer described the increase in substandard oil tankers carrying “bottom feeder” oil to less-regulated countries. He points to his current case, where the M.T. Prestige tanker simply cracked in half while moving in expected sea conditions. “Shortly after the casualty, the owners disappeared, the cargo owner disappeared, the underwriters hide under a rock, so we’re going after the American


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Collins Leaves Law Work for Greener Pastures Bureau of Shipping, who certified this substandard ship. I’ve been after these class societies for 30 years trying to stem shoddy work. This time we’ll get them.” The Coveted Chesterfield

This year Starer received the firm’s coveted Chesterfield Smith Partner Award, Holland & Knight’s highest individual honor. With two grown, married children, an art gallery and home in New York City, a farm in upstate New York, a beach house in South Carolina, and some 100 major maritime casualty cases under his belt, including the Exxon Valdez which his firm is still working on, Starer remains as driven as ever. “After a while you don’t work for money,” he said. “Lately, large law firm work is a rough business. But how many chances do you get to change the world you have worked in for 35 years?” Starer said, his finger on the Bay of Biscay to show the M.T. Prestige’s route to the Straits of Gibraltar. “Most lawyers in their career never have this opportunity.” Starer asks one thing of his legacy: “I’d like to know we made ships safer and the world a safer place.” Paraphrasing his grandmother, he offered his principled philosophy: “Spend one-third of your life educating yourself, one-third raising your family, and one-third serving others.” – David Singer

After building a successful legal career through a series of positions including one at a large law firm, in-house counsel for a financial services company, and his own firm in New York City and San Francisco, Chris Collins ’76 decided to step back and consider his future. “What do I want to do for the next 10 years?” I asked myself. After nearly a year of travel, leisure and thought, “I made a list of things to accomplish.” Collins now serves as the executive director of Solar One, a non-profit center in New York City focused on energy education for urban consumers. For three years now Collins has shared a 500-square-foot stand-alone solar powered classroom/office where he and staff raise funds, teach children and produce theater, concerts and dance to raise the city’s green consciousness. “We’ve built a good team, we’ve reached a lot of people, and it’s been a great experience for all of us,” Collins said. But the work remains far from finished. Collins has raised a little more than $8 million of the $12.5 million he needs to scrap his current building—located on a city-owned Brownfield site— and build at the same location an 8,000-square-foot carbon neutral, Platinum LEED certified, net-zero energy use building adjacent to the FDR Drive and next to Con Edison’s 14th Street generating plant. “Raising money is hard work,” Collins said, laughing, but optimistic about the final

one-quarter he plans to receive before 2008, when he’d like construction to start. Solar 2, as the future building is known, will be carbon neutral in a city where 79% of the CO2 emissions come from buildings, said Collins. Meanwhile, the Center has a good amount of open space— they maintain Stuyvesant Cove Park on the East River’s waterfront—where they’ve recently put on CitySol, a clean energy festival that aims to inspire interest and support for local sustainability initiatives through music, interactive art installations, games and workshops and other elements designed to entertain and educate. The event drew some 3,000 New Yorkers of all ages. “We had 12 bands perform, 17 installations and about 30 vendors selling recycled jewelry and toys and organic foods, for example.” All the events are powered by sustainable sources, said Collins, whose father, George Collins ’35, also graduated Albany Law School. Visit the Center’s Web site at www.solar1.org for more information. “The timing of all this couldn’t be better,” said Collins, referring to environmental interest at an all-time high, but also referring to the serendipitous timing of his own life. “People are thinking about the environment and energy more than ever, even in the city. But they don’t know what they can do in their own lives. That’s the role we’re playing.”

Collins addressing the crowd at Solar One’s annual event, “Revelry By The River,” held this past May in New York City.

“People are thinking about the environment and energy more than ever, even in the city. But they don’t know what they can do in their own lives.” 39


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N.Y. Inspector General Sees Large Mission Ahead As the new Inspector General for New York State, Kristine Hamann ’77 is fixed on a two-fold vision: aggressively identify and prosecute corruption; and use her staff audit experts to examine longstanding agency systems to improve the integrity of the operations’ controls. To do this she’s built a team of investigators, prosecutors and auditors. On the investigative side, Hamann’s expecting to place Kristine Hamann heavy emphasis on contract fraud, particularly in construction, given the billions of state dollars spent on the industry. “Some of these building-related contracts are huge, and we’re going to give some emphasis to the larger contract awards in the state,” Hamann said. She’s started building a team with construction expertise that includes ex-prosecutors, former police detectives and forensic auditors. At the same time, Hamann said, her office will continue to investigate the more routine cases, such as those involving allegations of misconduct by individual state employees. “I want a team that really knows how to investigate,” Hamann said. “The emphasis will be on integrity. I want to re-invent this agency, and that includes helping agencies improve their internal systems using our experts.” She’s reaching out to agency employees to encourage communication, including whistle-blowing. She’s met with numerous statewide commissioners to tackle their concerns as a team. “They will make effective changes a lot easier inside their own agencies when they can point to directives from the Inspector General’s office.” Hamann has announced several indictments since taking office, including a case with Michael Garcia ’89, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, involving a $100,000 kickback to a painter for a $3.5 million contract to paint a subsidized housing project in the Bronx. More recently she released a comprehensive “integrity” review of the four entities seeking to operate the state’s thoroughbred race tracks. “I assure you that this is the very beginning,” she said.

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1978

1981

Kathryn Grant Madigan, a partner in the firm of Levene Gouldin & Thompson LLP, Binghamton, N.Y., has ascended to the office of President of the 72,000-member New York State Bar Association, the nation’s largest voluntary state bar. Madigan is the Association’s 110th president and fourth woman to hold the position.

Philip L. Burke, a partner in the law firm Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP in Rochester, N.Y., has been named the new chair of the 5,000 member Trusts and Estates Section of the N.Y. State Bar Association.

David S. Weinstock, a Director/ Senior Regulatory Counsel for Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield, Conn., has been named chair of the N.Y. State Bar Association’s Food, Drug and Cosmetic Law Section. 1979

Sheldon W. Boyce joined the Rochester, N.Y., law firm of Brenna & Brenna, now Brenna, Brenna & Boyce, PLLC. 1980

Gary M. Hind has received the 2007 Roger B. Linden distinguished service award from SUNY Potsdam. He was honored for his steadfast support through leadership, advocacy, service and stewardship. He is executive vice president at The Ayco Company, a Goldman Sachs company. Robert S. Hite has been nominated to serve as a member of the Public Employment Relations Board. He currently serves as managing principal of Hite, O’Donnell & Beaumont. He is also Special Village Attorney for Labor Relations for the Village of Menands, N.Y.

Adm. Barry M. Costello retired as commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet. During his tour as commander, he advanced the Navy’s Sea Shield vision for a technologically advanced Navy. Costello retires from active duty after serving his country for more than 31 years. As U.S. 3rd Fleet commander, he was responsible for training and deploying more than 35,000 Sailors on 134 operational assets. 1982

Matthew D. Babcock, St. Elizabeth Medical Center Vice President/Chief Operating Officer, Utica, N.Y., has been elected president of the Catholic Healthcare Council for 2007. As president, he will also serve on the N.Y. State Catholic Conference’s Public Policy Committee. Linda J. Cohen was named to the 2007 Board of Directors for The Empire State Society of Association Executives, Inc. (ESSAE). She is executive director for N.Y. State Corps Collaboration, a non-profit association of youth community service corps based in Latham, N.Y.


A L U M N I

Hon. Polly A. Hoye, Fulton County Judge, was honored by State Sen. Hugh T. Farley as a recipient of the N.Y. State Senate’s annual “Women of Distinction” award in Albany. The program honors distinguished women who do outstanding work in their communities. 1983

Gail M. Norris has been chosen to direct the College Office of Technology Transfer at the University of Rochester. As director, she will develop strategies for the licensing and commercialization of intellectual property developed at the University, as well as foster corporate collaborations and assist in the establishment of start-up companies which use technology developed at the University. 1984

Andrew C. Rose has been named managing partner of Nixon Peabody’s Albany office. Rose is a 22-year veteran of Nixon Peabody, with a practice focusing on commercial and intellectual property litigation, and technology development and commercialization. He also represents print and broadcast media entities in business, newsgathering, and litigation matters. 1985

Eddie J. Thompson has been appointed as Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Syracuse regional office, which includes Oswego County, by Attorney General Hon. Andrew M. Cuomo ’82.

1986

James E. Braman joined Lemery Greisler LLC as an associate attorney. His practice includes counseling contractors, developers and lending institutions in commercial and residential real estate transactions including matters related to real estate law, corporate law and regulatory compliance. Peter J. Molinaro has been named managing director of Mark Ross & Co., Inc. In his new role, he will be part of the senior management team involved in all aspects of the business. In addition, he will serve as president and chief operating officer of The American Life Insurance Congress, a new industry group founded to promote ethical standards in the life insurance industry. Richard C. Roxin was appointed general manager of Hunt Hollow Ski Club in Naples, N.Y. He will maintain overall responsibility for all operations at Hunt Hollow. 1987

Lt. Col. Charlie M. Johnson was promoted to colonel and will be transferred to Japan to serve as chief judge advocate for the Air Force. She currently presides on the Military Appeals Court. 1988

Lawrence E. Ball has been appointed to a part-time judgeship in Kingston, N.Y. 1989

Bridgit M. Burke was named recipient of the N.Y. State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council Community Leader of the Year Award for 2007.

P R O F I L E

Averting West Coast Erosion, Aceti Works to Save Beaches Ever since El Ninõ hit the West Coast some 10 years ago, decimating the California shores, Steve Aceti ’81 has been fighting to save the state’s beaches. Part trade group, part advocacy, Aceti helped organize and serves as executive director of the California Coastal Coalition, where he has secured billions of state and federal dollars to restore wetlands, stem the erosion of beaches, and improve Steve Aceti the quality of coastal waters. “We now have 35 cities and five counties participating as members,” said Aceti, who is based in Encinitas. “This is not a partisan issue for California. We all treasure our coast, our beaches, our water. My job is to make sure there’s money in the state budget for protecting these resources. That means educating people on the dangerous conditions of our shores.” The Coastal Coalition—called CalCoast—created California’s Public Beach Restoration Program through legislation introduced in 1999. A bill last year sought to create a permanent source of funding for coastal projects, but, after passage in the Senate and Assembly, was vetoed by the governor. Aceti explained that beaches lose sand that washes offshore; urbanized coastlines cut off the replenishment system that typically nourishes beaches. “If a beach isn’t replenished naturally, then we need to provide sand or it will erode and eventually be lost for good.” Through partnerships with other organizations, Aceti also works to acquire wetlands and coastal properties, as well as put in place storm drain filters so run-off water gets as “clean as possible” before it hits the ocean. Raised in Utica, N.Y., Aceti worked as a legislative aide in New York for two years before law school. After school he practiced trial law mostly for insurance carriers, and lobbied the state and local governments on behalf of municipalities and corporations. While CalCoast is a full-time job, Aceti also represents Southern California for a D.C.-based lobbying firm for its city and county clients. Nationally he’s on the board of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. “I wanted to do more than just trials,” Aceti said. “I wanted to work with legislative issues, and I really liked Southern California. After El Nino, the coastal towns realized they needed a stronger presence in Sacramento. The timing was fortuitous for me.” Steve lives in Encinitas with his wife, Betsy, and their three children Amy, Sam and Stevie. 41


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Connecting Inventor and Investor, Novak Brings Products to Market

Michael P. McDermott was appointed to the N.Y. State Commission on Sentencing Reform, formed by Gov. Eliot Spitzer to review the state’s sentencing structure and practices.

Most patents never receive the attention needed to realize their true value, largely due to a communications gap between investor and inventor, says David Novak ’86, president of the Inventis Group Ltd. Call him a matchmaker between technology and wealth. Novak keeps informed a bevy of investors eager for the right startup. Given the knowledge and experience Inventis partners bring David Novak to clients, Novak says, they’re bound to burst a successful IPO. “We perform the due diligence, determine the commercialization potential of the technology and its inventors, and, if we like it,” said Novak, “our mission becomes delivering the product to the market. Whether we’re establishing a start-up company, or developing a small company’s commercialization plan, our mission is technology transfer to commercialization, wealth creation and economic development.” Inventis represents government research labs, private companies and universities, such as the University of Dayton, which has 750 scientists and engineers in their labs. They also represent the Institute for the Development and Commercialization of Advanced Sensor Technologies (ID CAST)—this includes six Ohio universities, two Air Force Research Labs and approximately 15 industry members. For these groups Inventis gets first rights of refusal on all technologies made available for commercialization. Novak also chairs the ID CAST Committee on Ohio Science, Technology, Engineering, Entrepreneurship and Mathematics, (CO-STEM) that works to develop K-16 programs. On the investor side Inventis has five angel groups and over 10 venture capital groups, including investors in London, Stockholm and Japan, opening access to the European and Asian markets. For ID CAST, Inventis is steeped in work with Analog Bridge Inc., a company that will market a nano-sized circuit device that will shrink the cell phone, PDA and MP3 player down to a wrist-watch sized gadget. While Inventis has its eye on world-changing technology, they’re open to less thrilling but equally promising technology. “About 1% of patents are ever used to their potential in the marketplace,” Novak said. “Our job is to educate investors about technology we think can create a lot of wealth and lead to economic development in the U.S. and globally.”

Dawn Jablonski Ryman has been appointed the vice president of legal affairs and deputy general counsel at MVP Health Care in Albany, N.Y.

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1990

Hon. Elizabeth A. Garry was sworn in as State Supreme Court Judge for the Sixth Judicial District, as the first Democrat ever elected to the Supreme Court in the Sixth District. Christine M. PatneaudeKrahulik was inducted into the new Schalmont High School Alumni Wall of Distinction in Rotterdam, N.Y.

Shannon Martin LaFrance was named to the Rhinebeck Savings Bank Board of Directors. She is a partner with the Law Offices of Rapport, Meyers, Whitbeck, Shaw & Rodenhausen, LLP of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 1995

Lisa M. Codispoti joined the National Women’s Law Center as Senior Counsel on their Health and Reproductive Rights Team working on health care reform, Medicaid and SCHIP at the state and federal level. Dionne A. Wheatley was promoted to partner at the firm Roemer Wallens & Mineaux in Albany, N.Y. 1996

David R. Ross joined the Albany law firm of O’Connell and Aronowitz, working principally in the healthcare and criminal defense practices of the firm.

Amber L. Barber, a senior associate of the DRM Schoenberg Family Law Group, Burlington, Vt., was elected to the Vermont Bar Association’s board of managers.

1992

1997

Lawrence C. Digiulio was named vice president and general counsel of Independent Health, Buffalo, N.Y. He will be responsible for all legal matters for Independent Health.

Michael P. Naughton Sr. has joined in partnership with Owens McHugh Naughton & McQuade PLLC and opened a law office in downtown Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The firm provides a broad range of services but specializes in real estate, environmental and intellectual property law, and estate litigation.

1993

Carol E. Owens joined Harris Beach in Rochester, N.Y.

Kathryn L. Clune joined the Litigation Group and Intellectual Property Group of the firm Crowell & Moring LLP, in Washington, D.C.

Deon T. Retemeyer was promoted from Senior In-House Attorney to Assistant General Counsel for NEC Corporation of America, Melville, N.Y.


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1998

Stephanie T. Dunn moved to Charlotte, N.C., where she is Second Vice President, Assistant General Counsel in the General Counsel’s Office of Transamerica Reinsurance. 2000

Matthew Fuller was recognized by the Capital District Business Review as a promising young member of the business community through their 40 Under 40 Awards Program. He is an attorney and partner at FitzGerald Morris Baker Firth P.C. in Glens Falls, N.Y., and is in charge of the firm’s Washington County, N.Y., office. Richard A. Fuerst recently became a partner in the 170-year-old Niskayuna, N.Y., law firm of Higgins, Roberts, Beyerl & Coan, P.C. His primary areas of practice are trusts and estates, wills, taxation, corporate and elder law. This past December he was invited to give a faculty presentation on the Legal Aspects of Retirement at the 60th annual Postgraduate Assembly in Anesthesiology in New York, N.Y. Catherine M. Hedgeman launched her law practice in Albany, N.Y., which will handle a variety of matters, but will practice in the areas of Land Use and Zoning, Government and Regulatory Affairs, Commercial and Corporate Law, Litigation, and Real Estate.

P R O F I L E

Moving from Firm to In-house to Firm, Berdon Likes the Pharma World Several hundred million dollars of revenue are likely to be at stake when Andrew Berdon ’87, a partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart Oliver & Hedges in New York City, argues a case on behalf of a pharmaceutical company applying to become the first manufacturer to win FDA approval to produce a generic version of a branded medication. Berdon and his colleagues won just such a case for a client, which became the first company approved by the FDA to produce a generic version of Neurontin, a $2 billion-a-year medication that reduces nerve pain after shingles and treats epilepsy in adults and children. “These cases are long and complex and it’s very much a collaborative process,” Berdon said. “Without having a great team of very talented people around me, our clients wouldn’t have had the kinds of successes they’ve had.” Berdon’s challenge is to keep current in a complex and shifting area of law. “I joke that

“The cases were being discussed on the front pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. It inspired me to want to practice law at that level.”

the laws governing the pharmaceutical industry are like the weather in San Francisco,” he said. “If you don’t like it, wait 15 minutes, it’ll change. The stakes are so high that it makes economic and business sense to litigate to resolve patent conflicts or to bring clarity to regulatory ambiguities. I represent both branded and generic companies, so I’ve come to understand both sides of the industry.” At Albany Law School, Berdon grew interested in becoming a litigator after completing Peter Preiser’s class on federal jurisdiction and a civil procedure course taught by Professor Stephen Gottleib. He credits Howard Sprow as the professor who had the greatest influence on his career path. “He had been a senior partner at Rogers and Wells and general counsel at Merrill Lynch and he really sparked my interest in litigating Wall Street-type cases,” Berdon said. An Albany Law School experience that confirmed the career direction for Berdon was his work as a student clerk for Judge Roger Miner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, who heard cases in New York City. “It was exciting to see law practiced at a major league level,” Berdon said. “The cases were being discussed on the front pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. It inspired me to want to practice law at that level.” His first job out of law school was with the securities litigation group of Weil, Gotshal and

Andrew Berdon Manges in New York. He next moved to Schulte, Roth & Zabel and focused on securities litigation and white-collar criminal cases. One of his first cases involved representing a pharmaceutical company accused of falsifying test data on a heart medication. “I found the pharmaceutical industry very challenging and decided to become a specialist in order to add value to a law firm in a way I might not have been able to do if I remained a generalized securities litigator,” he said. That decision to specialize led Berdon to take a position in-house as general counsel for Faulding Pharmaceuticals, a New Jersey-based division of Australia’s Faulding Group, which made both branded and generic drugs. He remained with Faulding Pharmaceuticals for five years. In 2004, he joined Quinn Emanuel, where he focuses his practice on litigating patent, regulatory and business disputes for major pharmaceutical companies. Berdon and his wife, Randi, who’s completing a master’s degree in social work, have two children and they live in Westchester County. “I’m glad that I’ve found a way to have a life and a practice,” he said. “I make sure that I attend a lot more of my kids’ ballgames than I miss.” – Paul Grondahl 43


A L U M N I

P R O F I L E

From Government to Lobbying, Parks to Finance, Balachandran Stays Centered with Law Training When Robert Balachandran ’91 heads downtown on New York’s West Side Highway, it’s not the traffic that upsets him, it’s the five miles of green space that runs along the Hudson River from 59th Street down to Battery Park. “It was always the little things, like an unmowed lawn, or an overflowing garbage can,” said the former CEO of the Hudson River Park Trust, where he oversaw the design, construction and management of the $400 million park. “It was the greatest job in the world, but there was a time my wife Michelle didn’t let me drive down the West Side Highway,” recalls Balachandran, who is now a managing director at Bear Stearns, where he is an investment banker in the municipal finance department. “The Park job was politically challenging because along with running a company,” Balachandran said, “there were the thousands of New Yorkers who were your ‘customers’ that you needed to please, and an endless number of federal, state and city government agencies that also required attention.” But politics is Balachandran’s

Robert Balachandran strongest suit and lies at the center of his winding career since he left Albany Law School. He started at a White Plains law firm, Cerussi & Spring, moved to the N.Y. Attorney General’s Office for a year, and then to the government relations firm Coppola, Ryan, McHugh, in Albany, for two years where he became partner. “I loved working with government both in the A.G.’s office and at the lobbying firm. I kind of thought that’s where my heart was,” said Balachandran. Later, he followed his heart right into the epicenter

“It was the greatest job in the world, but there was a time my wife Michelle didn’t let me drive down the West Side Highway.” 44

of government working as a Senior Assistant Counsel to Gov. Geroge Pataki from 1995 to 1999, where he was liaison to Pataki for 16 state agencies and public authorities. Legislation that he drafted while in Pataki’s office, the Hudson River Park Act, led to his appointment as Hudson River Park’s first CEO. After five years at the Park he moved to Bear Stearns, where he works as a banker focusing on N.Y. state issuers such as the Empire State Development Corp., the Dormitory Authority, and the Thruway Authority. “I work with many of the same agencies and authorities that I dealt with when I was in the Governor’s office. Now I sit on the other side of the table from them,” said Balachandran. “Because of connections to the New York real estate community from my time at the Hudson River Park, I also do a fair amount of real estate work at the firm. At the risk of sounding cliché, almost everything that I have accomplished in my professional life would not have been possible without the training that I got while in law school. Learning how to analyze problems and ‘think like a lawyer’ has proved to be useful in many situations other than just in a court room.” Balachandran lives in Westchester County with his wife Michelle and two children Isabelle and Rowan. – DS

Jodie L. Ryan, an attorney with Phillips Lytle LLP, Rochester, received the N.Y. State Bar Association President's Pro Bono Service Award for the 7th Judicial District. John R. Vero with Moshe H. Bonder ’03, both attorneys at Couch White, LLP, presented at the 98th annual meeting of the Conference of Mayors and Municipal Officers on June 11, 2007, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. They discussed how communities can recruit and retain tomorrow’s leaders to ensure communities are prepared for the future. 2001

Maureen E. Maney, attorney with Hancock & Estabrook LLP, Syracuse, N.Y., was named president of the Central New York Women’s Bar Association. Maney’s law practice concentrates on civil litigation at the trial and appellate levels. Jessica A. Norgrove joined the Albany Office of Hiscock & Barclay LLP as an associate. She focuses her practice on complex legal issues in the areas of real property tax and condemnation. 2002

Joanmarie M. Dowling was the 2007 recipient of the Law Day Associate Award presented by the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York.


A L U M N I

2003

Moshe H. Bonder with John R. Vero ’00, both attorneys at Couch White LLP, presented at the 98th annual meeting of the Conference of Mayors and Municipal Officers on June 11, 2007, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. They discussed how communities can recruit and retain tomorrow’s leaders to ensure communities are prepared for the future. Damien G. Granderson, previously associate director for Business & Legal Affairs at KOCH Entertainment LLP, New York, N.Y., is now an associate at the entertainment law firm Davis Shapiro Lewit & Hayes LLP. Gregory R. Nearpass has joined Nixon Peabody’s Rochester, N.Y., office as an associate in the Real Estate Group. He previously practiced at Harter Secrest & Emery LLP, Rochester, for four years. 2004

Kristen B. Degnan is an associate with Chelus, Hardzik, Speyer and Monte, Cheektowaga, N.Y. Jessica A. Knouse is an assistant professor of law at The University of Toledo College of Law, Toledo, Ohio. She teaches Constitutional Law I, Family Law, and Sexuality and the Law. After graduating as valedictorian from Albany Law, she worked as an Appellate Court Attorney for the N.Y. State Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Third Judicial Department, and then as a law clerk for Justice Howard H. Dana Jr.,

P R O F I L E

IPO to Acquisition: Sheehan Goes Full Circle diversified its customer-base, adding Siemens and GE, to name a few, “Phillips’ interest in Intermagnetics increasingly grew to the point that they made a serious offer.” Off work

Kathy Sheehan Kathy Sheehan ’94 started producing a television real estate show in 1987, far ahead of its time. Her path to law school included TV reporting in Toledo, and directing communications for a Catholic Diocese. Those skills—particularly writing—fed into her legal career, of which the last 11 years took place at Intermagnetics General Corp., recently bought by Philips Medical Systems. “I’ve stayed that long at one company because the company changed every year, and still does,” said Sheehan, who was IGC’s general counsel. “My work constantly shifted in focus from corporate law to intellectual property to mergers and acquisitions. I had to manage the legal work for a profitable business and the start-up subsidiary SuperPower.” In the middle of all that, pieces of the company were sold to corporations in Asia and Europe; also, Intermagnetics’ business model shifted from sell-

ing almost exclusively to OEM’s to selling directly to hospitals. Intermagnetics, spun off from General Electric in 1971, made most of its money from magnets used for MRI systems. Before being purchased by Philips, Intermagnetics was traded on NASDAQ, and its SuperPower subsidiary was developing high-temperature superconducting material for electric power transmission. Sheehan liked the small company—1,150 people—where things moved quickly and the company would feel the impact of her three-person office. “A person typically has to do a lot of job-hopping to learn all the things I learned at Intermagnetics.” For now, Sheehan enjoys the experience of a global conglomerate. “There are things we can do now that we couldn’t do before,” she said. “Philips talked often about acquiring us, since we were their sole-supplier of MRI magnets.” As Intermagnetics

Sheehan, who married in her first year of law school, has an 8-year-old boy in the Albany Public Schools. “I’m a big advocate of the Albany school system, and economic and cultural diversity in general,” said Sheehan. A journalism graduate of Bowling Green State University, Sheehan passed up Cornell Law School to attend Albany Law. “I made a good choice attending Albany Law School,” Sheehan said. “I appreciate very much all the opportunity it’s given me.” Sheehan has hired one alumni and sponsored more than half a dozen interns while at Intermagnetics, and intends to stay involved with her alma mater. Recently, Sheehan left Philips.

“My work constantly shifted in focus from corporate law to intellectual property to mergers and acquisitions.”


Maine Supreme Judicial Court. She received her LL.M. from Yale Law School, where her studies included legal philosophy, constitutional theory and antidiscrimination law. Stephen F. Swinton Jr. has been named a member of Hoffman, Warnick & D’Alessandro LLC, an Albany, N.Y., law firm that specializes in intellectual property. Swinton’s practice primarily focuses on biotechnology. He has been an associate with the firm since 2004. 2005

Stacey M. Barrick is an associate at Whiteman Osterman and Hanna LLP, Albany, N.Y. She previously practiced with Bartlett, Pontiff, Stewart & Rhodes, P.C., Glens Falls, N.Y., and Higgins, Roberts, Beyerl & Coan, P.C. Niskayuna, N.Y.

MARRIAGES AND BIRTHS 1972

Hon. William H. Moutain III married Rhonda J. Deckman on Sept. 23, 2006, in Olean, N.Y.

Elizabeth M. Corrado was appointed town justice for Hurley, N.Y. 2006

Ryan T. Emery joined the firm Mackenzie Hughes LLP, in North Syracuse, N.Y. Previously Ryan was a summer law clerk for firms in both Syracuse and Albany. Celia E. Moore is an associate at Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece, P.C., Syracuse, N.Y., where she works with the firm’s litigation practice group. 2007

Shervon M. Small was selected as the 2007 recipient of the Law Day Student Award. The award is presented by the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York to a student who has exhibited an outstanding commitment and dedication to providing pro-bono legal services.

The Wedding Photo Exception

It is the magazine’s policy not to run wedding photos. For this photo, we’ve changed our rules. Wedding photos with 25 or more Albany Law School alumni will now be included in the magazine, particularly if all the names and class years are provided, as did Tracy ’03 and Mark Chieco ’02 who were married in Utica, N.Y., Nov. 18, 2006. Front row, from left: Wayne Smith ’03; Patrick Jordan ’02; Brian Connelly ’02; William Conboy ’02; Daniel Lynch ’02; William Conway ’02; and Sam Kaufman ’02. Second Row: William Kelly ’03; Colleen Ostiguy ’03; Sara Paupini ’03; Beth Pritchett ’03; Maria Ascenzo ’03; Tracy Chieco ’03; Mark Chieco ’02; Beth Columbo ’04; Devon Conway ’02; Amy Kellogg ’02; Alisa Boll ’03; and Jordana Kaufman ’02. Third Row: Rocky Fitizzi ’03; Laura Jordan ’03; Helmut Philipp ’03; Brian Garvey ’03; Kim Raab ’02; Erik Koenitzer ’04; and Laura Ayers ’03.

1994

1999

Robert A. Rausch married Elizabeth J. Gallagher on July 28, 2007, in Saratoga Lake, N.Y.

Jennifer A. (Grady) Proper ’99 and Justin E. Proper ’99 welcomed their second daughter, Julianna Elizabeth, on Nov. 1, 2006, joining her sister Isabella.

1995

James T. Potter married Amy Ford on April 14, 2007, in Albany, N.Y.

Erin L. (Gordon) Herbst ’95 and John J. Herbst ’96 had a daughter, Alexandra Lena Herbst, on March 13, 2007, joining big brother Zachary.

1987

1996

2003

Penny (Slomovitz) Glaser welcomed a daughter, Ariana Natalynn Glaser, on Aug. 5, 2006.

John M. Bagyi and Dania Bagyi had a baby girl, Kennedy Barbara Bagyi, on June 26, 2007.

Jennifer L. Carlson ’03 and Matthew W. Tebo ’03 were married on Sept. 29, 2006, in Hawaii.

1980

Erin L. Leitman Scott had a son, Michael Witte Scott. 46

2000

Brian D. Mercy ’00 and Megan M. Parsons ’04 were married on Sept. 16, 2006.

Molly J. Slingerland ’03 and Helmut S. Philipp ’03 were married on May 20, 2006, in Cooperstown, N.Y. Hon. Polly A. Hoye ’82 officiated. 2004

Peter J. Glennon ’04 and Kimberly A. (Nichols) Glennon ’04 welcomed twins Madeline Grace and John Pierson on July 9, 2007. 2006

Suzanne M. Post married Andrew E. Bolling on Aug. 26, 2006. Erica L. Augliano married Jeremy I. Cohen on July 22, 2006, in Alexandria Bay, N.Y.


I N

INMEMORIAM

M E M O R I A M

{

Warren M. Anderson ’40 Dies at Age 91 Warren M. Anderson, 91, a 1940 Albany Law School graduate and longtime Republican leader in the New York State Senate, died from heart failure on June 1, in Binghamton, N.Y. Anderson graduated from Colgate University in 1937 and after graduating from Albany Law, was an assistant county attorney in Broome County, served in the Army in World War II and then joined the firm Hinman, Howard & Kattell in 1949. He became a partner in 1952, a position he maintained until his death. He was elected to the Senate in 1952, to a seat that had been held by his father, Floyd E. Anderson, who became a State Supreme Court justice. Anderson served 36 years in the State Senate, a leadership tenure unsurpassed in the history of the State Senate. In 1973 he was elected President Pro Tem and Majority Leader of the Senate, a position he held until his retirement in 1988. While he is credited with having a leadership role in the effort to save New York City from bankruptcy in 1975, one of his lesser known legislative accomplishments in which he took pride was chairmanship of the committee which rewrote New York’s Business Corporation Law. Anderson was a member of the Advisory Committee of Albany Law School’s Government Law Center. He also helped to create New York’s Tuition Assistance Program and was a strong supporter of the State University of New York school system, including Binghamton University. Anderson’s first wife, Eleanor, died in 1996. He is survived by his second wife, the former Ruth W. Bennett, whom he married in 2001; four sons from his first marriage, W. David, of Darien, Conn.; Lawrence C., of Castle Creek, N.Y.; Richard S., of Hillcrest, N.Y.; and Thomas B., of Marblehead, Mass.; and seven grandchildren. In 1992, Albany Law School’s Government Law Center established the Warren M. Anderson Legislative Breakfast Seminar series, a program that takes place during the legislative session on topics of interest to legislators and other policymakers.

F A L L

1942

Richard H. Connors passed away on June 26, 2007, in Hilton Head, S.C., at the age of 88. He practiced law in Rochester, N.Y., for 46 years where he was a senior partner with Winchell, Connors & Corcoran. He was named one of America’s “Top 100 Lawyers” during his long law career. He is survived by his second wife, Gwendolyn, six children, 10 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Hon. William L. Ford, 91, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., died Feb. 27, 2007, in Tucson, Ariz. He was president of his class at Albany Law School. He returned to Saratoga Springs from military service in 1946, and practiced law for the next 25 years. He joined the Saratoga law firm of Butler and Kilmer, followed by Leary, Fullerton and Sweeney, which later became Leary, Fullerton, Ford and Aussicker and then Ford, Jones and Hogan. In 1973, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller nominated him to the N.Y. State Court of Claims. While a judge of this court, Ford wrote a decision in Cathedral Academy of Albany vs. The State of New York that was appealed up to the U.S. Supreme Court, which reinstated his decision.

2 0 0 7

}

This was, Judge Ford claimed, his most satisfying legal experience. He was elected to the Supreme Court of N.Y. State in 1975, from which he retired in 1988. He is survived by his second wife, Eleanor (Staley) Ford, four children, four step-children, 16 grandchildren and 10 greatgrandchildren. 1948

John D. Briggs, 90, of Cambridge, N.Y., died on March 20, 2007. After graduating from Albany Law, he joined his father’s firm, Briggs & Wilson (which later became, Briggs, Wilson & Tomasi) of Cambridge and Salem. He served the community in many capacities, including Washington County Judge, Washington County District Attorney, Washington County Attorney, Supervisor of the Town of White Creek, Village of Cambridge Justice and Attorney for the Town of White Creek. He was a member of the Director Advisory Board of Marine Midland Bank and director and attorney of Mary McClellan Hospital. Hon. John W. Rehfuss, 86, of Albany, N.Y., passed away March 5, 2007. Judge Rehfuss was a practicing attorney for more than 50 years. He was a former president of the Albany County Bar Association, and former Albany City Court Judge. Survivors include his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

47


INMEMORIAM

1949

1954

1959

Robert P. Worden, 86, of Greensboro, N.C., died on April 16, 2007. Survivors include his wife, Marjorie, children and grandchildren.

Robert L. Harder, 79, of Glenmont, N.Y., died on June 9, 2007. Mr. Harder was a general practitioner in the City of Albany for over 50 years. Passionate about the law, he was practicing law from his hospital bed the day he died. In 1999, with his daughter, he won a medical malpractice verdict of over $2.5 million. He has a daughter who is a state prosecutor in Florida and a daughter who is a professor of law at the College of Saint Rose in Albany.

Hon. Leo F. Hayes, 74, passed away on March 19, 2007. From 1960 to 1965 he was in general practice in Syracuse, N.Y. Justice Hayes was appointed to the staff of New York State Senate and later was appointed Assistant District Attorney of Onondaga County. In 1971, Justice Hayes was elected District Attorney of Onondaga County. In 1973, he was elected as a Supreme Court justice of the Fifth Judicial District. Justice Hayes was appointed to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, in 1997 and was recertified on several occasions. He retired from this position in 2006. He is survived by his wife, Arlene, two children and three grandchildren.

1950

Louis Weisman, 84, of Lancaster, Penn., died on Jan. 5, 2007. He opened his practice of law in Lancaster in 1951, practicing continually for 50 years, and retiring in 2001. He is survived by his wife, Gwen, three daughters and three grandchildren. 1953

Kenneth T. Gibbons, of Scotia, N.Y., died June 28, 2007. While at Albany Law School, he served as editor of the Albany Law Review for two years. Mr. Gibbons was a partner in the firm of Gibbons and Burke in Scotia since 1953. He served as councilman and later as supervisor of the town of Glenville. In addition to all courts of the State of New York, he was admitted to practice in the U.S. District Court for the Northern jurisdiction of New York and to the Supreme Court of the United States. Survivors include six children and 12 grandchildren.

Wolfgang J. Riemer, 79, of Schenectady, N.Y., passed away on March 3, 2007. He was editor of the Albany Law Review and was one of three to graduate cum laude in 1954. Mr. Riemer practiced law for over 50 years in Schenectady, and pursued a political career as well. He served on the county board of supervisors/board of representatives for 14 years. He also served at the N.Y. Constitutional Convention in 1967, and ran for Congress’ House of Representatives. He is survived by his wife, Elliess, four daughters and five grandchildren. 1956

William S. Prescott, 76, died on June 5, 2007. He is survived by his nephew Andrew Prescott. 48

1971

Eugene E. Kowalczuk, 63, of Annapolis, Md., died April 10, 2007. His public service career began as a volunteer with the Legal Aid Bureau in the VISTA program in Albany and Cattaraugus Counties, N.Y. In 1979 and 1980 he was ombudsmen of the Advocacy Program of Southern Maryland and joined the Maryland Legal Aid Bureau. Every Saturday for the past 28 years he was the law librarian of the Maryland State Law Library. He was known for working for equality and justice for handicapped and impoverished persons, and was instrumental in changes to the Maryland

Code through legislation. In the courts he defended those denied their legal rights to services, with many favorable outcomes. He is survived by his wife, Sandy, and two children. 1972

Michael G. Rice, 59, of Rochester, N.Y., died on Feb. 27, 2007. He was retired from the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office. He is survived by his wife, Pamela, two sons and three grandchildren. 1974

Ronald W. Lorensen died March 29, 2007, at home with his wife, Bernadette, by his side. Mr. Lorensen moved to Juneau, Alaska, in 1974 to practice law as a partner in Josephson, Trickey and Lorensen Law Firm and spent 10 years as Alaska’s deputy attorney general. In addition to his wife, he is survived by three daughters and three grandchildren. 1984

Anthony N. Mammone, 47, of Manlius, N.Y., died on March 16, 2007. He established his law practice in 1989 and was a practicing attorney at law and was admitted to practice in N.Y. state and federal courts. He is survived by his wife, Amy, and two daughters.


R E P O R T O F 2 0 0 6 – 2 0 0 7

G I F T S

49


A

M E S S A G E

F R O M

The Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dear Alumni and Friends, Thanks to your generous support, the 2006-07 Albany Law School Fund was one for the record books. For the first time in our history, we reached, and then surpassed, the $1 million mark. We also saw the highest percentage of alumni giving—24 percent—10 percent higher than the national average for law schools. Overall fund raising at Albany Law School also reached a record high of $4.5 million. This past year will also be remembered for the incredible generosity of Sherry Gold and her children, Sari and Ben ’06, whose $1 million gift to endow the Barry Gold Health Law Clinic spoke volumes about the importance of our clinical program to both our students and the community. In addition, we received significant gifts from Seymour Fox ’49 and Stuart Doling ’63 and his wife, Ann, to fund scholarships for our students.

For the first time in our history, we

It has been a great pleasure to witness such an outpouring of support for Albany Law School this past year. Your generosity has put the Law School on solid footing for future growth and your continued, wonderful support will help us to realize our ambitious goal of becoming an excellent New York law school with a national reputation. Thank you again,

reached, and then surpassed, the $1 million mark.

50

Helen Adams-Keane Vice President for Institutional Advancement


A

M E S S A G E

F R O M

The National Chair of the Annual Fund Fellow Alumni and Friends of Albany Law School: It has been my pleasure to chair this year’s Albany Law School Fund. Thank you to all who supported this year’s efforts and to the countless volunteers who gave not only their dollars, but also their time to ensure we reached and surpassed our $1 million goal. In recent years, Albany Law School has built a broader, more national reputation by recruiting faculty who are legal experts in their fields and attracting bright students who are landing jobs at our country’s finest firms. These accomplishments enhance the reputation of our law school and add to the value of our Albany Law degree. This success is reflective of a firm vision for Albany Law School to become “smaller, smarter and more selective.” Your gifts help Albany Law School realize these goals. Support from alumni and friends means increased scholarships to deserving students, competitive faculty salaries and enrichment opportunities, and a rigorous legal curriculum to prepare our graduates for careers in the global society. Thank you for investing in the students, the legal profession and the prominence of our alma mater in the law community.

Support from alumni and

Mary Ann McGinn ’83 National Chair of the Annual Fund Chair of the Development Committee Vice-Chair, Board of Trustees

friends means increased scholarships to deserving students ...

51


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

Giving Levels THE BARRISTER SOCIETIES The Barrister Societies recognizes leadership gifts to Albany Law School. It is those gifts that make a great impact on the legal education provided to our students. The Barrister Society levels are named after prominent members of the Albany Law School family whose history, service and philanthropy has shaped the institution Albany Law is today. The Barrister Societies consist of five giving levels designed to recognize gifts of $1,000 or more in a single fiscal year. Recent graduates of the last 10 years have the opportunity to join the Barrister Society at a reduced rate of giving. THE DEAN’S CABINET $10,000 AND ABOVE

Just as the position of Dean is the premier at Albany Law School, members of the Dean’s Cabinet are the premier donors to the institution in a given year. Each year, Dean’s Cabinet members are listed on a special plaque in the Board of Trustees conference room in the 2000 Building to honor their philanthropy to Albany Law School. The Dean’s Cabinet members are subdivided into three philanthropic levels:

DEAN’S CABINET PLATINUM CIRCLE - $50,000 AND ABOVE DEAN’S CABINET GOLD CIRCLE $25,000 TO $49,999 DEAN’S CABINET SILVER CIRCLE $10,000 TO $24,999

THE JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY $5,000 - $9,999

Widely considered as one of the greatest Supreme Court Justices in history, Justice Jackson also served as U.S. Attorney General and chief prosecutor for the Nuremburg World War II trials. Donors who give to Albany Law School at this level recognize the need to perpetuate Justice Jackson’s legacy ensuring that today’s law students receive the best education possible.

THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY $1,000 - $2,499

THE AMOS DEAN CLUB $500 - $999

Katherine “Kate” Stoneman 1898 was the first female graduate of Albany Law School and the first female to be admitted into the New York State Bar. She was also a lifetime educator and renowned women’s rights suffragist. Donors to the Kate Stoneman 1898 Society idealize the values of Kate Stoneman as a pioneer in the field of law and help provide students with the resources to do the same.

Amos Dean was a graduate of Union College and founding father of Albany Law School. Dean was a noted educator, appointed professor at Albany Law School and was chair of medical jurisprudence at Albany Medical School. He later became the first president of the University of Iowa.

GRADUATES OF THE LAST DECADE (G.O.L.D.)

Young alumni within 10 years of graduation may join the Kate Stoneman 1898 Society at a reduced rate: CLASSES OF 1997-2001 - $500+

THE JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY - $2,500 - $4,999

CLASSES OF 2002-2006 - $250+

Just three years after graduating from Albany Law School, Justice Brewer began his distinguished career in public service. Serving for 20 years on the U.S. Supreme Court as an Associate Justice, his cases illustrated a strong commitment to the protection of individual liberties as well as international peace. Donors at the Brewer 1858 level also show their commitment to supporting Albany Law School students in their legal endeavors.

THE FOUNDERS CLUBS The Founders Clubs recognize alumni and friends who give to Albany Law School between $100 and $999. Named in memory of Amos Dean, Ira Harris and Amasa Parker—the three individuals who founded the Law School in 1851— these founding fathers understood the need to provide a place to formally study law in the Albany area.

THE IRA HARRIS CLUB $250 - $499

Ira Harris was a graduate of Union College and founding father of Albany Law School. He was also Justice of the New York State Supreme Court and a U.S. Senator. Harris spent the last eight years of his life as a professor at Albany Law lecturing on equity jurisprudence. THE AMASA PARKER CLUB $100 - $249

Amasa Parker was a graduate of Union College and founding father of Albany Law School. He had a distinguished career in the New York State Assembly, United States Congress and Justice of the New York State Supreme Court.

Albany Law School Fund Five-year Comparison THE 2006-3007 ANNUAL FUND ACHIEVED A RECORD-BREAKING $1,045,000. THE ANNUAL FUND’S GROWTH OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS HAS OUTPACED THAT OF MANY LAW SCHOOLS, REAFFIRMING OUR VISION OF BECOMING A GREAT LAW SCHOOL WITH A NATIONAL REPUTATION.

$1,200,000 $1,000,000

$1,045,000

$923,000

$900,000

$400,000

$702,000

$600,000

$808,000

$800,000

$200,000 $0 2002 – 2003

52

2003 – 2004

2004 – 2005

2005 – 2006

2006 – 2007


The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

M. Sherry Gold, Benjamin D. Gold ’06 & Sari Gold Harry L. Robinson ’65 David D. Siegel DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

William A. Brewer III ’77 Stuart P. Doling ’63 & Ann Doling Seymour Fox ’49 E. Stewart Jones Jr. ’66 The A. Lindsay & Olive B. O’Connor Foundation William F. Pendergast ’72 & Judith Pendergast Robert B. Stiles ’76 Edward P. Swyer The Swyer Foundation Inc. Dale M. Thuillez ’72 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

M. Diane Bodman ’72 Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC Mei Yang Chow James J. Clark ’79 Robert V. Gianniny ’53 Thomas F. Guernsey & Kathe Klare Joseph K. Hage III ’78 Harold C. Hanson ’66 James E. Kelly ’83 Peter C. Kopff ’75 & Dianne Kopff Bruce L. Martin ’66 Mary Ann McGinn ’83 Robert C. Miller ’68 Thomas J. Mullin ’76 & Carol E. S. Mullin ’76 Georgia F. Nucci ’96 Richard D. Parsons ’71 Frank H. Penski ’74 Rory J. Radding ’75 Rhodes Memorial Fund Katherine M. Sheehan ’94 E. M. Sneeringer Jr. ’79 Johnna G. Torsone ’75 Donna E. Wardlaw ’77 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Albany Law School Student Bar Association Arnold Barnett & Mary Jo Barnett Cohoes Savings Bank Foundation Brian C. Cuneo ’96 Frank L. Fernandez ’80 James Freeman & Lynn Freeman-Massey Michael H. Glor ’83 Susan M. Halpern ’83 Hinman, Howard & Katell LLP Ann Horowitz Erik E. Joh ’70 JP Morgan Chase Matthew H. ’58 Lawrence I. & Blanche H. Rhodes Memorial Fund

Thomas M. Santoro ’72 & Corinne Collins Andrea M. Terrillion ’90 & Scott M. Terrillion ’90 Stephen P. Younger ’82 & Prudence M. Younger ’82 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Richard T. Aulisi ’69 Mei Y. Chow Jean K. Cleary ’70 & Stephen M. Cleary ’70 Elaine M. & Myron J. Cohn Foundation William J. Curry ’87 Charles A. Forma ’76 Daryl R. Forsythe James E. Frankel ’73 Robert A. Gensburg ’67 Samuel P. Gerace ’61 Paul J. Goldman ’85 John J. Halloran Jr. ’84 David M. Heim ’77 Sharon R. Kaplan ’82 & Richard A. Kaplan ’82 Peter Keane ’97 & Helen Adams-Keane Michael S. Kelton ’77 Ian G. MacDonald ’58 William L. Nikas ’75 Timothy D. O’Hara ’96 Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler LLP James T. Potter ’80 William E. Redmond ’55 Richard A. Reed ’81 Patricia E. Salkin ’88 & Howard Gross Edgar A. Sandman ’46 James J. Sandman & Beth Mullin Mary Beth Sandman & Paul W. Sandman John L. Schmid ’77 Michael P. Shanley Jr. ’71 Kenneth Veneziano ’90 Ronald J. Weiss ’80 Jack Withiam Jr. ’74 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Anonymous Lucretia M. Adymy ’86 Mary Ann D. Allen ’81 & John L. Allen ’76 Ruth Anderson Warren M. Anderson ’40* Peter G. Appelbaum ’65 Aspen Publishers Inc. Robert A. Barker Timothy A. Barker ’82 Mildred K. Barnett Martin J. Barrington ’80& Mary P. Barrington ’80 Robert C. Batson ’75 James N. Benedict ’74 Ronald M. Berman ’65 Jerry Bilinski Ira M. Bloom David A. Blumberg ’98

Rosemarie Riddell Bogdan ’92 & Edward A. Bogdan III ’92 Constance M. Boland ’86 Catherine L. Bonventre ’05 & Vincent M. Bonventre Jeffrey H. Bowen ’80 Thania F. Bradley ’85 James G. Brennan ’52 Brown, McMahon & Weinraub Charlotte S. Buchanan ’80 Frederic W. Burr ’79 James B. Cantwell ’73 Capital District Trial Lawyers Association Anthony V. Cardona ’70 John R. Casey ’70 Kim M. Clark ’73 Robert J. Coan ’58 Paul T. Cohn ’81 Andrea L. Colby ’80 Constructive Copy LLC Cool Insuring Agency Inc. Barbara D. Cottrell ’84 Coughlin & Gerhart L.L.P. William C. Coyne Patricia M. Crippen ’77 Harry J. D’Agostino ’55 Donald D. DeAngelis ’60 Garrett E. DeGraff ’77 Andre R. Donikian ’69 Andrew B. Donnellan Jr. ’77

Sean M. Doolan ’87 & Michele M. Doolan ’89 James H. Doran ’43 Harold Dubroff Fred J. Emery ’57 Featherstonhaugh, Wiley, Clyne & Cordo LLP David R. Ferris ’76 Alan B. Friedberg ’77 & Kristine Hamann ’77 Richard A. Frye ’58 Stuart L. Ginsburg ’72 Alfred L. Goldberger ’57 James C. Goodfellow ’70 Diane A. Goodman ’75 * Victoria A. Graffeo ’77 Jeffrey Gural James E. Hacker ’84 Clifford T. Harrigan ’53 William M. Harris ’72 John J. Herbst ’96 & Erin L. Herbst ’95 Heslin Rothenberg Farley & Mesiti P.C. Gary M. Hind ’80 Hiscock & Barclay LLP Margaret F. Holbritter ’82 Marvin I. Honig ’63 Chester D. Hooper ’70 David J. Hubbard ’97 Carol A. Hyde ’84

Michael H. Glor ’83 PRINCIPAL, GW & WADE, INC. MEMBER, JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

Michael Glor ’83 is a principal and founding member of GW & Wade, Inc., a private wealth advisory firm in Wellesley, Mass., that manages more than $2.7 billion in assets for over 1,700 clients. Glor is a generous donor to Albany Law School at the Justice Robert H. Jackson 1912 Society level. He says he supports Albany Law School at a leadership level because he wants to see the core values of earning a legal education endure at Albany Law School. Inspired by great faculty, Glor had an exceptional law school experience. In particular, Professor Anthony Baldwin, who he had for Constitutional Law, was a mentor and sounding board for advice on his studies and career. Prof. Baldwin’s no-nonsense approach taught Glor to no longer focus on failure as an obstacle, but as challenges to overcome. Glor lives in Wellesley with his wife Sara and sons Robert, Taylor and Harrison.

53


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above Bruce E. Hunter ’73 William T. Hutchens Jr. Anthony R. Ianniello ’70 Irad S. Ingraham ’60 Robert H. Iseman ’73 John A. Jackson ’90 & Juanita Jackson Jacquelyn L. Jerry ’76 Margaret C. Jones ’91 Katheryn D. Katz ’70 Veronica G. Keegan ’86 Thomas D. Keleher ’79 Deborah L. Kelly ’87 Stephen M. Kiernan ’62 James P. King ’59 Carol D. Klein ’81 Jason J. Legg ’96 Ruth E. Leistensnider ’88 Erin L. Leitman Scott ’96 Levene, Gouldin & Thompson LLP LexisNexis Matthew Bender Roger B. Linden Jr. ’77 Harry J. Love ’52 Lyric Foundation William C. MacMillen Jr. ’37 Barry W. Marr ’74

MatLaw Systems Corporation Connie M. Mayer Mary Elizabeth McCaffrey ’91 David E. McCraw ’92 Elizabeth J. McDonald ’78 William P. McGovern III ’68 Michael T. McGrath ’80 McNamee, Lochner, Titus & Williams P.C. Frederick J. Meagher Jr. ’71 Mary Eileen Mealey Robert T. Melillo Jr. ’92 Ira Mendleson III ’69 David A. Merkel ’60 Gregory M. Messer ’77 & Elinor D. Molbegott ’77 Daniel Lincoln Miller ’56 Martha L. Miller ’83 Richard J. Miller ’71 Joseph D. Mitchell ’84 & Carol Turner-Mitchell ’84 Dale L. Moore Morrison & Foerster LLP Patricia A. Murphy ’89 Judith L. Needham ’78 Miriam M. Netter ’72

New York Long-Term Care Brokers Ltd. Daniel P. Nolan ’78 Christopher M. Nolland ’77 Thomas G. O’Neil ’40 Lawrence W. O’Toole ’75 James W. Orband ’84 J. Lawrence Paltrowitz ’74 John C. Partigan ’85 Arnold C. Peer ’60 & Kathleen N. Peer ’76 Pitta, Bishop, Del Giorno and Dreier LLP W. Hubert Plummer ’56 Peter Preiser Brian M. Prew ’70 John J. Puig ’81 Qualcomm Incorporated Victor E. Rauscher James T. Raymond ’93 Joseph H. Reynolds ’76 Francis T. Roach ’56 Jeffrey S. Rodner ’69 James W. Roemer Jr. ’69 Robert A. Russell ’74 Thomas R. Ryan ’51 Stephen B. Salai ’74

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

John L. Sampson ’91 Farnosh R. Sarraf Paul E. Scanlan ’72 Joel L. Schaller ’80

Twenty-First Century Society THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY SOCIETY RECOGNIZES INDIVIDUALS WHO SUPPORT ALBANY LAW SCHOOL THROUGH CHARITABLE GIFT PLANNING VEHICLES SUCH AS BEQUESTS, BEQUEST EXPECTANCIES, TRUSTS, GIFTS OF LIFE INSURANCE, GIFTS OF QUALIFIED RETIREMENT PLAN ASSETS AND GIFTS OF REAL PROPERTY. DONORS WHOSE TESTAMENTARY GIFTS ARE RECEIVED BY ALBANY LAW SCHOOL ARE RECOGNIZED POSTHUMOUSLY. INDIVIDUALS WHO PARTICIPATE IN ALBANY LAW SCHOOL’S CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITY OR POOLED INCOME PROGRAMS THAT PROVIDE DONORS OR THEIR DESIGNATED BENEFICIARIES WITH A LIFE INCOME ARE ALSO CONSIDERED HONORED MEMBERS OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY SOCIETY.

Anonymous Milton A. Abelove ’36* John R. Aldrich ’76 Hon. Warren M. Anderson ’40* Julie Aussicker* Timothy A. Barker ’82 Gerald R. Barrett ’32* John S. Bartlett Jr. ’48 Hon. Robert W. Bascom ’33* Madalyn Bellinger-Bryant* Hon. Francis Bergan ’23* John Breyo ’71 Mary F. Brown* Anne Browne ’91 Charlotte S. Buchanan ’80 & Charles Buchanan Frederic W. Burr ’79 John A, Buyck ’48* Jay S. Caplan ’46* & Ruth Caplan* Hon. D. Vincent Cerrito ’35 H. Milton Chadderdon ’36* Margot J. Champagne William F. Christiana ’33* Robert J. Coan ’58 David A. Cohen ’22* Myron J. Cohn ’36* & Elaine Cohn* William L. Cohn ’20* John J. Collins III ’80 John K. Conners ’78 James E. Conway ’60*

54

Kevin G. Cowden ’83 Donald L. Curran* A. Hazel Curry* Hon. Harry J. D’Agostino ’55 Edward S. Dermody ’37* Kathryn R. Dugan* Elizabeth S. Ellard ’46* Albert Farone ’25* Angela Farone* Magdeline Farone* Amelia Foell-Stern ’81 Hon. Merle N. Fogg Jr. ’45* Marguerite Ford* Lillian S. Friedman ’58* Dorothy H. Gabrielli* Hon. Frank W. Getman ’58 Robert V. Gianniny ’53 Solomon M. Gilens ’26* Raymond T. Gilman ’76 Donald C. Glenn ’43* & Jane D. Glenn* Diane Goodman Eugenia S. Gutekunst* Hon. Julian R. Hanley ’36 Gerald T. Hennessy ’50* Harold Henson Gary M. Hind ’80 Carol M. Hoffman ’76 Stephanie Huested* John J. Kelliher Thomas B. LaRosa David A. Ladizki ’66

Eleanor Lieberman* Harry J. Love ’52 John B. Lurie ’20 & Ada B. Lurie* Andrew J. Malatesta ’34* Eileen Malone* Matthew H. Mataraso ’58 Gerald T. McDonald ’58 George W. McIsaac ’31* & Harriet M. McIsaac* Hon. Duncan S. McNab ’38* Kelsie E. Mead ’20* LeRoy E. Middleworth Jr. ’48* Robert C. Miller ’68 Joseph D. Mitchell ’84 Hon. Joseph A. Mogavero ’53* Delon F. Mousaw ’37* & Jean Mousaw* Robert E. Muehe ’51* Paul E. Mura ’63 Miriam M. Netter ’72 Jane Russell Nile Norbert L. Noel Daniel P. Nolan ’78 Georgia F. Nucci ’96 Kim Oster ’76 Richard D. Parsons ’71 Emil Peters ’32* Homer E. Peter ’31* William H. Phelps ’22* Charlotte Blandy Pitt Margrethe R. Powers ’63*

Helen M. Pratt ’28* William W. Pulos ’80 Hubert A. Richter ’50 Harry L. Robinson ’65 Carl S. Salmon Jr. ’47* & Leila N. Salmon Edgar A. Sandman ’46 & Margaret Sandman Harry M. Schaffer ’21* C. Fred Schwarz Jr. ’48* Dorothea Setzer* Marcia P. Simon* Harold Slingerland ’26* Isobel I. Smith* Raymond G. Smith ’33* & Ella F. Smith* Hon. Harold R. Soden* ’33 Charles W. Stiefel ’75 Edward P. Stiefel ’71 Bruce R. Sullivan ’38* Frank W. Tessitore ’80 Dale M. Thuillez ’72 James C. Tomasi ’54 Alfred C. Turino ’36* William M. Watkins* Walter H. Wertime Jr. ’22* Hon. Thomas M. Whalen III ’58* David S. Williams ’42 Georgina Harris Williams* Lyman P. Williams ’32* Pauline E. Williman John J. Yanas ’53


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Marc D. Schechter ’78 Larry P. Schiffer ’79 Charles J. Scibetta ’95 Security Mutual Life Insurance Company Robert S. Segelbaum ’64 Jeffrey M. Selchick ’75 Laurie F. Shanks Barbara A. Sheehan ’84 Marcia P. Simon* Henry F. Sobota ’77 Harold L. Solomon ’62 & Valerie N. Solomon ’70 Victoria M. Stanton ’87 & R. Matthew Sweeney Brian D. Starer ’72 Robert S. Stockton ’72 William C. Streets ’55 James G. Talbot ’98 Thomas Thomas ’59 Robert E. Van Vranken ’74 Jorge I. Vidro ’90 Francis X. Wallace ’49 & Joyce P. Wallace ’73 Charles S. Webb III ’58 Robert K. Weiler ’77 John C. Welsh ’55 Denis Whalen Lisa A. Whitney ’71 David S. Williams ’42 John A. Williamson Jr. ’71 Pauline E. Williman Peter S. Wilson Jr. ’83 Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP Paul L. Wollman ’70 John J. Yanas ’53 & Mary F. Yanas Kathleen A. Yohe ’97 Paul J. Zegger ’87

Kevin C. Harp ’00 & Heather D. Harp ’00 James B. Hettie ’04 John R. Higgitt ’01 Michelle Holmes Ladouceur ’99 Patrick K. Jordan ’02 & Laura M. Jordan ’03 Charles W. Judge II ’98 Norman W. Kee ’04 Amy J. Kellogg ’02 Sungchurl Koh ’98 James W. Leary ’06 Randall S. Lewis ’98 Michael S. Pascazi ’05 Kimberly C. Petillo ’05 Alexander Powhida ’99 Sandra D. Rivera ’02 Dana L. Salazar ’05 Darius Shahinfar ’97 & Noelle M. Kinsch ’96 Claude W. Shelverton ’02 Matthew P. Side ’99 Jordan M. Smith ’05 Shelly L. Stone ’97 Joshua S. Vinciguerra ’99 Neil L. Wilcove’98 & Kelly C. Wilcove ’98 Diana Yang ’05 Jianping Zhang ’05

1925 AMOS DEAN CLUB

J. Howard McIsaac*

1935

David S. Williams Edgar Blumberg AMASA PARKER CLUB

AMASA PARKER CLUB

James T. Taaffe Jr.

John W. Bergin Francis T. Longe Edward J. Malone Michael A. Perretta Robert J. Sise Donald A. Walsh

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Francis J. Juracka Augustus Nasmith

1943

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

James H. Doran

Nancy C. Roth Donald H. Sommers

AMASA PARKER CLUB

1950

Rollin L. Twining George E. Whalen ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

George F. Frey

1946 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Edgar A. Sandman ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Sadye J. Zilin

Lester H. Rappaport

1937 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

William C. MacMillen Jr.

1939 IRA HARRIS CLUB

William J. Crangle Jr. Darwin R. Wales

1940 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Warren M. Anderson* Thomas G. O’Neil IRA HARRIS CLUB

Harry W. McDonald AMASA PARKER CLUB

Charles E. Littlefield AMASA PARKER CLUB

Nathan A. Bork Cranston H. Howe Philip D. O’Donnell Armand J. Rosenberg Louis Weisman* Hubert A. Richter B. Robert Rosenberg Stephen T. Voit

Charles S. Collesano Earle N. Cooper

1951 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Thomas R. Ryan

Miller F. Moran

AMOS DEAN CLUB

1948

Howard D. Clayton John W. Tabner

IRA HARRIS CLUB

AMASA PARKER CLUB

John F. Cenesky Leonard A. Weiss AMASA PARKER CLUB

John P. Balio John S. Bartlett Jr. Robert T. Booth Frederick S. Dennin Sol Greenberg Russell C. Marron Jr. Robert J. McKeegan ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Eugenie E. Gillespie Robert P. Heywood John E. Hunt William F. Jones Allen H. Samuels

1949

1941

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

F. Van D. Ladd

IRA HARRIS CLUB

IRA HARRIS CLUB

George B. Grow

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Donald B. Frederick John F. O’Malley Jr.

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

AMASA PARKER CLUB

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

AMOS DEAN CLUB

1947 Harry M. Kammire

George E. Toomey

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Oreste Vincent Frank J. Williams Jr. Robert F. Winne

IRA HARRIS CLUB

D. Vincent Cerrito Leo T. Sawyko AMASA PARKER CLUB

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Richard W. Lent KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

IRA HARRIS CLUB

G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Anonymous Pamela M. Babson ’02 David C. Bruffett Jr. ’02 Keiki M. Cabanos ’97 Jay S. Campbell ’03 & Youngmin Oh Campbell ’03 Douglas E. Coleman ’04 Margery C. Eddy ’00 Frederick M. Fink ’06

1942

Charles A. Bohl John J. Darcy Richard P. Harrison ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Charles B. Grimes Jr.

1952 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

James G. Brennan Harry J. Love AMOS DEAN CLUB

John T. Garry II IRA HARRIS CLUB

James J. Cahill Eugene F. Frink AMASA PARKER CLUB

Seymour Fox

C. Theodore Carlson Robert C. Kastensmith

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Francis X. Wallace

Gordon K. Garlick

55


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above

1953

1955

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Robert V. Gianniny KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Clifford T. Harrigan John J. Yanas IRA HARRIS CLUB

Thomas F. Burke AMASA PARKER CLUB

William D. Brinnier Adelaide I. Cartwright Frank A. Decker Robert L. Dorfman Anthony J. Kelvasa Jr. Edward F. Layden ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Clarence F. Giles Jr. Daniel D. Mead Herbert Rothenberg

1954 AMOS DEAN CLUB

William E. Redmond KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Harry J. D’Agostino William C. Streets John C. Welsh AMOS DEAN CLUB

Walter R. Gelles IRA HARRIS CLUB

Richard E. Clark Henry J. Gelles Kenneth S. MacAffer Jr. James J. Murray Alfred C. Saunders William A. Toomey Jr. AMASA PARKER CLUB

John B. Cosgrove Leo M. Lynett Jr. J. Edward Murray L. Eugene Williams

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Wayne M. Davis Charles F. Little Jr.

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

AMASA PARKER CLUB

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Bert R. Dohl James E. Keable Sondra D. Markowitz John L. McMahon ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Eugene H. Berkun Francis E. Dorsey Jr. Frank G. Leo Edward J. McMahon Paul L. Ryan Lawrence Wayne

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

1957 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Fred J. Emery Alfred L. Goldberger AMOS DEAN CLUB

James W. Clyne Charles R. Welch

Curtis W. Barker Robert P. Best George P. McAloon Winifred R. Widmer

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Lewis E. Grotke

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Gene L. Catena John G. Connor Robert L. Ramsey Theodore L. Reinhard

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Joseph R. Donovan James C. Tomasi Donald G. Walls

Daniel Lincoln Miller W. Hubert Plummer Francis T. Roach

AMASA PARKER CLUB

AMOS DEAN CLUB

David H. Brind John Q. Driscoll Alan J. Gould Harold J. Hughes Jr. Edward L. Nadeau

James F. Donohue Herbert B. Gordon Richard P. Tuohey

1956

$25,000–$49,999

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Willard W. Cass Jr. Robert F. Doran Scott G. Eissner Vincent A. Lamb Conrad H. Lang Jr. Sidney Lorvan James E. McGrath Jr. Howard C. Nolan

Frank N. Parisi Gloria L. Seiler Arthur Shapiro Joseph C. Shapiro Morton D. Shulman Paul J. Spielberg ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Benjamin P. Roosa Jr. John D. Stenard

1958 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Matthew H. Mataraso JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Ian G. MacDonald KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Robert J. Coan Richard A. Frye Charles S. Webb III AMOS DEAN CLUB

Michael J. Duffy William R. Holzapfel Charles H. Umbrecht Jr. IRA HARRIS CLUB

John B. Kinum AMASA PARKER CLUB

John J. Cunningham Herbert G. Hall John E. Herlihy Francis C. LaVigne Gerald T. McDonald John C. McDonald George A. Schindler A. Thomas Storace Forrest G. Weeks Charles M. Wright

1959 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

James P. King Thomas Thomas

56


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS

1961

Amos Dean Club

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

$500–$999

Samuel P. Gerace

Ira Harris Club

$250–$999

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Richard D. Morris

Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249

IRA HARRIS CLUB

* **

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

John L. Bell John T. Buckley John J. Cavanaugh Donald J. Corbett Jr. James A. Graham Jr. Joyce M. Wrenn

1962 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Stephen M. Kiernan Harold L. Solomon AMOS DEAN CLUB

Loren N. Brown Thomas E. DeLorenzo Donald P. Hirshorn George Rusk Jr. IRA HARRIS CLUB

John A. Barsamian Edward A. Bogdan Jr. James H. Kerr AMASA PARKER CLUB

Donald B. Davidoff John P. Laparo Duncan S. MacAffer Robert L. Moore ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Robert J. Grice John T. Manning Walter W. Smith Adrian R. Weissfeld

1960

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Bernard Kaplowitz AMASA PARKER CLUB

Nicholas Colabella James E. McHenry Howard W. Roth Alan E. Steiner Beverly Cipollo Tobin Edwin J. Tobin

1963 DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

Stuart P. Doling

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AT ALBANY LAW SCHOOL LED NOT ONLY WITH THEIR WISDOM AND TIME, BUT WITH THEIR GENEROUS GIFTS TO THE SCHOOL AS WELL. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES GAVE MORE THAN $300,000 IN 2006-2007 WITH 100 PERCENT PARTICIPATION.

Stephen C. Ainlay William A. Brewer III ’77 Hon. Anthony V. Cardona ’70 Barbara D. Cottrell ’84 Benjamin D. Gold ’06 Lisa Gootee ’04 J.K. Hage III ’78 Susan M. Halpern ’83 Harold C. Hanson ’66 Erik E. Joh ’70, Vice Chair E. Stewart Jones Jr. ’66, Secretary James E. Kelly ’83 Peter C. Kopff ’75 Betty Lugo ’84 Hon. Bernard J. Malone Jr. ’72 Mary Ann McGinn ’83, Treasurer

Marvin I. Honig AMOS DEAN CLUB

Andrew A. Matthews Andrew L. Sipos Jr. IRA HARRIS CLUB

Edward T. Feeney AMASA PARKER CLUB

Andrew J. Baldwin Jr. Peter R. Liebschutz Edward J. Martin III Richard L. Sippel

AMOS DEAN CLUB

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Charles D. Becraft Jr. Thomas E. Dolin Gary F. Olsen Edward D. Vacca

James A. Costello Richard A. Finke Joseph R. Healy

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

1964

Harry L. Robinson

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Robert S. Segelbaum

IRA HARRIS CLUB

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Peter G. Appelbaum Ronald M. Berman

William A. Bacas James B. Fitzsimmons Richard I. Mulvey Richard T. Rosen Laurene L. Tacy

John M. Barrett James H. Erceg Thomas J. McAvoy

AMOS DEAN CLUB

IRA HARRIS CLUB

James B. Canfield C. Richard Cole Joyce M. Galante Allan E. Gandler Robert E. Heslin

Samuel C. Alessi Jr. Culver K. Barr James J. Devine Jr. Kent B. Joscelyn William H. Namack III ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Arne E. Heggen Thomas W. Jeram

Robert G. Hurlbutt AMASA PARKER CLUB

John M. Coulter James E. Davis Frederick M. Englert Gerald Greenfield Charles E. Inman Louis H. Quinlan Edward F. Zwick

1966

1965

Harold L. Galloway Bert G. Gordon Patrick D. Monserrate Marvin D. Parshall

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Robert C. Miller ’68 Thomas J. Mullin ’76 William F. Pendergast ’72 James T. Potter ’80 Rory A. Radding ’75 William E. Redmond ’55 Richard A. Reed ’81 Harry L. Robinson ’65, Chair Hon. John L. Sampson ’91 Thomas M. Santoro ’72 Eugene M. Sneeringer ’79 Victoria M. Stanton ’87 Robert B. Stiles ’76 Dale M. Thuillez ’72 Hon. Randolph F. Treece ’76 Allen J. Vickey ’05 Donna E. Wardlaw ’77 Stephen P. Younger ’82

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Donald D. DeAngelis Irad S. Ingraham David A. Merkel Arnold C. Peer

Board of Trustees 2006 - 2007

Eugene L. Nicandri IRA HARRIS CLUB

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Keith G. Flint Hugh A. Gilbert John F. Rausch Charles B. Ries

E. Stewart Jones Jr. DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Harold C. Hanson Bruce L. Martin AMOS DEAN CLUB

Martin B. Burke Jonathan P. Harvey John F. Larkin III Dale L. Van Epps IRA HARRIS CLUB

Thomas J. Forrest Edward O. Spain AMASA PARKER CLUB

Paul M. Cantwell Jr. Nancy S. Harrigan Thomas M. Hirschen Virginia D. Messing Frederic B. Rodgers

57


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above

National Alumni Association Board of Directors THANKS TO THE HARD WORK OF DEVELOPMENT LIAISONS DAVID EHRLICH '01 AND DARIUS SHAHINFAR '97, THE NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS LED BY EXAMPLE WITH THEIR PARTICIPATION IN THE 2006-07 ALBANY LAW SCHOOL FUND.

John M. Bagyi ’96 Robert C. Batson ’75 Mary A. Berry ’94 Joel I. Binstok ’81 Stephen Bobarakis ’89 Beth A. Bourassa ’90 Lisa E. Brown ’96 Megan Brown ’93 David C. Bruffett Jr. ’02 Keiki M. Cabanos ’97 Hon. Christine M. Clark ’96 Clorisa L. Cook ’04 Jason N. Cooper ’99 Roger J. Cusick ’75 Diane Davis ’91 Hon. Patricia A. DeAngelis ’94 Adjoa A. Debrah-Dwamena ’06 Hon. Ryan T. Donovan ’01 Crystal A. Doolity ’04 David A. Ehrlich ’01 David J. Fernandez ’92 Thania B. Fernandez ’85 Hon. Julie A Garcia ’99 Thomas F. Gleason ’78 Peter J. Glennon ’04 Hon. Victoria A. Graffeo ’77 J.K. Hage III ’78 Harold C. Hanson ’66 Laura E. Hartman ’91 John E. Higgins ‘89 Hon. Erik E. Joh ’70 Patrick K. Jordan ’02 Gerald Jospitre ’01

Vereonica G. Keegan ’86 Amy J. Kellogg ’02 Andrew M. Klein ’92 Hon. Michelle H. Ladouceur ’99 Ruth E. Leistensnider ’88, Vice President Betty Lugo ’84 Ian G. MacDonald ’58 Lisa M. Penpraze ’98 Justina R. Cintron Perino ’00 James T. Potter ‘80 Robert A. Rausch ’94 William E. Redmond ’55 David E. Reid ’95 Christina L. Roberts ’01 James W. Roemer Jr. ’69 Larry P. Schiffer ’79, President Darius Shahinfar ’97 Heena Shaikh ’04 Barbara A. Sheehan ’84 Hon. Leslie E. Stein ’81 Daniel J. Stewart ’88 Elisha S. Tomko ’01 William A. Toomey Jr. ’55 John J. Toy ’92 Robert R. Tyson ’93 John R. Vero ’00 Jorge I. Vidro ’90 Lisa A. Whitney ’71 Winifred R. Widmer ’54

Norman I. Siegel Freling H. Smith Kenneth J. Toomey Albert R. Trezza Richard A. Wittenburg Donald J. Zahn ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Lawrence P. Cohen Gary N. Hagerman Mary B. Miller Polly N. Rutnik

1967 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

Robert A. Gensburg AMOS DEAN CLUB

Laurence W. Boylan Michael J. Hoblock Jr. Rex S. Ruthman James R. Sandner ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS IRA HARRIS CLUB

Richard E. McLenithan Richard P. Wallace

Lee P. Armstrong James L. Beers Stephen H. Gersowitz

AMASA PARKER CLUB

1969

J. Michael Bruhn David D. Egan Barry R. Fischer Terry L. Flora Michael A. Kaplan Patrick T. Maney Vincent J. Reilly Jr. John T. Sullivan Jr. Thomas N. Trevett ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Richard T. Aulisi KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Andre R. Donikian Ira Mendleson III Jeffrey S. Rodner James W. Roemer Jr.

Paul E. Coffey David R. George James L. Kalteux Stephen V. McQuide Michael P. Regan Sr. Paul T. Sullivan Paul N. Tavelli Elbert H. Watrous Jr.

AMOS DEAN CLUB

1968

AMASA PARKER CLUB

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Robert C. Miller KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

William P. McGovern III AMOS DEAN CLUB

Edward J. Cummings Jr. Robert S. Rose IRA HARRIS CLUB

J. Alan Mack Eugene E. Napierski Jan H. Plumadore Ira P. Rubtchinsky AMASA PARKER CLUB

Stephen E. Ehlers Paul D. Feinstein Thomas B. Hayner Frank C. Kiepura Frank J. Longo Max T. Stoner

John D. Austin IRA HARRIS CLUB

Nicholas J. Criscione James D. Harrington Harvey Randall Martin Zeldis Raymond P. D’Amante Marc I. Gold William H. Helferich III Roger J. McAvoy Peter C. McGinnis Robert S. McMillen Harold von Brockdorff Richard P. Woodhouse ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Joseph P. Callahan Arthur F. Casey Edward Galison Robert J. Hahn David L. Henry Tom G. Morgan William E. Nitterauer Louis C. Noto Charles J. Yanni

1970 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Erik E. Joh

58


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Jean K. Cleary Stephen M. Cleary KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Anthony V. Cardona John R. Casey James C. Goodfellow Chester D. Hooper Anthony R. Ianniello Katheryn D. Katz Brian M. Prew Valerie N. Solomon Paul L. Wollman AMOS DEAN CLUB

Lisa A. Whitney John A. Williamson Jr. AMOS DEAN CLUB

John S. Erwin Richard A. Langer IRA HARRIS CLUB

Arthur A. Pasquariello Peter J. Ryan Martin F. Strnad Joseph C. Teresi James T. Townsend AMASA PARKER CLUB

John J. Elliott Richard A. Hanft Joel M. Howard III Douglas J. Hunt L. Foster James Jr. Edward J. Kennedy Eugene E. Kowalczuk* Howard I. Krantz J. Douglas McManus Jr. Francis T. Murray Jr. Michael J. Novack Robert W. Redmond Richard B. Spinney David J. Strickland Charles J. Wilcox ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Ralph D. Camardo George N. Curtis Donald T. Gallagher Barry J. Gross John R. McGlenn Frederick E. Parola Jr. Francis A. Woidzik

1972

Roland M. Cavalier DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE IRA HARRIS CLUB

Nicholas J. Greisler John A. Lahtinen Timothy B. Thornton Edward J. Trombly AMASA PARKER CLUB

Michael J. Beyma Sr. John T. Biscone John E. Darling Joan A. Kehoe Gearon J. Kimball Walter A. Ludewig Michael J. Tommaney Mark E. Watkins ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Katherine G. Gabel James Joseph Griner Earl T. Hilts Walter O. Rehm III

1971 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Richard D. Parsons JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Michael P. Shanley Jr. KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Frederick J. Meagher Jr. Richard J. Miller

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Nelson R. Alford Jr. Andrew B. Amerling Roger A. Boucher Robert J. Bruno William H. Gritsavage Paul R. Kietzman Franklin M. Klinger Kenneth M. Kramer Donald M. Matusik James E. Morgan Gregory J. Mott William H. Mountain III Lewis S. Nestle Neil H. Rivchin William E. Russell William J. Spampinato Fred B. Wander William N. Young Jr. ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Joseph A. Barbetta Joseph T. Baum Laurence I. Fox Virginia E. Nolan John K. Northrop Stuart I. Silbergleit

1973

James B. Cantwell Kim M. Clark Bruce E. Hunter Robert H. Iseman Joyce P. Wallace AMOS DEAN CLUB

IRA HARRIS CLUB

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Bartley J. Costello III KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Stuart L. Ginsburg William M. Harris Miriam M. Netter Paul E. Scanlan Brian D. Starer Robert S. Stockton AMOS DEAN CLUB

Bernard J. Malone Jr. Douglas R. McCuen E. Guy Roemer IRA HARRIS CLUB

Martin J. Goodman Stephen W. Herrick Philip C. Johnson Joseph B. Meagher John H. Minehan Kevin A. Moss

MEMBERS

J.K. Hage III ’78 Harold Hanson ’66 E. Stewart Jones ’66 Peter C. Kopff ’75 Betty Lugo ’84 Matthew H. Mataraso ’58 Thomas J. Mullin ’76 Rory J. Radding ’75 William E. Redmond ’55 Stephen P. Younger ’82

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

M. Diane Bodman

Thomas M. Santoro

Mary Ann McGinn ’83

James E. Frankel

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

CHAIR

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Carl F. Becker Jr. David W. Beier Michael G. Gartland Madonna A. Stahl

William F. Pendergast Dale M. Thuillez

Trustee Development Committee 2006 - 2007

Renee D. Baruch Philip F. Curtin Peter L. Danziger Ralph P. Miccio Timothy Murphy Michael B. O’Shaughnessy James A. Sevinsky John S. Vaneria Mark S. Wallach AMASA PARKER CLUB

Philip L. Bailey Robert J. Bergin Anthony J. Carpinello Frederick C. Degen James F. Donlon Stephen W. Easton Norman P. Fivel Madeline S. Galvin Jeremiah M. Hayes Teresa M. Holland Peter K. Hulburt Dennis F. Irwin Michael S. Kozubek Peter T. Mangione Jeffery P. Marks James E. Nelson

Frank Schnidman Robert J. Simon Peter K. Smith Thomas C. Walsh ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

George F. Biondo Wayne L. Burton Michael T. Kelly Kinga M. La Chapelle Michael P. LaHaye Stephen M. Mason Cecil L. Murphy III Frederick J. Neroni Cathleen E. O’Horo Peter J. Ostrowski Jr. Stephen M. Richardson David S. Sampson John G. Sisti David A. Slutsky Robert J. Vawter Douglas K. Watson Robert H. Wright

1974 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Frank H. Penski JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Jack Withiam Jr. KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

James N. Benedict Barry W. Marr J. Lawrence Paltrowitz Robert A. Russell Stephen B. Salai Robert E. Van Vranken

59


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above AMOS DEAN CLUB

Jonathan D. Deily IRA HARRIS CLUB

Franklin K. Breselor Paul M. Collins Richard M. Eisenstaedt James A. FitzPatrick Jr. Susan B. Jones Gerald H. Katzman Richard A. Mitchell Stuart L. Newman William F. Roberts Jr. AMASA PARKER CLUB

Richard T. Altieri William J. Aram Stephen C. Baker James E. Bartlett III Joseph C. Bierman Sam C. Bonney Joseph J. Carline John H. Ciulla Jr. Arthur M. Cohen John P. Coseo Margaret E. Doran Frederick L. Fowler Donald R. Fox Stewart P. Glenn Marjorie E. Karowe Joan S. Kohout Allen R. Larson Patricia D. Marks Wilson S. Mathias Edward J. Nowak Thomas J. O’Connor James J. O’Rourke Anthony J. Pieragostini Alan S. Rome Kevin K. Ryan William F. Sheehan Bruce L. Trent Joyce Y. Villa Robert B. Wiggins ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Robert J. Balbick Russell C. Bennett Michael T. Brockbank Richard L. Burstein Ira B. Feinberg Marilyn A. Kaltenborn Karen J. Lewis James A. Locke Karen M. Mankes

Craig S. Neckers Valentino T. Sammarco Gary F. Stiglmeier Richard R. Terry Francis I. Walter

1975 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Peter C. Kopff Rory J. Radding Johnna G. Torsone JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

William L. Nikas KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Robert C. Batson Diane A. Goodman* Lawrence W. O’Toole Jeffrey M. Selchick AMOS DEAN CLUB

Daniel J. Arno Joseph R. Cardamone Steven Z. Szczepanski IRA HARRIS CLUB

Fredric L. Bodner David A. Engel David E. Glassberg Schuyler T. Van Horn John R. Winn Geoffrey D. Wright AMASA PARKER CLUB

Suzanne L. Charles Roger J. Cusick Philip T. Dunne J. Scott Finlay Vinson J. Friedman Perry S. Heidecker F. Brian Joslin Steven S. Katz Sherry S. Kraus Stuart I. Lipkind Richard J. Maloney Anthony J. Mastrodonato Thomas W. Murphy Jr. John M. Panara James S. Ranous Mark M. Rider Michael J. Roulan James B. Salada Jr.

Sharon P. Stiller Charles E. Sullivan Jr. Thomas J. Vilsack Val E. Washington ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

George P. Banitch William P. Bates Peter M. Bluhm Mary J. Donahue Daniel J. Dugan III Donald M. Fishman Daniel Green H. Stanley Kaltenborn Jr. Gary H. Lieberman Charles E. O’Brien John T. Orcutt David L. Pogue Jeffrey M. Samuels Jan Stiglitz

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

1976 DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

Robert B. Stiles DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Carol E. S. Mullin Thomas J. Mullin JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Charles A. Forma KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

John L. Allen David R. Ferris Jacquelyn L. Jerry Kathleen N. Peer Joseph H. Reynolds AMOS DEAN CLUB

Donald Cappillino David A. Caruso Robert G. Conway Jr. Raymond T. Gilman James J. Jasinski Robert E. Leamer Thomas E. Reilly Jr. David I. Rosenberg Randolph F. Treece IRA HARRIS CLUB

Gary D. Centola Richard A. Curreri Linda K. Fraser

Louis R. Malikow Margo L. May Marcia R. Minehan William H. Price Jr. David J. Roman Kathryn R. Rooney Stephen J. Rooney John J. Ryan Jr. Charles H. Schaefer David S. Shaw Theodore M. Weiner AMASA PARKER CLUB

James B. Anderson Richard F. Anderson Jr. Eric A. Evans Lawrence C. Franco Robert H. Freehill Charles A. Gardner Mark F. Glaser Karen K. Kaunitz Alice J. Lenahan Robert G. Main Jr. James J. Morris Jr. Janet H. O’Brien-Aram Randolph E. Parker Maurice K. Peaslee Glenn E. Pezzulo Edward S. Rowley Robert S. Ryan Richard H. Sarajian Joseph J. Shaheen Stephen J. Tafaro Ellen M. Telker Mary Anne M. Tommaney Douglas C. Webb Janine J. Webb Richard T. Williams II John C. Williamson James R. Winkler ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Kathryn N. Fantauzzi William H. Getman John S. Hicks Thea Hoeth John F. Liebschutz Robert E. Littlefield Jr. Mitchell S. Morris Jeffery M. Pohl Larry A. Swartz

60


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Margaret Chow-Menzer Martin J. Cirincione Peter L. Coseo James S. Gleason Joseph L. Kay Christine Marbach Kellett Jean A. Miller Michael J. Moore David R. Murch Matthew J. Murphy III Jean E. Nelson II Cornelius J. O’Connor Jr. Samuel E. Rieff Kathleen M. Rogers Harold Semanoff John K. Sharkey Paul A. Tagliaferro Edward G. Watkins Michael F. Young ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

1977 DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

William A. Brewer III DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Donna E. Wardlaw JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

David M. Heim Michael S. Kelton John L. Schmid KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Patricia M. Crippen Garrett E. DeGraff Andrew B. Donnellan Jr. Alan B. Friedberg Victoria A. Graffeo Kristine Hamann Roger B. Linden Jr. Gregory M. Messer Elinor D. Molbegott Christopher M. Nolland Henry F. Sobota Robert K. Weiler AMOS DEAN CLUB

Andrew C. Coronios David B. Cubeta Edward B. Flink Donald R. Moy Judith F. O’Shea Kevin M. O’Shea Anne G. Phillips Jonathan I. Rabinowitz Terence A. Zemetis

John J. Aveni George R. Bartlett III Karen L. Bennett Robert J. Boehlert Jr. John B. Carroll Michael J. Desha Gerald A. Dwyer Robert H. Feller Kevin H. Harren Bryan S. Hemley William F. Ketcham Leslie S. Lowenstein Joan S. Murphy Craig H. Norman Arthur S. Okrend William F. Reynolds Amy M. Schneider Mark F. Snider Claudia A. Wagner-Lebowitz Edward G. Watkins

1978 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Joseph K. Hage III KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Elizabeth J. McDonald Judith L. Needham Daniel P. Nolan Marc D. Schechter AMOS DEAN CLUB

Paul DerOhannesian II Edward D. Falso Thomas F. Gleason Kenneth R. Glick Thomas A. Phillips Katherine H. Wears John W. Winans

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Charles L. Bach Jr. Paul L. Banner Mark F. Cacozza William H. Calnan Linda C. Griffin Barry M. Hoffman Margaret M. Hogan Timothy P. Kelleher Sharon L. McNulty Mitchell H. Pally William O. Riiska Edward T. Stork Kenneth G. Varley

IRA HARRIS CLUB

David G. Anderson Ronald C. Blass Jr. George J. Calcagnini Jeffrey M. Elliott Gregory A. Gates James L. Gorman Sharon L. Hauselt Edwin H. Howard Christopher J. Lagno Kathryn G. Madigan Gregory J. Murrer David A. Sirignano

Advancement Volunteers MANY THANKS TO OUR VOLUNTEERS WHO, THROUGH THEIR LEADERSHIP, SUPPORT ALBANY LAW SCHOOL IN ITS ADVANCEMENT EFFORTS. BECAUSE THEY GIVE GENEROUSLY OF THEIR TIME AND TALENTS, THE LAW SCHOOL IS ABLE NOT ONLY TO MOVE FORWARD WITH FUND RAISING IN SUPPORT OF OUR STUDENTS, BUT ALSO IN BUILDING STRONGER, LASTING RELATIONSHIPS WITH CONSTITUENTS. ALBANY LAW SCHOOL FUND FACULTY/STAFF COMMITTEE

Patricia Salkin ’88, Faculty Chair Connie Rohloff, Staff Chair Joanne Casey Sharmaine Moseley Tammy Weinman Mary Wood BARRISTER SOCIETY VOLUNTEERS

David M. Heim ’77 Margaret F. Holbritter ’82 Michael S. Kelton ’77 Ira Mendleson III ’69 Robert C. Miller ’68 NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION DEVELOPMENT LIAISONS

Darius Shahinfar ’97 David A. Ehrlich ’01

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Daniel G. Barrett Stanley H. Blum S. John Campanie Cristine Cioffi Michael V. Coccoma William H. Collier Christopher J. Corbett Mary Elizabeth T. Dunne Andrew S. Fusco William D. Harrington Lyle D. Jentzer Bruce M. Jordan Mark L. Koblenz Nelson F. Migdal J. Stephen Reilly Marjorie A. Rogers Kent J. Schreiner Joseph W. Sheehan Robert R. Snashall Robert B. Stein Robert J. Tompkins Todd W. Weber Diane R. Weisz Richard L. Weisz ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Carl T. Baker Jonathan Birenbaum Andrea K. Charlow Eugene D. DeSantis Earl F. Dewey II Richard M. Doyle

Melanie R. Farace George K. Forsyth Robert M. Goldberg Ellen B. McDonald Priscilla C. Press Richard E. Stowe Thomas A. Torto

1979 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

James J. Clark E. M. Sneeringer Jr. KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Frederic W. Burr Thomas D. Keleher Larry P. Schiffer AMOS DEAN CLUB

John W. Bailey Arthur H. Domby Deborah A. Mann Michael E. O’Hare IRA HARRIS CLUB

Donald C. Armstrong John B. Colangelo Stephen A. Johnston James A. Lombardo Frank P. Milano Sharon P. O’Conor Susan C. Picotte Fausto Simoes

61


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above Dale Skivington Peter K. Skivington George H. Weissman

Michael A. Sims Don H. Twietmeyer

1980

AMASA PARKER CLUB

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

AMASA PARKER CLUB

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Arthur F. Andrews Michael Barabander Ann G. Bleicher Sheldon W. Boyce Paul J. Campito Murray S. Carr P. Scott Duesterdick Timothy C. Eckel Mark E. Hallenbeck Lewis B. Insler Andrea R. Lurie Robert A. Murphy Jr. Richard P. Rosso Mark S. Ruderman Seth H. Schlanger Richard M. Seguljic Deborah J. Townsend Gregory A. Traphagen

JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Martin J. Barrington Mary P. Barrington Jeffrey H. Bowen Charlotte S. Buchanan Andrea L. Colby Gary M. Hind Michael T. McGrath Joel L. Schaller

Charles J. Cernansky Jr. Ellen L. Dembicer Louis E. Emery Charles W. Engelbrecht Roberta K. Feldman Stewart M. Finton Stuart C. Henderson Paul R. Hoffmann James F. Horan Joseph S. Koury Jill E. Martin Michael E. Mathisen John W. Prizzia James W. Spink Eileen W. Toll James D. Toll Joseph M. Walsh Gail E. Westgate

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

AMOS DEAN CLUB

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Susan C. Antos Robert P. Augello Lawrence E. Becker Barbara G. Billet Charles E. Crandall III Cheryl L. Eddy Thomas F. Hewner Mark E. Lahey Gail N. Mancher James A. McCarty Jr. R. Christopher Owen

Frank L. Fernandez JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

James T. Potter Ronald J. Weiss KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Christine A. Bartlett Janet D. Callahan Ronald G. Dunn David F. Kaiser IRA HARRIS CLUB

Jeanine Arden Ornt Francis L. Conte Carl D. Copps Mark H. Fandrich Gregory J. Getz

Byron K. Fogan ’08 RECIPIENT OF THE RICHARD D. PARSONS ’71 SCHOLARSHIP AND THE FRED L. EMERSON FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

Byron K. Fogan ’08 encountered more than just the typical difficulties faced by most law school students. Forced to relinquish employment in order to attend Albany Law, Fogan, a non-traditional student with a wife and a 7-year-old son, confronted significant financial hardships. However, he decided that the long-term benefits of a quality legal education outweighed the disadvantages. The recipient of both the Richard D. Parsons ’71 Scholarship and the Fred L. Emerson Foundation Scholarship, Fogan expressed his gratitude for the awards, saying, “These scholarships allowed me to minimize the financial burden of a law school education, freeing up valuable resources which I could use for the benefit of my family.”

62

Megan A. Huddleston Michael D. Kranis Jamie A. Woodward

Lucy P. Bernier John D. Bush William W. Cantwell Christine M. Carsky Edward B. Downey Edward C. Fassett Jr. Mark S. Gorgos Susan S. Htoo Eileen L. Kane Deborah R. Liebman Martha L. Sokol McCarty John J. Postel Christopher G. Quinn Howard R. Sanders Donald P. Segal John V. Tauriello Gerald F. Wahl Dennis G. Whelpley

1981 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Richard A. Reed KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Mary Ann D. Allen Paul T. Cohn Carol D. Klein John J. Puig AMOS DEAN CLUB

Jeffrey K. Anderson John H. Callahan Scott J. Clippinger David M. Mehalick Mark S. Nunn Stephen G. Schwarz Leslie E. Stein IRA HARRIS CLUB

Joseph J. Brindisi Daniel F. Brown Amy L. Fenno Craig P. Fenno Bruce Kastor Linda S. Leary Robert J. Meyer David J. Mungo Bruce D. Ray

$25,000–$49,999 $10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

George R. Repper Anne Reynolds Copps Howard A. Spier AMASA PARKER CLUB

Christopher J. Allen Abigail M. Armstrong William J. Barrett Michael A. Baum Catherine M. Bennett Melissa H. Biren Karen S. Callanan Ellen L. Coccoma Robert E. Coughlin Steven A. Fein Bernard S. Forman James E. Girvin Christian F. Hummel Mark P. Hutchison Amy R. Kellogg Michael T. Kellogg Terence A. Langan Michael M. Lease Michael L. Mackey Kevin P. Maney Jeffrey R. Martin Anthony D. Pennetti Andrew N. Piraino Susan A. Relyea-Bowman David J. Skiba Carol A. Venezia Mary M. Withington ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Andrew R. Baron Ellen B. Becker Gary L. Bennett Judith A. Brindle Dennis M. Galliher Stuart F. Gruskin Patricia A. Hite Michael F. Jordan Susan P. Keefer Ralph A. Lopez Richard L. Nabozny Malcolm B. O’Hara Rymn J. Parsons David J. Rapke Mark L. Stulmaker Susan F. Weber Barbara C. Werlin-Gorenstein


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Richard E. Sise Gregory J. Strzempek Patricia E. Watkins

Alice Shoemaker Ann M. Williams Gregory W. Wise

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

1984

McKen V. Carrington David T. Corretore Robert J. Fleury Peter G. Ford Christine F. VanBenschoten Jonathan P. Wallach

1983 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

James E. Kelly Mary Ann McGinn JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Michael H. Glor Susan M. Halpern KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

1982

Martha L. Miller Peter S. Wilson Jr.

JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Prudence M. Younger Stephen P. Younger JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Richard A. Kaplan Sharon R. Kaplan KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Anonymous Anonymous Timothy A. Barker Margaret F. Holbritter AMOS DEAN CLUB

Michel A. Daze Joseph F. Durkin Nathan R. Fenno Eileen P. Mulroy Marc A. Steinman Brian S. Stewart Stephen Tierney IRA HARRIS CLUB

Robert W. Birch Christine M. Galvin Edward A. Graham Bruce J. McKeegan J. David Sampson John B. Sheehan Robert V. Tiburzi Jr. Cynthia G. Yowan AMASA PARKER CLUB

Christopher L. Barker John W. Bartlett Robert M. Donlon Patsy M. Falcigno Patrick M. Harrigan W. Farley Jones Janet S. Kaplan Gary L. Karl Thomas K. Keefe Daniel S. Komansky Deborah A. Loncto Mary E. Lorini Kevin M. McArdle Jonathan D. Schneider

Paula M. Baker Daniel R. Cawley Gary H. Gutchess Florence M. Mastro Lisa A. Payne Andrea M. Quercia Lee H. Wasserman Scott C. Zakheim IRA HARRIS CLUB

John Chang Donald S. DiBenedetto Martin S. Finn Jeffrey D. Honeywell Edmund P. Kos Kevin L. Peryer AMASA PARKER CLUB

Stephen C. Appe Michael E. Basile M. Cornelia Cahill Donna M. Clyne Cathleen K. Condren Judy L. Doesschate Richard A. Frankel Mary E. Gallagher Robin D. Goldstein Michael P. Graven Valerie Kerker Robert F. Kozakiewicz Brian P. Krzykowski John H. Parmeter Jr. William F. Schwitter Jr. Martin Scully Jr. Douglas S. Trokie Patricia C. Wason ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Annette B. Colloton Michael J. DiDonato Paul Groenwegen Larry P. Kivitz Andrew I. Loeb Joan L. Matthews James P. Milstein Michael J. Misiaszek Thelma N. Neira Nancy B. Prior

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

John J. Halloran Jr. KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Barbara D. Cottrell James E. Hacker Carol A. Hyde Joseph D. Mitchell James W. Orband Barbara A. Sheehan Carol Turner-Mitchell AMOS DEAN CLUB

J. Wesley Jakovic Rika Murray David J. Taffany IRA HARRIS CLUB

Paul A. Cardinal Michael J. Danaher Jr. Susan E. Farley Richard C. Giardino Elizabeth L. Hileman Ronald E. Knox Betty Lugo Jeffrey P. Mans Leslie E. Templeman AMASA PARKER CLUB

Anonymous Albert W. Brooks Edward Joseph Carey Elizabeth Chiapperi Bryan J. Goldberger Irene C. Graven J. Scott Greer Leslie P. Guy M. Dawn Herkenham Richard W. Hoyt Stacy L. Pettit Elizabeth A. Roosa Andrew C. Rose Donna M. Ross Shari Seffer Paul Sieloff David J. Warager Arnis Zilgme ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Alice A. Belfiore Maureen A. Brady Richard G. Chalifoux Jr. Susan L. Cook Diane M. Deacon Lorinda S. DiDonato R. Timothy Eades Lisa K. Fox Nell M. Hurley Anthony J. Izzo Madeleine M. Kennedy Richard F. Luxemburg Kathleen L. Martens Mark M. McDonald E. Robin McJury Robert S. Pastel Vincent W. Prior Deborah D. Richards Beth VanHanswyk

Mark F. Volk David E. Winans

1985 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Paul J. Goldman KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Thania F. Bradley John C. Partigan AMOS DEAN CLUB

Paul F. McCurdy Keith B. Rose IRA HARRIS CLUB

Scott D. Bergin Mary E. Costello-Lazare Jay S. Duskin Amy R. Graham Donna D. Knox Stephen M. Lazare Russell A. Sibley Jr. Jay A. Smith AMASA PARKER CLUB

Suzanne M. Aiardo Nancy Z. Bastian Judith Blank Mark R. Bonacquist Kenneth R. Bozza James A. Carminucci Robert M. Casey Elizabeth K. Clyne Stephen M. Dorsey Carl S. Dziekan Richard P. Foote Mark F. Griffin Terence S. Hannigan William B. Joint Mark J. Kovack Steven Kraus Timothy J. Long John J. Mulrooney II Dorothy Burton Pearman Gary A. Rosa Michael D. Sharp Ilyse W. Tretter Bruce J. Wagner ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Mark V. Canary Jean F. Gerbini Mark H. Grunblatt Jeannette W. Hedderman Susan M. Kushner Karen L. Murtagh-Monks Carmen R. Neale Charles C. Neale Kevin M. O’Neill Sven R. Paul Dana D. Peck Andrew T. Pelletier Lisa A. Proven John J. Ray Jr. Stephen L. Rings Joseph Romano Suzanne N. Schilling JoAnn Vislocky Gary D. Vogel

63


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above

1986

AMOS DEAN CLUB

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Beverly Cohen Catherine B. Crandall

Lucretia M. Adymy Constance M. Boland Veronica G. Keegan AMOS DEAN CLUB

Bradley W. Bodmer Sr. James E. McGrath III Arthur V. Medel Cheryl L. Medel Sheila E. Shea IRA HARRIS CLUB

Kenneth L. Miller David E. Potter John Sciortino Karen B. Wolff AMASA PARKER CLUB

Steven E. Agan John T. Bauer Thomas G. Clements Shauna M. DeSantis Mark L. Dunn Mark H. Freise Arthur J. Golder III Julie A. Gordon Kenneth W. Gordon David H. Guy Robert D. Hooks Elizabeth A. Keating Mitchell P. Lenczewski Thomas G. Mazzotta Peter Joseph Molinaio Kevin M. Newman James E. Patrick Peter J. Pullano Margaret M. Sullivan Raul A. Tabora Jr. Jessica L. Vinall William A. Viscovich Wayne R. Witherwax ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Alma R. Arlos Diane L. Cagino Perry A. Carbone Nathaniel L. Corwin Ilse L. Gilbert Margaret D. Huff Concetta R. Lomanto Steven H. Malitz Bonnie Robinson Eric S. Sheidlower Patrick M. Sheller Karen L. Staff Jamie K. Von Ellen Jay G. Williams III Charles G. Youngblood

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Terresa M. Bakner Patrick D. Hennigan AMASA PARKER CLUB

David P. Arciszewski Diane Britton Greg Bucci William J. Burns Charles S. Carra Laurie B. Carra Richard J. Ciampi Jr. Stephen J. Gaba Michael J. Griffin Nancy D. Killian Elan A. Markewitz Bruce M. Maston Hilary A. Merkel McMillan Amy H. Robinson John W. VanDenburgh ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Catherine A. Carey Henry Garcia John P. Harden Demetrius G. Kalamaras Katherine H. Karl Gail S. Katz Ann C. Lapinski Paul M. Macari Jeffrey E. McMorris Mary Catherine O’Neill Robert F. Rich Jr.

1988 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Patricia E. Salkin KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Ruth E. Leistensnider AMOS DEAN CLUB

Barbara J. Collura Thomas J. Collura Evelyn C. Kaupp Brendan J. Keane Dianne R. Phillips Susan A. Roberts IRA HARRIS CLUB

Karen R. Arndt Janice Albanese Carpenter Thomas J. Hurley John J. Santacrose Aileen Brown Shinaman AMASA PARKER CLUB

1987 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

William J. Curry KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Sean M. Doolan Deborah L. Kelly Victoria M. Stanton Paul J. Zegger

64

Tracy Anagnost-Martinez Laura O. Beebe Bernadine M. Clements Joseph M. Connors Michele M. Fatone Daniel P. Fletcher Paul M. Freeman Anthony Giardina Joanne B. Haelen Daniel J. Moore John J. Muldowney T. Alexandra Pullano Andrea Celli Raiti Steven A. Rubin

Ivy M. Schildkraut Joseph M. Sise Robin L. Sise Daniel J. Stewart John J. Welsh ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Alan B. Ginsburg Dexter A. Johnson Richard A. Leszyk Jacqueline A. McMahon Smith John C. Mulcare Sylvia E. Toyos Catherine M. With

1989 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

Michele M. Doolan Patricia A. Murphy AMOS DEAN CLUB

Glen T. Bruening IRA HARRIS CLUB

Jonathan M. Cohen Laurie A. Cohen Andrea J. DiDomenico Joseph M. Gaug Lynn E. Ziegler Geist Robert L. Gosper Melissa T. Kiernan Thomas H. Moody Christopher M. Scaringe Nadine F. Shadlock Scott A. Spaulding AMASA PARKER CLUB

Stephen H. Bobarakis Heather C. Briccetti Jeffrey T. Culkin Eric N. Dratler Stephanie Donato Gaba Michael Garcia Susan P. Mahon Ted M. Mitchell Marylou K. Mucklewee Christina F. Myers Richard A. Paikoff James E. Prout Eileen M. Stack Donald J. Walker ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Marc D. Craw Gerald D. D’Amelia Jr. David D. DiBari Gayle A. Everitt Mark A. Mainello Noreen M. McKenna Valerie S. Milonovich Suzanne E. Santemma Amy Scatenato Mary W. Snyder Thomas A. Snyder

1990 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Andrea M. Terrillion Scott M. Terrillion JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Kenneth Veneziano

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

John A. Jackson Jorge I. Vidro AMOS DEAN CLUB

Carin F. Berolzheimer Stephen G. Fung Laurie M. Levitz Todd A. Wagner IRA HARRIS CLUB

Nicole M. Duve William J. Fiske Justin A. Heller Daniel R. Lennon J. Kevin McCarthy AMASA PARKER CLUB

Annmarie F. Addeo Kenneth P. Addeo Beth A. Bourassa Mary E. Burgess John Burke Doar Chris S. Dodig Craig Gallagher Elizabeth A. Garry Susan A. Hoblock Mary Beth Hynes John P. Luhr Valerie Parlave Robert L. Serenka Jr. ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Theodore M. Baum Jennifer A. Cusack Michael E. Cusack Kathleen D. Dole Jan H. Duffalo David L. Dufort John T. Ellis II Allen J. Hall Mickki L. Harrington Elizabeth E. Hofmeister Elisabeth E. Krisjanis Katherine D. Laboda Alan J. Lo Re Annamaria Maciocia Jude B. Mulvey Theresa A. O’Rourke Susan B. Reinfurt Joseph Verga


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Honorary & Commemorative Gifts ALBANY LAW SCHOOL WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO THOSE INDIVIDUALS WHO CHOSE TO HONOR OR MEMORIALIZE FRIENDS AND LOVED ONES BY MAKING A GIFT IN THEIR NAME, A GIFT WHICH PROVIDES AN ENDURING TESTIMONIAL TO THE HONOREE. IN HONOR OF SHERRI L. DONNELLY

Richard Day Research, Inc

John P. Balio ’48

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind

IN HONOR OF EDGAR A. ’46 & MARGARET SANDMAN

In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

A. William Manthorne & Jean S. Manthorne James J. Sandman & Beth Mullin Paul W. Sandman & Mary Beth SandmanIN EMORY IN MEMORY OF JOSEPH N. BARNETT

Arnold Barnett & Mary Jo Barnett Mildred K. Barnett

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Margaret C. Jones Mary Elizabeth McCaffrey John L. Sampson AMOS DEAN CLUB

Russell C. Hochman James J. LeBrou Kathryn L. Tabner IRA HARRIS CLUB

Diane Davis Sonya Del Peral Ruth G. Heller Kevin M. Lang Lydia T. McNally Michael J. Murphy Maureen W. Young AMASA PARKER CLUB

Patricia A. Baldwin David M. Boon Peter L. Burgess Daniel R. Burke Peter Catalano Jacqueline Dunbar Grande Alison M. Kelly Laura R. Lapidus Michael J. Masino William J. McCann Jr. Michael P. McClaren Susan M. McClaren James W. Ryan III Denise M. Sheerin Mary Beth Wilmit

IN MEMORY OF ALEXANDER THOMPSON GALLOWAY ’67

Rebecca B. Galloway IN MEMORY OF BARRY A. GOLD ’70

M. Sherry Gold, Benjamin D. Gold ’06 & Sari Gold David A. Kadish & Jane B. Kadish IN MEMORY OF DAVID GREENBERG

IN MEMORY OF CHRISTOPHER SAM CHOW

1991

IN MEMORY OF JUDGE DOMENICK L. GABRIELLI ’36

Mei Y. Chow William T. Hutchens Jr. John T. Johnson ’93 Christopher J. Kelly ’94 & Anne M. Kelly Sang H. Kim ’93 Gloria J. Ogoshi ’94 Woody N. Peterson Qualcomm Incorporated James D. Redwood Farnosh R. Sarraf Alex Y. Seita Sheila E. Shea ’86 Ronald L. Thompson Sr. & Sheryll D. Thompson Dang M. Vo Michael A. Weinstein

Geraldine Greenberg IN MEMORY OF THOMAS A. HOFFMAN

John M. Collins IN MEMORY OF ELY S. KOPLOVITZ ’21

Esther Koplovitz Richard J. Martell & Denise A. Martell Louie Szabo & Eva Szabo Judith M. Torres IN MEMORY OF ROSE LEITERMAN

Stephen Fromson IN MEMORY OF EDGAR C. LEONHARDT ’51

Bucknell University IN MEMORY OF ARTHUR F. MATHEWS ’62

IN MEMORY OF JEREMY V. COHEN

Robert B. McCaw

Peggy Cohen

IN MEMORY OF KAREN C. MCGOVERN ’01

IN MEMORY OF HON. RICHARD J. DARONCO ’56

William P. McGovern III ’68

Wayne M. Davis ’56 James F. Donohue ’56 W. Hubert Plummer ’56 IN MEMORY OF FRANCES ENIDES

John Aviza Patricia Aviza & Stephen Aviza Helen Hamm Alberta Hans Grace M. Keller Ferne Kott Jeanette M. McCoy & John B. McCoy Mary L. Perone & William J. Perone Jr. Hugh Schrader Arthur Taylor William Wigand

IN MEMORY OF DONNA J. MORSE ’91

Lawrence R. Yantz & Theresa Yantz IN MEMORY OF ROBERT NOVARK ’25

Penny S. Haitkin IN MEMORY OF PETER RAYMOND PORCO ’77

Cornelius J. O’Connor Jr. ’77 IN MEMORY OF GEORGE M. SIMON

Marcia P. Simon* IN MEMORY OF JUDGE MICHAEL E. SWEENEY ’38

Beatrice Sweeney IN MEMORY OF MAYOR THOMAS M. WHALEN ’58

Denis Whalen

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Sharon M. Beilinson James E. Doern Victor C. Garlock Lori T. Hickey Amy B. Korcz Brian E. Logan Christopher T. Maier Rebecca S. Mensch James P. Murphy Michael D. Ranalli Michael P. Ravalli Katherine B. Roach Andrew C. Saunders Justine M. Welch

1992

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Edward A. Bogdan III David E. McCraw Robert T. Melillo Jr. Rosemarie Riddell Bogdan

Karen L. Colonna William R. Lane Jr. Christopher C. O’Brien Rose T. Place Linda A. Redlisky Mark S. Zaid

AMOS DEAN CLUB

AMASA PARKER CLUB

George M. Stone

Robert E. Bailey Heath S. Berger Patrick H. Cartwright

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Mark J. Caruso Anthony A. Fazzone David J. Fernandez Kelli J. Flansburg Paul M. Gallagher James J. Green Paul D. Jureller Andrew M. Klein Bruce E. Knoll Maria D. Melendez Leslie J. Moyer Kyran D. Nigro

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REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above

Faculty & Staff DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

Christina A. Sebastian Gregory Sergienko David Singer Evelyn M. Tenenbaum Susan Terwilliger Diane Thompson Kathleen Whelan Donna E. Young

Helen Adams-Keane Patricia E. Salkin ’88

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

David D. Siegel DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Thomas F. Guernsey Kathe Klare

THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

Robert A. Barker* Ira M. Bloom Vincent M. Bonventre Harold Dubroff Katheryn D. Katz ’70 Mary A. Lynch Connie M. Mayer Dale L. Moore Peter Preiser Victor E. Rauscher Laurie F. Shanks Francis X. Wallace ’49* John C. Welsh ’55* AMOS DEAN CLUB

Robert T. Begg Beverly Cohen ’87 Patrick M. Connors Norman T. Deutsch Robert A. Emery Paul Finkelman James R. Kellerhouse Deborah A. Mann ’79 Daniel G. Moriarty Nancy K. Ota David A. Pratt Alex Y. Seita Mary M. Wood IRA HARRIS CLUB

Richard J. Bartlett* Gail S. Bensen Melissa L. Breger Edward P. Brennan Martha J. Doyle Nancy M. Lenahan Sandra L. Mans Nancy M. Maurer AMASA PARKER CLUB

Joanne M. Casey Joseph M. Connors ’88 Joann Fitzsimmons Stephen E. Gottlieb Peter H. Halewood Sheldon W. Halpern Michael J. Hutter Jr. Barbara Jordan-Smith Annette Kahler Jennifer Kroez Richard L. Ludwick Elaine Mills Karen Minahan Alicia R. Ouellette ’94 Noelle M. Pecora ’05 Kris Ross

66

Anonymous Rose Mary K. Bailly Joseph T. Baum ’72 Frederick W. Brewer Darlene Cardillo Barbara A. Chandler Theresa R. Colbert John M. Collins Michael R. Cournoyer Sr. Wendy B. Davis Laurie Dayter Sherri L. Donnelly Jean M. O’Donnell Goldsmith Lori-Ann Hamill Lynn Holland Andrea Irizarry Brown Tanya Johnson-Rankin Beverly J. Kenton Brian E. LaPlante Stephanie V. Leslie Ruth Lex Bennett M. Liebman Timothy D. Lytton Barbara A. Mabel Steve H. McClaney Sherri A. Meyer Michele A. Monforte Paul D. Moore Morgan Morrissey Sharmaine Moseley Rebecca Z. Murphy Sue E. Nohai Lisa A. Portolano Ariane Putnam Rosetta Rawlins James D. Redwood Eileen Roepe Constance P. Rohloff Colleen E. Smith Nicole F. Soucy Laurie A. Stevens Samuel Sullivan Christian Sundquist Lisa A. Suto Jenean M. Taranto Evette Tejada Traci F. Tosh Jennifer M. Tromblee Joseph Velez Mary E. Wager Tammy Weinman Pershia M. Wilkins

Suzanne M. O’Neil Thompson G. Page Sharon M. Persbacker Christine L. Stetson John J. Toy Matthew J. Walko ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Madeleine M. Jester Carlson Victor A. Civitillo Kelly M. Curro Brett L. Malofsky Jean A. McDonnell Meredith A. Neverett Rachel L. Samuels Patrick L. Seely Jr. Thomas M. Shephard Karina M. Thomas Ingrid M. Van Zon Borwick Charles B. Weber Eleanor M. Zimmerman

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

1993 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

James T. Raymond AMOS DEAN CLUB

Michael J. Balch Megan M. Brown Kathryn L. Clune Paul B. Goucher Adam R. Shaw Keith J. Stinton IRA HARRIS CLUB

Thomas E. Dietz Jill A. Dunn Gregory W. Gribben Sang H. Kim Kathleen M. McElroy Jonathan N. Pazer Joyce Serbalik Choi AMASA PARKER CLUB

Eileen F. Fazzone Debra S. Finelli Christopher C. Gerard John T. Johnson Judith Gaies Kahn Anthony P. Levatino Gregg M. Lysko Bonnie J. Riggi Stephen N. Schaefer Ellen C. Schell Louise K. Sira Robert R. Tyson ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Kathleen M. Baynes Charles E. Graney Elena DeFio Kean Tracy A. Morgan Joseph A. Papa Jr. Steven M. Schwartz David A. Weintraub

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Sunil Bakshi Mary A. Berry Patrick Michael Donegan Alexander F. Ferrini III Christopher J. Kelly David S. Rothenberg Joseph H. Warren Kathy A. Wolverton AMASA PARKER CLUB

Dena T. Amodio Brenda K. Eckstein Andrew R. Ferguson Kathleen A. Gleeson-Lagace Jason A. Goebel 5+ Stanley A. Kitzinger Brian P. Lynch Michael J. Mongin Kimberly A. O’Connor Alicia R. Ouellette Robert A. Rausch William J. Renahan ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Christopher P. Baynes Kenneth S. Carlson Michael P. Cavanagh Stephanie A. Fitzgerald Rory E. Jurman Kelly L. Malloy-Pogoda Claudette Y. Newman Gloria J. Ogoshi Heather J. Redlich Warren Redlich Theodore P. Robinson Whitney J. Smith Daniel P. Tierney Marvis A. Warren Kristin M. Wheaton

1995

1994

KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Erin L. Herbst Charles J. Scibetta

Katherine M. Sheehan

AMOS DEAN CLUB

*Faculty Emeritus

AMOS DEAN CLUB

Matthew F. Herman

Deborah L. Jones Irina Kogan David E. Reid


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Classes of 1997-2001— $500 + Classes of 2002-2007— $250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Timothy D. O’Hara KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

John J. Herbst Jason J. Legg Erin L. Leitman Scott AMOS DEAN CLUB

$100–$249

Christine M. Clark Noelle M. Kinsch

* **

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Patricia L. Brown Peter A. Lauricella Amy F. Melican John W. Melican Clarissa H. Porter Carla T. Shouldice AMASA PARKER CLUB

IRA HARRIS CLUB

James D. Goode Patrick T. O’Connor AMASA PARKER CLUB

Jessie A. Aitcheson Stephanie S. Baxter-Jenkins Karen A. Butler Brendan M. Clifford Joseph A. DeTraglia John P. DiBartolo Jr. Barbara L. Guzman Kevin R. Law James E. Martel Stephen N. Ment Victoria A. Plotsky Matthew J. Rider Michelle F. Rider ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Paula K. Almgren Marc I. Berner Julia S. Bielawski Indira M. Dingledine Brian A. Farlow David G. Glass Kristin E. Koehler Guilbault William L. Hahn Jennifer P. Hughes Brandon R. King Marcia L. LeMay Kathleen A. Leo Darren T. Miller Lee A. Palmateer Jennifer M. Palmer David F. Powell David E. Siegfeld John S. Tassone Steven G. Thomas Quincy Vale Jennifer Millett Wilbur

1996 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Georgia F. Nucci JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON SOCIETY

Brian C. Cuneo

Lucia A. Ferrara Rachelle M. Fragnito-Dufault William M. Hoblock Jacqueline Keller Neil T. O’Donnell Lisa M. Paczkowski William F. Paczkowski John F. Queenan Kimberley B. Robidoux Daren J. Rylewicz Richard A. Sherman John T. Sly J. Dormer Stephen III Mark W. Stoutenburg ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Amber L. Barber Jonathan A. Barber Lisa E. Brown Kathryn E. Clearfield Dawn M. Conklin Darrin B. Derosia Mark R. Ferran Julie M. Hess Gerald P. Leary Jr. Stephanie L. Moriarty Andrew L. Moses Michael F. Piecuch Robert B. Speidel Donna L. Studebaker James S. Walsh Brian J. Wasser

1997 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER SOCIETY

Peter R. Keane KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

David J. Hubbard Kathleen A. Yohe G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Keiki M. Cabanos Darius Shahinfar Shelly L. Stone IRA HARRIS CLUB

Melody A. MacKenzie Deon T. Retemeyer Paul M. Salvino J. Anthony Van Ness Kristen E. Mollnow Walsh

AMASA PARKER CLUB

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Richard D. Belliss Jennifer S. Bumgarner Maria B. Morris Christine M. Motta Kimberly A. Schanzer Rachel N. Schatten Laura L. Silva Erin S. Stephen

Natalie A. Carraway Michael D. Ferrarese Sr. Julie A. Garcia Matthew P. Hoff

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Donna L. Kelly Joseph Kuo Arthur C. Mueller Michael P. Naughton Sr. Brett A. Preston Louise T. Seeba Maryellen Suhrhoff Annmarie Taggart Stephanie J. Waters Jessica R. Wilcox

1998 KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

David A. Blumberg James G. Talbot G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Charles W. Judge II Sungchurl Koh Randall S. Lewis Kelly C. Wilcove Neil L. Wilcove IRA HARRIS CLUB

Edward J. Greene Jr. Jeong H. Oh Lisa M. Penpraze Elizabeth T. Simon AMASA PARKER CLUB

Debra C. Brookes Amy P. Conway David V. DiFusco Rachel A. DiFusco Stephanie T. Dunn Mahsa Khanbabai David C. Klingebiel James E. Martineau Jr. Lisa A. Schryer Matthew N. Wells Elizabeth A. Worthington ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Trudy L. Boulia Francis J. Brennan Daniel N. DeFio Karen V. DeFio Minerva John-Stull Christopher M. Martin Gary G. Parchment Teresa M. Pare Yiselle Ruoso Diana E. Skelly Jennifer M. Wilson Melissa M. Zambri

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Elizabeth A. Corliss Sacco Lea A. Ermides Ian S. MacDonald John D. Minehan Mark J. Sacco Jessica L. Schneider Paul D. Soares Katherine R. Van Loan ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Sandramarie M. Allen Nicholas C. Bennice Jason N. Cooper James W. Dayter Jr. Colleen M. Diaz Susanne H. Dolin Thomas E. Dolin Jr. David G. Drexler Benjamin M. Farber Amy E. Gaynor Stefanie L. Guido Justin P. Jiron Riele J. Morgiewicz Krishna N. O’Neal David Perino Kimberly A. Rosenberg Frederic P. Skinner Jr. Aaron J. Smalls Donna M. Snyder Michael T. Snyder April A. Ziegler

2000 G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Anonymous Margery C. Eddy Heather D. Harp Kevin C. Harp IRA HARRIS CLUB

Christopher J. Watt AMASA PARKER CLUB

George E. Lamarche III Joanne Y. Li James T. Maxwell II Tanhena M. Pacheco-Dunn ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

1999

Katrine A. Beck Jeffry E. Hines Shannon K. Kearney Deborah S. Kearns Susan Ly Anne-jo McTague Jennifer A. Murphy Jeffrey H. Pearlman Justina R. Cintron Perino Nicole M. Snyder Richard V. Stewart Jr. John R. Vero

G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

2001

Michelle Holmes Ladouceur Alexander Powhida Matthew P. Side Joshua S. Vinciguerra

G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

John R. Higgitt

67


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above IRA HARRIS CLUB

Gregory Hunt AMASA PARKER CLUB

Ryan T. Donovan Bruce C. Dunn Jr. David A. Ehrlich Gerald Jospitre ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Gilbert L. Carey Jr. Kileen C. Davies Sara A. Duncan Christopher A. Guetti Linda M. Blom Johnson James F. Marotta Christina L. Roberts Heath M. Rossner Paul P. Sarratori Gina M. Spadaro Elisha S. Tomko Sean A. Tomko Oleg Tsyn

2002 G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Pamela M. Babson David C. Bruffett Jr. Patrick K. Jordan Amy J. Kellogg Sandra D. Rivera Claude W. Shelverton AMASA PARKER CLUB

Christopher J. Brantigan ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Justyn P. Bates Christianne Beaury-Apuzzi Devon T. Conway William T. Conway III Joanmarie M. Dowling Fatima Goodman Ursula E. Hall Robyn L. Hoffman Natasha Kerry John A. Mancini Todd G. Monahan Stephen P. Sherwin Frank K. Staiano Tracy A. Swanson

2003 G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Jay S. Campbell Laura M. Jordan Youngmin Oh Campbell AMASA PARKER CLUB

Paul G. Flint Alanah N. Keddell Meredith A. Moriarty Fei-Lu Qian Eric P. Sugar Tara M. Venditte Lee M. Zeldin Jacqueline M. Zore-Smrek ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Mathew P. Barry Adam B. Bear Kevin T. Bezio Young I. Choi Maria L. Dracker Ascenzo

68

Matthew F. Guilbault Jessica J. Hall Michael E. Kenneally Jr. Judith M. Mayle Gregory R. Nearpass Daniel B. Wade

Peter C. Ringel Lorie J. Robinson John G. Salvador Ian L. Schlanger Nicole Strippoli Stephanie I. Valentin

2004

2006

G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

Douglas E. Coleman James B. Hettie Norman W. Kee

Benjamin D. Gold

AMASA PARKER CLUB

Jill K. Clemente Lisa A. Gootee Heena Shaikh ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Jamie N. Batcher Cynthia H. Beaudoin Dana D. Blackmon Pina M. Campagna Patrick J. Campion Catherine A. Corlett Crystal A. Doolity Kimberly A. Glennon Peter J. Glennon Lisa A. Gray Nadia A. Havard Sharon L. Higginbotham Brooke D. Werner McEckron Paula J. O’Brien Karen A. Rhoades Gabriel N. Seymour Andrew J. Staub Mark Visscher

2005 G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Michael S. Pascazi Kimberly C. Petillo Dana L. Salazar Jordan M. Smith Diana Yang Jianping Zhang AMASA PARKER CLUB

Patrick J. Champ Joanne C. Chwiecko Daniel K. Clemente Craig G. Cornwell Gina L. Demuria Emily J. Karr-Cook Noelle M. Pecora Allen J. Vickey ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Lorenzo L. Angelino Danielle M. Barone Beth S. Cooper Jason G. Dexter Colin J. Donnaruma Sarah E. Gold 2+ Christopher T. Higgins Jeffery V. Jamison Paul M. Kampfer Brett M. Knowles Noelle E. Lagueux-Alvarez Justin C. Levin Sutton S. McMinn Courtney S. Radick Sean D. Ragusa

G.O.L.D. BARRISTER SOCIETY

Frederick M. Fink James W. Leary AMASA PARKER CLUB

Robert W. Marchiony Stephanie A. Straw

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Adjoa A. Debrah-Dwamena Kelly K. Drago Francesca Fonte Daisy G. Ford Bridgid C. O’Connor Sergio D. Simoes Jessica S. Strugibenetti Stacey L. Stump Michael L. Walker Christopher E. Wilcox

2007 AMASA PARKER CLUB

Jennifer R. Sunderlin ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Caroline B. Ahn Renee J. Albaugh Erin J. Asher Melissa A. Ashline-Heil Corey A. Auerbach Willow F. Baer Stephanie C. Baker Jeffrey P. Barringer Alison C. Bates Justin Berhaupt Matthew S. Blank Deanne M. Braveman Cassandra A. Brekke Christopher Brennan Daniel W. Brennan Talia L. Bryan Evan S. Cantor Britt E. Carlson Laura B. Carroll Emily S. Cartwright Eric P. Chapman Megan K. Christian Andrew T. Cleary Lia E. Coniglio Rhonda M. Corcoran Kevin J. Davis Justin V. DeArmas Yaron S. Deskalo Blaise S. DiBernardo Amy L. Dickson Michael A. Discenza Jan E. Dormsjo Robert F. Dwyer Jr. Kelly L. Egan Sarah L. Elghannani Katrin E. Falco Matthew E. Falso

Charles F. Farcher Gregory E. Fassler Raquel Felix Adrienne A. Foederer Steven J. Ford Benjamin M. Friedman Glinnesa D. Gailliard Eileen B. Gallagher Janette M. Garcia Brian J. Gillin Aliza Ginsburg Andrew R. Goldenberg Ross F. Goodman Michael J. Gregg Matthew J. Griesemer Jonathan A. Grippo Stephen P. Gruberg Jonathan E. Gunther Donneshia M. Hall Christine M. Halverson Stephen B. Hanse Kristal M. Heinz Katharine V. Hemann Donald J. Hillmann Brian R. Hodgdon Kathleen K. Hogan Annette M. Hollis Eric M. Holzer Heidi A. Husser Curtis A. Johnson Allison C. Joyce Maria C. Kelly Jacob M. Kesterke Mahta Khanjar Stuart L. Kossar Rachael E. Kruse Catherine J. Kwan Sabrina L. Lall Shawn W. Lappin Shannon J. Lawlor Jason P. Litwak Benjamin L. Maggi Tania Magoon Karen G. Maynard Kristen J. McCabe Meghan K. McNamara Jacqueline D. Mecchella Christopher A. Montalto Quinn M. Morris David A. Mossberg Ryan P. Mullahy


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Justin D. Myers Mark A. Myers Stacy L. Newman Olivia T. Nix Kristen J. Northrup Margaret P. Nyland Corey J. Pugliese Brianne E. Rahn William C. Robertson Nicole M. Roman Janet L. Rosales Ronney L. Rosenberg Paige I. Saperstein Seth D. Schraier David W. Schweikert Robert D. Seymour Marla B. Siegel Hannelore F. Smith Sarah A. Spain Daniel F. Thomas Lincy M. Thomas Charis Torok Paul D. Trumble Judy Tsang Peter J. VanBortel Lauren L. Wainwright Carmen M. Warner Jacob R. Wilkinson Leah M. Williamson Robert M. Witt Roderick D. Woods Hannah Yoo Ellen K. Zwijacz

Class of 2007 Senior Gift For 16 years, each graduating class has presented Albany Law School with a class gift. In celebration of their final year at Albany Law School, the Class of 2007 generously made a gift of $7,500 with a 54 percent participation rate—the highest participation rate in 12 years—which included a match from Trustees J.K. Hage III ’78, Rory Radding ’75 and Robert B. Stiles ’76. The class chose to earmark its gift to purchase four benches in front of the 1928 Building, honoring the memory of their classmate Stevenson Kim ’07. A special thank you to Jennifer Sunderlin and Senior Gift Committee members Emily Cartwright, Steve Ford, Glinnesa Gailliard, Jon Grippo, Curtis Johnson, Quinn Morris, Olivia Nix and Dave Schweikert for all of their hard work and detemination.

New Endowment Funds EACH YEAR ALBANY LAW SCHOOL RECEIVES A NUMBER OF RESTRICTED GIFTS FOR THE PURPOSE OF ENDOWING PROFESSORSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PROGRAMS AND PRIZES. GIFTS TO ALBANY LAW SCHOOL’S ENDOWMENT PROVIDE FUNDING IN PERPETUITY. BELOW ARE NEWLY ENDOWED FUNDS ESTABLISHED IN THE 2006-07 YEAR. BARRY GOLD ’70 HEALTH LAW CLINIC PROGRAM

DOLING FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

SEYMOUR FOX ’49 SCHOLARSHIP

M. Sherry Gold and her children, Sari and Ben ’06, established the fund in memory of her husband and their father, Barry Gold ’70. This endowment allows for the hiring of the Barry Gold ’70 Health Law Clinic Fellow and/or Professor who would be responsible for representing clients with cancer or other chronic medical conditions, and provide training on legal rights for clients/patients, advocates, health care staff, physicians, and related professionals, as well as law and medical students.

Stuart ’63 and Ann Doling established the Doling Family Scholarship in honor of Mr. Doling’s father, Irving M. Doling ’34. The award, intended to provide financial assistance to the most capable students who pursue the study of law, will be presented annually to students with financial need, who are in good academic standing.

This scholarship, designed to assist qualified students with financial need, was established in December 2006 by Seymour Fox ’49. When setting up the endowment, Mr. Fox expressed his desire to make a gift to show his confidence in the future of Albany Law School.

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REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above

Annual Restricted, Capital & Endowment Gifts ALBANY LAW CLINIC & JUSTICE CENTER

Albany Law School Student Bar Association Altria Group Inc. Melissa L. Breger Crystal A. Doolity ’04 Judith Gaies Kahn ’93 Noelle M. Kinsch ’96 Michael S. Kozubek ’73 Lavelle & Finn LLP Legal Aid Society of Northeastern NY Inc. Mary A. Lynch Nancy M. Maurer Noelle M. Pecora ’05 Darius Shahinfar ’97 Susan Terwilliger Kathleen Whelan BARRY GOLD ’70 HEALTH LAW CLINICAL PROGRAM

M. Sherry Gold, Benjamin D. Gold ’06 & Sari Gold David A. Kadish & Jane B. Kadish ANNUAL FUND DISCRETIONARY

Albany Aqua Ducks Inc. Albany College of Pharmacy Student Center Albany Marriott

Alibi’s Martini Lounge BFS The Mediterranean Restaurant Bayou Café M. Diane Bodman ’72 Capital Repertory Theatre Cool Insuring Agency Inc. Cranwell Resort, Spa & Golf Club Crowne Plaza Hotel Delmonico’s Italian Steakhouse Domino’s Elbo Room El Loco Mexican Cafe Emil J. Nagengast Gideon Putnam Hotel Glen Sanders Mansion Grandma’s Country Restaurant Hilton Lake Placid Resort Impress Printing and Graphics Isn’t It Sweet Lou-Bea’s Pizza McDonald’s Fox Management Robert C. Miller ’68 Mirror Lake Inn Resort & Spa My Linh Nicole’s Restaurant & Catering Georgia F. Nucci ’96 Olive Garden Paesan’s Pizza & Restaurant Skyline Pub & Nightclub Sneeringer Monahan Provost Redgrave Title Agency Inc. Spectrum 7 Theatres Stuyvesant Plaza Inc. The Century House

Stuart P. Doling ’63 FOUNDER OF THE NEW DOLING FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

My wife Ann and I wanted to make a contribution in honor of my father, Irving M. Doling ’34, and when we began to look at the areas that were available, the Law School jumped out at us. Since just about the entire Doling family had attended Albany Law, it was not difficult to focus on the School. Why did we establish the Doling Family Scholarship Fund? We wanted to do something to show our love of Irving M. Doling ’34 our family. We wanted to show our love for the Law School where we experienced happy times. We wanted to make it possible for future students to have a chance to experience the full range of activities with less concern for finances. Why endow a scholarship? Because we can. Because it makes us feel good. Because it might lead to someone else doing the same thing. Really, the best answer to that question is, “We love our family, and the Law School is part of our family.”

70

The Desmond The Ginger Man The Sage Colleges Union Graduate College United Group of Companies The Washington Tavern Westwood Capital Prudence M. Younger ’82** Stephen P. Younger ’82** ENDOWED FELLOWSHIPS & PROFESSORSHIPS

Edward M. Cameron Jr.’21 Public Service Fellowship Lyric Foundation The Joseph C. Foiadelli ’97 Public Service Fellowship John Aviza Stephen Aviza & Patricia Aviza Gladys Foiadelli Helen Hamm Alberta Hans Grace M. Keller Ferne Kott John B. McCoy & Jeanette M. McCoy William J. Perone Jr. & Mary Perone Hugh Schrader Arthur Taylor William Wigand Edgar A. Sandman ’46 & Margaret Sandman Research Fellowship Bank of America Barbara S. Hancock ’00 Robyn L. Hoffman ’02 A. William Manthorne & Jean S. Manthorne NY Life Insurance Company Edgar A. Sandman ’46 James J. Sandman & Beth Mullin Mary Beth Sandman & Paul W. Sandman Carla T. Shouldice ’96 Warren M. Anderson ’40 Graduate Fellowship in Government Administration & Regulation Coughlin & Gerhart L.L.P. Hinman, Howard & Kattell LLP Levene, Gouldin & Thompson LLP Thomas J. McAvoy ’64 Molly McKeown Brian M. Prew ’70 Robert S. Rose ’68 Security Mutual Life Insurance Company GOVERNMENT LAW CENTER

Rose Mary K. Bailly Andrew R. Baron ’81 Robert C. Batson ’75 Mary A. Berry ’94 City University of New York Robert J. Coan ’58 Fred J. Emery ’57 Rebecca B. Galloway Joseph K. Hage III ’78 Health Research Inc.

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

John A. Jackson ’90 & Juanita Jackson John J. Kelliher James P. King ’59 Bennett M. Liebman Margaret J. Lubitz John A. Mancini ’02 Michele A. Monforte Paul D. Moore David Perino ’99 Robert W. Redmond ’71 William E. Redmond ’55 Richard A. Reed ’81 Patricia E. Salkin ’88 State University of New York University at Albany Warren M. Anderson Breakfast Series Warren M. Anderson ’40* Bartley J. Costello III ’72 Featherstonhaugh, Wiley, Clyne & Cordo LLP Hinman, Howard & Kattell LLP Pitta, Bishop, Del Giorno and Dreier LLP Pauline E. Williman Network Membership Michael C. Fallon Herbert B. Gordon ’56 Christopher T. Higgins ’05 Paul Sieloff ’84 Racing and Gaming Program Jerry Bilinski Brown, McMahon & Weinraub Patrick M. Connors Jeffrey Gural William C. MacMillen Jr. ’37 Patricia E. Salkin ’88 Edward P. Swyer Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP Chris E. Wittstruck Clarence D. Rappleyea Government Lawyer in Residence W. Carroll Coyne Leonard M. Cutler Victoria A. Graffeo ’77 Hiscock & Barclay LLP NBT Bancorp Dale M. Volker


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001—$500 + Classes of 2002-2007—$250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

Friends of Albany Law School DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

AMOS DEAN CLUB

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

$250–$999

M. Sherry Gold, Benjamin D. Gold ’06 & Sari Gold

Amasa Parker Club

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

Rebecca B. Galloway John J. Kelliher Gloria Littlefield A. William Manthorne & Jean S. Manthorne Cynthia W. Szczepanski James A. Wears

Benjamin J. Auerbach Stephen Aviza & Patricia Aviza John Aviza Keely M. Bannister Jason B. Browne Colin J. Caffrey Catherine M. Cournoyer Faith Delahanty Geraldine Greenberg Helen Hamm Alberta Hans Harvey M. Huff II Arlene Johnson David A. Kadish & Jane B. Kadish Grace M. Keller Ferne Kott James F. Langton Margaret J. Lubitz Richard J. Martell & Denise A. Martell John B. McCoy Jeffrey M. Pepe & Jeanette M. McCoy William J. Perone Jr. & Mary L. Perone Florence Rappaport Hugh Schrader Steve Sloan Aaryne M. Strand Louie Szabo & Eva Szabo Arthur Taylor Ronald L. Thompson Sr. & Sheryll D. Thompson Judith M. Torres William Wigand

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Senior Citizens’ Law Day CSEA Local 1000 AFSCME Cohoes Savings Foundation Crestwood Health Inc. New York Long-Term Care Brokers Ltd. Retired Public Employees Association PRIZES

Annual Prizes Capital District Trial Lawyers Association LexisNexis Matthew Bender** MatLaw Systems Corporation** William P. McGovern III ’68 Patricia E. Salkin ’88 Erin S. Stephen ’97 J. Dormer Stephen III ’96 Thomson West** Francis H. Anderson Negotiation Award Robert A. Emery Mary M. Wood Edward M. Cameron Jr. ’21 Memorial Prize Lyric Foundation Hon. Domenick L. Gabrielli ’36 Prize Veronica G. Keegan ’86 Gabrielli Appellate Advocacy Competition Prize Ann Horowitz Donna J. Morse ’91 Prize Lawrence R. Yantz & Theresa Yantz Isabelle Redman Prize Barbara D. Cottrell ’84 PROGRAMS

Client Advocacy & Litigation The Swyer Foundation Inc. Environmental Forums Laura M. Jordan ’03 Courtney S. Radick ’05 Law Day Reception Constructive Copy LLC Anne Erickson Hiscock & Barclay LLP James T. Potter ’80

Mei Yang Chow Ann Doling Judith Pendergast Edward P. Swyer DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

Anonymous Dianne Kopff JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

Arnold Barnett & Mary Jo Barnett Corinne Collins James Freeman & Lynn Freeman-Massey Ann Horowitz JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

Mei Y. Chow Beth Mullin & James J. Sandman Paul W. Sandman & Mary Beth Sandman KATE STONEMAN SOCIETY

Ruth Anderson Mildred K. Barnett Jerry Bilinski William C. Coyne Jeffrey Gural William T. Hutchens Jr. Juanita Jackson Mary Eileen Mealey Farnosh R. Sarraf Marcia P. Simon* R. Matthew Sweeney Denis Whalen Pauline E. Williman Mary F. Yanas

Law Journals Kim M. Clark ’73 Laura M. Jordan ’03 Patrick K. Jordan ’02 Norman W. Kee ’04 Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler LLP Adam R. Shaw ’93 Laurie A. Stevens Samuel Sullivan Law Review Fund Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation Loan Repayment Assistance Program Albany Law School Student Bar Association Moot Court Justina R. Cintron Perino ’00 Theresa R. Colbert Krishna N. O’Neal ’99 David Perino ’99

IRA HARRIS CLUB

Hon. Richard J. Bartlett Peggy Cohen Leonard M. Cutler Martha J. Doyle Penny S. Haitkin Marcia K. Hopple Anne M. Kelly Woody N. Peterson AMASA PARKER CLUB

Robert H. Bowmar Sharon Burley Gladys Foiadelli Stephen Fromson Esther Koplovitz Melynda B. Ludwick Robert B. McCaw Paula F. Murphy Steven A. Rogers Diana Schneider & Donald A. Schneider Beatrice Sweeney Diane Thompson Dang M. Vo Michael A. Weinstein Lawrence R. Yantz & Theresa Yantz

Katherine R. Van Loan ’99 Kristin M. Wheaton ’94 Sobota Lecture Series Henry F. Sobota ’77 Swyer ACES Fellow The Swyer Foundation Inc. Trial Term Laurie F. Shanks Realize the Future Campaign Gifts Richard A. Frye ’58 E. Stewart Jones Jr. ’66 John L. Sampson ’91 Schaffer Law Library Elizabeth Chiapperi ’84 Martha J. Doyle Laura M. Jordan ’03 Beverly J. Kenton Richard A. Paikoff ’89 Robert S. Ryan ’76 Joseph Velez

SCHOLARSHIPS

Janice Albanese Carpenter ’88 Jeffrey K. Anderson ’81 John J. Aveni ’77 John M. Barrett ’64 Martin J. Barrington ’80 & Mary P. Barrington ’80 Ira M. Bloom Megan M. Brown ’93 Greg Bucci ’87 Bucknell University Richard G. Chalifoux Jr. ’84 Beverly Cohen ’87 Douglas E. Coleman ’04 John M. Collins Wendy B. Davis Eugene D. DeSantis ’78 John T. Garry II ’52 Richard C. Giardino ’84 Edward J. Greene Jr. ’98 Joanne B. Haelen ’88 Peter H. Halewood

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REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

The Barrister Societies DEAN’S PLATINUM CIRCLE

$50,000 and above Ayco – Albany Law School Alumni Scholarship Craig G. Cornwell ’05 Brian C. Cuneo ’96 Jacqueline Dunbar Grande ’91 Edward A. Graham ’82 James J. LeBrou ’91 Deborah A. Loncto ’82 David S. Rothenberg ’94 Keith J. Stinton ’93 Shelly L. Stone ’97 The Ayco Charitable Foundation Tara M. Venditte ’03 Joseph N. Barnett ’29 Memorial Scholarship Mary Jo Barnett & Arnold Barnett Mildred K. Barnett Elaine M. & Myron J. Cohn ’36 Scholarship Elaine M. & Myron J. Cohn Foundation Hon. Richard J. Daronco ’56 Memorial Scholarship Wayne M. Davis ’56 James F. Donohue ’56 Herbert B. Gordon ’56 Charles F. Little Jr. ’56 W. Hubert Plummer ’56 Francis T. Roach ’56 Doling Family Scholarship Stuart P. Doling ’63 & Ann Doling J. Frances Doyle ’63 Scholarship Mary Eileen Mealey

Donald P. Hirshorn ’59 Douglas J. Hunt ’71 Jephson Educational Trust J.P. Morgan Chase Charles W. Judge II ’98 Katheryn D. Katz ’70 Amy J. Kellogg ’02 Esther Koplovitz Michael D. Kranis ’80 Lawrence I. & Blanche H. Rhodes Memorial Fund Joanne Y. Li ’00 Denise A. Martell & Richard J. Martell Florence M. Mastro ’83 Robert T. Melillo Jr. ’92 Charles E. O’Brien ’75 Janet H. O’Brien-Aram ’76 Sharon P. O’Conor ’79 Anthony J. Pieragostini ’74 Courtney S. Radick ’05 Deon T. Retemeyer ’97 Christian Sundquist Eva Szabo & Louie Szabo Leslie E. Templeman ’84 The A. Lindsay and Olive B. O’Connor Foundation Judith M. Torres Bruce L. Trent ’74 Oreste Vincent ’49 George H. Weissman ’79 John C. Welsh ’55 Pershia M. Wilkins Mary M. Wood Jamie A. Woodward ’80 Donna E. Young

Hon. John M. Finnerty ’65 Memorial Scholarship Michael P. Shanley Jr. ’71 Seymour Fox ’49 Scholarship Seymour Fox ’49 James E. Frankel ’73 Scholarship James E. Frankel ’73 Elizabeth A. & Russell F. Freeman ’57 Scholarship Lynn Freeman-Massey & James Freeman David Greenberg Memorial Scholarship Stephen Fromson Geraldine Greenberg Juanita & John Jackson ’90 Scholarship John A. Jackson ’90 & Juanita Jackson Robert E. Littlefield ’52 Scholarship Gloria Littlefield Robert E. Littlefield Jr. ’76 Arthur F. Mathews ’62 Memorial Scholarship Robert B. McCaw Stanley A. Rosen ’68 Memorial Scholarship McNamee, Lochner, Titus & Williams P.C. Paul E. Scanlan ’72 William M. Watkins Scholarship Sharon Burley Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation

DEAN’S GOLD CIRCLE

$25,000–$49,999 DEAN’S SILVER CIRCLE

$10,000-$24,999 JUSTICE ROBERT H. JACKSON 1912 SOCIETY

$5,000–$9,999 JUSTICE DAVID J. BREWER 1858 SOCIETY

$2,500–$4,999 THE KATE STONEMAN 1898 SOCIETY

$1,000–$2,499

Hon. Thomas W. Whalen III ’58 Memorial Scholarship Denis Whalen SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LAW CENTER

Darlene Cardillo Susan E. Farley ’84 John D. Minehan ’99 Jean M. O’Donnell Goldsmith Rory J. Radding ’75 George R. Repper ’81 Steven Z. Szczepanski ’75

Endowment Fund and Beneficial Interest in Trusts THROUGH INCREASED FUND RAISING EFFORTS, SMART FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS AND STEWARDSHIP OF OUR CURRENT ENDOWMENT, ALBANY LAW SCHOOL HAS SEEN CONSIDERABLE GAINS IN OUR ENDOWMENT AND BENEFICIAL INTEREST IN TRUSTS. WITH A GOAL TO INCREASE THE ENDOWMENT SIGNIFICANTLY TO SUPPORT FACULTY AND STUDENTS, GIFTS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND ARE MORE CRITICAL THAN EVER.

$8,741,244

$9,749,919

$21,542.345

$20,452,023

$19,167,669

$10,000,000

$17,168,028

$15,000,000

$25,281,134

$20,000,000

$5,332,455

$25,000,000

$6,037,708

$30,000,000

$10,314,399

$35,000,000

Beneficial interest in trusts

$5,000,000

Endowment investments

0 2003

72

2004

2005

2006

2007


G.O.L.D. BARRISTER

Classes of 1997-2001— $500 + Classes of 2002-2007— $250 + THE FOUNDERS CLUBS Amos Dean Club

$500–$999 Ira Harris Club

$250–$999 Amasa Parker Club

$100–$249 * **

Deceased Denotes a gift-in-kind In-kind contributions of goods and services provide Albany Law School with many vital resources.

Intellectual Property Law Conference Aspen Publishers Inc. Heslin Rothenberg Farley & Mesiti P.C. Morrison & Foerster LLP Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler LLP Thomson West Stephen P. Younger ’82** & Prudence M. Younger ’82** THE LAUREL SOCIETY

Mei Y. Chow Thomas F. Guernsey & Kathe Klare William T. Hutchens Jr. John T. Johnson ’93 Christopher J. Kelly ’94 Sang H. Kim ’93 Lawrence I. & Blanche H. Rhodes Memorial Fund Gloria J. Ogoshi ’94 Woody N. Peterson Qualcomm Incorporated James D. Redwood Harry L. Robinson ’65 Farnosh R. Sarrof Alex Y. Seita Sheila E. Shea ’86 David D. Siegel Sheryll D. Thompson Dang M. Vo Michael A. Weinstein Prudence M. Younger ’82 Stephen P. Younger ’82 UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT

Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC William F. Pendergast ’72 & Judith Pendergast Victor E. Rauscher

Corporations, Law Firms & Community Partners Aetna Foundation Inc. Albany Aqua Ducks Inc.** Albany College of Pharmacy Student Center** Albany Law School Student Bar Association Albany Marriott** Alibi’s Martini Lounge** Allied World Assurance Company Altria Group Inc. Andrew S. Fusco P.C. Aspen Publishers Inc. Assaf & Mackenzie Bacas & Krogmann Balbick & Degnan Bank of America Bank of New York Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Bayou Cafe** Berger Ducharme Harp & Clark BFS Mediterranean Restaurant** Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC Bonville & Howard Brockbank Law Offices Brown, McMahon & Weinraub Bucknell University CSEA Local 1000 AFSCME Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Callahan & Wolkoff Capital District Trial Lawyers Association Capital Repertory Theatre** Chubb & Son Inc. Clements Firm Cohoes Savings Foundation Constellation Brands Inc.** Constructive Copy LLC Cool Insuring Agency Inc. Coughlin & Gerhart L.L.P. Cranwell Resort, Spa & Golf Club** Crestwood Health Inc. Crowne Plaza Hotel** CSEA Local 1000 AFSCME D’Amante, Couser, Steiner Pellerin PA Delaware Otsego Corporation Delmonico’s Italian Steakhouse** DerOhannesian & DerOhannesian Dietz & Dietz LLP Dominos** Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation Elaine M. & Myron J. Cohn Foundation El Loco Mexican Cafe** Emil J. Nagengast ** Fannie Mae Foundation Featherstonhaugh, Wiley, Clyne & Cordo LLP Ferrara & Nigro LLC Ford and Ford Abstract Corp. Foundation for Jewish Philanthropies Frank Kiepura & Associates PC Galison & Galison Galvin & Morgan Gannett Company Inc. Gideon Putman Hotel** Glen Sanders Mansion**

Global Impact Goldberger and Kremer Grandma’s Country Restaurant** Heslin Rothenberg Farley & Mesiti P.C. Hilton Lake Placid Resort** Hinman, Howard & Kattell LLP Hiscock & Barclay LLP ISO-New England Inc. Impress Printing and Graphics International Business Machines Matching Gifts Corp. Isn’t It Sweet** J.P. Morgan Chase Jephson Educational Trust John J. Laboda Attorney at Law Jones & Skivington Kelleher & Gable LLC Kerker & Gleeson P.C. Key Foundation Klein Law Group PLLC Kos & Associate Lavelle & Finn LLP Lawrence I. & Blanche H. Rhodes Memorial Fund Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York Inc. Levene, Gouldin & Thompson LLP LexisNexis Matthew Bender** Llhryne Group LLC L’Oreal USA Benefits Dept., College Gift Match Program Lou-Bea’s Pizza** Lyric Foundation MatLaw Systems Corporation** McDonald’s Fox Management** McKeegan & McKeegan McKenna’s Carpentry McNamee, Lochner, Titus & Williams P.C. Mirror Lake Inn Resort & Spa** Mobil Foundation Inc. Morris & Morris Morrison & Foerster LLP Moynihan, Hayner & Moynihan Murphy Law Office My Linh** New York Life Insurance Company Elbo Room** New York State Bar Association New York Long-Term Care Brokers Ltd. New York State Racing Association Nicole’s Restaurant & Catering** Olive Garden** One Beacon Insurance Paesan’s Pizza & Restaurant** Parola & Gross LLC Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler LLP** Paula K. Almgren, Attorney at Law PC Pearson Education Pitney Bowes Employee Giving Campaign Pitta, Bishop, Del Giorno and Dreier LLP Qualcomm Incorporated Rafferty & Redlisky

Retired Public Employees Association Rhodes Memorial Fund Richard Day Research Inc Rockefeller Family Fund Rose T. Place PLLC Rosenberg & Fortuna LLP Sarratori Law Office PA Security Mutual Life Insurance Company Shell Oil Company Simoes & Monteiro PC Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Skyline Pub & Nightclub** Snashall Associates Sneeringer Monahan Provost Redgrave Title Agency Inc. Spectrum 7 Theatres** Spencer & Maston LLP Stuyvesant Plaza Inc.** The Swyer Foundation Inc. Tarshis, Catania, Liberth, Mahon & Milligram Tavelli & Seldin The A. Lindsay and Olive B. O’Connor Foundation The Century House** The Desmond** The Ginger Man** The Merck Company Foundation The Sidney and Beatrice Albert Foundation The Washington Tavern** Thomson West** Unilever United States Inc. United Group of Companies United Way of Dutchess County Van Horn & Habinger Van Ness Law Firm P.A. Watson Law Office Wells Fargo Foundation Westwood Capital Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP Zakheim & Associates P.A.

73


REPORT OF GIFTS 2006–2007

Scholarships and Fellowships Each year Albany Law School awards more than $4 million in scholarships funded by alumni, friends and other sources. Fellowships and assistantships are also awarded. Deans’ and Founders’ scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic promise as demonstrated by the candidate’s undergraduate grade-point average and LSAT score. Diversity scholarships are awarded to students with unusual backgrounds including those who historically have been underrepresented in the legal profession. These three-year scholarships, established by the Board of Trustees for entering students, honor Justice Kenneth S. MacAffer, former chairman of the Board of Trustees; former deans Andrew V. Clements, Harold D. Alexander, J. Newton Fiero, and Samuel M. Hesson; and Justice Isadore Bookstein, lecturer and former trustee. MEDALLION SCHOLARSHIPS & FELLOWSHIPS

Endowed with gifts and commitments at a minimum of $250,000: AYCO-ALBANY LAW SCHOOL ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP

Established by alumni of Albany Law School employed by The Ayco Company of Albany, preference for this scholarship is to students with an interest in tax or tax-related areas who have demonstrated this interest through prior work experience, college and law school course credits, or other means. HONORABLE EARLE C. BASTOW ’19 AND EVE E. BASTOW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Established in 1994 through a bequest by Mary E. Bastow, in memory of her husband, Judge Bastow, and his mother. THE DEWAR SCHOLARSHIP

Created with a grant from the Dewar Foundation, Inc., this scholarship is awarded to deserving students based on their financial need and/or academic merit. Recipients must be graduates of Oneonta, N.Y., Senior High School. ELIZABETH F. AND RUSSELL A. FREEMAN ’57 SCHOLARSHIP

Established by Elizabeth and Russell Freeman in 1997, this scholarship is designed to assist students with financial need. BARRY GOLD ’70 HEALTH LAW CLINIC PROGRAM

Established in 2006 by M. Sherry Gold with her children, Ben ’06 and Sari, in memory of her late husband, this endowment—the largest ever given to the Albany Law Clinic & Justice Center—funds efforts to focus on representation of low-income clients with cancer or other chronic medical conditions. It also provides training on legal rights for clients, advocates, health care staff, physicians, and law and medical students. JUDGE R. WALDRON HERZBERG ’33 AND RUTH MILLER HERZBERG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Established by the bequest of Ruth Miller Herzberg, this scholarship is awarded to a student demonstrating financial need.

74

CONSTANCE M. JONES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

ADDITIONAL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Constance Jones was a woman of boundless energy who was devoted to many worthwhile community causes. Upon her passing, her husband, E. Stewart Jones Jr. ’66, established this medallion scholarship in her memory. The Constance Jones Scholarship will provide perpetual support to Albany Law School students, preferably women, who live in the Capital Region area.

American Express Scholarship Hon. Felix J. Aulisi ’24 Memorial Scholarship Joseph N. Barnett ’29 Memorial Scholarship Louis G. and Carmela M. Bianchi Scholarship Bond, Schoeneck and King Science and Technology Law Fellowships Leo W. Breed ’21 and Helen E. Breed Scholarship Charles Ward Brown ’27 and Mary Furlong Brown Scholarship Edward J. Cameron Jr., Public Service Fellowship Forest N. Case ’57 Memorial Scholarship Fund Dawn M. Chamberlaine Scholarship Class of 1991 Scholarship Class of 2001 and Karen C. McGovern Memorial Book Scholarship Con G. Cholakis ’58 Public Service Fellowship Judge William J. Crangle Class of 1908 Memorial Scholarship Hon. Richard J. Daronco ’56 Memorial Scholarship Fred L. Emerson Scholarship Hon. John M. Finnerty Memorial Scholarship Joseph C. Foiadelli ’97 Public Service Fellowship James E. Frankel ’73 Scholarship Friends of Robert Glennon ’70 Adirondack Park Fellowship David Greenberg Memorial Scholarship Dale Gutekunst Memorial Scholarship Dorothy S. Hartman Scholarship Arthur J. Harvey ’30 Fellowship Juanita and John Jackson ’90 Scholarship Thomas B. LaRosa Scholarship Hon. Howard A. Levine Fellowship in Juvenile Justice Robert E. Littlefield ’52 Memorial Scholarship Alonzo C. Mason Scholarship Justin McCarthy ’61 Memorial Scholarship Thomas F. McDermott Scholarship Leo E. Mills ’30 and Kenna J. Mills Memorial Scholarship Ruth M. Miner Memorial Scholarship Richard D. Parsons ’71 Scholarship Gary M. Peck ’79 Memorial Scholarship Lawrence I. and Blanche H. Rhodes Memorial Fund Scholarship The Stanley A Rosen Class of 1968 Memorial Scholarship Fund Edgar A. and Margaret D. Sandman Research Fellowship Hon. Harold R. Soden ’33 and Eunice Soden Memorial Scholarship Henry J. Speck Scholarship Ina G. and Earl W. Tabor ’35 Scholarship Regina and Leo Tanenbaum Memorial Scholarship Joan Van Slyke Scholarship Professor William M. Watkins Scholarship The Professor John C. Welsh ’55 Scholarship Hon. Thomas M. Whalen III ’58 Memorial Scholarship

E. STEWART JONES SR. ’35 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

This medallion scholarship at Albany Law School was established by the family and friends of E. Stewart Jones Sr. ’35, a distinguished lawyer of national renown whose career spanned 60 years. Jones Scholars will be chosen on the basis of merit with preference given to applicants from Rensselaer, Albany or Saratoga counties. ELEANOR AND PERCY LIEBERMAN ’25 FELLOWSHIP

Established by bequest of Eleanor Lieberman in 1995 in memory of her husband, Percy Lieberman, Class of 1925. This fellowship benefits students pursuing public and municipal law. ARTHUR F. MATHEWS ’62 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

This medallion scholarship honors Arthur F. Mathews, Class of 1962, former trustee, and preeminent securities law practitioner. It was established by family and friends, with special support from his colleagues at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering. It is awarded based on merit. THE SINGLETON SCHOLARSHIPS

Established in September 1996, by bequest of Stephanie Singleton Huested in memory of her husband, Harry H. Singleton, Class of 1927. These scholarships provide assistance to Albany Law School students based on financial need and academic merit. INSIGNIA SCHOLARSHIPS

Endowed with gifts and commitments between $100,000 and $249,999: John A. Buyck ’48 and Virginia C. Buyck Scholarship Elaine M. and Myron J. Cohn ’36 Scholarship Judge John C. Clyne ’53 Memorial Scholarship J. Francis Doyle ’63 Scholarship Richard C. Johnson ’51 Scholarship Leo and Esther Krause Scholarship Norbert L. Noel ’44 Scholarship Margot M. Roberts Scholarship Marjorie and Ralph D. Semerad Scholarship for Academic Excellence J. Vanderbilt Straub ’28 Memorial Scholarship Jerome H. and Marian J. Teitelbaum Memorial Scholarship Rose Mary E. and Alfred C. Turino ’36 Memorial Scholarship Walter H. Wertime Memorial Scholarship Mayor Thomas M. Whalen ’58 Memorial Scholarship David S. Williams ’42 Scholarship

The Report of Gifts acknowledges the generous support of contributors to Albany Law School during the July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007 time period. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy of our donor listings. We regret any error or omission and ask you to notify James Kellerhouse, Director of Development, at 518-445-3219.


Mimi Netter Finds Gift Annuity Brings Pleasant Returns

From 1969 to 1972 I invested my time and financial resources in attending Albany Law School. During those years tuition was $2,300, significantly less than the cost of law school tuition today. That minimal investment led to great returns. I have enjoyed a successful career that included representing R.P.I., Russell Sage College, Planned Parenthood and MapInfo as General Counsel. Albany Law School paved my way. Considering the opportunities law school afforded me, I believe it important to help students who are in law school today…and tomorrow. My charitable gift annuity is a wonderful way for me to once again invest in Albany Law School (and receive a great return). Not only do I benefit from an immediate tax-deduction, I also receive a remaining lifetime of fixed payments at a rate better than most investments. While I benefit today, Albany Law School benefits tomorrow. Miriam “Mimi” Netter ’72

Please contact James Kellerhouse, Director of Development, to discuss a gift to Albany Law School: 518-445-3219 or jkell@albanylaw.edu.


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Albany Law Magazine - Fall 2007