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A. THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE APPLICANT. Name of Applicant: Educating Albany Responsibly a non-profit operating Albany Community Charter School. Board of Directors 1. 2. 3. 4.

Jennifer Cummins Ellen Carlson Edward Gallagher John Borden

Steering Committee The steering committee was formed to gauge the feelings and priorities of parents and community members. All decisions made had input from the steering committee members. Members come from all backgrounds including teachers, medical professionals, financial analysts, former home schoolers, and many more. Non Profit Status The Albany Community Charter School (ACCS) is currently a project of “Educating Albany Responsibly” (EAR), which is in the process of becoming an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The IRS is currently processing applications received in March of 2012. ACCS’ application was received in August of 2012. There is no approximation on when the non-profit status will be in place. Educating Albany Responsibly is not associated with any non-public sectarian schools or religious institutions, nor otherwise religiously based.

B. THE NAME OF THE PROPOSED PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL. The name of the proposed charter school shall be Albany Community Charter School. C. A DESCRIPTION OF THE PHILOSOPHY AND MISSION OF THE PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL. Our Mission Statement Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will encourage students to learn from Page 1 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


experiences, show compassion for others, and to grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, by being respectful, thoughtful and independent learners. School Philosophy Provide a complete, balanced education in all subjects at all ages; an educational system that will be beneficial to our students and their families. Students will be encouraged to explore what they are learning through hands on opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom. Students will be excited to learn and feel good about helping their peers. Daily experiences our students are exposed to will assist them to be strong, smart leaders in our community now and in the future. How will Albany Community Charter School achieve balanced education of its students? *Small class sizes of approximately 22 students per class with a teacher and assistant for each class, this allows the teacher to better cater to the learning styles and speeds throughout the curriculum. *We believe that parents are the primary educators of their children and it is our desire to partner with them in the education of their children. If the parents and school staff communicate and work together, there is no limit to the potential of our students. How will we encourage parents to be the primary educators? 1. Volunteering in the school will be highly encouraged. Parents are asked to share their talents, skills, and life experiences to help supplement the learning of our students. 2. Parents will be a vital part of the decision making process through their participation in committees appointed by the board of directors, and through the Parent Advisory Council. 3. ACCS will hold family night events to develop and nurture relationships between all parents, educators, and students. *Community based learning. We will work with local businesses and organizations such as the Linn County Extension Office, and the Department of Fish and Wildlife, ACCS parents, community members, as well as other corporate sponsors to create meaningful learning opportunities for our students that demonstrate real world uses of the math, science and language skills the students are learning in the classroom. The Linn County Extension Office will work with Albany Community Charter School to create and plant raised garden beds, demonstrating life skills demonstrating proper use of a calendar, advance Page 2 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


planning and again those math, science and language skills in the core of our curriculum. The garden beds also serve as a learning connection to the students’ health and nutrition and will supplement our children’s meals and snacks. This project will work nicely with the Oregon agriculture in the classroom project. Also collaborating with Albany Community Charter School to offer our students experience in environmental and biological sciences is the Department of Fish and Wildlife. Some projects we plan to complete are fish sorting, turtle surveys, and implementing an environmental awareness program. We believe that the community- based learning strategy engages and motivates students while strengthening the relationship between schools and communities by involving families and offering an innovative alternative to the standard classroom. Students who may not thrive in a standard classroom have the opportunity to learn a different way and are given a new lease on learning through this method.

Community schools foster a learning environment that extends far beyond the classroom walls. Students learn and problem solve in the context of their lives and communities. Community schools nurture this natural engagement. Because of the deep and purposeful connections between schools and communities, the curriculum is influenced and enhanced, removing the artificial separation between the classroom and the real world. Our vision for community schools is that they are places where all students engage in learning, achieve to the best of their ability, and become productive citizens and participants in our democracy. http://nationalcenterforcommunityschools.childrensaidsociety.org/system/files/community-basedlearning.pdf

*Albany Community Charter School will offer a different choice for the education of children in the area. A good solid education is a priceless gift that can be used as a tool to change the direction of a person’s life forever. Education is not just a score you earn on a test. It is about learning to work together, solving new and challenging problems, as well as learning how to best utilize your skills in any situation. Our vision is to give children the real life experiences that take their learning to a whole new level; to help them make connections to real world issues and solutions, linking skills that they learn in the classroom to those future job opportunities. Through innovation, our plan is to inspire and give direction to children in order to, ultimately, help them find career paths that they will find fulfilling and challenging. *Our curriculum will give a solid base of knowledge to our students. Albany Community Charter School will allow students to explore their own history, as well the history of other countries and the heritage of Page 3 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


our ancestors. We want our students to identify with those that came before them, recognize and learn from the differences that both unite and divide different groups of people. *Science in the Albany Community Charter School classrooms will include hands on experiences, which have been unequivocally proven to be more memorable and a better learning experience. Children will be able to learn through all five of their senses, creating more pathways in the brain for recall of that information later on. A strong, well-guided understanding of science and it’s principles in the primary years will allow for a more in depth study in later years. Every child is a scientist. *Language arts and math will be vital core subjects throughout our students’ education. We believe that other subjects such as science and history when presented with an innovative and fresh perspective help students learn how to enjoy all aspects of their education. At Albany Community Charter School our goal is to create life-long learners who enjoy the process of learning because they had the small class sizes and excellent teaching staff available to them. *Our curricula at Albany Community Charter School will cover many topics such as writing, reading, spelling, math, science, geography, history, government, music, art, agriculture, engineering, health, and physical education. Our thought process is that learning in the classroom setting is enriched with the experiences and opportunities students have to apply their new knowledge both outside of their classroom and in inventive experiments, group projects and through research. So how does that fit with Greater Albany Public Schools Educational Philosophy? While our philosophies are similar and compatible, there are also some differences. However, those differences are what will make Albany Community Charter School innovative and an asset to the Greater Albany Public Schools.

WE ARE INNOVATIVE IN ALBANY! GAPS does not currently have a school that embodies our differences. 1. Smaller class sizes. 2. A small school model. 3. Kindergarten through eighth grade in one school. 4. Integrated curriculum focused on the social sciences. Page 4 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


5. STEM learning including robotics in all classrooms, agriculture in the classroom, and more. 6. Community Involved Education. 7. A new structure for how to run a school-A Leadership Team. 8. A hybrid report card, evaluating each state standard, as well as letter grades for homework scores, test scores, participation, and behavior. Plans to operate with a much lower class size than most GAPS classrooms will give parents whose children may be struggling an opportunity to try a smaller classroom model and see if that helps their student become a better learner. Greater Albany Public Schools typically have classrooms as large as thirty-five students, whereas, Albany Community Charter School plans to have classes no larger than twenty-two students and will have a full time teacher and an assistant available for each class, making those class sizes feel even smaller. We believe that class size makes a difference in how our children learn. According to School Class Size: Research and Policy by Gene Glass, class size is strongly related to pupil achievement; smaller classes are more conducive to improved pupil performance than larger classes; smaller classes provide more opportunities to adapt learning programs to individual needs; pupils in smaller classes have more interest in learning; and teacher morale in smaller classes is better. The biggest and most credible of class size studies, Tennessee’s statewide Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio, or STAR, project, begun in the late 1970s, found that the learning gains students made in classes of 13 to 17 students persisted long after the students moved back into average-size classes. What’s more, the Tennessee researchers found, poor and African-American students appeared to reap the greatest learning gains in smaller classes. After kindergarten, the gains black students made in smaller classes were typically twice as large as those for whites. Follow-up studies through the years have found the students who had been in small classes in their early years had better academic and personal outcomes throughout their school years and beyond. Krueger, A.B., Whitmore, D.M., "The Effect of Attending a Small Class in the Early Grades on College-Test Taking and Middle School Test Results: Evidence from Project STAR," 2001. Albany Community Charter School will operate as a small school. We believe that a smaller school offers more opportunities for parent and community involvement, more opportunities to try new things, and a closer knit school family. Albany Community Charter School will serve students in grades Kindergarten through eighth grade. It is our belief that having a majority of a family’s children under one roof is a benefit. There are also increased opportunities for peer mentoring and involvement, as well as tracking our students through the years. Page 5 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will also use different curriculum that follows a more integrated approach. ACCS believes that exposing students to history, geography, and other topics that our students will have a greater love for learning. Engineering or Robotics will be offered to ALL students in grades kindergarten through eight in their classrooms at ACCS. Lessons are built around mathematical, scientific and engineering principles that put the skills kids learn to work in real life. While using these skills kids will learn how to work as part of a team and how to become better problem solvers. Our country needs more STEM ready employees and we want to help get students ready for those jobs by exposing them to STEM learning opportunities. In our efforts to organize a charter school we have met many parents and community members who would like to make an impact on education at ACCS. This impact can be seen through our community involved education days. ACCS will hold a community involved education day once a month where these parents and community members can come into the schools and share their skills and experiences. Students would rotate between stations (age appropriate) throughout the day and learn from each station Some already committed topics include: Spanish, gardening projects, pastel drawing, clay projects, history experts, woodworking, and community service projects to name a few. These projects and many more will be taught by parents and community members.

Opening a charter school in Oregon requires a group of people who are willing to put in incredible amounts of work to get it up and running as well as to sustain it. All on a budget that is drastically less than a school district’s. ACCS plans to hire three lead teachers who will oversee educational areas, a site director who will oversee much of the day to day operations of the school, and to use our board of directors and their substantial experience to oversee the school. Albany Community Charter School will use a report card that will give parents a complete picture of how their students are performing at school and what they are learning. ACCS will provide parents with a report card that will show the mastery level of each state standard for their child’s grade level, A-F subject area grades based on homework assignments, test scores, and participation, as well as a behavior section that will communicate each student’s behavior. Standardized test scores will also be reported on report cards. We believe that Albany Community Charter School can offer a viable, innovative learning solution to families throughout the Greater Albany area who are presently utilizing some form of homeschooling, whose children are not performing well in a large classroom setting or families who enjoy the community atmosphere of a school like Albany Community Charter School. Our main goal is to work with GAPS to provide another option for education in Albany. We are not ‘taking money’ from the district but offering another option within the district for students who are currently attending schools in Corvallis or Lebanon. This would draw money back into GAPS programs, money that GAPS has already lost. In addition, we Page 6 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


think that Albany Community Charter School will draw people from other districts into the GAPS district. This would give a potential of a revenue increase to GAPS as we pull homeschoolers and out of district transfers into Albany Community Charter School. Our opportunity to bring this choice to the families in Albany excites us because Albany is a growing, thriving, progressive community in Oregon, one where we enjoy our sense of community and show our pride daily. Albany Community Charter School will also create roughly 20 jobs for the Greater Albany area. These jobs will include everything from teachers with Master’s Degrees and student teachers to clerical/administrative positions. In addition, there will be potential for peripheral economic growth as the school rents a local facility, purchases supplies and the employees and student’s families’ patronize local businesses. Together GAPS and Albany Community Charter School will provide options for all the fantastic families who live in this area while creating jobs, increasing the economic vitality of the area all while inspiring our children through an innovative hands-on learning educational model.

D. DESCRIPTION OF THE CURRICULUM AT THE PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL Albany Community Charter School will use the Common Core State Standards as the base for our academic offerings. While all of our curriculum selections meet the requirements of CCSS, they frequently go far beyond what is expected. Our goal is to meet or exceed the CCSS in all areas. Below are our recommended curricula, changes or additions may be made by following the curriculum change policy.

Albany Community Charter School Curriculum Language Math History/Geog. Health Music Art Robotics Arts K Core Saxon Core Core Core Core Knowledge Math Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Early /CKLA Simple Machines

Agriculture PE Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

1

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge /CKLA

Core Core Core Simple Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Machines

Page 7 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


2

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge /CKLA

Core Core Core We DO Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge

3

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge /CKLA Anna Menueir History of Oregon Curriculum

Core Core Core We Do Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge

4

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge

5

Anna Menueir History of Oregon Curriculum Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge

6

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge

7

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge

8

Core Saxon Core Knowledge Math Knowledge

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K Sp A R K

Core Core Core Carnegie Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Melon: Robotics Engineering 1

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

Core Core Core Carnegie Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Melon: Robotics Engineering 1 Core Core Core Carnegie Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Melon: Robotics Engineering 1 Core Core Core Carnegie Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Melon: Robotics Engineering 1/Robotics Engineering 2 Core Core Core Carnegie Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Melon: Robotics Engineering 1/Robotics Engineering 2

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

Sp A R K

ELL:

Page 8 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


English Now!

Core Knowledge including Core Knowledge Language Arts The school will be based on Core Knowledge — an INTEGRATED, rigorous, sequential curriculum rich in language arts, history, geography, math, science, art and music. The breadth of subjects taught each year far exceeds what is being taught in most elementary schools. All subjects are integrated with one another which helps students grasp concepts, and enjoy learning. Core Knowledge repeats subjects occasionally in an age appropriate way so knowledge builds or spirals. This encourages children to build cognitive connections between diverse subjects, while ensuring that rich, specific content provides a level playing field for students no matter their incoming cultural knowledge base.

Many charter schools in the country use Core Knowledge as their curriculum. It provides in depth learning opportunities that other curricula do not offer. For example:  Kindergarten students learn about the seven continents, Native Americans, early settlers, presidents, and American symbols and figures when studying History and Geography.  First Grade History and Geography students add early world and American Civilizations, how colonies became independent, world geography, and early exploration of the American West. This example shows how the base of information offered in Kindergarten is built upon in the subsequent years of the student’s education. Not only are they connected, but they offer students an age appropriate look into the subjects they are studying and reinforcement of those topics in stages throughout their learning experience. Core Knowledge Language Arts When Albany Community Charter School’s original proposal was submitted, the feedback from the charter school committee addressed the lack of correlation between core knowledge and the Oregon State Standards. We believe with the addition of Core Knowledge Language Arts, this concern has been addressed. The Language Arts program that has recently been developed by Core Knowledge, will serve as the primary source of language arts instruction. The Core knowledge Language Arts program (CKLA) consists of two strands. The first strand is the skills strand, which ACCS students will use to learn the basics of reading. Core Knowledge teaches students to decode by using synthetic phonics. It also emphasizes the blending of sounds as well as segmenting. Students will practice these skills in large group Page 9 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


as well as in small group using decodable stories. CKLA also offers numerous opportunities to practice phonemic awareness, and repeated oral reading. In addition to the skills strand, Core Knowledge Language Arts has the listening and learning strand. The listening and learning strand will tie in with the information contained in the original Core Knowledge editions. The Listening and learning strand will help students to have better comprehension of what they are reading through exposure to vocabulary and the wealth of information contained in the Core Knowledge sequence. This strand is comprised of read alouds and many oral language exercises to help master these skills. The listening and learning strand builds on the fact that comprehension while listening is an important part of the learning process. Within the strand are several domains that are dedicated to teaching a particular topic or area of information. The listening and learning strand will allow students to gain extensive vocabulary and a wealth of information about many different domains or topics. In a pilot program at ten New York City Public Schools the effectiveness of the Core Knowledge Language Arts Series was studied. These ten schools were matched with demographically similar schools in New York City that were not using the CKLA program. In nearly all measures CKLA schools made a larger gain in their standardized testing scores from the beginning to the end of the year. This holds true for kindergarten, first, and second grades. Students who were both low and high achieving also had greater gains than non CKLA students. Source: Policy Group of the New York City Department of Education.

PLEASE SEE THE CKLA CURRICULUM MAPS IN THE APPENDIX PLEASE SEE THE CKLA PROGRAM BROCHURE IN THE APPENDIX PLEASE SEE THE CKLA CCSS ALIGNMENT WITH PUBLISHERS CRITERIA IN THE APPENDIX PLEASE SEE THE CURRICULUM CHANGE POLICY IN THE APPENDIX

What’s included in Core Knowledge (without the language arts portion)? When ACCS purchases the Core Knowledge curriculum we will receive an extensive teachers guide, texts that cover the topics covered in the Sequence, (which is available for free download on line at coreknowledge.org), novels assigned to each grade, read alouds assigned to each grade, Pearson Learning History and Geography text, What your ___ Grader Needs to Know, music cd’s, art visuals, posters, extensive lesson plans, and more. In addition to what ACCS teachers will receive, there are extensive online resources for teachers that are available for free. Extensive, specific teacher guides for the core classics like King Arthur, Gullivers Travels, and more. These are not 10-20 page guides. They are ninety plus pages with resources, questions, activities, discussion topics, and more. The What your ___ Grader Needs to Know books cover all of the Page 10 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


topics covered in class, without quite as much detail. They are intended to go back and forth from school to home with the student, depending on the teacher’s preference. Parents are encouraged to refresh their memories on topics that they learned about when they were younger. How can a third grader learn anything meaningful about topics like Rome? It is a great misconception that students in America today are not capable, or interested in learning about serious historical topics. We need to give children more credit, and demand more of them. They are capable to learn about historical topics, will be interested, and are often greatly intrigued by these topics. Not only that, reading about history and geography will teach all children a greater base of vocabulary to build upon in their everyday lives. It has been pointed out that second graders are too young to learn about Ancient Greece, and third graders are too young to learn about topics like Rome. This is not true. Kids are capable of learning about topics like these at younger ages then they are required to by the common core state standards. Will they know enough at a young age to be a master of the topic? No, but they will know enough to come home and hold a conversation about the topic with their parents. How does an integrated curriculum work? Core Knowledge takes subjects such as history and uses them to teach reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. For example, core knowledge recommends teaching about China in the fourth grade. A teacher would take the topic to be covered and build in the common core state standards around that topic. Each teacher is allowed to use their creativity and innovation to make sure all of the common core standards are being met. At the beginning of the school year, teachers will work with our partner schools to learn how to create domain maps for each topic being covered in Core Knowledge. These domain maps will differ from teacher to teacher depending on their teaching style and preferences. The common thread between teachers is that all of the state standards will be taught using a deep curriculum that will offer our students learning experiences in many topics that are no longer taught, especially in the earlier grades. Please see examples of domain maps in the appendix to this proposal. Who uses Core Knowledge? Albany Community Charter School has spoken with other charter schools throughout Oregon that have used the Core Knowledge curriculum for many years. The experiences they shared of having students who are more interested in what they are learning about, motivated to come to school and learn and of having success on standardized testing area a testament to the performance of the Core Knowledge curriculum. We should also point out that the Core Knowledge curriculum has been used all over the country with great success, not just in Oregon. Core Knowledge is not used in the Greater Albany School District. We are proposing a new and innovative way to educate Albany’s children.

Page 11 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


So who does use Core Knowledge? Sand Ridge Charter School Franklin Elementary School (magnet school in Corvallis district) MITCH Charter School Coburg Community Charter School Kings Valley Charter School Cascade Heights Charter School Sweet Home Charter School Sherwood Charter School Luckiamute Valley Charter School What do all of these schools have in common? They all use Core Knowledge and have great report card ratings. Every one of these schools received an OUTSTANDING rating on the most recent state report card. They also experience a larger percentage of students meeting or exceeding on the OAKS tests. ACCS has been working with many of the schools that currently use Core Knowledge to better understand Core Knowledge and how the curriculum aligns to state standards. Some of the schools we have worked with include Franklin Elementary, Sand Ridge Charter School, and Cascade Heights Charter School. They have vowed their continued support once we are approved, set up and comfortable and successfully implementing Core Knowledge. ACCS believe that these partnerships will help us be even more successful in our implementation of Core Knowledge. In addition to these Oregon schools who use Core Knowledge, many other schools nationwide use Core Knowledge, including Blue Ribbon Award Winning Schools across the country. Evidence for the Core Knowledge Curriculum A Johns Hopkins study widened the focus to look at Core Knowledge schools across the country. Researchers looked at twelve Core Knowledge schools in Colorado, Florida, Ohio, Maryland, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. Each school was matched with a demographically similar control school in the same district. Researchers visited each of the Core Knowledge schools five times. During visits they monitored classroom activities and also used an instrument called the Classroom Observation Measure, which has been validated in other studies of elementary classroom instruction. Researchers also surveyed teachers to assess the extent of Core Knowledge implementation. Researchers confirmed that the following predicted benefits “were in fact associated with Core Knowledge implementation�: For students, Core Knowledge does: Page 12 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


• • •

Provide a broad base of knowledge and a rich vocabulary Motivate students to learn and create a strong desire to learn more Promote the knowledge necessary for higher learning

For the school, Core Knowledge does: • Provide an academic focus and encourage consistency in instruction • Provide a plan for coherent, sequenced learning from grade to grade • Promote a community of learners— adults and children • Become an effective tool for lesson planning and communication among teachers and with parents • Guide thoughtful purchases of school resources. Beyond these, the study identified some unexpected benefits: • •

Core Knowledge created coordination in the curriculum. Implementing Core Knowledge improved the professional lives of teachers. “Core Knowledge was viewed very favorably by teachers and seen as an enhancement to their lives. Overwhelmingly, teachers enthusiastically encouraged their teacher friends to implement Core Knowledge. This is a very important finding.” Implementing Core Knowledge led to increased teacher collaboration. Such “genuine collaborative work among teachers that has a focus on the curriculum and instruction is all too rare in education,” the researchers note. Core Knowledge enriched students' classroom experience. “Teachers reported that it was not just certain students who were excited by Core, but all students.... The benefits are great for teaching those children who would normally not be exposed to such subjects at home.” Core Knowledge challenged conventional assumptions about student ability. “Many teachers reported being initially skeptical that Core Knowledge content was not developmentally appropriate for elementary students. However almost all teachers interviewed found that no matter what students' starting points were — low achieving, average or high achieving — they were able to grasp and gain from learning the Core material.” One teacher commented: “They may be six-year-olds, but they can grasp a lot more knowledge than we thought before we started this.” Students built on what they learned previously in Core Knowledge. “Teachers find that in fact students make connections to Core topics they learned in previous grades.... Students make lasting academic connections because of the integration of the curriculum and [its] spiraling structure.” Core Knowledge increased students' interest in reading. Teachers report that “students are learning to read bigger words sooner. There's an interest to read and to learn.” At a number of schools, “educators cited the fact that students are more interested in reading non-fiction as one of the main benefits of Core Knowledge.” Core Knowledge increased parent satisfaction. “Parents are thrilled, thrilled, thrilled," according to one teacher, another of whom said, "Our parents are elated with the results of Core.” Page 13

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Source: National Evaluation of Core Knowledge Sequence Implementation: Final Report by Sam Stringfield, Amanda Datnow, Geoffrey Borman, and Laura Rachuba of the Center for Social Organization of Schools, Johns Hopkins University. Year to year, disparity between Core Knowledge students and traditionally educated students is significantly greater: "The city's charter schools are outperforming their peers in traditional city public schools by a wide margin on reading tests. Third- through eighth-grade charter students bested their public-school peers by 8.6 percentage points. " Charters Top the Charts, New York Post, 2009 Core Knowledge alignment to state standards You must remember that the common core state standards are a floor for students should be learning. It is the minimum that they should learn, not the maximum. Providing further learning opportunities and options beyond the common core only enriches the student’s knowledge. Core Knowledge has a sequence which is available in the appendix . It outlines the topics that are to be covered in each grade. Teachers then work together to outline how they will work the standards into the sequence using a grade level domain map. Virtually any reading, writing, listening, or language arts standard can be worked into a topic in the sequence. Kids will be listening, reading, and writing about things like China, Rome, and the thirteen colonies just to name a few. Concerns have been voiced about the topic of Rome being taught in the third grade rather than the seventh grade. Third graders are exposed to Rome and how it played a part in world history. Seventh graders will review what they learned in third grade, and go more in depth. ACCS plans to partner classes together when a topic is covered in multiple grades. With Roman history for example, the seventh graders would review what they know, and perhaps learn the whole unit again. Then the class would come to the third grade classroom and assist the teacher in teaching the third graders about Roman History, and work together on a project about Rome. We believe that allowing the older children to review and supplement what they have learned, and then impart that information to younger students will only help both groups of students have a firmer grasp on the material. There are opportunities for partnerships throughout the sequence between different grades. Schools that use Core Knowledge have a consistently higher score than schools within their district that do not. If a school is continually receiving high scores on the OAKS, and later the smarter balanced assessment, that school’s curriculum must have a good alignment to the state standards. For example see the chart below comparing OAKS reading scores at Sand Ridge Charter School to the Lebanon Community School District. Greater Albany Public Schools scores are also provided for reference. Page 14 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


100 Total Percent meets and exceeds

Sand Ridge

80 60 40

20

Lebanon District GAPS

Reading and Literature OAKS Scores 20112012

0 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th Grade

Core Knowledge is aligned to the National Common Core Standards. Oregon Standards are aligned to the National Common Core. Therefore, by the transitive property of equality Core Knowledge is aligned with Oregon Standards. Please review the following applicable documents in the appendix: Core Knowledge Domain Maps Correlation of Core Knowledge to Oregon State Standards

Page 15 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Struggling Readers ACCS has selected Lexia Reading Core 5 as an intervention for struggling readers in all grades The program provides a truly adaptive and personalized learning experience that enables students at every tier of instruction to advance their reading skills development. Students work independently, at their own pace, on activities based on the Common Core State Standards. If a student struggles with the task, he or she is presented with a scaffolded approach to the skill. If the student continues to struggle, he or she receives skill-specific, direct instruction in the software, and if necessary, explicit, teacher-led instruction using Lexia’s scripted lesson materials. This personalized approach to skill development enables at-risk students to close the gap more quickly, and enables on-level or advanced students to continue to progress with limited support from their teacher. Lexia can also be used at home on the student’s own time. Mathematics-Saxon Math While Core Knowledge serves all subjects, Albany Community Charter School plans to supplement what is offered for mathematics with Saxon Math. Saxon is a curriculum that has been successful for many years throughout the country. Saxon provides a different way for students to learn. Math textbooks are usually segmented in their approach, while Saxon Math is not. Saxon Math uses what is called a spiral curriculum. The way a spiral curriculum works is that one topic is taught in unit one, for example adding two single digit numbers. Unit two will teach a new topic, such as adding one two digit number to a single digit number. The problem set in unit two will contain problems relating to the concept in the previous unit as well as the new concept that was just taught. The spiral continues throughout the book with units constantly reviewing concepts taught previously while adding new concepts. One of the many benefits of a spiral curriculum is that students are less likely to forget what they have learned in previous units. At the end of the book, the student is doing a large sampling of problems taught over the course of the school year. This helps students who did not fully grasp a concept the first time it was taught and enables the teacher to reteach those modules to struggling students or identify areas where many students are struggling in order to offer more instruction. Each time the concept is reviewed the student will have another chance to learn and practice that skill and it gives the instructor the ability to double check the students aptitude throughout the year. Traditional curriculum teaches the concept and the student did not master that concept they would simply fail that unit and move on to the next. Since not everyone is capable of understanding math concepts when they are first introduced, we felt it was important to teach and reinforce that learning by weaving the past concepts throughout the school year’s curricula. Saxon Math meets the CCSS by:  Helping students make sense of problems and persevere in solving them  Being able to reason abstractly and quantitatively  Teaching the ability to construct viable arguments, critiquing the reasoning of others  Modeling with mathematics Page 16 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


   

Attending to precision Using appropriate tools strategically Looking for and making use of structure Looking for and expressing regularity in repeated reasoning

Testimony for the Saxon Math approach: Gagne’s theory of cumulative learning is based on the premise that intellectual skills can be broken

down into simpler skills, which can in turn be divided into even simpler skills. Research has shown that intellectual skill objectives are arranged into a pattern that reveals prerequisite relationships among them. Source: Gagné, R. M. (1965). The conditions of learning and theory of instruction ( 1st ed.). New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Students who are taught with a mathematics curriculum that uses continual practice and review demonstrate greater math achievement and skill acquisition than do students who are taught with a mass approach. Source: Mayfield, K. H., & Chase, P. N. (2002). The effects of cumulative practice on mathematics problem solving. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 105-123. Evidence for Saxon Math Schools that use Saxon have a consistently higher score than schools within their district that do not. If a school is continually receiving high scores on the OAKS, and later the smarter balanced assessment, that school’s curriculum must have a good alignment to the state standards. For example see the chart below comparing OAKS Mathematics scores at Sand Ridge Charter School to the Lebanon Community School District. Greater Albany Public Schools scores are also provided for reference.

Page 17 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


100 Total Percent meets and exceeds

Sand Ridge

Mathematics OAKS Scores 2011-2012

80 60 40 20

Lebanon District GAPS

0

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

Grade More Evidence for Saxon Math The results of the study conducted on archival data from Texas middle schools demonstrated that Saxon Math students showed significant growth on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) from 6 th to 8th grade (1998–2001). This growth was not dependent upon how long a school had used the program prior to 1998. Students in 6th–8th grade using Saxon Math programs outperformed students who attended these schools prior to implementing the Saxon programs. Furthermore, an analysis of a matched sample of Saxon and non-Saxon schools found that, in all three grade levels, Saxon students outperformed non-Saxon students and scored higher than the statewide average after implementing Saxon Math. More recent data from these schools found that across all three grade levels, a higher proportion of Saxon students passed the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) math standard and performed better on all math objectives measured by the TAKS compared to non-Saxon students and the statewide average. Most significantly, the analysis found that a higher percentage of students who used Saxon Math in grades 6–8 met the TAKS minimum requirements on the exit-level (10th grade) test compared to non-Saxon students. Students using Saxon Math scored an average of ten points higher for math achievement than non-Saxon students did.

Page 18 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


(Resendes and Fahmy 2005, PRES Associates) Please see the What Works Clearinghouse for Saxon Math in the Appendix Please see the saxon alignments to state standards located in the appendix

Math Supplement: Number Corner and Khan Academy Albany Community Charter School understands that there are concerns with some lessons being out of sequence in Saxon Math. To combat this issue, we have chosen to add Number Corner and Khan Academy as supplements to Saxon. These supplements will allow us to adjust for sequencing issues without major confusion to the students. Number Corner consists of many hands on manipulatives and activities that can be used alone or in supplement of a math curriculum. Number corner is built around the use of the classroom calendar with activities and questions on several different topics. Number corner does a good job of teaching problem solving and critical thinking skills. It allows for repeated practice of concepts including telling time, fractions, temperature, counting by tens, and many more concepts depending on the grade level. Number Corner is aligned to the common core state standards. Khan Academy is an online site that gives free instruction to anyone. There are opportunities to practice problems, see demonstrations, and watch instructional videos. There are two ways to use the site. A teacher can sign up her class on Khan Academy with accounts and they will begin the process of working from very elementary math skills such as elementary addition, and will continue up the ladder as far as they are capable. Each time a section is mastered the student receives a little digital sticker/badge and is advanced to the next level. All data is stored in the teacher’s account so they can track where a student is at on the hierarchy. This method of using Khan Academy will benefit ACCS by being used as a supplement to what is already being learned. It will give students more practice, instant feedback, and increased confidence in their skills. The second way Khan Academy can be used is by selecting a specific objective. A video explaining the objective can be watched and the student can practice problems related to the objective, until they master that area. This second method will be useful for ACCS to fill the sequencing gaps that exist in Saxon. STEM Curriculum Why should we have a STEM curriculum?

Page 19 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


"Why is science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education so important and what must we do? The global economy has "flattened" the world in terms of skills and technology. A new workforce of problem-solvers, innovators, and inventors who are self-reliant and able to think logically is one of the critical foundations that drive a state economy's innovation capacity. State K-12 (kindergarten through grade 12) education systems, with the support of postsecondary education, the business sector, foundations, and governments, must ensure that 1) all students graduate from high school with the necessary science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competencies to become this workforce; and 2) a greater number of students graduate from high school as potential professionals in STEM fields." National Governors’ Association

Excellence in STEM education is an important factor in the nation's ability to remain competitive in our global economy. President Barack Obama launched Educate to Innovate, a campaign to improve the participation and performance of America’s students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), on November 23, 2009. This campaign includes education reform not only from the federal government but also asks leading companies, foundations, non-profits, higher education, and science and engineering societies to work with young people across America to excel in science and math. There is a market for STEM based jobs in America. We simply don’t have the qualified people to fill those jobs. Our students need to be learning STEM skills from early in their academic lives. STEM teaches kids what they need to learn and peaks their interest at the same time. STEM learning is vital to preparing our students to become the productive, well employed citizens of tomorrow. Experts say that technological innovation accounted for almost half of U.S. economic growth over the past 50 years, and almost all of the 30 fastestgrowing occupations in the next decade will require at least some background in STEM. Albany Community Charter School has chosen to incorporate STEM into the curriculum of all students in grades kindergarten through eight. We believe that it gives students hands on opportunities for learning about math, engineering, science, and how things work in the real world. The best part about STEM is that it is hands on and keeps students engaged in what they are doing. Students will have STEM at least once a week in the classroom. The program and type of curriculum will vary based on the age of the students. Lessons and a teachers guide are provided with each kit. All lessons are student led, and the teacher is the facilitator. The concentration is on experimenting, trying new things, and learning from your failures. First Year Plans Kindergarten: Early Simple Machines

Page 20 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Early Simple machines teaches kids about pulleys, levers, gears, and wheels and axles while exploring energy, buoyancy, and balance. It is hands on way for students to learn about concepts that they experience in real life. First Grade: Simple Machines Simple Machines is a student led learning opportunity that is hands on rather than pencil and paper based. Students work with gears and other pieces to learn about how simple machines work. It also teaches students how to read diagrams, math and science terminology, and best of all keeps students engaged in their work. It also teaches students how to work together to solve problems. Second and Third Grade: We Do Robotics Students will be able to build LEGO models featuring working motors and sensors; program their models; and explore a series of cross-curricular, theme-based activities while developing their skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as language, literacy, and social studies. Fourth through Eighth Grades: Mindstorms Students will be building robots in partner teams and programming the robot to complete assigned tasks. Students will be doing lessons from Carnegie Melon Robotics curriculum level I and II, STEM with Vernier levels I and II, lessons provided with the mindstorms kit, as well as other internet resources. Students will program robots to use sensors to follow lines, complete missions, use color sensors, and touch sensors. Mindstorms can be programmed to take the temperature of a liquid, move objects, and many more tasks. The possibilities are endless. The real value in mindstorms come in how all of the pieces work together to function at optimal level while working with partners doing computer programming and building the robot. Mindstorms teach students to become critical thinkers, plan ahead, think in scientific and mathematical terms, and be good teammates. In addition to STEM curriculum in the classroom, ACCS will continue with its FLL Lego robotics teams in an after school program. Second Year Plans In ACCS’ second year of operation, the largest adjustment to our program will be that we will hire a half time STEM teacher. This teacher will oversee all STEM programs and look for more opportunities to implement new ideas and projects. Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom ACCS plans to use Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom in all grades. OAITC is a free program including lesson plans, supplies, and activities that teach students about agriculture in Oregon, healthy eating habits, and natural resources. We feel that OAITC is a good addition to our STEM offerings. Projects include hatching chicken eggs, gardening, water studies, and more. ACCS feels that students would learn about the area you live in and how it affects your life.

Page 21 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


We have already been in contact with master gardeners as well as the Linn County Extension Office, who are eager to help us set up some garden beds. Albany Community Charter School will use our gardening area to teach students life lessons, work ethic, science, food awareness, and responsibility. We feel that gardening will serve as an alternative classroom where students can get out and get involved physically in their education. Benefits of a school garden: J. Michael Murphy, an associate professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School, studied the Edible Schoolyard program in Berkeley, California for two years. He discovered that school gardens are both "shrinking students' waistlines and increasing their understanding of food and the environment." He observed that "when middle school students in large urban communities are given the opportunity to learn about ecology in a real-world context, they are more enthusiastic about attending school, make better grades, eat healthier food due to wiser food choices, and become more knowledgeable about natural processes." Students will also have opportunities to experience environmental and biological learning with the Department of Fish and Wildlife. Students will assist in fish sorting, habitat restoration, and other learning opportunities. We believe that getting out and getting involved in what they are learning about will allow for better retention of the information. These opportunities will allow students to have fun while they are learning. Other Resources/Curriculum Oregon State University STEM Resources National Institute of Health’s Science Education Resources NASA resources INTEL free STEM based curriculum Evaluation of STEM learning Teachers can test students on many of the concepts they learn in their STEM classes. The idea of STEM is that it allows integration with the curriculum. STEM offers a different opportunity to learn new material rather than a lecture or a worksheet. Journaling and note taking will also be used to evaluate student learning. This will serve as another way to have our students writing more often, and will give teachers another opportunity to evaluate that writing.

Physical Education: Spark PE Currently there is no required amount of physical education minutes for elementary and middle school students. Recently the legislature passed a law that is set to take effect in the 2017-2018 school year that Page 22 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


will require:  

Kindergarten-5th are required at least 150 minutes of physical education time weekly 6th-8th Grades are required to have 225 minutes of weekly physical education.

Albany Community Charter School plans to follow the Oregon Guidelines for physical education to ensure that not only do students get at least the mandated 150 minutes per week of physical activity, but also include the components of physical fitness by being exposed to different types of physical fitness activities. One example is a local karate instructor who would like to come and teach an extended unit on karate and self-defense, and how it can help keep you active. ACCS has also received offers of free assistance from a Zumba instructor, a dietician, and a certified personal trainer, that are all willing to wrok with teachers to create fun opportunities for our students to be active. It is our belief that by making physical fitness fun and being offered in a variety of formats our students will be happy to be active. Health Education Albany Community Charter School will use a Registered Nurse Educator (volunteer) to help over-see the health program at ACCS. Our nurse educator will teach units in cooperation with classroom teachers in the areas of substance abuse prevention, CPR and first aid for kids, and how to make healthy food choices among other topics. Albany Community Charter School plans to supplement our guest lecture series with Core Knowledge, as well as utilizing the gardening program and Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom to teach healthy eating habits and environmental health. Oregon History Curriculum In the new Oregon Common Core Standards there are standards listed for both third and fourth grade in the area of Oregon History. ACCS will be using a free curriculum provided by Anna Meuneir from the Medford School District. The curriculum is over 1,000 pages and has many resources on all Oregon topics contained in the state standards. Advanced Students “Talented and gifted children means those children who require special educational programs or services, or both, beyond those normally provided by the regular school program in order to realize their contribution to self and society… .” Oregon Revised Statute 343.395(4) Albany Community Charter School understands that the rights of a TAG parent include: Parent permission is required for any individual testing that may need to be administered for identification purposes. If a student is not identified as TAG, a parent has the right to appeal the results. When a student is identified as TAG, the district must inform the parents about the available programs and services. Parents must be provided an opportunity to give input and discuss with the district the programs and services available to their child. Parents may request withdrawal from Page 23 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


TAG services and programs at any time, and parents must be informed of their right to file a complaint. (ODE TAG Policy) If a student is identified as a potential TAG student, the appropriate test can be administered by the recommendation of the leadership team. The leadership team will choose the test based on the age and learning style of the student. Standardized test scores, using a percentile conversion table, provided by ODE, can also be used to identify gifted students. All students will be given a TAG screening in the first grade to screen for students who are likely to fall into the TAG category. If a child is found to be a TAG student, a letter will be placed in their file. That student will then be eligible for an education plan to be developed in cooperation between the lead teacher, classroom teacher, student, and student’s parents. Each plan is individual to a student and what the team feels is best for that specific student. While ACCS will not offer a specific TAG program, as it is not required of charter schools by Oregon Law, many opportunities will be available for advanced students. It is our belief that all students need a program of learning that is suited to their learning style, academic ability, and intellectual potential. Therefore each teacher, in cooperation with a lead teacher, will make sure each student is properly stimulated in the classroom. Some examples of how this can be accomplished are: assigning in depth projects, recommending students for school wide projects, encouraging further exploration of the child’s interests, recommendations for extra-curricular programs and classes, and moving a child to a different classroom for certain subjects. For instance in a class of first graders studying Ancient Egypt the teacher might have three students at the very bottom and two students at the very top. At the bottom for their culminating project, she might give very specific directions: (build this pyramid out of this material and copy this paragraph (or sentence) on a 3x5 card. In the big middle group she might give them three choices of projects. You can : (1) build a pyramid (no specific instructions) (2) build an aqueduct system or (3) mummify something and then write about its significance in Egypt. At the very, very top she might say "What would YOU like to learn about Egypt? What has been the most interesting part of Egypt that we have learned so far?" then have a conference with parents and the student and design their OWN project and research to present to the class. So everyone gets to share something at their own level and everyone learns something and no one is left out. The students at the top do not have to do MORE work, but DIFFERENT work.

Page 24 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Keeping all ACCS students educationally stimulated is one of our top priorities. ACCS believes that by teaching to each student at their ability level, that student will make larger educational gains while at ACCS. Albany Community Charter School commits to providing the best program possible for ALL of our students no matter what their learning level. ELL Students Program Goal: ELL students will perform academically in English at the same level as their English-speaking peers in all subjects after no more than five years of enrollment There are 5 major components of ESL services: 1) Identification of eligible English Language Learners (ELLs); 2) Program placement; 3) Curriculum and instruction for English Language Development (ELD); 4) Reclassification of ELLs who reach English proficiency; and 5) Monitoring of former ELLs for two complete school years. Identifying Students for ELD Services Albany Community Charter School identifies English Language Learners in accordance with state and federal requirements. Students are identified in the following manner: 1. A home language survey is completed by a parent/guardian when the student enrolls in school to determine whether the student speaks a language other than English. 2. If the student speaks a language other than English, the English as a Second Language Teacher will communicate to the parent that the student qualifies to be administered the Woodcock-Munoz Language Survey (WMLS) to determine language proficiency and possible entry into the school’s ELL program. If the parent agrees, the WMLS is administered.  Students with scores of 3 or less out of a possible 5 in any of the subcategories will be admitted to the ESL program with parent consent. (Students with scores of 3 or 4 will be provided academic tutoring in an afterschool program*). *ACCS knows that students across the nation tend to get to Level 3 and languish there, sometimes for years. They have conversational English, but do not move onto acquiring the academic language necessary for school success. Therefore, once students are at the Intermediate Level, their language focus is on Academic Language, not Forms and Functions. It is our hope, that moving strongly into Academic Language and Academic Assistance, we will see our students move quickly into Early Advanced and Advanced Levels.

Page 25 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


“The results are clear; we need to change direction and change how we do business at every level to ensure our English Language Learners are receiving the instruction, support, and opportunities they need and deserve,” said Deputy Superintendent Rob Saxton. “This year we saw the results for our ELL students moving in the wrong direction and that is simply unacceptable. As we work to redesign our state’s education system around common goals and rigorous outcomes, improving services and supports to our English Language Learners will be a critical piece in the equation. Continuing down our current path is not an option.” (Oregon Education News Release, 10/1/2012)

Service Provided: All students identified as ELL will receive a minimum of 45 minutes of English as a Second Language by an instructor certified in ESOL Oregon’s as per Teachers Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) for students at the Beginner and through Intermediate Levels. Once they have reached the Intermediate Level, having received an Intermediate (Level 3) score in all the state assessment subtests, they will be given direct instruction in academic language by their classroom teachers for a minimum of 30 minutes a day. In addition they will be given academic tutoring in an afterschool program. School Program: 

 

Students at the Beginner and Early Intermediate levels are provided ELD instruction in a zero hour class provided before regular classes begin. This is deemed as only a plus for the students since transportation is provided for none of the students at ACCS, and in extending the day of the English Learner, he/she is able to be included in all classroom activities/instruction during the school day. Should numbers reach a point that the teacher and an assistant cannot meet the language needs of the students in the hour before school; the after-school tutoring time will also be used for ELD instruction. Students will be placed in Level 1-2 and Level 3-4 instructional groups. The instructor and assistant will rotate groups during the instructional time. The program is taught by a certified ELD teacher who is also a classroom teacher. The ELD teacher is relieved of her classroom duties for the amount of time she/he is responsible for ELD instruction. A part-time certified teacher takes the class for the amount of time that ELD instruction is required. This part time position varies yearly, depending on the number of ELs enrolled at ACCS.

Exiting the Program Students move from active to monitor status when their English proficiency is considered fluent. Students are on monitor status for two years after they exit from active status. The ELD teacher is responsible for gathering the following data for presentation to the administrator and classroom teacher when considering students who are considered for exiting from active status in the ELL program and reclassified to monitor status.  Student’s ability to score a level 4, Early Advanced, or Level 5, Advanced, on the annually administered state assessment, English Language Proficiency Assessments (ELPA). These Page 26 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


 

assessments ensure that listening, speaking, reading and writing are assessed before a student is exited from the ELL program. Student’s observed ability to function effectively in mainstream classes and to progress as well as their English proficient peers. This includes being able to work at the pace of the class and able to use regular mainstream classroom materials. Students should be passing their classes in the core curriculum. Teacher recommendations, both mainstream and ELL, will be considered. Other scored items that will attest to the student’s linguistic performance such as oral competence and writing samples.

Students demonstrating continued academic success by meeting the above criteria during the two-year monitoring period are considered to have successfully completed monitor status. Grade reports are collected at the end of each grading period for each student in monitor status. A copy is placed in the student’s ELL folder. If a student does not meet these criteria, the ELL team attempts to determine the cause. If a cause is undetermined, a language test used with all students such as the TOLD-4 or CELF is administered to the student, given parent permission. This kind of assessment assists us in determining how the student’s language level compares to his classroom peers. If the team decides that a lack of English language skills is causing the student to not succeed academically, he/she is readmitted into the ELL Program, again with parent consent. If it is determined that the reason for the student’s academic failure is not due to premature removal of ELD services, the ELL teacher will write a statement of explanation and place it in the student’s ELL file. The student is then referred for other intervention programs as appropriate. Adopted Program ACCS is adopting English Now!, a research-based program that provides instruction in vocabulary, oral language skills, and oral and written composition of stories. In addition, it targets literacy and academic and content vocabulary. Given the poor literacy and vocabulary scores of ELL students across the nation, we believe a program that includes an added focus on literacy will bring positive results to our English Learner population. The cost of purchasing the program will be offset by the 80% of the additional .5ADM that ACCS will receive for every identified ELL student that is served. Professional Development for Staff All certified staff will receive professional development and follow-up on using active participation, instructional routines, and direct instruction methods for teaching academic vocabulary. A minimum of Page 27 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


five clock hours a year of staff development will be provided to teachers. Video presentations/instructional practices by Kate Kinsella, Anita Archer, and Isabel Beck, as well as others, will be used. The administrator will participate in all professional development and look for the instructional use of active participation and effective teaching of academic vocabulary in classroom observations. Please see the Home Language Survey in the appendix Take home elements of the curriculum Albany Community Charter School feels that fostering a good school to home transition is important for students. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to help your child with a math problem and having nothing to reference to help the parent. Therefore, we kept the need for take home materials for reference and review in mind when selecting our curriculum.  Core Knowledge has a soft bound book that is occasionally used in class, but is primarily to be used at home to help keep parents up to date on what their students are learning about. There are sections on all the different pieces of the core knowledge sequence.  Saxon Math is manipulative based until third grade, when a textbook will travel back and forth from school with the student. Saxon Math texts are also available for parental viewing online at home with a school provided password.  Lexia Reading Core Supplement is accessible at home, so students can further their progress at home.  Khan Academy is also accessible at home, and will help both students and parents understand and review mathematics techniques. Students can also spend time advancing through the different levels of Khan at home. Implementation of the Curriculum Albany Community Charter School has been offered support from other charter schools in Oregon in implementing our curriculum. Our charter partners have volunteered to meet with our teachers and staff prior to the beginning of the school year to advise ACCS teachers in how to best utilize our curriculum choices to serve our students, and meet the Oregon Common Core Standards. In addition to our charter partners, ACCS teachers and staff will receive specific training on Saxon from the professional development team at Saxon. Throughout the school year, our charter partners will be available for questions and concerns from our staff. ACCS teaching staff will have two weeks of preparation time before students arrive at school in which to go over curriculum as a group and decide on its implementation. It is the teaching staff’s responsibility to make sure that their lesson plans will address all of the common core standards for Oregon. Page 28 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


ACCS plans to hire at least one lead teacher with experience in Core Knowledge and Saxon Math who will serve as our curriculum implementation coordinator. All of our lead teachers will be able to assist newer teachers in the implementation of the curriculum. Every year in August, the charter school conference is held in Oregon. All teachers, staff, administrators, and board members are welcome to attend. For a small fee participants can choose from dozens of different classes and workshops on things like implementing science in the classroom, how to interpret standardized testing scores, addressing the common core state standards, techniques for classroom management, and many more topics. To best utilize ACCS’ time, all participants will split up and cover as many classes as possible, reporting back to the whole group after the conclusion of the conference. ACCS believes that by using the help offered from our charter partners, hiring three lead teachers-one having experience in our curriculum, combined with frequent staff meetings and check-ins, that the implementation of our curriculum will go as smoothly as possible.

E. DESCRIPTION OF EXPECTED RESULTS OF CURRICULUM AND VERIFIED METHODS OF MEASURING AND REPORTING OBJECTIVE RESULTS THAT WILL SHOW THE GROWTH OF KNOWLEDGE OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL AND ALLOW COMPARISONS WITH PUBLIC NON-CHARTER SCHOOLS Student Performance Goals 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

80% of all students will meet or exceed OAKS testing or smarter balanced assessment. 100% of all eligible students will complete their OAKS testing or smarter balanced assessment. All students will finish first grade as “established readers” according to DIBELS testing. Albany Community Charter School’s yearly student attendance will meet or exceed 95%. MAP testing for ACCS students will show improvement of one grade level from the fall test to the spring test. 6. MAP testing will show that all students are on grade level at the end of the school year. Goals for Charter Schools outlined by the Oregon Legislature in 338.015 In addition to having our own student performance goals, we will also strive to meet the goals set forth by the Oregon Legislature for all public charter schools. 1. Increase student learning and achievement: Albany Community Charter School plans to increase student learning and achievement by offering small class sizes and a broad curriculum that is reinforced every year by using the Core Knowledge Curriculum. ACCS also plans to have students in class approximately one hundred additional hours as compared to other district Page 29 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


schools. 2. Increase choices of learning opportunities for students: Many alternative environments will be provided so that students can demonstrate their learning. 3. Better meet individual student academic needs and interests: Albany Community Charter School will be better able to meet students’ needs because of a smaller class size with a max of a 12:1 student to teacher/teacher’s aide ratio. 4. Build stronger working relationships among educators, parents and other community members: Albany Community Charter School will build stronger working relationships with its educators by involving them in the decision-making processes within the school. We will build strong relationships by offering open communication with teachers through phone, email, and tracking reports (weekly updates on behavior, what is being learned, and other classroom news) that will be sent home weekly. 5. Encourage the use of different and innovative learning methods: We will encourage different methods by providing service learning that teaches each person’s responsibility to the community, STEM learning, and community based learning opportunities that expose the students to solving problems for people from all walks of life. 6. Provide opportunities in small learning environments for flexibility and innovation, which may be applied, if proven effective, to other public schools: Albany Community Charter School will capitalize on our Teacher’s and their assistants to provide small learning environments through the use of leveled reading and math groups. Groups will be small enough that teachers can employ a variety of methods to teach the objectives, from using the garden beds to watching a video, many resources will be available to the teachers to help them teach to every learning style. 7. Create new professional opportunities for teachers: New opportunities will be provided for many teachers who are currently unemployed or looking for a different teaching environment. Albany Community Charter School will be providing a supportive environment where lead teachers mentor less experienced teachers in a non-threatening, supportive and collaborative environment. 8. Establish additional forms of accountability for schools: Forms of accountability for Albany Community Charter School will include, but not be limited to: Page 30 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


participating in additional testing that is not required by the state or federal government, sharing all requested records and documents with the public and the District as well as posting test results on our website. 1.

Create innovative measurement tools: We will create innovative measurement tools that demonstrate how our students grow and learn through the different learning environments we will offer. The measurement tools may include, but not be limited to: standards/behavior hybrid report cards, Science Fairs, Robotics Competitions, Art Exhibits, plays and performances, and peer nominations for end of year awards (at both the student and teacher levels).

( http://www.leg.state.or.us/ors/338.html) METHODS OF MEASURING AND REPORTING OBJECTIVE RESULTS There will be four levels of objective measures of student academic growth: 1. Placement testing 2. Formative assessments 3. Summative assessments 4. Statewide assessments Placement testing: Each teacher will use the assessments provided with the curriculum, as well as MAPS standardized testing (more information below) to place children in appropriate math and reading groups. Formative assessment: Formative assessments check for understanding along the way and guide teacher decision making about future instruction; they also provide feedback to students so they can improve their performance. Albany Community Charter School will utilize variety of formative assessments. Some examples are homework assignments, reports, short quizzes, question and answer sessions, and observations. Each teacher will use a variety of these assessments to help gauge how their students are learning. Assessment results will be shared with both the parents and the student to illustrate the progress and shortcomings each student is experiencing. It is vital that there is a progress measurement so that the parents and teachers can intervene in order to assist children and think outside the box to help those children learn the necessary skills, whatever that might entail. Formative assessments are important because they help the teacher to recognize that a student is off track. These assessments allow a teacher to change their teaching approach, provide one on one help as needed, and review topics. If formative assessments are performed regularly and incorporated Page 31 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


into daily learning, there will be no surprises when it comes time for the summative assessing in the form of a unit test, performance or project. Summative assessment: Summative assessments are typically given at the end of a unit in the curriculum. These would be things like a unit test, a final paper or project. Summative assessments are important because they help show what the student has learned as well as where they are deficient. Ideally, with good formative assessments and tracking, summative assessments will lead to positive results. Statewide assessment: Albany Community Charter School will administer the Oregon Statewide Assessments (OAKS) until the “Smarter Balanced” assessment is developed and implemented in the 2014-2015 school year. When the “Smarter Balanced” system is in place, Albany Community Charter School will follow the requirements of that assessment tool. Currently, the OAKS assessments are only available for third through eighth grades. ACCS will use each classroom assistant to administer the OAKS testing for that class. We feel that by using an assistant the students are familiar with, the student will be more comfortable asking questions. The assistant will also be more aware of that students learning style. ACCS requests that if sponsored by the district, ACCS staff be allowed to attend district training for standardized testing. Additional means of assessment: Albany Community Charter School will administer the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS), a set of standardized, individually administered measures of early literacy development. DIBELS tests are designed to be short (one minute) fluency measures used to regularly monitor the development of pre-reading and early reading skills, this testing is used throughout the teaching community to address children in a wide age category with great success. Individually administered pre and posttests on the DIBELS Reading Fluency Test will be available for all children in Kindergarten through sixth grades each year. Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Testing MAP testing will be administered three times yearly to track student learning throughout the year. ACCS believes that additional testing is required because OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessments are only available for grades three through eighth. State assessments also don’t show growth from the beginning to the end of the year. ACCS feels that in order to better tailor our educational program to our students, we need to add an additional assessment.

From the NWEA website: Created by educators for educators, MAP assessments provide detailed, actionable data about where each child is on their unique learning path. Because student engagement is essential to any testing experience, NWEA works with educators to create test items that interest children Page 32 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


and help to capture detail about what they know and what they’re ready to learn. It’s information teachers can use in the classroom to help every child, every day. Adapting the Test to the Student

MAP dynamically adapts to a student’s responses – as they take the test. *Answer a question correctly and the test presents a more challenging item *Miss a question, and MAP offers a simpler item In this way, the test narrows in on a student’s learning level, engaging them with content that allows them to succeed. Curriculum Alignment

Measurement of student growth is the hallmark of NWEA assessments, and aligning that data to state and national standards helps keep MAP tests relevant to the educational community. Data You Can Trust

NWEA researchers and test developers study standards throughout the year to ensure that MAP tests reflect current requirements. Every NWEA assessment, in every state, becomes a resource for educators that enables them to focus on helping every student meet their academic goals, and guiding districts and states toward systemic change. The MAP Advantage

Understanding a student's true achievement level and academic needs gives educators an advantage when proficiency exams approach. By using MAP assessments, teachers know precisely where each student needs additional instruction, and how students may be grouped for a more effective learning dynamic. MAP tests also help educators prepare for the coming year by providing them with reliable information to guide instructional planning.

Other Evaluations  Student report cards will be issued three times per year. Student report cards will be a hybrid report card. They will include scores based on each standard for the current grade, as well as a letter grade A-F reflecting a student’s performance on tests, quizzes, homework scores, and participation. A section for behavior will also be present.  Parent Perception Survey (annually) This survey will ask parents to answer questions regarding teacher performance, school environment, communication, staff attitude, areas for improvement, areas of success, happiness with the school, and other questions.  Student Perception Survey (annually) This survey will ask students to answer questions regarding teacher performance, school environment, communication, staff attitude, areas for improvement, areas of success, happiness with the school, and other questions. Page 33 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


 

Parent Conferences (three times each year) Weekly “Track” Reports which will serve as a communication tool between school and home. They will include progress made during the week, behavior issues, and updates on what is being studied.

Performance below expected standards Performance that is significantly below the level of the students’ peers on standardized tests, incorporating results of formative assessments done in the classroom, and classroom evaluations by the teacher will result in a meeting with the parents, principal, student’s teacher, and any other applicable staff. An action plan would be outlined for how to increase the student’s performance and aid their success. Options may be to move the student to a different grade, put them into a lower level group for the subject they struggle in, have after school tutoring, or modify class work assignments to catch the student up to his/her peers (this could include doing the work verbally or doing only the even numbered problems, etc.). Every effort will be made to ensure our students are successful at ACCS. Please see the flow chart under Special Education intake for an explanation of the process. Meeting AYP/AMO/Next Generation Accountability Plan The cornerstones of the accountability plan are attendance at school, participation in standardized testing, and making progress in standardized testing. No matter the name of the plan, Albany Community Charter School wants to make sure our students are making progress both from the start to finish of the school year, as well as from year to year. If our students are not showing progress, then they are not being served appropriately. In order to have the best chance to show that progress, students need to be in class as much as possible, and participate in the testing. Students also need to be exposed to the appropriate material before the test is given. By keeping a close eye on the attendance of our students, including calling home, holding meetings with parents when there are attendance problems, and helping eliminate barriers to kids not making it to school, ACCS will meet requirements for attendance. Our attendance plan lays out a specific process that is to be followed for student absences and tardies. ACCS will report attendance to GAPS via the most convenient method requested.

In order to ensure participation in standardized testing, whether that be the OAKS or the Smarter Balanced Assessment, a careful record will be kept for each class detailing windows for test taking, who has taken the test, and who has not. This record will be kept by each teacher in cooperation with the leadership team. To make sure all students participate , ACCS plans to use the complete window for participation in order to prevent someone from waiting until the last day. This means that testing needs to begin happening as soon as that window is open. Notes will be sent home informing parents the day prior to the

Page 34 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


scheduled test day for a student to communicate the importance of getting good sleep, eating a good breakfast, and being to school on time. How will ACCS make sure we are making gains from test to test and year to year? ACCS plans to use MAP testing three times throughout the year to gauge where our students are at in their learning. Evaluating MAP results will help us to understand where each student’s as well as classes weaknesses are. If teachers know where a student is having an issue, they can make sure and address that gap before the student takes the state mandated test. MAP is aligned to common core state standards and will help our teachers and leadership team ensure the success of our students on state assessments. In addition to using the MAP test, Albany Community Charter School will address the size of a test group, as well as some pre-exposure to the test format and environment. ACCS believes that when a child is tested, the optimal environment is one that is free of other distractions-including other students. ACCS will make every effort possible to ensure that students are tested on a one on one basis as much as possible. ACCS also knows that students get nervous before taking state tests. Teachers will talk to students about what to expect, will take students to visit the testing environment, discuss problem solving strategies, and have students take practice tests available online. ACCS believes that these measures will help students become more relaxed when presented with the actual tests.

Please see our attendance policy in the appendix F. THE GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE OF THE PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL. Steering Committee Members of the steering committee are both parents who are interested in helping make decisions about Albany Community Charter School, as well as community members. There was not a selection process involved in forming the committee. We have found our strengths and abilities while doing the research required to make decisions regarding how our school will function. We have a great abundance of talent, knowledge, and experience within our steering committee. Together we make a strong team with a common goal: we are people who want a different choice in the education of our children. Upon completion of our proposal, our steering committee will work with the new Board of Directors to ensure the compliance in our charter agreement. They will still be involved in offering input, and opinions throughout the years to come. Any interested parent may be assigned to a committee at the Board’s discretion. Any parent with a conflict of interest will be required to declare it and recuse themselves from the discussions and votes.

Page 35 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will be run by the non-profit Educating Albany Responsibly and its Board of Directors . The directors were hand-picked by parents who were looking for certain qualities. We wanted directors who were passionate about offering a different option for educating children in Albany, had experience in schools, managing budgets, fundraising abilities, experience with curriculum, community connections, and problem solving skills were all factors in our decision to select our board of directors. The Albany Community Charter School Steering Committee also considered the experiences of other charter schools and non-profits in how they selected their directors. Board of Directors Biographies -Jennifer Cummins, Founding Director. Jennifer was raised in Harrisburg, Oregon, and is the oldest of seven siblings. Jennifer attended Western Oregon University and Portland State University. She earned her Bachelors degree in Social Science. Jennifer is married to Christopher, they have two boys, Levi age ten and Eli age eight. Jennifer has been a very active volunteer at her children’s schools, former PTC president, and is a former preschool teacher. Jennifer is a mom who is passionate about the education of all children, including her own. -J. Ellen Carlson, Director. Ellen was raised in Bakersfield, California. She has three grown daughters and a son with her husband Bert. Ellen’s formal education includes a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Master’s degrees in Education and Speech/Language from the University of Oregon. She also received a post baccalaureate degree in Deaf Education from the University of British Columbia. Ellen has taught at all three levels in public education while working as a classroom teacher, teacher of the hearing-impaired, resource teacher, reading specialist, and speech pathologist. Most recently she was an elementary school principal. -Ed Gallagher, Director. Ed was born and raised in Massachusetts, as the second oldest of eight children. Ed holds degrees from Gordon College, Hartford Seminary, and Rutgers University. He is married and has one son who just completed his education at Oregon State University. Ed has served as the Library Director of Albany for the past nine years and has extensive experience in budgets, capital fundraising, and working with others. -John Borden, Director. John was raised in Washington for most of his childhood. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Accountancy from Oregon State University. John currently owns his own CPA firm in Albany. John is married and has three children and six grandchildren. John enjoys being involved in his community with the Chamber of Commerce Greeters.

Board roles and responsibilities

Page 36 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School has a Board of Directors that operates according to the non-profit corporation’s bylaws. As noted in the introduction, the Board will operate under the legal structure of an existing 501(c)(3) organization, “Educating Albany Responsibly.” In terms of composition, the Board may have a minimum of four (4) and a maximum of seven (7) directors. The inaugural Board of Directors will be appointed by the founder of the corporation. The Board of Directors will serve a three year term from the date of their election. The Board will meet monthly to conduct its business. The Board will comply with all elements of the public meeting laws (ORS 192.610 to 192.690). The board will follow all other state and federal laws pertaining to a non-profit corporation. The Board will operate with sound, legal and ethical practices, managing liability and protecting the school’s legal interests. Albany Community Charter School understands that charter school board members are considered “public officials” per ORS 244.020(15); thus Albany Community Charter School’s Board of Directors will conduct themselves in accordance with Oregon’s Government Ethics laws. Albany Community Charter School’s Board of Directors will ensure that the school remains true to its mission, and will focus on two primary objectives: 1. Oversight—monitoring organizational and fiscal health and overall school effectiveness; 2. Strategy- planning for the future The Board‘s primary roles and responsibilities will include:  Upholding the mission and vision of Albany Community Charter School;  Overseeing Albany Community Charter School’s performance relative to the school’s vision and goals, applicable statutes and rules and provisions of the charter agreement;  Adopting Albany Community Charter School’s general policies, governance policies, student policies, personnel policies and financial management policies;  Supervising the Albany Community Charter School Site Director and Lead Teachers.  Adopting the annual budget and overseeing the fiscal solvency of Albany Community Charter School;  Approving major expenditures and all contracts;  Soliciting financial and in-kind support from organizations and private individuals, both within and outside the local community and  Performing any and all duties imposed on them collectively or individually by law or the organization’s corporate documents. Board Vacancies

Page 37 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


A vacancy on the board shall exist upon the death, resignation or removal of any director, and when the board has approved an increase in the number of directors but has not yet elected directors for such new positions. In these situations the vacancy will be published in local media outlets, and announced in school newsletters. The announcement will be accompanied with a request for submittal of applications to join the board, along with a deadline established by the remaining board members. All applications must be received by the deadline. The remaining directors will select two applications for each vacancy that they feel will best fill the vacancy and carry out the mission of Educating Albany Responsibly. Once the board selects the candidates, they will be presented to a committee for evaluation. Members of the committee may include supporters, parents, staff, and anyone else the board feels applicable. One month before a director has completed their term, the current board members will select two applications for each vacancy to present to the evaluation committee. The current director may be included in the applications, but will not count towards the minimum number of two applications. Therefore, there may be a maximum of three applications if the board member wishes to complete another term. The applications will be presented to the evaluation committee, who in turn presents their findings and makes a recommendation to the board. The board then votes on who they feel will best fill the position at the annual board meeting. The candidate with the most number of votes for each position will then fill that director position. If there are two or fewer applications, those applications will be presented to the evaluation commitee for their consideration, along with the current director, if that director wishes to complete another term. Board elections, terms, decision-making and other operations will occur in accordance with Albany Community Charter School’s nonprofit bylaws. The Board will be advised by committees as noted below. The board may choose to establish more committees as the need arises. All members of a committee must be current Members of the Board. One person may serve on more than one committee. Advisory committees 

Budget Committee: Will consist of at least 2 members of the board of directors, the site manager, at least two teachers (one being a lead teacher), and at least one parent with oversight from the board. The committee will present a recommendation for approval/denial to the board of directors. Personnel Committee: Will consist of at least 2 members of the board of directors, the site manager, at least two teachers (one being a lead teacher), at least one assistant, and at least one parent with oversight from the board. The committee will present a recommendation of employment to the board of directors.(as needed to fill employment vacancies) Curricular Committee: Will consist of at least 1 member of the board of directors, the site manager, at least three teachers (two being lead teachers), at least one assistant, and at least one parent with Page 38

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.




oversight from the board. The committee will present a recommendation of curriculum changes to the board of directors. (Only when a curriculum change is necessary) Parent Action Committee (PAC): This committee will not be appointed, but will have an open membership. All members of the Parent Action Committee will vote to appoint a chairperson in June for the following school year. The purpose of the Parent Action committee is to support the school, teachers, and staff in any way possible. They will be responsible for special events, coordinating school volunteers, organizing fund raisers, advising the board, and any other activities the Board of Directors assigns. The PAC will develop a line of communication with the principal to better understand the school’s needs. Teachers and staff are welcome at all PAC meetings.

The Leadership Team ACCS will follow a collaborative concept uniquely suited to the "small schools" model. This small school will serve a population of about 200 students and have a faculty of nine fulltime teachers, nine part time instructional assistants, a problem solving staff person, a site director, and a board of five directors. The requirements for collaboration are present in the sense of community this small setting offers: .commitment to a common set of goals . relative ease of communication . opportunity for consensus decision making . clearly delineated responsibilities Together, an ideal opportunity for an efficient, productive and accountable system is established. ACCS will use an innovative approach for the administration of the charter school. We believe that by delegating responsibilities to a team, the school will be well rounded and run smoother. We will call our administration a leadership team. The leadership team will consist of the board of directors, the site director, and three lead teachers. Each piece of the team will have its responsibilities, but will work with the other parts of the team to ensure success. Please see the following chart for further explanation. Board Training Upon approval, the Board of Directors will take a one day workshop on Charter Governance from Northwest Center for Educational Options. Each year all Educating Albany Responsibly/Albany Community Charter School board members and staff will attend the charter school conference in August. Last year there were several classes that applied to board members and the roles they play in the charter school. Board members may also attend conferences through OSBA with a consensus agreement. If a board member would like to attend additional professional development, they must bring their request to the other members of the board.

Page 39 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Team Approach for the Administrator Position Board of Directors Both the Site Director and the Lead Teachers report to the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors will over-see all committees, and make decisions based on their recommendations and input. The board will be responsible for coordinating professional development of all staff. The Board will always strive to meet the mission statement.

Site Director

The site manager would be responsible for conducting regular meetings, coordination of all school activities, and be the “go-to” person for on site decisions such as what to do if a staff person becomes ill or an unsafe situation occurs. The site director will also order supplies, handle the payroll, prepare reports to the board on school issues, and oversee attendance. The site director will handle all public relations for the school and over see the Parent Action Committee. The site director will work with the PAC to find and pursue grant and funding opportunities. The site director will also serve as the liason with the GAPS school board.

C O O P E R A T I O N !

Lead Teachers

The Lead teachers will be responsible for oversight of all curricular standards established by the State. Teachers will meet to discuss issues and approaches with one another. The lead teachers, collectively, will serve as the “go-to” for curriculum and learning questions, will oversee the implementation of standardized testing, IEP Plans, ELL Services, students on an action plan, and will oversee the problem solving room, in cooperation with the problem solving room specialist.

Budget Committee: Will consist of at least 2 members of the board of directors, the site manager, at least two teachers (one being a lead teacher), and at least one parent with oversight from the board. The committee will present a recommendation for approval/denial to the board of directors. Personnel Committee: Will consist of at least 2 members of the board of directors, the site manager, at least two teachers (one being a lead teacher), at least one assistant, and at least one parent with oversight from the board. The committee will present a recommendation of employment to the board of directors. Curricular Committee: Will consist of at least 1 member of the board of directors, the site manager, at least three teachers (two being lead teachers), at least one assistant, and at least one parent with oversight from the board. The committee Page will 40 present a recommendation of curriculum changes to the board of directors. Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the Staff confidence Evaluation: All teachers will be evaluated and assessed the classroom bylearn an outside professional to risk intelligently, think critically and in succeed. We will fromexperienced our experiences, show chosen by the board. This evaluation in addition to self-evaluations, peer evaluations, student evaluations, and test results compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to will be submitted to the board to become part of the employee’s file. That file will be evaluated to determine a renewal of be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners. employment. *ALL COMMITTEES ARE APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS*


G. THE PROJECTED ENROLLMENT INCLUDING AGES AND GRADES.

Albany Community Charter School will initially offer classes for children from Kindergarten through eighth grade in the 2013-2014 school year if sponsored by GAPS. If sponsored by the State Board of Education, ACCS will open in the fall of 2014. In our initial year of operation we plan on having two hundred and two students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. However, ACCS is proposing a total first through eighth grade enrollment of two hundred and two. While we plan to only enroll one hundred eighty first through eighth grade students, should enrollment numbers support adding an additional class, we will do so. ACCS’ proposed number of kindergarten students is twenty two. Grades

Capacity

Expected Enrollment

Kindergarten

22

22

1st through 8th grades

202

180

Albany Community Charter School creates a quality distinctive alternative to home schooling, and a similar but more convenient alternative to neighboring charter schools. With our innovative design, ACCS will be a new and creative alternative for students in the GAPS district. We believe Albany Community Charter School will be successful and could prevent student flight from the district. Survey data indicates, for example, that several families who currently home school their children would consider enrolling in a public charter such as the proposed Albany Community Charter School. We have also been in contact with several families from charter schools in neighboring districts who are interested in attending. Prospective Students by Grade Albany Community Charter School has received letters of intent to enroll from two hundred forty-five students. We have many families who are awaiting a decision from GAPS, to declare their intent. Below are our current class numbers based on the letters of intent. Kindergarten 33

Fifth Grade 27

First Grade

Sixth Grade

30

25 Page 41

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Second Grade 33

Seventh Grade 20

Third Grade 29

Eighth Grade 20

Fourth Grade 28

Current School Placements of Students with Intent to Enroll Forms on File Kinderg arten

First Second Third Grade Grade Grade

Fourth Grade

Fifth Grade

Central

1

2

1

1

Clover Ridge

2

2

Lafayette

2

2

Liberty

1

2

4

North Albany Elem.

2

2

1

1

Oak

1

1

Oak Grove

1

1

1

Periwinkl e

1

2

3

South Shore

1

2

2

1

2

1

9

Sunrise

2

2

2

1

3

2

12

1 3

3

Sixth Grade

Seventh Eighth Grade Grade

SCHOOL TOTAL 6 10

1 2

1

1

1

1

5 2

11

1

7

4 1

1

6

7

Page 42 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Takena

1

1

Tangent

1

1

1

2

1

1

7

1

1

3

7

1

3

Timber Ridge Waverly

2

2

4

1

1

1

10

5

Calapooia

6

4

2

12

Memorial

6

4

3

13

North Albany Middle

1

2

4

7

Homesch ool

6

4

4

1

4

4

1

3

3

30

Private

5

4

5

6

3

4

2

2

2

33

Other Charter

3

3

4

3

3

2

4

3

3

28

Out of District

1

3

1

3

2

2

1

1

2

16

Total

33

30

33

29

28

27

25

20

20

245 Total

In GAPS/O ut GAPS

18/15

16/14

19/14

16/13

16/12

15/12

17/8

11/9

10/10

138/107

245 intent to enroll forms Page 43 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


H. THE TARGET POPULATION OF THE STUDENTS. Factors Influencing Educational Choices While administering a parent survey to prospective Charter School Parents, some patterns emerged. Most parents cited class size, and the quality of the curriculum as the most important factors influencing their educational choices. Albany Community Charter School can provide small class sizes and a high quality curriculum to each student. Students Living Within GAPS Boundaries Albany Community Charter School will serve students in Kindergarten through Eighth Grade, mostly from within the Albany School District Boundaries. There are currently many families who are pulling their children from GAPS schools and enrolling them either in private schools, out of district schools, or homeschooling their children. They are not satisfied with what their neighborhood school has to offer for some reason or another and are going outside of the district to find what they need for their children. We believe that Albany Community Charter School will work to pull students back into the district from these current out of district, homeschooled, and private school placements. While Albany Community Charter School will draw students from GAPS schools, we believe that the effect on any one school will be minimal due to our proposed small size. Albany students are already travelling outside of the district in order to go to school. While the district does gather data, some students are not counted due to never being enrolled in Albany schools, not renewing an application for a transfer, or many other factors. Santiam Christian (Adair Village) currently has 285 (k-12) students who live in Albany. That’s 40% of their total student body. Sand Ridge Charter School in Lebanon (approximately 65 miles driving per day) has approximately seventy students who communte five days a week from Albany. The list goes on and on. Students are already leaving, and the district is already losing money. Albany Community Charter School can help pull some of that money back into the district. Students Living Outside GAPS Boundaries Additionally, according to our research, there is interest from families located outside of the district boundaries as well. We have families from the Jefferson, Corvallis, Central Linn, and Harrisburg School Districts who are interested in sending their children to Albany Community Charter School. With current school scores out, we believe that Albany Community Charter School will receive even more interest from these areas.

Page 44 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Prospective Albany Community Charter School Students' Current Educational Enrollment Homeschool

Out of District

Private School

Other Charter School

In GAPS District

12% 7% 14% 56% 11%

These districts, with the exception of Corvallis do not have charter school options. Corvallis has a small rural charter school that serves a small number of Kindergarten through fifth grade students. Differing Needs Among Albany Community Charter School Students With children coming to Albany Community Charter School from many different educational backgrounds, it is important to consider their intellectual and educational differences. There are a few things that we believe will aid in the transition of those students who are not at the same place academically as their classmates. The leveled reading and math groups we plan to have will aid in children being taught at the appropriate level. Small class sizes and extra staff support will also help students to either catch up to their classmates or be challenged with more opportunities for one on one instruction. Please refer to the sections on Special Education and Advanced Learners. English Language Learners The Albany Community Charter School steering committee has reached out to local community members who are among our areas large Hispanic population. These community members have helped us to make announcements at local Hispanic church services and within Hispanic cultural gatherings. When Albany Community Charter School enrolls English Language Learning students, the adopted process in “Section D Curriculum-ELL Students� will be used. Why have a kindergarten through eighth grade school?

Page 45 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


When discussing the makeup of a charter school, one thing was common among supporters. Everyone was interested in getting all of their children under one roof in one school. Parents wanted opportunities for their kids to be part of a school family throughout their educational careers. There is a lot of evidence that talks about the benefits of a k-8 school: Middle schools, for one, have been called the “weak link” of public education. According to researchers, the transition to middle school is often a difficult one for students, and during these years, there is often a problem with discipline, absenteeism and low test scores. Education researchers began looking at the middle school model and comparing it with the K-8 schools. They found that there are benefits to the latter model. Some of these benefits are: o Safety – Parents and children feel safer in a K-8 school as they become older because they are secure in their location and enjoy continuity. o Engagement – Studies have shown students do not suffer the same motivational declines in schoolwork and extra-curricular activities when they stay in a K-8 school. Discipline problems and absences also are reduced. o Achievement – Research has shown that students do not experience the same academic declines when the middle school transition is eliminated. Center for Education Reform: The K-8 Solution: The Retreat from Middle Schools. Increasing the breadth of grades offered also allows higher achieving students in the intermediate grades to benefit from having opportunities available in the upper grades. With class sizes so high, especially in middle and high school, a smaller k-8 school will serve the struggling students who are lost in the chaos of a large class. Franklin Elementary in Corvallis is a small Core Knowledge k-8 school. While there are not official statistics, a large portion of the valedictorians at nearby Crescent Valley High School are graduates of Franklin. Albany Community Charter School believes that when we are approved, our graduates will be exemplary students at Albany high schools. Schools that are k-8 even have an impact on achievement and graduation in high school: ……students who left elementary schools for middle schools in grades six or seven “lose ground in both reading and math compared to their peers who attend K–8 schools,” he wrote in “The Middle School Plunge,” published in the spring 2012 issue of Education Next. Additionally, Florida students who entered middle school in sixth grade were 1.4 percentage points more likely than their K–8 peers to drop out of high school by 10th grade — a whopping increase of 18 percent.

Page 46 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


I. A DESCRIPTION OF ANY DISTINCTIVE LEARNING OR TEACHING TECHNIQUES. Albany Community Charter School will use a combination of teaching and learning techniques to ensure our students are well educated. These techniques include, but are not limited to: active participation, integrated curriculum, student-led partner and cooperative work, teaching to posted objectives, differentiated instruction, community based learning, and STEM based learning opportunities. It is our belief that each teacher has their own method of teaching and should be allowed to use those methods and techniques. The curriculum that we have chosen as a framework-Core Knowledge, allows teachers to tailor the lessons they teach to both their student’s preferences as well as their own. Active participation Active participation is any learning activity where the student is not listening to the teacher talk. They are doing some sort of an activity and using that activity to learn the material being presented. Some examples of active participation that our teachers will us include asking students for their reactions to material, asking for a written response, performing science experiments, doing STEM based robotics projects, and many more. The possibilities are endless. Active participation works because it keeps students engaged and interested in the topic at hand. Core Knowledge allows teachers to implement their own projects and activities around a unit of study. It is flexible, and is a great opportunity to use active participation. Integrated Curriculum Core Knowledge is our choice for a framework for how ACCS will teach students. It is a curriculum that is full of information that students enjoy learning about. Our students will learn reading, writing, and speaking using the topics covered in core knowledge. Not only will ACCS students become proficient readers, writers, and speakers, they will become experts in history, geography, and other social sciences. If students can get interested in learning about history and geography they will become lifelong learners. Student led Partner and Cooperative Work Students at ACCS will work in partner groups, as well as in larger group. Grouping students in pairs or trios allows many of the advantages of group work. Students have the opportunity to state their own views, to hear from others, and to hone their argumentative skills. Further, pairs and trios make it virtually impossible for students to avoid participating, thus making each person more accountable. While groupings will happen in many different areas, the most common and consistent place students will learn in groups is in STEM based learning. Projects will be student led and depending on the age of the students they may work in pairs or groups of three. Students will discuss ideas about what will work, what won’t work and how to modify their approach when they are not successful. ACCS believes that all areas of STEM learning-Robotics/Engineering, Agriculture in the classroom, and hands on science projects are the most successful and meaningful when they are led by the students. Teachers may lay out the expectations Page 47 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


of the activity, and consult with students, but the majority of the learning, questioning, and teaching will be done within groups, as well as between groups. Teaching to posted objectives Each classroom at ACCS will have the common core state standards available for viewing. In grades three through eight teachers will routinely review the standards and help students understand what is expected of them to meet the standards. The teacher will have students check in with each other, as well as the teacher, to demonstrate the standards. If students know what is expected of them and how to reach that goal or standard, they are much more likely to be successful in reaching it. This effort will be furthered by using an extensive hybrid report card that lists the objectives for each grade and gives a score based on how the student has showed proficiency. ACCS feels that this will further educate both our students and their parents, and holds parents more accountable for their student’s success. Many parents are unsure of what their children are learning, what they are expected to learn, and when they are expected to learn it. We feel that our posted objectives effort will make our students more successful in reaching and exceeding the standards. Differentiated Instruction All Albany Community Charter School students will be tested prior to school starting to determine the appropriate placement of the student into math groups. All teachers and assistants will work together to form skill based math groups that reach across grades. For example if you have a second grader who is performing in math above her peers, maybe at a fourth grade level, she will move to the fourth grade classroom to receive math instruction. At the same time, if you have a fifth grader who is struggling that child will be placed within a group for math that is closer to their level. Leveled groups will assist in helping those students who are behind gain new skills without being frustrated by work that is above their abilities. Students who work above grade level will also have the opportunity to be challenged with more rigorous work than what is available in their classroom. All math groups will be decided upon by teachers evaluating testing results, and actual skills of each student. Students at Albany Community Charter School will also be involved in differentiated instruction in other areas. For example, when dealing with a classroom (this will most likely be all classrooms) with some students who are high achievers, some that are struggling, and a group in the middle, teachers will differentiate their instruction. If the third graders are working on a unit on the thirteen colonies, the middle cluster of students may do a map activity that shows travel routes between colonies. The struggling students will work to identify the thirteen colonies and their names. High achieving students may study and prepare a short presentation on what goods and services were traded in the thirteen colonies, and where they came from. Each group will have something to share with the class, and will still be learning the information needed. Community Based Learning Page 48 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will have both a traditional classroom as well as a non-traditional one. In our efforts to organize a charter school we have met many parents and community members who would like to make an impact on education at ACCS. We have parents who have many skills to help our students. Some already committed topics include: Spanish, gardening projects, pastel drawing, clay projects, history experts, woodworking, and community service projects to name a few. These projects and many more will be taught by parents and community members. ACCS would like to hold a community based learning day once a month where these parents and community members can come into the schools and share these things. Students would rotate between stations (age appropriate) throughout the day and learn from each station. We will also use Community Based Learning Days to complete any Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife projects that we have. All volunteers will be background checked. STEM Based Learning Opportunities Educating Albany Responsibly (the non-profit that runs Albany Community Charter School), applied for and received a grant for two teams from the First Lego League of Oregon. First Lego League involves building, programming, and launching robots to perform designated tasks. Students will learn science and math skills, teamwork, and public speaking skills, just to name a few. We believe that using a tool like these robots will be a fun and exciting way to teach kids about real life science and engineering skills. Designing a robot to do even a simple task can place extensive demands on students' creativity and problem-solving. .Druin, A., & Hendler, J. (2000). Robots for kids: Exploring new technologies for learning. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. ACCS plans on an integrated approach to robotics, rather than the usual after school program that benefits a few students. All of our students will receive STEM based learning in the classroom. Projects are student led with an opportunity for extensive discovery and problem solving skills. Measurement Tools For Alternative Learning When a student participates in an alternative learning environment such as service based learning, engineering based learning, and community based learning, we would like to see what they are learning. While some concepts can be tested via a test administered by the teacher, we feel that not every aspect of the learning is covered in this way. So, each student will be asked to either keep a journal detailing the things they have learned, and their reflections on that learning, or they will be asked to write an essay about their experience. Not only does this tell teachers what the students have learned from that experience, it gives students another opportunity to practice their writing and reasoning skills. J. THE LEGAL ADDRESS, FACILITIES AND PHYSICAL LOCATION, IF KNOWN.

Page 49 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


With district sponsorship, Albany Community Charter School hopes to come to an agreement with GAPS to lease the vacant Fir Grove building at 5355 NW Scenic Drive NW. We have submitted a letter of intent and are hoping to meet with the district to discuss a price as well as terms. The main stipulation in the letter is that we only want to use the building until they are ready to reopen the school for GAPS use. ACCS feels that an arrangement with the district would be ideal for both parties involved, as the district will receive money from a lease, will not have the upkeep costs, and the building will be occupied. We feel that using the building in our first year or two depending on availability; will allow the school to be more financially stable, as the first year of opening a charter school is often the most difficult, and financially difficult. ACCS plans to put aside some money if granted a lease at Fir Grove, so that when the district is ready to reopen the school we have some extra money for obtaining and modifying a new building. Estimated Location Expenses at Fir Grove 2013-2014

Facility Expenses Lease (paid Sept-June), access to building in June Electric Natural Gas Water/Sewer Trash Communications (telephone, internet) Alarm Cost Septic Pumping Safety inspection of playground Facility Improvements Maintenance Total Facility Expense:

30,000.00 12,000.00 14,400.00 1,800.00 2,028.00 5,500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 20,000.00 90,228.00

How were the facility expenses determined? The lease amount was determined by an informal survey of former district schools being used by charter schools. The prices vary depending on size between $1-$12,000 per year. ACCS felt that using $3,000 in our budget was a number that allowed us some room in our first year of operations, since start up costs are so high. Fir Grove is not currently being used by the school district, it is a liability. ACCS specified in our intent to lease letter that WHEN GAPS decides to reopen Fir Grove, we will find another location without complaint. It is not our intention to keep district schools closed. We also considered that the starting salary of a GAPS teacher just out of school was approximately $36,000. ACCS feels that the lease amount and maintenance deferral makes the lease offer attractive and profitable to the district. Page 50 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


The facility expenses (excluding the lease) were determined using figures provided by Russ Allen, Business Operations, from Greater Albany Public Schools. We took the costs provided and inflated the utilities drastically for the first year to protect ACCS from an unexpected utility bill (from $1140 per month to $1519). ACCS also looked at costs at a similarly sized former school building in Millersburg, which led us to believe we needed to budget more for utilities. Subsequent years’ leases will have a standard 3% increase in all utility costs. Mr. Allen also specified we would need a certified drinking water operator, asbestos management, and boiler prevention and maintenance. It is our hope that ACCS can contract with GAPS to provide these services. These costs would come from the maintenance line item in the budget. Since Fir Grove was recently a school, no structural changes or modifications are necessary. It is a perfect building for our intended use. Securing a location for State Sponsorship In the event of a denial from Greater Albany Public Schools, ACCS plans to file an appeal for sponsorship with the State Board of Education. Using state sponsorship would require ACCS to find an alternative location. It is our belief that we can better pursue this option once district sponsorship is off the table. Below please find our draft schedule for finding a location. Dates of reference March 1, 2013 Proposal submitted to Greater Albany Public Schools March 21, 2013 Denial from Greater Albany Public Schools March 22, 2013 ACCS requests state review Dates of action March 25, 2013: Begin scheduling meetings and tours with churches in the Albany district. April 4, 2013 (subject to change depending on tour schedule): Review potential locations based on space, willingness to share space, location, parking, and fit for our program in a board meeting. Rank locations in order of preference. April 18, 2013: Formulate a lease offer for our top choice with an occupancy date of June of 2014. Our first choice for a location has always been the Fir Grove building. If the district is unwilling to sponsor a charter, it is our assumption that they are also unwilling to lease to ACCS. Therefore, under ODE sponsorship, Albany Community Charter School has been exploring the possibility of sharing space with a large local church during the week. We feel that this could be a positive arrangement for the church as well as the Charter School. It would benefit the church’s finances, and allow Albany Community Charter School a place to operate. If we can reach an agreement with a local church, little modification would be required. We would use their existing classroom and multipurpose space to suit our needs. Page 51 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


While we have spoken to some churches, we have not heavily pursued them. It is our belief that once we are clear on our path of sponsorship-school district or GAPS-that we will then more heavily pursue a church partner. ACCS will also consider any commercial properties that are a good fit for a school location. What we are looking for Albany Community Charter School is looking for a location of approximately 12,000 sq ft or more that has classroom space for 9 classes, a multipurpose area, plenty of parking, and that is within the Albany District. ACCS feels that a church building would be a good fit for our requirements. They are often large, have classroom space already laid out, and have ample parking. Estimated Expenses for a cooperative church agreement 2014-2015 Facility Expenses Lease (June-June) Electric Natural Gas Water/Sewer Trash Communications (telephone, internet) Maintenance Total Facility Expense:

60,000.00 12,000.00 14,400.00 1,800.00 2,028.00 5,500.00 5,000.00 100,728.00

The expenses listed for a church location are pure estimates. ACCS erred on the side of caution and kept all utility costs the same as we used for Fir Grove. It is possible, that depending on the agreement with a church, this cost could greatly decrease. Subsequent years’ leases will have a standard 3% increase in all utility costs. When determining a lease price for a church location, ACCS considered what would be attractive to a church. We felt that the addition of $60,000 per year to a church’s budget would go a long way in furthering their many endeavors. Any location ACCS chooses will be in compliance with all building codes, health and safety laws, and with the ADA act by the time of school opening. ACCS has looked at and considered the following properties: 1.

International Paper training center/Former Millersburg School (couldn’t come to an agreement on lease price and terms). 2. Chapel on Hill (not enough space) Page 52 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


3. Former post office property on Ferry ST. (not enough space) ACCS has spoken to the following churches: 4. Fairview Mennonite Church 5. South Albany Community Church 6. Eastside Christian 7. Knox Butte Baptist Church

Please see the lease proposal letter in the appendix K. A DESCRIPTION OF THE ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROPOSAL PROCEDURES. Admission Rules and Procedures Albany Community Charter School will comply with the admission provisions of Oregon’s charter school law (ORS 339.115). A student seeking enrollment in Albany Community Charter School for the first time must meet all academic, age, immunization, and other eligibility prerequisites for admission as set out in state law and the following policies. Admission to Albany Community Charter School may only be limited by a student’s age and grade level, and will not be limited on the basis of ethnicity, national origin, race, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, income level, proficiency in English language or athletic ability. Incoming Kindergarteners must turn five by September 1 of the year they are applying to enter Kindergarten. If a parent feels their child is ready for Kindergarten, and their birthday is before March of the upcoming school year, the child may be tested for readiness to enter Kindergarten. The leadership team and the Kindergarten Teacher will determine based on test scores, conversation with the parents, and interactions with the child, what is in the best interest of the child. . Please refer to 339.115 (9) Albany Community Charter School assumes that students are enrolling in the full-time instructional program; Albany Community Charter School does not permit part-time enrollment. All students residing within the boundaries of the Greater Albany Public School boundaries are eligible to apply to Albany Community Charter School. Students from outside of Greater Albany Public School boundaries are eligible to apply if there is space. Nonresident students are not required to obtain an interPage 53 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


district transfer or other release from their resident district. Nonresident students must notify their resident district of their enrollment in the charter school to ensure accurate and non-duplicative student counts.

Steps Necessary for Attendance 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Application Lottery Acceptance for enrollment Admitting and registration Attendance

For initial enrollment for 2013-2014 (GAPS sponsored) or 2014-2015 (state sponsored) school year all prospective students will be asked to fill out an application form by April 30, 2013/ 2014 . If more application forms are received than there are spots available, a random public lottery will be held during the first week of May 2013/2014. Notice will be given to the public in regards to the time and date of the lottery. Students will all be assigned a number coded to their grade upon filling out an application for the purpose of a random lottery. Once a child’s number is drawn, they will have 48 hours to accept enrollment to ACCS. Upon accepting enrollment, each child will be admitted and registered with ACCS. Each time a vacancy occurs, a lottery will be held. Preference will be given to any student on the waiting list that has a sibling enrolled at Albany Community Charter School. If more than one sibling is on the waiting list, all of the siblings will go into a separate sibling lottery where one name is drawn. Enrollment priority is given to students who were enrolled in the charter school in the prior year and to siblings of students currently enrolled in the charter school. Definitions for the purpose of the lottery: Previously enrolled students: Any student who finished the prior school year at Albany Community Charter School. Sibling: A child who lives in the same household as another child and shares at least one parent or guardian. Each year beginning in March, re-enrollment forms will be available for current Albany Community Charter School students. Re-enrollment forms must be received in the office by the final business day of March. If your form is not submitted, your child may lose their spot at Albany Community Charter School. Page 54 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Beginning the first business day of April, and ending on the final business day of April, Albany Community Charter School will take applications to fill any remaining openings in each grade. Students will be selected by a random lottery of all students in that grade with preference going to siblings. In case of a mid year opening, all applicable student numbers on the waiting list will be placed in a lottery, and a student will be randomly selected. There is no preference given for students who have been on the waiting list longer. The selection is completely random. Once a student is on the waiting list, there is no need to reapply. The student will remain on Albany Community Charter School’s waiting list, until they are placed within the school, or if a parent requests their name be removed. All families are responsible for letting Albany Community Charter School know of ANY changes in address or contact information. Lottery Albany Community Charter School will first offer enrollment to students who are residents of the Greater Albany Public School District for each grade the charter school provides. If spaces are available following enrollment of Greater Albany Public School District residents, enrollment will be offered to non-resident students. In the case of Greater Albany Public School District resident students or non-resident students, if there are more applicants than space available at a particular grade level, the charter school will hold an equitable lottery for applicants for that grade level. Names will be drawn at random to fill the available spaces. All other applicants not selected by lottery will remain in the pool of applicants. If at some time after the initial lottery, space becomes available, names will again be drawn at random to fill the spaces. A prioritized enrollment list based on an earlier lottery will not be maintained for purposes of subsequent enrollment or admission. When filling spots from the lottery, the staff at Albany Community Charter School will contact the first person drawn. Staff will not move to the next student until verbal contact has been made. Once contact has been made, the parent has 48 hours from the time of contact to make a decision if they will accept the opening at Albany Community Charter School. If a parent chooses to not accept the opening at the time their child’s name is drawn, they will be removed from the waitlist. Once a child is on the waitlist, they are eligible for any lottery that takes place. Their names are not removed from the lottery. ACCS will hold a lottery during the first week of May preceeding the school year.

Page 55 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Notification to the Public of Open Enrollment Periods Beginning at least seven days before open registration is available, Albany Community Charter Schools will provide directions on how to apply, deadlines associated with applying, and contact information to local news outlets. These local news outlets will be The Democrat Herald, The Corvallis Gazette Times, and Bi-Coastal Media radio station group. We will also advertise on local bulletin boards, and through our outreach contacts in the Hispanic community.

Albany Community Charter School will also have an updated website available, communicate through a Facebook page, and be available through email. The office staff will be available for questions and assistance in filling out the necessary paperwork. All interested parents will receive an informational packet upon request. We will continue to build our current email list of both potential families wanting to attend the charter school and community members who have expressed interest in supporting the charter school both financially and through volunteering. Special Education Identified Students Albany Community Charter School does not discriminate on the basis of disability and will enroll all students without limitation. From Oregon Charter School Handbook 2012: Under OAR 581-015-2075 when a child with an Individual Education Program (IEP) enrolls in a charter school, the district, in consultation with the parent, must provide a free appropriate public education (including comparable services) until the district adopts the existing IEP or develops a new IEP. Enrollment in the charter school is not considered a change in placement. OAR 581-015-2075 reflects records requests and notifications required by the 2011 charter school legislation. However, schools enrolling a child with an IEP may not delay their attendance while they request, and wait to receive, student education records. The district must serve children with disabilities attending the charter school in the same manner as it serves children with disabilities in its other schools, including providing supplementary and related services on site at the charter school to the same extent as it provides those services on site at its other schools. Additionally, if the district provides federal IDEA funds to its other schools, it must include the charter school(s) in this distribution. Please see Section R for more information on ACCS’ proposed Special Education processes. L. THE STATUTES AND RULES THAT APPLY TO THE SCHOOL.

Page 56 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. As provided in ORS 338.115(1), statutes and rules that apply to school District Boards, School Districts, or other public schools will generally not apply to Albany Community Charter School; however, laws specifically ascribed as applicable in ORS Chapter 338 and the charter agreement will be applicable and followed. Albany Community Charter School will be non-sectarian in all of its programs and operations; will not charge tuition; and will not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender or disability. Albany Community Charter School will actively comply with all federal and state statutes that pertain to Oregon charter schools, specifically (per ORS 338.115(1)): a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k)

Federal law Public records law (ORS 192.410 to 192.505); Public meetings law (ORS 192.610 to 192.690); Municipal audit law (ORS 297.405 to 297.555 and 297.990); Criminal records checks (ORS 181.539, 326.603, 326.607, ORS 342.223 and 342.232); Textbooks (ORS 337.150); Tuition and fees (ORS 339.141, 339.147 and 339.155); Discrimination (ORS 659.850 and 659.855); Tort claims (ORS 30.260 to 30.300); Health and safety statutes and rules; The statewide assessment system developed by the Department of Education for mathematics, science and English under ORS 329.485 (1); l) Academic content standards and instruction (ORS 329.045); m) Any statute or rule that establishes requirements for instructional time provided by a school during each day or during a year (OAR 581-022-1620); n) Prohibition on infliction of corporal punishment (ORS 339.250(12)); o) Reporting of child abuse and training on prevention and identification of child abuse (ORS 339.370, 339.372, 339.375 and 339.377); p) Diploma, modified diploma and alternative certificate (ORS 329.451); Oregon q) Unemployment Law (ORS Chapter 657); r) ORS 339.326; and s) Oregon Charter School Law (ORS Chapter 338). As an Oregon non-profit corporation, Albany Community Charter School will also comply with ORS Chapter 65 (Oregon law for not-for-profit corporations). As a non-profit with federal tax-exempt status through the Internal Revenue Service, under code 501(c)(3), Albany Community Charter School will also comply with laws and regulations for federal tax-exempt public benefit organizations.

Page 57 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


M. THE STANDARDS FOR BEHAVIOR AND A DESCRIPTION OF DISCIPLINE, SUSPENSION OR EXPULSION OF STUDENTS.

Student Expectations and Discipline Policies Albany Community Charter Schools School-wide Discipline System is centered in the relationship and communication between students, staff, and parents. Parents are kept informed of current school issues, successes, and concerns through school-wide newsletters, classroom teachers’ newsletters, the school website, parent meetings, and handbooks. By varying the means of communication the likelihood that the parent community is well informed is greatly increased therefore increasingly the likelihood of success. Creating a Safe and Positive Learning Environment The staff at Albany Community Charter School strives to create a safe and positive learning environment in the school. In this environment, students should feel accepted and valued by their peers and the staff of the school. Student behavior plays a large role in creating the type of school culture we desire at ACCS. Our discipline policy is to support your child’s educational rights by directing students to make responsible decisions about appropriate behavior. All discipline at ACCS is based on safety, respect and responsibility. Albany Community Charter School Rights and Responsibilities The purpose of these behavior guidelines is to ensure that all students understand their rights and responsibilities. These rights and responsibilities will be presented to students in a contract. It must be signed and dated by the student and parents before entering school. This contract will be the agreement that we all live by. Albany Community Charter School students, like members of any community, have both rights and responsibilities. It is the obligation of the school to protect those rights and insist upon those responsibilities. Below you will find listed the guidelines for behavior at Albany Community Charter School. Guidelines for common areas: walk facing forward, keep hands, feet, and objects to self, get adult help for accidents and spills, use all equipment and materials appropriately, use kind words and actions, wait your turn, clean up after self, follow adult directions, follow school rules, respectfully remind others to follow school rules, take proper care of all personal belongings and school equipment, be honest Guidelines for lunch time: keep all food to self, stay seated with feet on floor, and facing table, do not share food, allow anyone to sit next to you, use quiet voices, raise hand and wait to be excused, clean up your space, do not waste food Page 58 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Guidelines for hallways and sidewalks: stay to the right, single file, allow others to pass, hold the door open for the person behind you, use quiet and kind voices, keep body to self, follow the rules that are presented by staff, yield to younger children and older adults Guidelines for bathrooms: keep water in the sink, wash hands thoroughly, put paper towels in garbage, give people privacy, use quiet voices, remember the bathroom is not a social area, flush toilet, return to room promptly Guidelines for arrival and dismissal areas: use sidewalks and crosswalks, wait calmly, do not use loud voices, use kind words and actions, follow adult directions, arrive on time, leave on time Guidelines for Special Events and Assemblies: carry chairs properly, single file, sit respectfully, use audience manners, enter and exit quietly, respect personal space, follow directions, set a good example for others Guidelines for Playground/Recess: walk to and from the playground, stay within boundaries, be aware of activities / games around you, no play fighting, what is on the ground stays on the ground, use equipment on your own/under own power, play fairly, include everyone, use hall/bathroom pass for leaving the area, return equipment, return to class/building promptly Rights of All Students • I have the right to an education. Therefore it is my responsibility to listen, learn, and complete assignments in a timely manner and ask for help when needing it. I will behave in a manner that does not disrupt the learning environment. • I have the right to be safe and secure in school. Therefore I will not hurt anyone physically, spiritually, or mentally. It is my responsibility to treat others the way I want to be treated. • I have the right to go to school and be in a class with my classmates. Therefore it is my responsibility to be a classmate and act respectfully toward every adult and student in a team effort. • I have the right to be treated with dignity and respect. Therefore it is my responsibility to treat all others with dignity and respect, to honor, be polite, and use consideration. Bullying, intimidation, harassment, or any menacing to personal safety will not be tolerated, and I will not act in this matter. • I have the right to be myself.

Page 59 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Therefore, it is my responsibility to respect others as individuals even though they may look, act or think differently than I do. Albany Community Charter School represents a microcosm of the diverse community we live in. • I have the right to express my opinions and feelings in a polite and respectful manner, when appropriate (not when the teacher is talking, without interrupting, etc). Therefore, it is my responsibility to listen to and respect the thoughts, ideas, and feelings of others. The classroom is a place for cooperative inquiry in which everyone’s voice is recognized, free from bullying, intimidation, and manipulation. • Students are responsible to respect the property of others, including students, staff and community. •

I have the right to participate in an appropriate course of studies.

I have the right to have confidential records, including behavior and academic records. My records will not be shared with other students or other parents.

The Classroom Teacher’s Commitment • Enforce the school wide system as agreed • Communicate high behavioral expectations to students and parents • Take responsibility for classroom problems and behavior • Foster a school climate characterized by a concern for students as individuals • Take an interest in the personal goals, achievements, and problems of students • Support the students in their academic and extracurricular activities

The Leadership Team’s (lead teachers, site director, board of directors) Commitment • Support the teachers • Model high behavioral expectations • Delegate discipline • Share decision making power • Maintain a school climate in which everyone wants to achieve self-discipline Page 60 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


• Foster a school climate where the leadership team is sincerely concerned for the staff as individuals • Interest in personal goals by the leadership team reaching out to the teachers

Albany Community Charter School Community’s Commitment • Be timely: don’t wait to praise or correct • Be specific: tell the student exactly what they did (good or bad) • Be sincere: insincere praise is usually worse than none at all • Be consistent: with everything, everywhere • Be proportional: match the amount of intensity or recognition, do not go overboard • Communicate: the many people involved in the students’ lives need to communicate

Discipline Process On an individual basis, student behavioral issues are addressed with parents through the parent/teacher emails, notes home, phone calls home, and the processing forms. Each processing form requires a parent signature. This signature ensure that parents are being made aware of behavioral concerns of their child and opens the lines of communication at home and between parents and the classroom teachers. This communication again fosters the success of the school-wide behavioral system. ACCS’ system is based on a commitment to each child’s success, to simple school rules, and to consistency. The system allows for each teacher’s style in the classroom and it allows for age appropriate communication and discipline without compromising school-wide policies, expectations, and consistency. For example, parents school-wide know their child will be given a reminder, a warning, and a process for minor infractions or distractions. Anytime a child receives a process form that child is referred to the problem solving room. This fosters success because the system gives clear expectations and consistency without being rigid. With a consistent school-wide behavioral system in place and an overriding theme designed to promote positive behaviors and diminish inappropriate student actions the school is working in a community forum undivided. The students feel safe, secure, and the boundaries are consistent wherever they go. This allows them to perform at higher levels. It is the position of ACCS that each student has the right to an education based on the concept of individual human dignity which includes individual choice and the responsibility of accepting the consequences.

Page 61 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


The orderly operation of school requires the respectful cooperation of students, parents/guardians, and staff. Teachers and administrators have the responsibility to preserve a learning environment for all students. Whenever that environment is disrupted by a student or a group of students, school officials may find it necessary to take appropriate action by removing disruptive students from the formal learning environment. Careful attention will be given to procedures and methods whereby fairness and consistency in discipline shall be assured each student. Many issues arise during a school day which require sensitive and timely assistance or intervention and a level of attention that would be difficult to offer in the classroom environment. Maintaining a productive environment in (and outside of) the classroom is also a priority. Therefore ACCS will have a fulltime problem assistance staff person. This person will be trained in behavior management skills, and will be responsible for assisting and supporting other staff members in meeting the ACCS goals. This person is not meant to serve only as a disciplinarian, although assistance with behavior problems will be part of the job description and will include coordinating with the teacher or other staff when communicating with parents as the situation suggests. Referral to specialists or other agencies will be a collaborative decision making process in which the Problem Assistance staff person may participate. This staff person also will collect behavior data to assist the staff and board in making decisions for future program development and, in general, contribute to the array of school wide efforts to promote a safe and welcoming school environment. This list is not exhaustive, nor is it meant to be. In situations not detailed here, teachers and administrators will use their best judgment and attempt to be as fair, reasonable, developmentally appropriate and thorough as possible. Infractions Some examples of minor infractions: losing control of your body, name calling, calling out, out of seat, offtask (quietly or disruptively), talking when the teacher is talking, not following directions in a timely manner, copying (eyes wandering), continually arriving late to class, dress code violations. Daily Ladder of Discipline for minor infractions 1. “Free” reminder: addressed with proximity, eye contact, saying student's name, etc. 2. Verbal reminder: e.g. “Frank, please remember to raise your hand.” 3. Clip moved on the behavior chart. Notice given. 4. Clip moved on the behavior chart. Notice given. 5. Student is placed on process and sent to the problem solving room to work on a solution. A child’s behavior for the day will be tracked on the weekly reports sent home on Thursdays. All reports are to be returned on Fridays signed by the parent. Some examples of major infractions: three processing forms in one day, five processing forms in a school week, any pattern of activity that is detrimental to the welfare or safety of other students or repeatedly Page 62 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


interferes with the school’s ability to provide educational opportunities to other students, any intentional unauthorized physical contact with another person which causes physical injury or would be reasonably expected to cause physical injury including but not limited to, hitting, shoving, biting, or physically assaulting another student, verbal abuse, intimidation or threats, physical intimidation, or sexual intimidation or harassment, ridiculing others or using profane language or gestures, possession of matches or cigarette lighter (or other dangerous items); willful destruction or defacing of school property*, theft, actions of continual willful disobedience or open persistent defiance of proper authority, cheating on a test, plagiarism, tampering with any document, providing false statements of any kind, leaving school property without permission, truancy, or cutting class, arson, alcohol or drugs, computer/internet misuse, drug paraphernalia, threat of violence to self or others, blatant defiance, intimidation, harassment, cheating, any unlawful act, bringing weapons to school, fighting *Fines will be levied to parents for vandalism or theft. Fines will also be levied for lost or damaged Major infractions are referred directly to the problem solving room and will result in a call home to the student’s parents, as well as a process form being sent home. The form needs to be returned with a parent signature the following school day. Parents are encouraged to discuss the process with their child. Consequences are determined at the discretion of the problem solving room staff. Some examples of consequences could include: Call/email/meet with parents, Other natural consequences (e.g., student defacing desks must spend recess time cleaning desks), apology letter written, loss of recess periods, and any other consequence deemed appropriate in cooperation between the problem solving room staff, classroom teacher, and administrator. All process forms will be tracked in the problem solving room based on student, grade, and type of infraction. ACCS believes that tracking infractions can help our staff learn how to better help our students become productive members of the school family.

Lunch/Recess Detention After two processes within one school day students will receive detention. Lunch detention will take place in the problem solving room monitored by a staff member. Students will be expected to be completely quiet while they eat their lunch. The benefits of lunch detention are that it is powerful, immediate, easily implemented and excellent for self-reflection on behavior.

Suspension or Expulsion Suspension or expulsion is a last resort and will be assigned on an individual basis. If repeated detentions are issued and the student is not showing improved behavior and decision making skills, suspension or expulsion may be considered based on the severity of the infraction. If suspension or expulsion is under Page 63 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


consideration a conference will be called with the problem solving room staff, the classroom teacher, and the administrator. Parents will be invited to the conference as a listening party only. The parent may be asked to leave at any time during to conference to protect other student's privacy and/or when the course of action for discipline is being decided. The parent may also be asked questions or consulted at the request of the group. The team will work together to decide on the best course of action for each student, taking into consideration the offense committed, and their behavior record. Albany Community Charter School agrees to follow Greater Albany Public School’s due process guidelines: Due Process When an alleged offense occurs, the procedure below will be followed: 1. The student will be informed of the conduct involved and the nature of the charge and will be given the opportunity to present his/her view of the occurrence. 2. If discipline is to follow, the student will be informed of the immediate action, reasons for its administration, and subsequent procedures to be followed. 3. When a student is suspended or when stronger discipline is contemplated, the student's parents will be notified as soon as possible. 4. In working through disagreements, the District complaint procedure will be followed. Suspension Albany Community Charter School agrees to adopt Greater Albany Public School’s policy on suspension: Students may be suspended for willful violation of school regulations or for willful conduct that materially and substantially disrupts the rights of others to an education; endangers the student or others; or endangers district property. Suspension may take the following forms: -In-school suspension: Exclusion of the student from class attendance for a designated length of time to be determined by the administration (leadership team). -Out-of-school suspension: A temporary exclusion from school for not more than 10 school days. -Exclusion in cases being investigated and/or pending expulsion. -Exclusion until some specific pending action occurs such as a physical or mental examination; incarceration by court action; a hearing by the superintendent or designee; and/or official Board action.

Page 64 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


-Saturday school, detention before school, and/or detention after school may be assigned as disciplinary consequences in the place of suspension when appropriate. Out-of-school suspended students are not to be on school grounds without administration (leadership team) permission. When a student is suspended, he/she will be informed in writing of the charge and of the suspension. Parents will be notified by telephone whenever possible and will be sent a letter in cases of out-of-school suspension. The letter will state procedures for reinstatement. Parents may request and will be given a conference with the building principal (leadership team). (GAPS Policy JGD) from GAPS Parent and Student Handbook When a student is suspended from school, classwork will be provided to the student to complete. Work is expected to be completed and turned in when the student returns from suspension. The classroom teacher will be available before or after school for assistance for the duration of the suspension based on arrangements made with the parents. Expulsion Albany Community Charter School agrees to adopt Greater Albany Public Schools policy on expulsion: “A principal or designee (ACCS leadership team), after reviewing available information, may recommend to the superintendent (ACCS board of directors) that a student be expelled. Expulsion of a student shall not extend beyond one calendar year unless a weapon is involved. No student may be expelled without a hearing by the superintendent or designee (ACCS board of directors) unless the right to a hearing is waived by the student’s parents or by the student if he or she is 18 years old. The right to a hearing may be waived in writing or by failure to appear at a scheduled hearing. By waiving the right to a hearing, the student and parents agree to abide by the findings of a hearings officer (ACCS board of directors). When an expulsion hearing is to be held, the student and parents will be given written notice by personal service or certified mail at least five days before the scheduled hearing. Notice will include the specific charge or charges, and the alleged misconduct, including the nature of the evidence of a violation. If the student or parent has difficulty understanding or speaking English, the district will provide a interpreter. At the hearing, the student may have a representative present. The representative may be an attorney or parent. The district’s attorney also may be present. The student will be allowed to present his or her version of the charges and to present evidence. The student also will be allowed to be present and hear the evidence presented by the district. The hearings officer will determine the facts in the case and decide on disciplinary action, including the duration of any expulsion. The hearings officer’s decision may be appealed to the Board. Parents of students who wish to appeal will have the opportunity to be heard at the time the Board reviews the decision. The Board will affirm, modify or reverse the decision. Before expulsion, the district must propose alternative programs of instruction, or instruction combined with counseling to a student subject to expulsion for reasons other than a weapons policy violation.” Page 65 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


(GAPS Policy JGE) from GAPS Parent and Student Handbook Note: Disciplinary action may extend beyond the preceeding guidelines. If an infraction violates the law, the appropriate enforcement agency may be contacted. Expulsion from Albany Community Charter School shall be mandatory for the following violations: 1. Carrying, bringing, using, or possessing a dangerous weapon (including a firearm or firearm facsimile, any pellet or BB gun or other device operational or not designed to propel projectiles by spring action or compressed air; fixed blade knife with a blade that measures longer than three inches in length or a spring loaded knife with a blade longer than three and a half inches, any object, device, instrument, material, or substance, whether animate or inanimate used or intended to be used to inflict death or serious bodily injury. Weapon is defined as follows: The possession, use, or threat of use, of any instrument, article or substance specifically designed for and presently capable of causing death or physical injury; or any weapon, device, or look-a-like device, instrument, material or substance which under the circumstances in which it is used, attempted to be used, or threatened to be used, is readily capable of causing death or serious physical injury (See Section 921 of Title 18 of the US Weapon Policy JFCJ). 2. The sale or possession of a drug or controlled substance 3. Death threats to other students or administration; 4. The commission of an act, which if committed by an adult would be robbery or assault other than third degree assault. Expulsion of a student shall not extend beyond one calendar year, however expulsion for not less than one year is required for any student who is determined to have: A. Brought a weapon to a school, to school property under the jurisdiction of the school or to an activity under the jurisdiction of the school. B. Possessed, concealed or used a weapon in a school or on school property or at an activity under the jurisdiction of the school, or C. Brought to or possessed, concealed or used a weapon at an interscholastic activity administered Page 66 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


by a voluntary organization approved by the State Board of Education under ORS 339.430. Albany Community Charter School Dress Code All students will be required to comply with the dress code. If there are questions or concerns regarding the dress code, please contact the office for assistance. Acceptable bottoms: ALL in khaki color slacks, corduroy pants, dress pants, shorts, jumper with acceptable polo underneath (girls), or skirt (girls). No designs, pictures or embellishments please. Skirts, jumpers, and shorts must all pass the length of the longest finger when hands are held at student’s sides. Acceptable tops: Any solid colored polo shirt, t-shirt length or longer, no designs, pictures, or embellishments. Acceptable shoes: sturdy shoes suitable for physical education should be worn at all times. No flip flops, heels, or sandals are allowed. Acceptable outerwear: any solid colored sweatshirt can be worn inside the building-no designs, pictures, or embellishments. Heavier weight coats are acceptable for outdoor play in any color or pattern. Hats, gloves, and scarves may be worn outside as well. Acceptable accessories: solid colored tights (girls), solid colored socks, hair accessories and jewelry that is not distracting (at teacher’s discretion). Albany Community Charter School is happy to assist a family in securing appropriate clothes for school if necessary. ACCS also will maintain a clothes closet of donated uniform pieces for families in need.

This policy and conditions contained therein is subject to change at the discretion of the board of directors of Albany Community Charter School. Special Education Students and Discipline ACCS agrees to follow GAPS policy on the discipline of Special Education Students, as stated in JGDA/JGEA.

N. A PROPOSED BUDGET AND FINANCIAL PLAN; SOUND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.

Page 67 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School has three years of proposed budgets. We recognize that the first year in operation as a charter school is the most difficult financially. We have provided a budget with many costs that will not be as large in subsequent years of Albany Community Charter School. All budgets were reviewed with other charter schools in the state. While some input was received from other boards and directors, and adjustments were made, it was determined that our budgets are accurate estimates, with a cushion. While ACCS is proposing 202 first through eighth grade students, we are only expecting to enroll 180. If ACCS chooses to open an additional class based on enrollment numbers, additional supplies will be purchased. Our budgets reflect 10% lower enrollment, but our budgeted supplies and staff allow for a full enrollment of 180. All State School Funds were calculated using flat funding from the 2012-2013 school year, using Greater Albany Public Schools ADM of $5994, with 80% pass through to the charter school for GAPS sponsorship, and 90% pass through with state sponsorship. Kindergarten revenue was calculated by taking half of a weight of 5994 at 80% for Gaps sponsored and 90% for State sponsored. Enrollment in the budget was calculated at 10% below the max enrollment. Albany Community Charter School feels that this is a very conservative estimate, considering we have more students with letters of intent than we have spots available. ACCS also believes that there are many more parents who have not heard of our efforts in the area, and that our numbers will only expand. Staff Expenses GAPS Sponsorship Staff Expenses Albany Community Charter School will rely on a staff of 9 full time classroom teachers working in self contained classrooms, 9 part time classroom assistants, 1 problem solving room attendant, and 1 site director to over-see operations in its first year of operation under GAPS sponsorship. In our 2014-2015 budgets, under GAPS sponsorship, ACCS has provided for a raise of $3,000 for each teacher. ACCS also added two half time specialists. One in the area of Music/Art and the other being a STEM coordinator. Due to no longer needing training for new curriculum, ACCS has cut teacher prep days before school starts from 14 in the 2013-2014 school year to 7 in the 2014-2015 school year. Included in our 2015-2016 budgets, health insurance costs were added for all full time teachers and the administrator. Staffing costs were the same otherwise. The quote for health insurance was received from an insurance agent in Portland who insures other charter school teachers. We were told that this quote was a bit above what other schools pay. ACCS will research all optional quotes and plans for insurance when we are ready to purchase prior to the 2015-2016 school year.

Page 68 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Assistant wages are calculated at $12.00 per hour, with the exception of the Problem Solving Room Staff which is calculated at $13.00. ACCS feels that these are good wages, and provide a good opportunity for those that are looking for a part time job that works with a child’s school schedule.

Page 69 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 70 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 71 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 72 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


State Sponsorship Staff Expenses In the first year of budgets for Albany Community Charter School under state sponsorship (2014-2015), our staffing levels include 9 full time classroom teachers working in self-contained classrooms, 9 part time classroom assistants, 1 problem solving room attendant, 3 half time specialists in music/art, STEM, and PE, and 1 site director to over-see operations in its first year of operation under GAPS sponsorship. Pay level would be equal to the pay in the first year of operations under GAPS sponsorship. In the 2015-2016 budgets under state sponsorship, ACCS increased teachers’ salaries by $3,000 for classroom teachers, increased site directors salary by $3,000, and gave all assistants a $1.00 an hour raise, bringing them to $13.00 per hour, and $14.00 for the problem solving room staff. The PE specialist was given additional hours as well as adding a Spanish specialist. ACCS added a full time office manager/bookkeeper. ACCS also added health insurance to all full time, site director, office manager/bookkeeper, and problem solving room staff. In the 2016-2017 budgets under state sponsorship, ACCS gave all classroom teachers a $3,000 raise bringing salaries to between $36,000-$39,000.

Page 73 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 74 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 75 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Page 76 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will utilize a sound financial management system. Our system will include internal controls (including segregation of duties), financial reporting, cash management and investment practices, and other components. Albany Community Charter School will use QuickBooks for Non-Profits as its accounting software. If this is not acceptable, ACCS will use software that the sponsor deems appropriate. ACCS agrees to adopt the rules governing the budgeting and accounting systems for schools as stated in Chapter Two of the Program Budgeting and Accounting Manual (2006 edition) per 581-023-0035 Albany Community Charter School will complete an annual Internal Revenue Service Form 990 (for 501(c)(3) corporations) and will submit a copy to the District annually. ACCS agrees to follow all guidelines provided by the PERS office. An ACCS representative will be attending a free workshop on how to satisfy all PERS requirements. Cash flow issues ACCS has identified the following strategies to deal with cash flow shortages: 1. Secure a private supporter. 2. Fundraise consistently and effectively. 3. Open a line of credit at ACCS’ financial institution. ACCS believes that with proper planning, responsible budgeting, and innovative solutions, we will not have cash flow shortages. Below please find a chart of planned cash flow for ACCS’ first year in operation as a GAPS sponsored school. Notice the double payment in the July column. Other years will be similar, but without the double payment in July. The cash flow chart is also available in the appendix.

Page 77 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


GAPS SPONSORSHIP-Fir Grove INCOME 3101

ADMw SCHOOL SUPPORT

July

141,998

August

September OctoberNovember December January February March

70,999 70,999 70,999 70,999

70,999

70,999 70,998

70,998

April

70,998

May

70,998

June

0

$851,982

$116,000 $46,101 $5,350 $42,146 $10,050 $928 $973 $4,000 $1,639 $1,229 $31,036 $11,472 $13,111 $284,035 $63,000 $14,868 $2,570 $20,246 $4,828 $464 $467 $2,000 $944 $708 $15,518 $6,611 $7,556 $139,780 $93,000

2540-328 2540-329 2540-350 2540-410 2540-460 2540-541

LICENSED SALARIES 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,546 10,545 CLASSIFIED SALARIES 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 4,191 SUBSTITUTE SALARIES 3.3% 535 535 535 535 535 535 535 535 535 536 PERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,832 3,831 SOCIAL SECURITY 914 914 914 914 914 914 914 914 914 914 914 WORKERS COMPENSATION 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 88 88 88 88 88 88 88 88 88 88 88 FIELD TRIPS 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 1,639 PE SUPPLIES 1,229 TEXTBOOKS 31,036 NON CONSUMABLES 11,472 DEPRECIABLE TECHNOLOGY 6,556 6,556 TOTAL K-3 LICENSED SALARIES 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 5,727 CLASSIFIED SALARIES 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 1,352 SUBSTITUTE SALARIES 3.3% 257 257 257 257 257 257 257 257 257 257 PERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 1,841 SOCIAL SECURITY 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 439 WORKERS COMPENSATION 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 FIELD TRIPS 1,000 1,000 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 944 PE SUPPLIES 708 TEXTBOOKS 15,518 NON CONSUMABLES 6,611 DEPRECIABLE TECHNOLOGY 3,778 3,778 TOTAL 4-5 LICENSED SALARIES 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 8,455 July August September OctoberNovember December January February March April May June CLASSIFIED SALARIES 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 2,027 SUBSTITUTE SALARIES 3.3% 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 PERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 2,725 SOCIAL SECURITY 650 650 650 650 650 650 650 650 650 650 650 WORKERS COMPENSATION 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 FIELD TRIPS 1,000 1,000 1,000 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 1,167 PE SUPPLIES 875 TEXTBOOKS 23,277 NON CONSUMABLES 8,167 DEPRECIABLE TECHNOLOGY 4,667 4,667 TOTAL 6-8 ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 1,091 PERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 SOCIAL SECURITY 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 WORKERS COMPENSATION 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 SUPPORT SERVICES-BUSINESS FISCAL SERVICES PETTY CASH 500 CLASSIFIED SALARIES 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 1,464 PERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 381 SOCIAL SECURITY 91 91 91 91 91 91 91 91 91 91 91 WORKERS COMPENSATION 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 POSTAGE 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 ACCOUNTING SERVICES 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 833 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 4,000 NON CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 500 REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,417 1,413 LEASE 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 ELECTRICITY 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 FUEL/NATURAL GAS 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,310 1,300 WATER/SEWAGE 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 July August September OctoberNovember December January February March April May June GARBAGE 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 OTHER PROPERTY SERVICES 208 508 508 408 408 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 COMMUNICATIONS 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 500 500 500 500 NON-CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 EQUIPMENT 1,000 1,000

2633-354 222-430 2230 231-300 231-381 231-640 231-651 2240

ADVERTISING LIBRARY BOOKS ASSESSMENT AND TESTING PURCHASED SERVICES AUDIT SERVICES DUES AND FEES LIABILITY INSURANCE STAFF DEVELOPMENT

TOTAL EXPENSES 1111-111 1111-112 1111-121 1111-211 1111-220 1111-231 1111-232 1111-331 1111-410 1111-416 1111-420 1111-460 1111-550 1112-111 1112-112 1112-121 1112-211 1112-220 1112-231 1112-232 1112-331 1112-410 1112-416 1112-420 1112-460 1112-550 1121-111 1121-112 1121-121 1121-211 1121-220 1121-231 1121-232 1121-331 1121-410 1121-416 1121-420 1121-460 1121-550 2410-113 2410-211 2410-220 2410-231 2410-232 2500 2520 2520-103 2520-112 2520-211 2520-220 2520-231 2520-232 2520-353 2520-380 2520-410 2520-460 2540-322 2540-324 2540-325 2540-326 2540-327

MONTHLY EXPENDITURES MONTHLY PAYMENT BALANCE CARRIED

2,000 1,750 1,000

200 3,000

2,000

200 1,000

200

1,750 2,000

541 5,300 1,300 139,893 141,998 2,105

2,000

2,000

59,739 59,039 70,999 70,998 56,710 68,669

58,489 70,998 81,177

2,000

2,000

1,300 70,514 60,039 62,739 61,439 70,999 70,999 70,999 70,999 4,211 15,171 23,430 32,990

58,539 70,999 45,450

58,489 58,789 70,998 70,998 93,686 105,895

56,275 0 49620

$22,302 $3,805 $29,979 $7,149 $696 $692 $3,000 $1,167 $875 $23,277 $8,167 $9,333 $203,442 $12,000 $3,120 $744 $116 $72 $16,052 $500 $16,107 $4,188 $999 $116 $97 $400 $10,000 $4,000 $500 $17,000 $30,000 $12,000 $14,400 $1,800

36906

$2,028 $3,500 $5,500 $2,000 $2,000 $2,000 $92,228 $600 $8,000 $3,500 $1,000 $10,000 $541 $5,300 $2,600 $803,985

851982 TOTAL ssf 5000 FUNDRAISING 400 CASH BALANCE 857382 TOTAL $ AVAILABLE RESERVE 803985 TOTAL EXPENDITURES

53997

Page 78 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Start-up costs Finances in a charter school can be especially tight in the first year. ACCS plans to use innovative solutions to help offset start-up costs. ACCS has already received a substantial amount of material donations. Everything from desks, books, tables, file cabinets, a safe, a copier, and computers. We will continue to gather donations during the planning stages. ACCS also plans on taking advantage of the many offers of help we have received from local business people, parents, and other charter schools. We currently have offers for teacher training, janitorial services, landscaping, furniture construction, and moving help just to name a few. ACCS will request a double payment of state school funds in July to help cover the price of purchasing necessary supplies and equipment. Handling money When money is handled at ACCS, it will always stay in the school building. Staff, parents, or board members are not allowed to take money home to count, or for any other purpose. Whenever money is being counted, two people must be present at all times. Budget development and oversight ACCS will hold frequent board meeting open to the public and give a report of the financial status of the school. Discussion about the current and future state of the budget will be encouraged among all in attendance. All meeting will be open to the public. Fir each yearly budget a committee will be formed and will consist of at least 2 members of the board of directors, the site manager, at least two teachers (one being a lead teacher), and at least one parent with oversight from the board. Annual Visit While ACCS will expect an annual visit from our sponsor, our school is open for a visit at any time. Financial records will be presented on request as well. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Albany Community Charter School’s draft financial management policies include: CODES OF CONDUCT When the Charter School board makes decisions involving the expenditure of Federal and State Funds, it must keep accurate minutes of meetings including attendance at meetings, motions, and voting results.

Page 79 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


A transaction in which a Board member has a conflict of interest may be authorized, approved or ratified if it receives the affirmative vote of a majority of the members on the Board who have no direct or indirect interest in the transaction provided: (a) The material facts of the transaction and the director's interest are disclosed or known to the Board or committee of the Board; and (b) The board member(s) involved has recused him or herself; The presence of a board member with a direct or indirect interest in the transaction does not affect the validity of any action taken under this section. PROCUREMENT STANDARDS FOR SPENDING FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDS These standards are designed to ensure that these materials and services are obtained in an effective manner and in compliance with the provisions of applicable law. 1. Avoid purchasing unnecessary items. 2. Where appropriate, an analysis is made of lease and purchase alternatives to determine which would be the most economical and practical procurement. 3. Solicitations for goods and services shall include: (a) A clear and accurate description of the technical requirements for the material, product, or service to be procured. In competitive procurements, a description shall not contain features that unduly restrict competition. (b) Factors that Albany Community Charter School will use in evaluating bids or proposals, including: (1) specific features of brand names or equal descriptions that bidders are required to meet; (2) A preference for products and services that conserve natural resources and protect the environment, and are energy efficient. 4. Show efforts to utilize local businesses and community members wherever feasible. 5. All contracts in excess of $25,000 must contain: (a) Contractual provisions or conditions that allow for administrative, contractual, or legal remedies in instances in which a contractor violates or breaches the contract terms, and provide for remedial action as may be appropriate; (b) Provisions for termination by Albany Community Charter School including the manner by which termination shall be effected and the basis for settlement; (c) Requirements relating to guarantees, performance bonds, and payment bonds. 6. All contracts in excess of $100,000 must follow the guidelines for minimum requirements as recommended by the State. CONTROLS, BUDGET, AND FISCAL MANAGEMENT Albany Community Charter School will maintain in effect the following principles in its ongoing fiscal management practices to ensure that, (1) expenditures are authorized by and in accord with amounts specified in the Board-adopted budget, (2) the school’s funds are managed and held in a manner that provides a high degree of protection of the school’s assets, and (3) all transactions are recorded and documented in an appropriate manner. Segregation of Duties Page 80 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will develop and maintain simple check request and purchase order forms to document the authorization of all non-payroll expenditures. All proposed expenditures must be approved by the site director who will review the proposed expenditure to determine whether it is consistent with the Board-adopted budget and sign the check request form. All checks and purchase orders over $2,000 require an approval signature by either the Board Treasurer or Board Chair, to ensure separation of expenditure authorization and check signing functions. All transactions will be posted in an electronic general ledger. The transactions will be posted on the ledger by someone at the school site or a contracted bookkeeper. BUDGET TRANSFERS The site director may transfer up to ten percent from one unrestricted budget item, in the board-approved annual budget, to another without board approval, as long as the budget remains balanced, but shall notify the Board of the transfer at the next regularly scheduled meeting. Any transfer above ten percent must be approved in advance by a quorum of the Board. REQUIRED BUDGET AND OTHER FISCAL REPORTS The site director, working in conjunction with the Bookkeeper, will produce and submit to the District any and all required fiscal reports as may be required by state or federal law, or mandated by the terms of the school’s charter. These include, but are not limited to, cash flow analysis, balance sheet, account reconciliation report, current fiscal year budget, attendance reports, enrollment and other data reports required by the Oregon Department of Education, and reports required by the District. PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE The Board will ensure that the school retains appropriate insurance coverage including:   

Property and liability insurance; Workers Compensation; and Any other insurance required by law, sponsor policy or charter contract.

BOARD COMPENSATION Board members will serve without compensation, but may be reimbursed for actual and necessary expenses. Expenses for travel necessary to attending board meetings and meetings of board committees need not be approved in advance by the board. All other expenses will be approved in advance by the board. Travel expenses reimbursed will not exceed levels that would be subject to federal or state income tax. All expenses reimbursed will be documented by receipts and in no event may reimbursements exceed actual expenses. AUTHORITY TO ENTER INTO CONTRACTS AND AGREEMENTS Except as otherwise provided in these policies, the site director may enter into contracts and agreements not to exceed $2,000 without Board approval, provided funds sufficient for the contract or agreement are Page 81 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


authorized and available within the school’s board-adopted budget. Contracts and agreements in excess of $2,000 must be submitted for board approval and may be executed by the principal or other person specifically designated by the Board after the Board has duly approved the contract or agreement. BORROWING From time to time it may be necessary for Albany Community Charter School to borrow funds from outside sources to fund operations and expansion. This may be necessary because of the seasonality of income from fees, donations, and sales, and due to major expansions or revisions of Albany Community Charter School’s programs. Funds are to be borrowed only as required to meet these needs, and borrowing is to be consistent with sound fiscal and management practices. Borrowings are not intended to make up for inadequate planning or spending above budgeted levels. The Board of Directors must decide, via majority vote, to borrow any funds. Borrowing funds should be done within the following guidelines: 1. Borrowing should be within appropriate limits approved by the board prior to the time of borrowing. 2. Amounts should be borrowed at the lowest available interest rates. Where borrowing from individuals can be done at lower than current commercial rates, this may be done. 3. Most borrowing will be done at short-term conditions due to the seasonal nature of income. Long-term borrowing will be done only if rates are favorable and amounts for short-term would be at the same minimum level. CREDIT CARDS Albany Community Charter School may maintain corporate credit cards which may be issued to staff as designated by the site director. Such credit cards will be used solely for school business. ACCOUNTING SYSTEM General Requirements The site director will establish and maintain an appropriate attendance accounting system to record the number of days students are actually in attendance at Albany Community Charter School and engaged in the activities required of them by the school. The annual audit will review actual attendance accounting records and practices to ensure compliance. The attendance accounting practices will be in conformance with the Charter Schools Act and the applicable Oregon laws regarding Average Daily Maintenance (ADMw). Therefore:  ADMw will be computed according to ORS 327.013. Page 82 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School’s instructional calendar will include at least 168 days of instruction and demonstrate that the school offers the annual instructional hours as required pursuant to applicable law.

Account Journals The Bookkeeper will maintain the following account journals:  General Ledger  Cash Receipts  Cash Disbursements The Bookkeeper will conduct routine maintenance of all books and accounts, which will be periodically reviewed by the principal. Each journal will be printed monthly and filed. Chart of accounts Albany Community Charter School’s Bookkeeper, in conjunction with a Certified Public Accountant as needed, will develop a Chart of Accounts which conforms to the State and charter sponsor reporting requirements, accurately reflects budget categories and provides information. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Financial statements will be prepared periodically, at the principal’s discretion, and will be available for review by the Board of Directors. These statements will include a comparison between the year-to-date actual and year-to-date budget and will be reviewed by the Treasurer. Financial statements will be presented to the full Board of Directors monthly or quarterly as requested. RECORD KEEPING Transaction ledgers, canceled/duplicate checks, attendance and entitlement records, payroll records, and any other necessary fiscal documents will be maintained by school staff in a secure location for at least three years, or as long as required by applicable law, whichever is longer. CASH MANAGEMENT: BANK ACCOUNTS AND PETTY CASH FUND Bank Accounts Albany Community Charter School will maintain its accounts in financial institutions that are federally insured. The signature of the site director, Treasurer or Board Chair will be required to open or close accounts, which may be done only after approval by the Board of Directors. Deposits and Withdrawals All funds received by Albany Community Charter School will be deposited at a minimum of once monthly. Orders of withdrawal will bear the signature of one of the following officers or staff members: Page 83 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


1. Board chair 2. Treasurer 3. Site Director Petty Cash Fund A petty cash fund, not to exceed $1000, may be established with an appropriate ledger for minimal out-ofpocket business-related expenses and reimbursements. Albany Community Charter School’s Site Director will maintain physical custody of the petty cash fund and will verify all receipts as required for all requested reimbursements. The petty cash fund will be kept in a locked fire proof safe. The petty cash fund will be reconciled weekly. Issuing/Signing Checks Checks will be issued only for expenditures within the Board-approved budget and after a completed check request has been prepared and reviewed. Bank Account Reconciliation Albany Community Charter School’s Bookkeeper will reconcile the school’s ledger(s) with its bank accounts on a monthly basis and prepare: 1) a balance sheet 2) a comparison of budgeted to actual revenues and expenditures to date, and 3) a cash flow statement. The Site Director will regularly review these statements. BONDING Each officer or designated signatory with authority to withdraw funds will be bonded. The amount of insurance coverage will be reviewed annually by the finance committee. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Albany Community Charter School’s Bookkeeper will maintain accounts receivable records for Average Daily Maintenance (ADMw) funds, grant funds, monetary gifts, and for student fees (in accordance with ORS 339.141, 339.147 and 339.155). The Bookkeeper will accrue current month receivables and invoices, if applicable based on the corrected reports. The Bookkeeper will prepare monthly reports indicating outstanding accounts receivable older than thirty days and give to the Principal for follow-up. PURCHASING Any equipment with an estimated value of $1,000 or more will be purchased through competitive bidding or comparative pricing by at least three vendors, except in the case of emergencies that necessitate the purchase of emergency response supplies, equipment, or services. All such purchase must include documentation of a good faith effort to secure the lowest possible cost for comparable goods or services. Page 84 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


The Site Director shall not approve purchase orders or check requests lacking such documentation. Documentation shall be attached to all check and purchase order requests showing that at least three vendors were contacted and such documentation shall be maintained for three years. Comparative pricing or competitive bidding should be used periodically for regularly purchased materials, supplies, services, and insurance. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE The Bookkeeper will maintain accounts payable. The Principal will review them on a monthly basis. A check request form will be completed by the employee purchasing, indicating validity of attached invoices/receipts. The Bookkeeper will review the check request form for completeness and will initial to indicate completeness and submit to the Site Director for approval of payment. Payments will not be processed without a completed check request form, invoice or receipt. All invoices received will be recorded on the general ledger. Information recorded will include the vendor, amount of invoice, and account. Albany Community Charter School, whenever practical, will pay invoices within thirty days of their receipt, unless alternative arrangements are made with vendors or unless a dispute arises. Invoices of an amount which precludes payment within sixty days may be put on a payment plan, allowing a monthly payment agreeable to both Albany Community Charter School and the vendor, unless another arrangement is reached agreeable to both Albany Community Charter School and the vendor. STAFF AND TRAVEL EXPENSES Staff will be reimbursed for travel and related expenses while on School business, or other business-related expenses, according to the following guidelines: 1. In general, all expenses must be pre-approved in writing by the Site Director, Board Treasurer or Board Chair. 2. All reimbursement forms must be complete and submitted to the Bookkeeper, who will review them for evidence of pre-approval, completeness, and mathematical accuracy. The Bookkeeper will discuss any inaccurate or incomplete information with the submitting staff member, and request any additional information required to process the reimbursement request. The Bookkeeper initial to indicate pre-approval, completeness, and accuracy, and will submit to the Principal for approval of payment. 3. In general, staff will receive reimbursements within thirty days of submission of complete, accurate paperwork with evidence of pre-approval. 4. The Bookkeeper will submit personal reimbursement requests to the Site Director for review and approval.

Page 85 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


5. All staff expense reimbursements will be on checks separate from payroll checks. PAYROLL SYSTEM / PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTEM (PERS) Albany Community Charter School will employ/retain a Bookkeeper to prepare payroll checks, tax and retirement withholdings, tax statements, and to perform other payroll support functions. The Site Director will establish and oversee a system to prepare time/attendance reports and submit payroll check requests. The Site Director, or his/her designee, will review payroll statements monthly to ensure that (1) the salaries are consistent with staff contracts and personnel policies and (2) the proper tax, retirement, disability, and other withholdings have been deducted and forwarded to the appropriate authority. Upon hiring of staff, a personnel file will be established with all appropriate payroll-related documentation including a federal I-9 form, tax withholding forms, and retirement date. The School will participate in PERS, per ORS 338.135(5), and withhold the appropriate percentage of employees’ wages in accordance with the appropriate timelines. The Bookkeeper will be responsible for submission of all pertinent information to PERS. Employees may receive payroll checks via mail or direct deposit. CAPITAL ASSETS AND EXPENDITURES Capital The term capital will mean equipment, structures or furnishings with a useful life of more than one year and valued at one thousand dollars ($1,000) or more, including actual or estimated tax, shipping and handling, and land, buildings, and improvements, other than buildings valued at five thousand dollars ($5,000) or more. All items over one thousand dollars ($1,000) with a useful life of more than one year will be capitalized. Assets fewer than one thousand dollars ($1,000) with a useful life of more than one year may be capitalized only upon decision of the Board. Equipment Classified as Capital In addition, in order to maintain property control, the following are recorded and tracked the same as capital even though they may be less than one thousand dollars ($1,000) or have a useful life of less than a year: (1) equipment purchased with grant funds or required by the terms of the grant to be tracked as capital; (2) furnishings for new spaces; (3) cameras; (4) musical instruments; and (5) television sets, DVD/VCR units, AV projectors, computer systems (PC, keyboard, monitor, printer and hard drives). CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS AND EXPENSES A guiding principle for distinguishing between a capital improvement and a repair and maintenance expenditure is that a capital improvement results in an improved asset. If an expenditure increases the utility or significantly extends the useful life of an asset, the expenditure should be capitalized. If an expenditure only maintains the original condition of the asset, the expenditure should be classified as an expense. Page 86 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Budget: Capital Expenditures Except in emergencies or for reasons of economy, the purchase of major pieces of equipment classified as capital will be scheduled so that annual budgetary appropriations for capital purposes either will be of similar size or will show a continuous trend without severe fluctuations. Any equipment with an estimated value of $1,000 or more will be purchased through competitive bidding or comparative pricing by at least three vendors whenever possible. The Board in cooperation with the Site Director will draft a capital improvements program which will project school needs for a three-year period. Individual capital projects will be assigned priorities. The schedule will be reviewed and updated annually. Copies will be provided to the Board for review and consideration. In addition to items specifically included in the annual budget, the Site Director may purchase capital items costing up to one thousand dollars ($1,000). The purchase of capital equipment exceeding these limits, which has not received prior budget approval, must be approved by the Board. Disposition The Board must approve the disposition of any asset with a value of $2,000 or more. The Board must approve purchase or sale of any real estate. FINANCIAL AUDITS The Board will annually appoint a Finance Committee by October 1. Any persons with expenditure authorization or recording responsibilities within the school may not serve on the committee. The committee will annually contract for the services of an independent certified public accountant to perform an annual fiscal audit of the accounts of the public school prepared in accordance with the Municipal Audit Law, Oregon Revised Statutes 297.405 to 297.555 and 297.990. The audit will include, but not be limited to (1) an audit of the accuracy of school’s financial statements, (2) an audit of the school’s attendance accounting and revenue claims practices, and (3) an audit of the school’s internal controls practices. The annual audit will be forwarded to the sponsor, the State Board of Education and the Department of Education, by October 15 or within two weeks of receipt from the audit firm (in the event that the audit firm submits the audit to Albany Community Charter School after October 15). Please find below our draft policies concerning our financial processes. These policies are used at Kings Valley Charter School, with a consistent record of financial success. KVCS has been in operation for twelve years, and after their initial startup year has a consistent $100,000 carryover every fiscal year.

Page 87 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Financial Roles and Responsibilities Objective: The objective of this policy is the following: • Define the check signers. • Define person to reconcile accounts. • Define administrator duties of signing checks and closing the books. • Define board member responsibilities. Check Signers: 1. The personnel that can sign checks are defined in the check signing procedure. The check signers can not reconcile accounts or handle bank statements until the books are closed. A check signer may handle bank statements to correct errors in the books found during reconciliation. Reconcile Accounts: • An employee that does not sign checks is eligible to reconcile accounts. Administrator’s financial duties: A. The administrator is a check signer and cannot reconcile accounts or handle bank statements before the books are closed. B. The administrator will close the books using the QuickBooks user passwords on the same day the accounts are reconciled. Bookkeeper’s duties: 1. Handle cash deposits to the bank accounts. 2. Sign checks per the check signing policy. 3. Enter checks and deposits into the QuickBooks software. 4. Maintain all financial files in the fire proof safe. Board member financial responsibilities: 1. Review and approve check register monthly. 2. Review and approve account reconciliation monthly. 3. Review and approve balance sheet every quarter. Page 88 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


4. Review and approve profit and loss statement every quarter. 5. Approve annual budget at the May board meeting. Approve changes to the budget as needed at monthly board meetings. Accountability map: Step

Detail

Description of the method.

Changes to procedur es.

Changes to procedure.

Submit changes to Board for approval.

Document is updated and filed.

Who is accountab le Board

Who is responsib le Board

Who is informed

Board

Site Dir

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

File in paper and electronic files.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Cash Account Management Responsibilities Objective: The objective of this policy is the following: Define the procedure for opening a checking account, savings account, or Federal Government securities account. Define the procedure for closing one of the above accounts. Define the procedures for sending a wire transfer.

Procedure for opening a checking account, savings account, or Federal government securities account: Accounts can only be opened upon resolution of the ACCS Board. The resolution should include the institution and the designated people that can access the account. Procedure for closing a checking account, savings account, or Federal government securities account: Accounts can only be closed upon resolution of the ACCS Board. Procedure for sending a wire transfer: Routine wire transfers can be set up for execution by a resolution of the ACCS Board. Each transfer must then be approved by one member and the administrator. No wire transfers are allowed without a resolution.

Page 89 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedure s.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method. Submit changes to Board for approval.

Who is accountabl e Board

Who is responsibl e Board

Who is informed

Board

Site Dir.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

File in paper and electronic files.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Policy for Spending Approval Objective: The objectives of this policy are the following: 1. Define the spending plan. 2. Define the operations budget. 3. Define the approval process for consumable items. 4. Define the approval process for non-consumable items. 5. Define the accountability map. The Spending Plan The board uses the Spending Plan to approve funding for expenditures and determine the source of revenue the expenditure is to come from. The spending plan covers expenditures from all sources of revenue except the ADMw funds. Operations Budget The board uses the operations budget to approve funding for expenditures coming from funds. These funds are intended to pay the payroll, utilities and other operational costs.

ADMw

Approval Process for Regular Consumable Items. These items typically are classroom supplies, office supplies, toilet paper, and paper towels. Items in this category are included in the operations budget. Procedure for approval: 1. A list of recurring items will be kept on Google docs that are preapproved for purchasing by individuals designated by the administrator. Page 90 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


2. The administrator will get approval of the board before exceeding the operational budget for these items. Approval Process for Out of Routine Items: Out of routine items must be approved by the administrator on an individual basis. These items may include lower cost reusable items to be used in the classroom such as books, games, furniture and tools. This may also include contracts for service. These items must be approved by the board in the operations budget or the spending plan. . Accountability Map: Step Detail

Changes to policy

Description of the method.

Changing policy

Submit changes to board secretary

Board approval

Vote at board meeting

Document is updated and filed

Who is accountabl e Board president

Who is responsible

Who is informed

Board President

Staff and board

Board Site Director

Board

File in paper and electronic files

Staff Board secretary

Staff, and board

QuickBooks password management Objective: The objective of this policy is: • To Define QuickBooks passwords and change dates QuickBooks passwords and date changes: Descriptions

Change dates

Person making the change

2nd password holder

Book keeper’s screen Quarterly saver

Bookkeeper

ACCS Board President

Bookkeeper QuickBooks entry

Quarterly

Bookkeeper

ACCS Board President

Site Director

Quarterly

Site Director

ACCS Board President

Page 91 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedure s.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method. Submit changes to Board for approval.

Who is accountabl e Board

Who is responsibl e Board

Who is informed

Board

Site Director

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

File in paper and electronic files.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Procedure for the handling of petty cash at the school. Objective: The objective of this policy is to define the following: • Define the person responsible for the cash on hand at the school. • Define the method for storing cash on hand at the school. • Define the requirements for documenting purchases. • Define the maximum amount for any single expenditure. • Define the method for reimbursing the cash on hand at the school account. Person responsible for the operating cash: The person responsible for the operating cash is the site director. The site director will be responsible for safe keeping, proper documentation, and ensuring the spending limit is not exceeded. Method for storing operating cash: The operating cash shall be stored in the fireproof cabinet. This cabinet is to remain locked unless the site director is present. Documentation requirements Each expenditure must be documented with a receipt. Maximum amount for any single expenditure The maximum single expenditure is 200. Method to reimburse the cash on hand at the school account: Page 92 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Receipts will be submitted to the site director. The site director will then replace the cash by giving the receipt to the book keeper.

Procedure for signing checks Objective: The objective of this policy is the following Define the procedure for signing checks. Defining the procedure for approving automatic deposit of paychecks and reimbursement checks. Define the Accountability Map. Procedure for signing checks: Checks below 2500 can be signed by any one of the following combinations: Two board members. Board member and site director. Executive director and book keeper. Checks including and above 2500 can be signed by any of the following combinations: Two board members. Board member and executive director. In an emergency, a checked can be signed by a board member or site director. Checks that must be signed by one board member or site director due to an emergency need to have an accompanying email sent to all board members the same day explaining the situation, including why it was an emergency. A copy of that email should be filed with the records for that check. Procedure for Approving Automatic Deposit of Pay checks and reimbursement checks: The site director and a board member will approve a copy of the payroll summary report on QuickBooks by signing at the bottom of each page of the report before wages are transmitted to the employees. Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedures.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method.

Who is accountable

Submit changes to Board for approval.

File in paper and electronic files.

Who is informed

Board

Who is responsibl e Board

Board

Site Dir

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Page 93 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Procedure for reconciliation of accounts Objective: The objective of this policy is the following: Define the procedure for reconciling accounts. Define the Accountability Map. Personnel designation: The employee that reconciles the account must not handle cash, make journal entries, or sign checks. Procedure: The designated employee receives the bank statements before they are opened. If the statements are opened, the designated employee should notify the ACCS Board president. The designated employee will complete the reconciliation and request the administrator to close the month to changes in the accounting software. Bank statements can then be filed by the book keeper in the fireproof safe. Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedures.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method.

Who is accountable

Submit changes to Board for approval.

Board

Board File in paper and electronic files.

Who is responsibl e Board

Who is informed

Site Director

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Page 94 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Procedure for Internal Financial Audits Objective: The objective of this policy is the following: Define audit team Define the procedure for auditing checking and savings account transactions. Define the procedure for auditing journal entries. Define the procedures for auditing Federal Government Securities transactions. Audit frequency and reporting The audit team: The audit team will consist of one member and the administrator. Procedure for auditing checking, savings accounts and journal entries: Five checks will be chosen at random. The transaction documentation will be viewed to insure purchase receipt and proof of arrival are present in the file with the check stub. Two cash deposits will be chosen at random. The transaction documentation will be viewed to insure cash receipts and deposit slip amounts balance. Two journal entries will be chosen at random. The transaction documentation will be viewed to insure proper reason for the journal entry is present. Audit frequency and reporting: Internal audits will be conducted in October and April. Reports will be completed and presented to the ACCS Board in November and May. Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedure s.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method. Submit changes to Board for approval.

File in paper and electronic files.

Who is accountabl e Board

Who is responsibl e Board

Who is informed

Board

Exec. Dir

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Page 95 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Procedure for Documenting Journal Entries Objective: The objective of this policy is the following: Define the required documentation for a journal entry The required documentation for a journal entry: The book keeper will prepare a letter to document the journal entry including the reason for the entry, date of the entry and the number of the entry. The site director will approve the entry by signing approval on the letter. The book keeper will keep a file of journal entry approvals with the other financial records. Accountability map: Step Detail

Changes to procedure s.

Changes to procedure.

Document is updated and filed.

Description of the method. Submit changes to Board for approval.

File in paper and electronic files.

Who is accountabl e Board

Who is responsibl e Board

Who is informed

Board

Site Director

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

Staff, Volunteers, and Board.

O. THE PROPOSED CALENDAR, INCLUDING THE LENGTH OF THE SCHOOL DAY AND YEAR. Albany Community Charter School’s school day will be from 8:00 a.m.-3:15 p.m. for all students in first through Eighth Grade. Kindergarteners will attend school from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. We will not use early release days or cut days. It is ACCS’ intent to adhere to GAPS calendar for the most part. Our conference days are scheduled differently, due to using the three semester system. Albany Community Charter School will operate on a three semester system. ACCS feels that having three semesters rather than two will allow teachers to better track students’ progress throughout the school year. The increase in semesters will help to keep parents informed of their child’s progress. Teacher Workdays can be used at the discretion of the teacher for preparing for conferences or holding conferences. If a teacher chooses to use a work day to prepare, conferences must be scheduled during non school hours at their discretion within five school days of the last teacher workday for that semester.

Page 96 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Proposed 2013-2014 School Calendar 9/3/13 First Day of School 11/11/13 No School Veteran’s Day 11/22/13 End of 1st Semester 11/25/13-11/26/13 1st semester Teacher Workdays (NO SCHOOL) 11/27/13-11/29/13 Thanksgiving Break 12/20/13-1/3/14 Christmas Break 1/20/14 No School Martin Luther King Day 2/17/14 No School President’s Day 3/5/14 End of 2nd Semester 3/6/14-3/7/14 2nd Semester Teacher Workdays (NO SCHOOL) 3/24/14-3/28/14 Spring Break 5/23/14-5/26 No School Memorial Break 6/5/14 End of 3rd Trimester 6/6/14 Last Day of School 6/9/14-6/10/14 3rd Semester Teacher Workdays (NO SCHOOL) ACCS agrees to adhere to all requirements for minimal instruction time. Whereas Kindergarteners will receive at least 405 hours of instruction, students in grades one through three will receive at least 810 hours, and students in grades four through eight will receive at least 900 hours. Days on Contract for Teachers Total number of days with students: 171 Total number of work days for teachers : Before school year begins: 14

Page 97 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Conference Prep/Conference days: 6 Total days on employment contract for teachers: 191

Days on Contract for Assistants Total number of days with students: 171 Before school year begins: 6 Conference Prep/Conference days: 0 Total days on employment contract for assistants: 177

Report to school dates Teachers: August 13, 2013 Site Director: August 13, 2013 Assistants: August 23, 2013

Sample daily schedule for First Grade Other grades will be similar, but flexible in most areas other than math, according to teacher’s preferences. 7:45-7:55 Children arrive to School, Supervision by volunteers 8:00 Students must be in seat and ready to learn 8:00-8:20 Phonics Instruction 8:20-10:00 Math 10:00-11:15 Core Knowledge Language Arts 11:15-11:40 Read to Self Page 98 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


11:45-12:45 Lunch and Recess 12:45-2:00 Core 2:00-3:15 Specials vary by day: PE/Health, STEM, computers, etc.

Total hours instruction time per day 1st-8th grades: 6 hours 15 minutes Total hours instruction time per day Kinder: 4 hours Total instructional hours in 2013-2014 school year 1st-8th grades: 1068.75 Total instructional hours in 2013-2014 school year Kinder: 684

Site Director Hours: 7:30-3:45 Teacher Hours: 7:30-3:45 Assistant’s: Vary

P. THE PROJECTED DATE THE SCHOOL WOULD BEGIN OPERATING. If approved by Greater Albany Public Schools, Albany Community Charter School’s planned date of opening will be September 3, 2013. In the event of a denial from Greater Albany Public Schools, Albany Community Charter School will pursue sponsorship with the State and will open in September of 2014. Timeline for Opening ACCS March 2013/2014- April 2013/2014: Advertise positions available, form hiring committee, screen resumes, interview candidates, make job offers, take PERS classes, Registration held at the school location if possible, if not registration will take place at Albany Public Library’s main branch. Several days will be available for registration. Or an appointment can be made if necessary, begin applying for grants and Page 99 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


fundraising if tax exempt status has cleared, review all policies and procedures, negotiate lease terms if not already completed, board training completed, May 1 2013/2014: Lottery will be held if necessary, begin making lists of required supplies and purchases, continue fundraising, public awareness campaign, register with the county for occupancy. June 2013/2014: Begin electricity service, move donated supplies and furniture into location, set up front office, assign classrooms to teachers, get the school as physically ready as possible-repaint parking lot lines, cleanup grounds surrounding school, submit enrollment data to sponsor, July 2013/2014: Receive a double payment from the State School Fund/Sponsor based on enrollment. Begin purchasing supplies, set up filing system, review any agreements made with sponsor (bus service, lunch arrangements, maintenance concerns), have fire extinguishers installed and inspected, play areas inspected, August 2013/2014: Teachers begin arriving, staff social events, training begins, family involvement activities, fill the school with supplies purchased, first paychecks go out.

Q. A DESCRIPTION OF STAFF MEMBERS AND REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS OF TEACHERS. Employment Arrangements The non-profit Educating Albany Responsibly will employ all teachers and staff of Albany Community Charter School. Educating Albany Responsibly (EAR) agrees to pay the current charter school rate for the PERS contribution. Beginning in July 2013, the rate is expected to increase to between 25 and 27 percent of total gross pay. Educating Albany Responsibly will not be responsible for making the 6 percent employee contribution. Educating Albany responsibly will report all licensing information of teachers to the Greater Albany Public School System, in the format requested. Staff Leave Policy ACCS will offer four days of leave for each full time employee. Any time beyond the four days will cause the employee’s salary to be prorated for that month. Professional leave will be approved on a case by case basis by the site director. The site director will provide coverage for teachers whenever possible to help keep costs down. Employee Handbook Upon approval of a charter, ACCS will construct an employee handbook including policies and procedures for distribution to all employees. Page 100 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Collaborative Leadership Approach Albany Community Charter School has chosen to use an innovative approach to address the role of an administrator, called the leadership team. The leadership team is made up of the Board of Directors who oversees the Lead Teachers as well as the Site Director. The Lead Teachers and the Site Director will work in complete cooperation with one another to insure that ACCS is managed appropriately. The Lead Teachers will serve as the experts on things like curriculum, special education, and English Language Learners. The Site Director will focus on the day to day operations of the school including budgets, scheduling, attendance, payroll, and support of the staff, among other things. The Lead Teachers and the Site Director will maintain daily communication to be sure to address all of ACCS’ needs. Site Director and Qualifications The Site Director will function under the supervision of the Board of Directors. They will oversee the daily operations and budgeting for the school, and facilitate communication with the EAR board and the District School Board. With the help of the EAR board, our Site Director will also apply for grants that align with our school vision and actively fundraise with the business community. The Site Director will be the day-to-day operator of the school, and his/her outlook and attitude will affect how the rest of the staff functions. We will search for a passionate Site Director who identifies with our mission statement and who can work with our Board of Directors. 

Administrative Duties: o Manage school budget (planning, proposal to EAR Board of Directors and implementation). o Serve as Albany Community Charter School’s representative to the Greater Albany Public School Board. o Oversee daily operations of Albany Community Charter School. o Establish the annual master schedule for instructional programs, ensuring sequential learning experiences for students consistent with the school’s philosophy, mission statement and instructional goals. o Coordinate and participate in community / school activities. o Responsible for planning and implementing orientation programs for the teachers, students and parents. o Acts as Albany Community Charter School’s contact person for the Oregon Department of Education o Works with the EAR Board of Directors and parents to actively fundraise for the school. o Manage, evaluate and supervise effective and clear procedures for the operation and functioning of the school consistent with the philosophy, mission, and goals of the school including extracurricular activities, building maintenance, office operations, and emergency procedures. Ensure compliance with all laws, board policies and civil regulations. Page 101

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


o Establish procedures that create and maintain attractive, organized, functional, healthy, clean, and safe facilities. o Assume responsibility for the health, safety, and welfare of students, employees and visitors. o Develop clearly understood procedures and provide regular drills for emergencies and disasters. o Maintain a master schedule to be posted for all teachers. o Establish schedules and procedures for the supervision of students in non-classroom areas with cooperation from the lead teachers (including before and after school). o Communicate regularly with parents, seeking their support and advice, so as to create a cooperative relationship to support the student in the school. o Participates with the EAR Board of Directors in the planning, development, implementation, interpretation, and administration of policies, rules and regulations. o Assumes a leadership role in the functions and activities of EAR and shares the responsibility for leading and scheduling regular faculty meetings. o Assists in the planning, development, organization, coordination, and supervision of instructional programs and activities, which includes curriculum development, program and activity development. o Maintains a positive communication system with the community, teaching staff, and Board of Directors, to ensure all staff members feel welcome to discuss policies and problems. o Monitors individual teachers’ professional development and leave requests. o Assist in the decision making process for the selection, retention, and separation of personnel. o Serves on IEP teams, and focus groups. 

Qualifications: o Holds a Charter School Registration from the state. o Working knowledge of state educational standards and assessments. o The ability to work productively and positively with staff, students and parents. o Must also have excellent organizational, planning, and implementation skills. o Passionate about the mission of the Charter School. Hiring of Initial Site Director The hiring of the initial Site Director will be handled by the Board of Directors of Educating Albany Responsibly, with assistance from the steering committee. The experience of our board, as well as our parents will help us choose a successful candidate. Great care will be taken to select the Site Director for our school and students. Any offer made to a Site Director will include the condition that the principal shall remain committed to the school for at least one year. At the conclusion of each school year, the board of directors will consider renewing the Site Director’s contract. The Board reserves the right to terminate the contract of the Site Director at any time.

Page 102 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Teachers’ Responsibilities and Qualifications Albany Community Charter School will hire nine teachers for nine grades. Each classroom will have a teacher who is certified to teach in a self-contained classroom. ACCS plans to hire three lead teachers with experience to help mentor younger teachers within the school. Depending on enrollment numbers, a blended classroom may be a possibility. It is a possibility that students will be moved around during certain periods of the day to meet individual student needs. Teachers may also choose to work together to educate each other’s classrooms, with approval from the leadership team. Classroom teachers work under the direction and supervision of the leadership team. The teachers and staff will work together to educate all students, while keeping the mission statement in mind at all times. Albany Community Charter School intends to hire all TSPC licensed teachers for all self-contained classrooms. It is a possibility that when hiring part time specialists in subsequent years, ACCS will hire un licensed, but highly qualified teachers. Lead Teachers and Qualifications 

Key Responsibilities: o Plan, prepare and deliver instructional activities that facilitate active learning experiences that are consistent with the philosophy, mission, and goals of EAR. o Identify and select different instructional resources and methods to meet students’ varying needs. o Provide a variety of learning materials and resources for use in educational activities. o Use relevant technology to support instruction. o Update all necessary records accurately and completely as required by state and federal laws, as well as EAR policies and regulations. o Keep up to date with developments in subject areas, teaching resources and methods and make relevant changes to instructional plans. o Establish and communicate clear objectives for all learning activities. o Work collaboratively with parents/guardians, families, and other members of the community to involve them in academic activities and to support the success of a diverse student population and to bring in volunteers and additional resources. o Collaborate with colleagues to continuously improve personal practice, classroom instruction, assessment, and student achievement, as well as the overall goals and mission of the school. o Fulfill all outlined and related functions professionally, timely and thoroughly. o Prepare required reports on students and activities. o Maintain accurate and complete records of students’ progress and development. o Assign, grade and provide appropriate feedback on class work, homework, tests and assignments. o Encourage and monitor the progress of individual students. Page 103

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


o Participate in department and school meetings, parent meetings, and school community activities. o Communicate necessary information regularly to students, colleagues and parents regarding student progress and student needs. o Manage student behavior in the classroom by establishing and enforcing rules and procedures. 

Supervisory Duties: o Offers support, and makes self available to less experienced teachers. o Meets and consults with teachers regularly. o Oversees IEP plans, ELL services, and students on action plans. o Consults with Problem Solving Room staff on discipline issues. o Assists other teachers with alignment to the Oregon Common Core State Standards.

Qualifications: o Must hold TSPC license o Five years of experience in the teaching field o Valid First Aid and CPR certificate o Teachers of core content areas must be ― “highly qualified” according to federal No Child Left Behind and Oregon requirements (ORS 584-100-0000) o Strong desire to work with a new curricula o Understanding of the basic principles of explicit instruction and student engagement o Knowledge of theory and practice of student learning styles o Knowledge of applicable federal and state regulations and statutes o Ability to turn best practices into high quality, goal-driven results o Highly effective writing, oral and interpersonal skills to communicate with a varied audience o Data managements tools, organizational tools, computer skills o Willingness to go above and beyond to support students in achieving academic goals

Teachers and Qualifications 

Key Responsibilities: o Plan, prepare and deliver instructional activities that facilitate active learning experiences that are consistent with the philosophy, mission, and goals of EAR. o Identify and select different instructional resources and methods to meet students’ varying needs. o Provide a variety of learning materials and resources for use in educational activities. o Use relevant technology to support instruction. o Update all necessary records accurately and completely as required by state and federal laws, as well as EAR policies and regulations. Page 104

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


o Keep up to date with developments in subject areas, teaching resources and methods and make relevant changes to instructional plans. o Establish and communicate clear objectives for all learning activities. o Work collaboratively with parents/guardians, families, and other members of the community to involve them in academic activities and to support the success of a diverse student population and to bring in volunteers and additional resources. o Collaborate with colleagues to continuously improve personal practice, classroom instruction, assessment, and student achievement, as well as the overall goals and mission of the school. o Fulfill all outlined and related functions professionally, timely and thoroughly. o Prepare required reports on students and activities. o Maintain accurate and complete records of students’ progress and development. o Assign, grade and provide appropriate feedback on class work, homework, tests and assignments. o Encourage and monitor the progress of individual students. o Participate in department and school meetings, parent meetings, and school community activities. o Communicate necessary information regularly to students, colleagues and parents regarding student progress and student needs. o Manage student behavior in the classroom by establishing and enforcing rules and procedures. Qualifications: o Must hold TSPC license or have active Charter School Registration with TSPC. o Valid First Aid and CPR certificate o Teachers of core content areas must be ― “highly qualified” according to federal No Child Left Behind and Oregon requirements (ORS 584-100-0000) o Strong desire to work with a new curricula o Understanding of the basic principles of explicit instruction and student engagement o Knowledge of theory and practice of student learning styles o Knowledge of applicable federal and state regulations and statutes o Ability to turn best practices into high quality, goal-driven results o Highly effective writing, oral and interpersonal skills to communicate with a varied audience o Data managements tools, organizational tools, computer skills o Willingness to go above and beyond to support students in achieving academic goals

Educational Assistants’ Responsibilities and Qualifications Each teacher will have an assistant in their classroom for the entire part of the day before lunch. We believe that the addition of an additional knowledgeable adult in the classroom will help students reach their full potential. Page 105 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


The educational assistants are under the direction and supervision of the leadership team in consultation with the Board of Directors. Assistants will have the responsibility for assisting teachers, playground monitoring, enrichment activities, small group instruction, and state testing support. They will have strong skills in math and reading, and will support classroom-based instruction and work one-on-one with children to meet their individual needs as identified by the teaching staff. 

Key Responsibilities: o Communicate respectfully and thoughtfully with parent/guardians remaining sensitive to different families’ cultures, values and needs. o Initiate and maintain timely communication with all parents/guardians as requested by the teacher (through daily/weekly folders, notes home, phone calls, in-person meetings, conferences) concerning student progress and to provide a clear picture of the curriculum and high expectations. o Work collaboratively with parents/guardians, families, and other members of the community to involve them in academic activities and to support the success of a diverse student population and to bring in volunteers and additional resources. o Collaborate with colleagues to continuously improve personal practice, classroom instruction, assessment, and student achievement, as well as the overall goals and mission of the school. o Monitor students on the playground and in school hallways. o Assist teacher with the implementation of classroom procedures, systems, and routines that provide structure for students and maximize instructional time. o Supervise and facilitate students in completion of computerized state testing. o Provide corrective feedback to students and re-teach as necessary to ensure that students have mastered the objectives.



Qualifications: o Experience working with children o Past job experience in school setting o Patient and flexible o Strong desire to work with a new curricula o Understanding of the basic principles of explicit instruction and student engagement o College degree preferred o Knowledge of school policy; knowledge of theory and practice of student learning styles o Highly effective writing, oral and interpersonal skills to communicate with a varied audience o Ability to work as part of a team o Desire to assist classroom teacher, in helping students reach their full potential

School Office Manager/Bookeeper Responsibilities and Qualifications

Page 106 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Although ACCS does not plan on hiring an office manager in the first year, the need may arise in the future. The first impression of any school is the person in the office. Their attitude can go a long way to make parents, students, teachers and visitors feel welcome and comfortable in a school. Our office manager will be chosen very carefully. The Office Manager is under the direction and supervision of the leadership team. The Office Manager will fulfill multiple needs, including but not limited to, office management, purchasing, some general bookkeeping, annual audit support, student registration, attendance recording, handle sign-in and signouts of students, answer phone calls, maintenance of all school / student records, facilitate lunch program, meeting coordination, building use management and administer medications and first aid to students. 

Key Responsibilities: o Answers phone calls in a professional and timely manner. o Updates and takes messages for staff. o Opens, dates and distributes all mail unless marked “confidential” or “personal”. o Routes forms brought in by students/families. o Provides comfort and assistance in cases of student injury or ill health. o Maintains first aid supplies (Band-Aids, Tylenol, creams, etc). Distributes medication to students as per their schedule. o Maintains records of injuries listing date, name, type of injury and action taken. o Maintains student emergency cards. o Monitors the area adjoining the reception area to ensure appropriate student behavior. o Monitors the security of the building, ensuring volunteers and visitors sign in when they arrive, sign out and are authorized to pick up students as per procedure. o Provides forms for students sent to the office and assists in their completion. o If necessary, regulates students needing to see the Administrator. o Collects attendance from the Classroom Teachers, making phone calls home when necessary. o Maintains current class lists and schedules. o Maintains reception desk procedures. o Maintains student records as per procedures; making files for new students; adding annual information; forwarding records for transferring students. o Maintains school waiting list. o Perform some general bookkeeping duties. o Makes copies, types memos and letters and creates forms as requested. o Records meeting dates on the building calendar. o Tracks and controls building keys and access (keep a sign out sheet). o Monitors, orders and distributes office supplies including copier paper. o Provides clerical and administrative support to all staff. o Oversees the maintenance of the copy machine and trains others in its use. Page 107

Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


o Labels and mails letters to families as necessary. o Manages school office volunteers. o Oversees the orderliness of common areas (supplies available for workroom, etc). 

Qualifications: o Ability and willingness to represent the school in a professional and courteous manner to parents, students, and visitors. o Ability to work effectively in a loud, busy environment o Experience with computer required software including word processing and spreadsheets. o Experience in school finance and budget preparation. o Highly organized and able to work on multiple tasks and projects. o Good communication skills and initiative. o Ability and willingness to be part of an active team. o College Degree preferred

Hiring Process for Teachers, Assistants, and Office Manager/Bookkeeper Each opening at Albany Community Charter School will be advertised on the school’s website and in the local newspapers. All Applicants will be asked to submit a cover letter and resume. After the deadline for applicants has passed, the board will narrow the applicants down. Not more than five applicants will be interviewed initially. The interview committee will consist of at least two members of the board of directors, site director, at least two teachers-one being a lead teacher, at least one staff member, and at least one parents. If there are more teachers or staff that would like to participate, they would be welcome to attend interviews. If a suitable candidate is not found, the committee can choose to review applications and resumes that were not selected by the board. For Teacher and Assistant Candidates After interviews are complete, the interview committee will work together to choose the best two candidates. The two candidates will be asked to teach a classroom of students while being observed by the lead teacher, site director, and at least one board member. Applicants will be advised in advance of the topics that will be discussed in the classroom. Upon completion of the teaching observation, the observation team will bring their observations back to the interview committee. The committee will work together to choose a candidate that best meets the school’s needs. A salary will be discussed and offered to the candidate. Any offer made to a teacher/assistant will include the condition that the employee shall remain committed to the school for at least one year. At the conclusion of each school year, the leadership team will consider renewing the employee’s contract. The Board reserves the right to terminate the contract of the teacher/assistant at any time.

Page 108 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


For Office Manager Candidates After interviews are complete, the interview committee will work together to choose the two best candidates. The two candidates will be asked to return for an additional interview. The committee will work together to choose a candidate that best meets the school’s needs. A salary will be discussed and offered to the candidate. Any offer made to an office manager will include the condition that the employee shall remain committed to the school for at least one year. At the conclusion of each school year, the leadership team will consider whether or not to renew the employee’s contract. The Board reserves the right to terminate the contract of the office manager at any time. Substitutes ACCS will develop a list of suitable substitutes from the candidates who applied for teaching and assistant positions, and who were not chosen. All substitutes must pass all background checks and be registered with the TSPC. When possible, the site director will serve as a substitute in the building in order to decrease costs. Upon acceptance of any job position, the following needs to be done: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Review the job description with the new employee. Contract signed. 
 Review employee handbook
 Review student handbook. Meet informally with other staff
 Formal paperwork for payroll, PERS, etc.

Are there teachers that are willing to fill these positions? ACCS has been contacted by several experienced teachers who are excited for the opportunity to work at Albany Community Charter School. Some of those teachers are from the GAPS system, others are teachers that have been laid off, and others are teachers who live in nearby communities. At nearby Sand Ridge Charter School, teachers drive to work from as far away as Eugene and Portland every day. There are teachers both new and experienced who are looking for a new opportunity to teach students. A job opening at Sand Ridge in the fall of 2012 attracted hundreds of applications from qualified candidates. Filling positions at ACCS should not be a problem. Teacher Pay While ACCS would love to pay teachers what they are truly worth, it is not possible with current education funding. All the time, love, and work that a teacher puts into his or her classroom is priceless. ACCS understands that we are offering a lower salary than what a traditional public school teacher will Page 109 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


make ($30-$33,000 as a beginning salary). However, we feel that a job with ACCS is a different job than what a traditional public school teacher will do. Class sizes are smaller, there is more assistance in the classroom, there are more opportunities for teachers to have input into how the school is run, and ACCS is something new in the area. ACCS plans to offset smaller first year salaries with a $3,000 raise in the second year for all teachers. After all, teachers are not usually teaching because they want a hefty salary. They are passionate about teaching, and will do so as long as they are fulfilled. Just like Albany Community Charter School can be an option for students, it can be an option for teachers as well. How will ACCS ensure that all staff meet ESEA Highly Qualified Teachers Requirements? When Albany Community Charter School advertises for teaching positions, we will explicitly state that we are only accepting candidates that are highly qualified. When reviewing applications ACCS plans to use the educator lookup feature on the TSPC website to check the status of all candidates’ licenses. We will also check the educator sanction list to make sure there have not been issues with a teaching candidate in the past. Additionally, ACCS will forward an explanation of how all newly hired teachers came to be “Highly Qualified” to the district. To document that ACCS will meet the “highly qualified” mandate, the school will furnish the following every year before the first day of school: 

List of names, qualifications and method of qualification for “highly qualified” status for all teaching staff.

For any teacher meeting the “highly qualified” status without a TSPC teacher license, VIMS will provide the TSPC charter school registry certificate, an official copy of the appropriate Praxis Test passing score, and proof of the teacher’s bachelor’s degree.

There are three pathways to becoming highly qualified that are acceptable for use in a charter school. ACCS has made clear that it intends to hire all traditionally state licensed teachers for our classroom teachers whenever possible. Teachers with charter school registrations may be considered for specialists positions at ACCS. 1. Traditional state licensure 2. Charter school specific registration with the state, which requires a bachelor’s degree in an associated field to what you are teaching, or a bachelors degree in an unrelated field with a passing score on a content knowledge test. 3. Qualify for HOUSSE Termination Process All employees are eligible to be terminated at any time, with the request of the leadership team. If upon completion of the review process the leadership team feels the employee is not meeting expectations, they may recommend the employee for termination to the board. Any time the leadership team recommends a termination, the employee will be allowed a hearing in front of the Board of Directors during a closed Page 110 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


session. The Board will hear the concerns of the employee and the leadership team will make a decision based on the information they have. Any decision of the Board is final. Professional Development All staff at Albany Community Charter School will become familiar with all curricula that will be used in their classrooms. Training will be provided as needed. All Albany Community Charter School Staff will be asked to attend the League of Oregon Charter School’s conference in August of each year. The conference provides many workshops on how to implement new curricula, integrating all levels of learners into the classroom, and many other useful topics. If a staff member has a professional development opportunity they would like to attend, the leadership team can approve that at their discretion. Other training available: 1. Conferencing and meeting with other teachers that teach core knowledge and Saxon math, from our charter partners. 2. Attendance at Lego Robotics trainings. 3. Shared enrichment activities amongst ACCS charter school staff. 4. Health and safety topic trainings through safe schools to cover multiple topics. 5. Licensed Nurse Educator volunteered to provide CPR and first aid training to all staff. Background Checks Prior to an offer of employment or volunteer assignment, EAR will perform a criminal background check on potential employees applying for regular full-time and part-time positions. Volunteers will also be required to submit to a background check. This will be performed in accordance with all state statutes and rules applicable to public charter school employees and volunteers, and will use the results of background checks in accordance with all applicable statutes and rules. Potential employees will also be checked through the state registry of sexual offenders, and we will use the results of background checks in accordance with all applicable statutes and rule in order to make sure our children are as safe as possible.

R. THE ARRANGEMENT FOR ANY SPECIAL EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WHO MAY ATTEND THE SCHOOL. Special Education Albany Community Charter School recognizes the importance of providing educational opportunities to all students, regardless of special needs. As such, enrollment will be open to all students regardless of disability. With regard to enrollment of students, ACCS will use a simple form Page 111 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


containing only name, contact information, home district, and sibling information necessary to conduct an equitable lottery as described in the charter school law. Only after a student has a confirmed placement at the Charter School will a registration form be filled out. The registration form will contain information indicating current services such as an IEP and accommodations needed. ACCS pledges that individuals with special needs will be served in accordance with applicable federal and state law, including identification through Child Find. ACCS will follow the districts Response to Intervention Process to ensure maximum coordination with the district. The Charter School pledges to work in cooperation with Greater Albany Public School District to insure that a free and appropriate education is provided to all students with exceptional needs. The Greater Albany Public School District will provide all special education services for all district as well as non-district students. According to the Oregon Charter School Handbook: . ‌.These districts are responsible for oversight of special education programs and services, including those in its charter schools, and for ensuring that services are provided and administered according to state1 and federal law.2 As a result, charter schools must typically provide general education services in consultation and collaboration with the school district. Managing and providing special education services may also include other agencies such as Educational Service Districts (ESD) and regional programs. 3 The procedural safeguards, decision-making processes, and other requirements of IDEA applying to students with disabilities in typical Oregon public schools also apply to students with disabilities enrolled in charter schools. For this reason, Oregon has very few special education laws or rules just for charter schools. OAR 581-015-2075 “Charter Schoolsâ€? is an exception. It was recently revised to include changes enacted the 2011 Oregon legislature.4 Under OAR 581-015-2075 when a child with an Individual Education Program (IEP) enrolls in a charter school, the district, in consultation with the parent, must provide a free appropriate public education (including comparable services) until the district adopts the existing IEP or develops a new IEP. Enrollment in the charter school is not considered a change in placement. OAR 581-015-2075 reflects records requests and notifications required by the 2011 charter school legislation. However, schools enrolling a child with an IEP may not delay their attendance while they request, and wait to receive, student education records. The district must serve children with disabilities attending the charter school in the same manner as it serves children with disabilities in its other schools, including providing supplementary and related services on site at the charter school to the same extent as it provides those services on site at its other schools. Additionally, if

Page 112 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


the district provides federal IDEA funds to its other schools, it must include the charter school(s) in this distribution. 5 Special Education Processes ACCS will admit any student without regard to his or her special education status. For any IEP student admitted into the program, the school will notify the student’s IEP team leader as soon as possible to determine whether the Charter School is a proper placement. While the Greater Albany Public School District will provide all special education services for its students, it has the discretion to determine which special education programs will be offered on site at ACCS. ACCS agrees to: ·Comply with district policies and regulations on discipline of special education students. ·Comply with training required by an IEP team for delivery of services to a charter school student. (Any costs of needed training, determined by the IEP team, for ACCS staff to implement an IEP will be paid by the district.) ·Provide staff to attend IEP meetings or other meetings related to ACCS special education students. ·Change the student’s placement or IEP only with IEP team action · Follow all requirements for modification of environment to address medical and physical access requirements. This may include, but is not limited to: providing quiet areas for rest, providing nutrition breaks, presenting choices based on child’s health, and modification of work. Special Education Intake Students who may have the potential for special education services will come to ACCS in one of three ways: an existing IEP, a referral from a teacher stating that the student’s needs are not being met, or a referral from a parent who is concerned the student’s needs are not being met. While processes do have some commonalities, each situation will be handled a bit differently. If a student transfers to ACCS from another school with an existing IEP, ACCS will review their file, consult with our special education liaison from GAPS if we have questions or concerns, and then an IEP team meeting will be held. Members of the IEP team will include the student’s classroom teacher, a lead teacher, ACCS behavior specialist, ACCS site director, and any district representatives. The IEP team will work together to see if ACCS is indeed a good fit for the student. If ACCS is equipped to handle the needs of the student, the IEP will be evaluated, necessary changes made, and services will be provided. If the IEP team decides that ACCS cannot handle the requirements of the student, an alternative recommendation will be made. It is ACCS’ intention to accept any student we are capable of handling in a manner that is safe for the student, staff, and other students at school.

Page 113 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


When a teacher has a concern that a child may be in need of special education services, a focus team will be formed at ACCS. The focus team will consist of the student’s teacher, a lead teacher, the behavior specialist, the site director, the student, and the student’s parent or guardian. All relative information will be gathered including work samples, attendance records, the student’s cumulative file, classroom observations, and at home observations and history. The team will evaluate where the student is having problems and develop an action plan for how to help the student become more successful. Each student’s plan may differ but could include things like modified assignments, extra one on one time, reviewing work at home, seat placement in the classroom, differentiated instruction, and many other interventions. The action plan is carried out consistently for six weeks and is monitored. The team will document the what, how, when and where of the plan extensively to better understand the results. After six weeks the focus team will meet and evaluate the results, again with all supporting documentation, new work samples, and observations. If the student shows improvement based on the action plan, it will continue, as long as it continues to be successful. If the student does not show improvement, the special education liaison from the district will be consulted for opinions and recommendations, a new action plan will be written, monitored for six weeks, and evaluated by the focus team. If there are still no significant improvements, the focus team will refer the student to the district for special education services. If a parent brings a concern to the teacher or leadership team regarding their child’s needs not being met in the classroom, the process differs slightly. The lead teacher will request that the parent write a letter detailing their concerns regarding their child’s ability to learn, and what has been done at home to try and help the student. After the letter is written, and placed in the student’s cumulative file, the process will be the same as when a teacher has a concern for a student’s ability to learn. All action plans should be evaluated at the beginning of each semester, at a minimum. When a teacher or parent feels that an action plan is no longer working, a meeting of the focus team will be called and the plan may be revised to address concerns. All IEP’s should be reviewed as directed by the District liason, as well as when any member of the team has a concern, no matter how small. ACCS wants to help all students be as successful as possible. Child Find ACCS will work closely with the district and any other referring school district to insure that Child Find is carried out in good faith. The Charter School will insure that at least one teaching staff member has been trained in the Child Find process or will arrange for at least one teaching staff member to receive such training. Any student referred for evaluation will remain enrolled unless or until an IEP team determines that ACCS is not an appropriate placement. The Charter School will notify the special education student’s resident school district if that student has applied to ACCS. Teaching special education students in the charter school

Page 114 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Teaching strategies vary according to individual needs. However basic principles that should be followed include: 1. a quiet, well organized environment with clear expectations and consistent follow through 2. active learning is an essential part of the education process for all children; a clear structure for those activities is needed 3. the belief that all students can learn and be successful is necessary 4. reinforcement of successful performance as it occurs (small class size and a teacher assistant can be especially responsive to this) 5. social acceptance and recognition of positive attributes which would be fostered sometimes more easily in a smaller, more personal setting. ACCS will keep ongoing data on academic achievement especially in the areas of reading and math, meeting monthly with other teachers to take note of students who are not making progress and making changes in their academic programs such as additional time-on-task or spending more time on direct instruction in phonics in the case of reading. Role of parents in implementing IEPs Parents have a prescribed role in the formal IEP process. Parents are expected to monitor progress and advocate for their children. ACCS will follow the lead of the district’s case manager in determining the role of parents in the implementation of IEPs. Denying Special Education Services In the event a parent denies special education services, ACCS will do its best to accommodate the student’s educational needs. ACCS will require parents to sign a denial of special educational services form which will be placed in the student’s file. ACCS will ask the parent to participate in a focus team with the student’s teacher, a lead teacher, the behavior specialist, the site director, and the student. If the parent refuses to participate, the remaining members of the focus team will continue and develop an action plan for the student in order to address the student’s needs outside of the special education umbrella. The focus team will work to ensure that all of the student’s needs are being met to the best of their ability. While this is not ideal, ACCS feels that every effort must be made to prevent students from falling through the cracks. Every effort is being made to ensure the academic success of every student. Training ACCS will request that all trainings offered to teachers in other district schools also be made available to ACCS teachers, so that we can better assist the district in carrying special education services.

Page 115 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Pathways to Special Education Services

Special Education Intake Process

Page 116 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


S. INFORMATION ON HOW THE COMMUNITY MAY BE INVOLVED IN THE PLANNING AND THE DEVELOPMENT. The dream for Albany Community Charter School started in June of 2012. Jennifer Cummins wanted a different option for all students in the Albany area. She began sharing her dream with close friends, and eventually with hundreds more. The Albany Community Charter School movement has gained support through many avenues. We have had press releases announcing meetings in the local newspaper, used social media applications to spread the word, and most of all we have benefitted from word of mouth. Parents are excited about having more input in how their child’s school will function. The Albany Community Charter School Movement is certainly a group effort with many people from different walks of life coming together to help build and plan a new option for students in Albany. Many of our parents are committed to Albany Community Charter School, not just for their children, but for the choice it will offer children in the future. Not only are parents involved, we have spoken with many community members who are excited to support this new endeavor. Albany Community Charter School had an informational booth at the Linn County Fair where we shared our dream with community members, gathered supporters, and taught many people about the ins and outs of charter schools. We have talked to local businesses that are supportive of our efforts and are excited to assist us when we need it. Our Board of Directors shows that this movement is not just a need desired by parents, but by community leaders as well. The depth of experience on our board of directors will serve us well in our development and operation in the future. Our Directors are well-connected members of the community who believe in our mission, and will do whatever is necessary to help us succeed. Upon approval, we will further intensify our efforts to share our vision and dream with local agencies and businesses. It is much easier to gain support when your dream is moving towards fruition. ACCS will recruit help and assistance from local partners to further strengthen our vision. ACCS hopes to have partnerships with many local businesses. Albany Community Charter School will host many informational meetings for interested parents and community members after our approval. We have two hundred forty five students that have an intent to enroll form filed, with many more families awaiting word of our approval. Everyday a new name is added to our list of supporters, and we are grateful for each one. We have come a long way, and strive to share our dream with many more people. Page 117 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Support from Educators Albany Community Charter School has approximately fifteen current Greater Albany Public School District teachers among our active supporters. These teachers have all asked to join our email update list, and share their opinions, but have asked for their identity to be kept confidential. Many teachers are afraid of losing their job if they speak out in favor of the charter school. Recently, we received an anonymous letter from a teacher that spoke of his or her support for the charter school option, as well as their fears. This letter is provided in the appendix under letters of support. ACCS has formed relationships with other local schools using Saxon and Core Knowledge, and they have been a great resource during the planning stages of this endeavor. They have promised their continued camaraderie and support. Albany Community Charter School believes that all parents, staff, community members, and students play an important role in our school, and that their opinion matters. ACCS will hold open board meetings where after each topic is addressed by the board, the public audience is welcome to respectfully ask questions, seek clarification, make comments, or give their input. Each person will be limited to three minutes on each topic on the agenda. ACCS will adopt a policy on public input to the board upon our approval. T. THE TERM OF THE CHARTER. Albany Community Charter School is proposing a three year charter agreement. We believe this will give us time to establish ourselves in the community, and begin to see the results of our choices. This will also be an ideal amount of time to get a better picture of the achievements our students are able to reach.

U. THE PLAN FOR PERFORMANCE BONDING OR INSURING THE SCHOOL. Albany Community Charter School has obtained an insurance quote for workers compensation, liability, building, and building contents. We used a local agency Rhodes Warden that will secure our insurance through PACE/OSBA. Rhodes Warden is experienced with insuring Charter Schools. Please refer to our budget for insurance costs. Once Albany Community Charter School has an executed charter contract and lease agreement, we will be legally eligible to obtain insurance for the public charter school. A certificate of insurance will be provided to the district for review prior to beginning operations and also upon request. The district will be named on the policy to receive direct notice from the insurance company in the event of cancellation. The district will be held harmless from any claims, demands, suits, actions, penalties, damage expenses for liability of any kind, including attorney fees, resulting from the conduct of the charter. Page 118 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


ACCS agrees to maintain insurance levels at the minimum level required by our sponsor. V. THE PROPOSED PLAN FOR TEACHERS, STAFF AND STUDENTS UPON THE TERMINATION OR NON-RENEWAL OF A CHARTER. If Albany Community Charter School faces a non-renewal of the charter, parents would be informed of their choices at that time. Those choices could include returning to their neighborhood school, enrolling in a private school, or homeschooling to name a few. If Albany Community Charter is forced to close, our Board of Directors will be in contact with the Greater Albany Public School District to inquire about openings within local schools for our students. What is unique about the parents on our list, is that they have made what they feel is the best choice for their child. It is our opinion that they will seek out an educational arrangement that they feel will best suit their child. No one arrangement is right for every student. That is why we are lobbying for a choice. The leadership team will work with our students’ new schools to be sure that they have all of the information and records needed to enroll students in to their program. ACCS’ leadership team and teachers will make themselves available for meetings and conversations with our students teachers whenever feasible. Through this process I have learned that charter schools are a close-knit group who are happy to help in whatever way possible. If Albany Community Charter School is not renewed, the Board of Directors will do whatever they can to help find a new placement for staff. Calls will be made to charter schools to check for openings, letters of recommendation will be written, and phone calls will be made. Every effort will be made to help our staff become gainfully employed.

W. THE MANNER IN WHICH THE PROGRAM REVIEW AND FISCAL AUDIT WILL BE CONDUCTED.

Albany Community Charter School will produce an annual report of the school operations and goals. It will include reports on the goals and objectives in the charter proposal/contract and identify achievements and challenges for the coming year as well as plans to remediate the challenges in the coming school year. A copy of the annual report and the school’s municipal audit will also be forwarded to the district and the Oregon Department of Education. The report to ODE will also contain any statements from the public charter school showing results of all operations and transactions affecting the financial status of the public charter school for the preceding annual audit period, and a balance sheet containing a summary of the assets and liabilities as of the closing date for the preceding annual audit period. Page 119 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


Albany Community Charter School will use a continuous improvement cycle; we will continually gather data, analyze data, and make instructional and other adjustments as needed to improve processes and/or outcomes. The District or State Board of Education will be welcome at any time, and Albany Community Charter School will proactively cooperate with the District or State Board of Education’s annual site visit to review the school’s compliance with applicable laws and the charter contract. Albany Community Charter School will—pursuant to ORS 338.095(1)—submit data and programmatic information to the District/SBE and ODE as required. Albany Community Charter School will create an annual written report that includes information regarding student academic growth and performance, and data regarding the overall school performance towards the goals outlined in the charter contract. This report will be given to the District Board/State Board of Education and Oregon Department of Education, as well as Albany Community Charter School parents and community. Albany Community Charter School will have an annual audit of its accounts in accordance with Municipal Financial Audit Law, ORS 297.405 to 297.555 and 297.998. The audit will be conducted by a certified CPA in an audit firm that has experience conducting municipal audits of Oregon public charter schools. The quote in our budget is from the firm of Pauly Rogers and Company. Albany Community Charter School will submit this audit to the District by October 15th of each year, or, if the audit firm submits it after that date to the school, the school will submit it to the District within 15 days of receipt.

X. OTHER ISSUES Meal Program If Albany Community Charter School is sponsored by the GAPS district, we will ask that Sodexo provide meals to our students in the same fashion they did before Fir Grove was closed. ACCS would process lunch money as instructed, but would not receive any lunch funds. If Albany Community Charter School is sponsored by the State Board of Education, meal program decisions will be based on our location. If possible, we will contract with Fresh Fingers from Salem, Oregon to deliver meals to our location. If this is not a possibility, ACCS will not offer lunch service. If a student at ACCS is without a lunch, their parent will be called at home as soon as possible. If ACCS in unable to reach the parent, the staff will make sure the child receives a lunch. We will do our best to make sure that no child goes hungry. Transportation Page 120 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


If sponsored by GAPS, Albany Community Charter School would like to cooperate with the transportation department at GAPS to see if there is a possibility of bus service for ACCS students. If this is not workable from the standpoint of the district, ACCS plans to work with parents to coordinate carpooling arrangements. In order to take our students on field trips, we hope to work with the district to provide transportation to and from field trip locations.

According to ORS 338.145: 

……. the school district within which the public charter school is located shall be responsible for the transportation of students attending the public charter school pursuant to ORS 327.043 in the same manner as students attending non-chartered public schools if the student is a resident of the school district. However, a school district may not be required to add or extend existing bus routes or other transportation services pursuant to this subsection.

Any transportation costs incurred by a school district under this section shall be considered approved transportation costs for purposes of ORS 327.013 in the same manner as transportation costs incurred by the school district for transporting students who attend non-chartered public schools are considered approved transportatio n costs for purposes of ORS 327.013.

Under sponsorship from the State Board of Education, Albany Community Charter School will not provide bus service during its first year. Depending on our location, we hope to work with parents to set up carpooling arrangements, as well as coordinate a student pass for the city bus system.

Technology Issues Albany Community Charter School has received several donations of usable materials including 26 desktop computers. The GAPS board has previously expressed concern over our lack of technology planning. While lack of technology is not an allowable reason for denial of a charter school proposal according to the Oregon Department of Education, ACCS felt the topic needed further addressed. A workable computer lab with wireless access can be setup using the computers in our possession. In addition, to address the school boards concerns ACCS has increased its computer hardware and peripherals budget to $22,000 for the first year. In addition we have allotted $10,000 for infrastructure Page 121 Please see the list of donated items School made towill ACCS in thewith Appendix Albany Community Charter partner parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


building. If we are sponsored by GAPS the wiring for a computer lab is in the Fir Grove Building, as it was recently operated as a school. Adverse Impact on GAPS District It is Albany Community Charter School’s belief that the implementation of a charter school in the GAPS district would be a benefit to the district. Greater Albany Public Schools serves approximately 9,200 students. It is not a small district, in fact it is the thirteenth largest district in the state. Lets assume full enrollment at ACCS of 180 1st through eighth graders and 22 Kindergarteners. Now we will use our intent to enroll data to assume that 55% of these students will come from current GAPS placements. Current flat funding sits at $5994 for each GAPS student, and GAPS will lose 80% of that amount to ACCS for enrolled charter school students. See the table below for explanation of losses and gains. The remaining 45% of students come from non-GAPS placements.

Description

Break Down

13 GAPS Kindergarteners

$2397.60 X 13 children

Estimated Amount -$31,168.80

Loss or Gain Loss

-$474,724.80

Loss

+$97,102.80

Gain

$599.40 X 13 students (20% pass through)

+$7,792.20

Gain

$3,000 per month X 12 months

+$36,000.00

Gain

? unavailable

+?

Gain

? X 99

+?

Gain

? X 13

+?

Gain

(80% of total student stipend)

99 – 1st-8th grade GAPS students

$4795.20 X 99 students (80% of total student stipend)

1st-8th

81 – grade students (Not currently in GAPS schools ) 9 Kindergarteners (Not currently in GAPS schools) Lease Payments for Fir Grove Maintenance and utility costs at Fir Grove Not responsible for Cost of educating 99 1st8th graders Not responsible

1198.80 X81 students (20% pass through)

Page 122 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


for Cost of educating 13 Kindergarteners Estimated Total $364,998.60

Net Loss

While GAPS lists the expenditure per student in its budget as $7,213.00 per student, ACCS understands that that is not the actual amount spent on one student. That amount includes many fixed costs that will still need to be paid. When ACCS contacted the district office, we were told that an attempt to answer that question “would be pure conjecture.” While it may not be an amount saved of $7213.00, there is certainly some money that is being saved. Therefore our figures do not account for the money saved in the education of students, or in the upkeep currently required of GAPS for the Fir Grove building. GAPS budget in the 2012-2013 general fund (not including contingent funds) was $67,373,620. If ACCS is approved as a charter school in the GAPS district, they will lose less than ½ of a percent of their budget. It remains unclear how such a small loss is one that will have a detrimental effect on the rest of the district.

Page 123 Albany Community Charter School will partner with parents to ensure that all children develop the confidence to risk intelligently, think critically and succeed. We will learn from our experiences, show compassion for others, and grow through discovery. Children will be able to achieve their personal best, to be respectful, thoughtful and independent learners.


proposal to GAPS 2013  

This is the proposal that GAPs will evaluate and decide if there will be a charter school in Albany. If we are denied, we will appeal to th...

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