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A fresh translation to touch the heart and mind The Common English Bible offers a fresh look at the timeless story of the Bible, making it relatable and understandable without compromising its powerful message – or undermining the importance of thorough biblical scholarship. Most important, the Bible is a message to God’s people. You might understand the words, but until it connects with your heart, its purpose is not fulfilled. The Common English Bible connects with the heart and mind. One of the largest and most diverse teams of scholars ever assembled began work on a brand-new Bible translation in 2008. The Common English Bible (CEB) team includes 118 editors and translators – men and women – from 22 different faith traditions, and various ethnicities. The translators are experts not only on their given book of the Bible, but also the biblical context, literature, and times. They worked closely with readability editors to ensure accuracy, relevant language, and ease of reading. As the translators and editors worked, 77 reading groups around the country gathered in churches, homes, and coffee shops to read aloud the passages they were assigned, and then commented back to the translators to make sure the language was smooth and natural. As retailers and church leaders, you know how vital the Bible is to effective ministry, personal growth, and store sales. Easy readability in a Bible enhances church worship and participation and Bible study. It also encourages children, youth, and those new to the English language to discover the Bible for themselves, perhaps for the very first time. We hope that you will take the time to look through this new translation, find your favorite verses, and reflect on them. We are certain the Common English Bible will enrich your walk with God and deepen your faith—and the faith of those you share it with.

TRANSLATION FACTS • Written at a comfortable reading level for more than half of all English readers • Vocabulary consistent with spoken language of today • Use of contractions according to ESL (English as a Second Language) guidelines • Bible maps designed exclusively by National Geographic • Information about the translators and reading groups, translation comparisons, free downloads, and much more can be found at the website: www.CommonEnglishBible.com

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Thinline Edition Easy to carry and easy to read • Convenient trim size with a thickness of less than one inch • Available in Softcover, DecoTone, and EcoLeather bindings • Ribbon marker in DecoTone and EcoLeather editions • Presentation page • Two-column setting with black-letter text • In-text subject headings • 8 pages of full-color maps exclusively from National Geographic (Actual type size)

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Reference Bible Ideal for in-depth Bible study • Center-column cross-reference system shows how verses relate to others in the Bible • Concordance to help readers find verses easily and quickly • Ribbon marker • Presentation page • Double-column format • 8 pages of full-color maps exclusively from National Geographic

MATTHEW Genealogy of Jesus A record of the ancestors of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham: 2 Abraham was the father of Isaac. Isaac was the father of Jacob. Jacob was the father of Judah and his brothers. 3 Judah was the father of Perez and Zerah, whose mother was Tamar. Perez was the father of Hezron. Hezron was the father of Aram. 4 Aram was the father of Aminadab. Aminadab was the father of Nahshon. Nahshon was the father of Salmon. 5 Salmon was the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab. Boaz was the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth. Obed was the father of Jesse. 6 Jesse was the father of David the king. David was the father of Solomon, whose mother had been the wife of Uriah. 7 Solomon was the father of Rehoboam. Rehoboam was the father of Abijah. Abijah was the father of Asaph. 8 Asaph was the father of Jehoshaphat. Jehoshaphat was the father of Joram. Joram was the father of Uzziah. 9 Uzziah was the father of Jotham. Jotham was the father of Ahaz. Ahaz was the father of Hezekiah. 10 Hezekiah was the father of Manasseh. Manasseh was the father of Amos. Amos was the father of Josiah. 11 Josiah was the father of Jechoniah and his brothers. This was at the time of the exile to Babylon. 12 After the exile to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Salathiel. Salathiel was the father of Zerubbabel. 13 Zerubbabel was the father of Abiud. Abiud was the father of Eliakim. Eliakim was the father of Azor. 14 Azor was the father of Zadok. Zadok was the father of Achim. Achim was the father of Eliud.

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1 Lk. 3. 23-38a; Ps. 132. II;Isa. II. I; Jer. 23.5;ch. 22.42; Lk. I. 3,69; Jn. 7.42; Ac. 2.30 &13.23; Ge. 12. 3&22.18; Lk. I 18 27. Lk.I. 35 4 Lk. 3. 23-38; Ps. 132. II;Isa. II. I; Jer. 23.5;ch. 22.42; Lk. I. 3,69; Jn. 7.42; Ac. 2.30 &13.23; Ge. 12. 3&22.18; Lk. I 20 27. Lk. I. 35 6 Lk. 3. 23-38; Ps. 132. II;Isa. II. I; Jer. 23.5;ch. 22.42; Lk. I. 3,69; Jn. 7.42; Ac. 2.30 &13.23; Ge. 12. 3&22.18; Lk. I 22 27. Lk. I. 35 10 Lk. 3. 23-38; Ps. 132. II;Isa. II. I; Jer. 23.5;ch. 22.42; Lk. I. 3,69; Jn. 7.42; Ac. 2.30 &13.23; Ge. 12. 3&22.18; 1 Lk. I 27. Lk. I. 35 13 Lk. 3. 23-38; Ps. 132. II;Isa. II. I; Jer. 23.5;ch. 22.42; Lk. I. 3,69; Jn. 7.42; Ac. 2.30 &13.23; Ge. 12. 3&22.18; Lk. I 18 27. Lk. I. 35

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Eliud was the father of Eleazar. Eleazar was the father of Matthan. Matthan was the father of Jacob. 16 Jacob was the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary—of whom Jesus was born, who is called the Christ. 17 So there were fourteen generations from Abraham to David, fourteen generations from David to the exile to Babylon, and fourteen generations from the exile to Babylon to the Christ.

Birth of Jesus 18 This is how the birth of Jesus Christ took place. When Mary his mother was engaged to Joseph, before they were married, she became pregnant by the Holy Spirit. 1 9 Joseph her husband was a righteous man. Because he didn’t want to humiliate her, he decided to call off their engagement quietly. 2 0 As he was thinking about this, an angel from the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph son of David, don’t be afraid to take Mary as your wife, because the child she carries was conceived by the Holy Spirit. 2 1 She will give birth to a son, and you will call him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” 2 2 Now all of this took place so that what the Lord had spoken through the prophet would be fulfilled: 23 Look! A virgin will become pregnant and give birth to a son, And they will call him, Emmanuel.a (Emmanuel means “God with us.”) 24 When Joseph woke up, he did just as an angel from God commanded and took Mary as his wife. 2 5 But he didn’t have sexual relations with her until she gave birth to a son. Joseph called him Jesus. Coming of the magi After Jesus was born in Bethlehem in the territory of Judea during the reign of King Herod, magi came from the east to Jerusalem. 2 They asked, “Where is the newborn king of the Jews? We’ve seen his star in the east, and we’ve come to honor him.” 3 When King Herod heard this, he was troubled, and everyone in Jerusalem was

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Isa 7:14

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Common English Daily Companion Bible Helps readers discover the richness and truth of Scripture

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The Common English Daily Companion Bible is a fresh way to help people discover biblical truths and apply them to their lives. The unique and versatile two-part format features Scripture reading selections with daily devotional commentary in the front followed by the full Common English Bible text. This allows readers to follow a traditional yearlong Bible reading plan or study topics pertinent to their lives. This unique approach to daily Bible reading will allow users to gain fresh perspective for years to come.

• 260 Scripture reading selections with devotional commentary, five for each week of the year • Space for personal reflection • Easy-to-use thematic index • Ribbon marker • Two-column setting with black-letter text • Presentation page • In-text subject headings • Additional reading plans • 8 pages of full-colour maps exclusively from National Geographic

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Previously announced

New Testament • Single-column format • 90-day reading plan • Full-color maps by National Geographic

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“Reading the Common English Bible’s Genesis and Matthew gave me fresh new insights and revelations because of its style and readability. It is like listening to and conversing with someone in front of you. It captures the life and spirit of the Written Word as each verse becomes a ‘rhema’ word or it comes alive at the right time.” – WWW.CHRISTIAN-BOOK-REVIEW.COM

Pocket-Sized Gift Editions • Baby New Testaments: complete text of the Common English Bible New Testament, presentation pages, “Treasured Scripture Selections for Tiny Hearts,” and “Prayers and Blessings for Children” • Wedding New Testament: complete text of the Common English Bible New Testament, presentation pages, an “I Love You” index with Scriptures to build a marriage on, and “Prayers and Blessings for Married Couples”

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New Testament Outreach Kits The greatest story ever told—now easier than ever to read and share The Common English Bible New Testament Outreach Kit is a simple-to-use, welcoming tool churches and classes can use to reach out to visitors and invite people to learn more about their church. Each kit includes: • 50 Outreach New Testaments • 50 door hanger bags • 56 invitations The Common English Bible Outreach New Testament is an affordable and compact edition ideal for personal and ministry use. The New Testament features twocolumn text, devotional thoughts and prayers for the specific season, a 90-day reading plan, an index to passages dealing with common issues, and a brief history of the Bible. These kits are ideal for: • Inviting people to holiday services or other church events • A gift for people attending a special service or program • A thank-you for ministry volunteers • A resource for camping ministries and retreats • Outreach events and missions

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ALSO FOR MULTI-SEASONAL USE Everyday Softcover Outreach New Testament £1.99 978-1-60926-076-7

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A retailer’s story about the Common English Bible... This past weekend I had a display at the annual Warmth In Winter youth conference in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. We always take a large number of Bibles, styles, and translations. This year we had the CEB New Testaments at the display, and they were a hit. On two separate occasions I met two women in their mid- to late 50s. One apparently has not been a Christian for many years but now is a volunteer in the youth ministry of a local church. She explained to me how hard it was for her not only to read the Bible, but even be encouraged to want to pick it up. I showed her the CEB and explained it to her, and she purchased it. The other woman works with youth who are having a hard time using the Bible, as well as has her own difficulty reading, studying, and comprehending. I asked her to try the CEB translation. I ran into both women later in the conference and both had been reading the CEB and were so very happy. They both approached me in the hallway to tell me their experiences. I did not seek them out. Just a little good news about the Good News. Blessings, Mark Bowers

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Bible Dictionary The only compact Bible dictionary based on the best contemporary scholarship • An easy-to-understand, one-volume portable dictionary of the Bible • Based on the best contemporary scholarship • Convenient and reliable • Includes significant names, places, and events of the Bible • Nearly 4,000 entries • Ideal for any level Bible study

AARONITES.

November 2011 £16.99 978-1-60926-024-8 992 pages • paper

been claimed by women cultic personnel. Numbers 16 Num 16 legitimizes Aaron’s exclusive priestly rank in opposition to rival claims by Levite groups personified by Korah “son of Levi” (vv. 1, 5-11). Korah’s dreadful death (vv. 32-33) stresses that only “the descendants of Aaron” (v. 40) can perform the priestly act of offering incense. When they do so, however, it serves as an effective intercession (vv. 47-48). Similarly, 2 Chr 26:16-21 2 Chr 26:16 2 Chr 26:17 2 Chr 26:18 2 Chr 26:19 2 Chr 26:20 2 Chr 26:21 describes the punishment of King Uzziah for encroaching on the cultic rights of “the descendants of Aaron” (v. 18). The budding of Aaron’s staff in Num 17 Num 17 also authenticates the Aaronic priesthood over against its rivals. See AARON’S STAFF. The golden calf incident (Exod 32 Exod 32 and Deut 9 Deut 9 ) associates Aaron with the cult of the calf image practiced in Bethel and founded by Jeroboam I, first monarch of the Northern Kingdom (compare Exod 32:4, 8 Exod 32:4 Exod 32:8 with 1 Kgs 12:28 1 Kgs 12:28 ). This could indicate that the priests of Bethel claimed Aaronic descent, or it might be a libel against the Aaronic priests by a competing faction represented by the “sons of Levi” (Exod 32:25-29Exod 32:25 Exod 32:26 Exod 32:27 Exod 32:28 Exod 32:29). First Kings 12:31 asserts that the Bethel priesthood was non-Levitical. This could be a false vilification of the Aaronites or an indication that they were not yet claiming a Levite background. Some connection between Aaron and the Bethel priesthood is suggested by the circumstance that the burial site of his son Eleazar was thought to be in Ephraim (Josh 24:33Josh 24:33 ) and the association of Eleazar’s son Phinehas with Bethel in Judg 20:26-28Judg 20:26 Judg 20:27 Judg 20:28. Another hint is the perplexing correlation between Aaron’s sons Nadab and Abihu and Jeroboam’s sons Nadab and Abijah, all of whom suffer premature deaths (Lev 10:1-2 Lev 10:1 Lev 10:2; 1 Kgs 14:1, 17; 15:25, 28

2 1 Kgs 14:1 1 Kgs 14:17 1 Kgs 15:25 1 Kgs 15:28 ).

AARONITES. Sons or house of Aaron. Descendants of Aaron, who emerged as the sole legitimate claimants to priesthood. Priestly office was not originally limited to Aaronites. Exodus 32 Exod 32 and Num 12, 16-17 Num 12 16-17 witness to rivalries between Aaronites and other groups claiming priestly prerogatives.

AARON’S STAFF. In Exodus, Aaron’s staff appears alongside the staff of Moses as an instrument of power in the confrontation with Pharaoh and the plagues: Exod 7:8-12 (becoming a snake), 19 (Nile into blood); 8:1-2, 5-6 (frogs), 12-13, 1617 (gnats).In Num 17, a staff representing Levi is inscribed with Aaron’s name. It blossoms, proving the placement and preeminence of the Aaronites within Levi as the only legitimate priests. It was preserved in the sanctuary as a warning to rival factions.

ABADDON uh-bad´uhn. Abaddon is translated as (the place of) destruction. It refers to the underworld and is found six times in the OT, most often in wisdom literature (Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Prov 15:11; 27:20; Ps 88:11). In the NT, it is personified as the angel of the bottomless pit who reigns over the demonic locusts of Rev 9:3-11.

ABANA ab´uh-nuh. A river, now called Barada, that orignates in the Antilebanon Mountains. It flows southeastward through Damascus, terminating in the marshy lake Bahret el-Kibliyeh (2 Kgs 5:12). ABARIM MOUNTAINS ab´uh-rim. A range across the Jordan extending from Mount Nebo in the north to the Arabian Desert (Num 27:12; 33:47-48; Deut 32:49; Jer 22:20). The northern part is also known as Pisgah, identified as the place where BALAAM blessed Israel the second time (Num 23:14), Moses saw the

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Bible Map Guide Beautiful, full-color oversize maps showing where significant Bible events happened The Common English Bible Map Guide helps bring Scripture alive, showing where the events of the Bible took place. • Includes 21 maps produced by National Geographic • Beautiful full-color oversize format, making it easy for classroom and group use • A brief narrative describes each map and references what specific chapters and verses of the Bible are being illustrated • Sidebars, photographs, and timelines highlight interesting facts about the lands of the Bible and some of the most religious places in the world • An exhaustive index makes it easy to locate places mentioned in the Bible

ISRAEL IN THE LATE BRONZE AGE Date: 1550 - 1200 B.C.E. Scripture: Genesis 12 Did Israel exist in the Late Bronze Age (1550-1200 B.C.E.). The debate rages on. A few facts stick out. Many Middle Bronze cities experienced destruction without restoration. The fortified city walls basically disappeared. Egypt controlled Canaan. The Amarna letters (about 1350) reveal strong international correspondence and commerce. They also show spats among city-state kings in Canaan who asked the Egyptian leaders for just a few soldiers to help them gain the victory. Central figures in such disputes included Labayu of Shechem and Abdi-heba of Jerusalem. The Book of Joshua shows Joshua and the Israelites worshiping at Shechem but not telling a story of their capture of Shechem (Josh. 8:30-35; 20:7; 24:1-27; Judg. 8:31–9:49; 1 Kings 12:1,25).

September 2011 £8.99 978-1-60926-074-3 48 pages • paper

The petty city-state kings also complain that a group of undisciplined marauders they called ‘apiru, threatened the country. Egyptian texts speak of bothersome shasu nomads who caused mischief for Egyptian troops and traders in Palestine between 1600 and 1100 B.C.E. Pharaoh Merneptah raised a memorial stele about 1210 for a successful raid into Canaan. On it he mentions Israel, the first such appearance of the name in history. Meanwhile, as the Bronze Age passed into the Iron, hundreds of new, small settlements dotted the central part of the Western Hills. Archaeologists show important Late Bronze Age remains at Acco, Aphek, Tell Halif (Rimmon), Lachish, Hazor, Megiddo, Beth-shan, Gezer, Shechem, Tel Rehov, Shiloh, and Tall Al ‘Umeyri, but not the expected remains at Ai and Jericho. Excavations reveal strong distinctions between the palaces of the rich and the hovels of the poor. Archaeologists also found Egyptian settlements at Beth-shen, Jaffa, and Deir elBalah, showing direct Egyptian control, as did the governor’s residence at Aphek. Commerce in metals, turquoise, copper, ivory, and other metals enriched Egyptian coffers. A major event near the end of the period saw Pharaoh Raameses II battle the Hittites at Kadesh on the Orontes (north of Tyre but not on this map). A truce finally indicated the boundaries for each of the empire-seeking lands. The Late Bronze Age mystery continues. See Maps 3,4,5 for Israel’s sojourn in Egypt, Exodus, and settlement in the Promised land.

Ruins near Jerash

Canaanite city-state kings wrote to Amen-hotep III and his “heretical” son Akh-en-Aton asking for help. The letters were discovered at Tellel-Amarna, a discovery including about 300 letters from Canaanites. Listen in as Labayu, king of Shechem, pleads his case. To my master the king, I bow down before you. You asked how strong is the army that captured your town and how they could be arrested. The town was captured in battle even though an Egyptian official joined me in a peace treaty. To my great shame, my god was also captured. You know the proverb: when ants are struck they do not remain passive. They bite the hand that struck them. Two of my towns have been taken from me. How could I not act? I have become so desperate that even if you tell me to pledge allegiance to them, I would fight back against them. These men took my town and my god. They are the ones who ruined my father. Yes, I would fight back against them.

Abraham’s Gate” at Tel Dan

Bronze Age Jar

My king, my master, my Sun-god. I bow my face to the ground seven times before you. I have heard your letter read. Who do you think I am that the king should lose his land because of me? Look here. I am faithful to you, having neither rebelled or sinned against you. I pay my tribute and obey the requests your representative here makes of me. I know those wicked people are slandering me, but surely the king will not charge me with rebellion. I know the true crime. I went to Gezer and publicly announced, “Shall the king take over my property and not do the same for your king Milkilu.” I do know what he has done. O king, I did not know my son, whom you inquired about, was dealing with the ‘apiru. I handed him over to Addaya. You know I

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What people are saying… “The Common English Bible, likely the largest cross-denominational translation project in recent memory, unites Baptist, Catholic, Methodist, Evangelical, United Methodist, and numerous other faith traditions in a joint effort to create a complete but broadly accessible Bible for the 21st century.…An excellent resource for the young or beginning Christian.” – LIBRARY JOURNAL (MARCH 2011)

“Reading the Common English Bible’s Genesis and Matthew gave me fresh new insights and revelations because of its style and readability. It is like listening to and conversing with someone in front of you. It captures the life and spirit of the Written Word as each verse becomes a ‘rhema’ word or it comes alive at the right time.” – WWW.CHRISTIAN-BOOK-REVIEW.COM

“[The Common English Bible New Testament] does seem very readable, yet does not insult the reader’s intelligence with over-simplification.” – LEIGH B. GILLIS, PRESBYTERIAN OUTLOOK

“...The Common English Bible is trying something much more difficult than a mere paraphrase: To express the exactness of a formal translation in the language of ordinary people.” – J.A. CARTER, AUTHENTICLIGHT.ORG

“…I love reading the Common English Bible because as a faithful translation it gives me an accurate reading of the biblical text at the same time that it puts the words in the English idiom, in the vernacular that connects with people in my congregation. I will be making my study and sermon notes in this smooth new translation, the Common English Bible.” – MIKE SLAUGHTER, AUTHOR AND SENIOR PASTOR, GINGHAMSBURG CHURCH (DAYTON, OHIO)

“I like the Common English Bible and plan to share it with others who travel with me on the spiritual journey. The CEB is appealing to me because the language in this Bible is friendly but not too casual.” – JUDY P. CHRISTIE, AUTHOR OF THE HURRY LESS, WORRY LESS SERIES AND NOVELIST OF THE GREEN SERIES

“I don't know how many times I have read the Gospel of Matthew. Scores? Hundreds? Reading this clear and energetic translation has given me insights into the text and perspectives on Jesus I have never had before. This is an exceptionally readable Bible that we will all want to ‘take and read.’” – CYNTHIA M. CAMPBELL, PRESIDENT, MCCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

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The following examples show how the Common English Bible compares to other widely used translations. Genesis 1:1-2

Genesis 2:7

Matthew 6:9-13

Common English Bible (CEB) When God began to create the heavens and the earth—the earth was without shape or form, it was dark over the deep sea, and God’s wind swept over the waters—

Common English Bible (CEB) the Lord God formed the human from the topsoil of the fertile land and blew life’s breath into his nostrils. The human came to life.

New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters.

New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) then the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living being.

Common English Bible (CEB) Pray like this: Our Father who is in heaven, uphold the holiness of your name. Bring in your kingdom so that your will is done on earth as it’s done in heaven. Give us the bread we need for today. Forgive us for the ways we have wronged you, just as we also forgive those who have wronged us. And don’t lead us into temptation, but rescue us from the evil one

New International Version (NIV) In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.

Genesis 1:11 Common English Bible (CEB) God said, “Let the earth grow plant life: plants yielding seeds and fruit trees bearing fruit with seeds inside it, each according to its kind throughout the earth.” And that’s what happened. New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) Then God said, "Let the earth put forth vegetation: plants yielding seed, and fruit trees of every kind on earth that bear fruit with the seed in it." And it was so. New International Version (NIV) Then God said, "Let the land produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds." And it was so.

New International Version (NIV) the Lord God formed the man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being.

Leviticus 19:33-34 Common English Bible (CEB) When immigrants live in your land with you, you must not cheat them. Any immigrant who lives with you must be treated as if they were one of your citizens. You must love them as yourself because you were immigrants in the land of Egypt; I am the Lord your God. New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) When an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God. New International Version (NIV) When an alien lives with you in your land, do not mistreat him. The alien living with you must be treated as one of your nativeborn. Love him as yourself, for you were aliens in Egypt. I am the LORD your God.

New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) Pray then in this way: Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors And do not bring us to the time of trial, but rescue us from the evil one. New International Version (NIV) This, then, is how you should pray: "'Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.'

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A Guide to Popular Bible Translations Translation (Abbreviation)

Date

Reading Level

Translation Method

Translators

Manuscripts and/or Texts Used

Amplified Bible

1965; rev. 1987

NA

Verbal equivalence; amplification of word meanings

Frances Siewert and Lockman Foundation Editorial Board

Greek text of Westcott and Hort; various translations

Common English Bible (CEB)

2010 (NT), 2011 (OT)

7

Hybrid: Verbal equivalence with dynamic balance and common language

Common English Bible Committee, an alliance of five denominational publishers (117 translators from 22 faith traditions and 5 countries; 77 field testing groups with 400 participants in 13 denominations)

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (4th edition), Biblia Hebraica Quinta (5th edition); Nestle Aland 27th Edition (1993), Gottingen Septuagint (in progress), Ralf's Septuagint (2005)

Contemporary English Version (CEV)

1995

5

Dynamic equivalence

American Bible Society. More than 100 translators and reviewers

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (4th edition), UBS Greek NT (3rd edition, corrected)

English Standard Version (ESV)

2001; rev. 2007

11

Verbal equivalence

Crossway. Translation Oversight Committee and Translation Review Scholars (evangelical scholars, primarily from the Reformed tradition)

Minor revision of Revised Standard Version (1971)

Good News Bible; The Bible in Today's English Version (TEV)

1976

6

Dynamic equivalence

American Bible Society. Robert Bratcher, NT; Bratcher and 6 others, OT

Biblia Hebraica (3rd edition), UBS Greek NT (3rd edition)

Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

2003

8

Hybrid: Verbal equivalence with dynamic balance

Holman Bible Publishers. 90 scholars, primarily Southern Baptist

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (4th edition), Nestle Aland 27th Edition (1993)

King James Version (KJV)

1611, 1769

12

Verbal equivalence

54 English scholars

Masoretic (OT), Textus Receptus (NT); The Bishop's Bible, 1568

The Living Bible (LB)

1971

8

Paraphrase

Kenneth Taylor

Paraphrase of American Standard Version (1901)

The Message

1993 (NT); 2001 (OT)

6

Paraphrase

Eugene Peterson

Paraphrase from original languages

New American Bible (NAB)

1970; NT rev. 1986

7

Dynamic equivalence, 1970; verbal equivalence, 1986

Confraternity of Christian Doctrine. 55 scholars, most of whom were Catholics

Masoretic (OT), Nestle-Aland Greek NT

New American Standard Bible (NASB)

1971; rev. 1995

11

Verbal equivalence

Lockman Foundation. 61 evangelical scholars (original and update)

Biblia Hebraica, Nestle's Greek Text, 23rd edition (1971); Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, Nestle-Aland/UBS, 26th edition (1995)

New Century Version (NCV)

1991

6

Dynamic equivalence

A team composed of the World Bible Translation Center and 50 scholars and translators

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, UBS Greek NT

New International Version (NIV)

1978; rev. 2010

8

Hybrid: Verbal equivalence with dynamic balance

Biblica. 2010 update by 10 person Committee on Bible Translation.

Biblia Hebraica, eclectic mix of original texts for NT

New International Reader's Version (NIrV)

1996

3

Verbal equivalence, with dynamic balance and some simplification

40, including stylists

Simplification of NIV

New Jerusalem Bible

1985

8

Verbal equivalence, with dynamic tendencies

Approximately 30

Original Languages; La Bible de JĂŠrusalem (French)

New King James Version (NKJV)

1982

11

Verbal equivalence

Thomas Nelson Publishers. Approximately 60 scholars and church leaders

Rev. of KJV, Biblia Hebraica (OT), Textus Receptus (NT)

New Living Translation (NLT)

1996; rev. 2007

6

Dynamic equivalence

Tyndale House Foundation. 90 scholars, primarily from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Asbury Seminary

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia; UBS Greek NT (1993), Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece (1993)

New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

1990

11

Verbal equivalence

National Council of Churches. 30 scholars

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (3rd edition), UBS Greek NT (3rd edition, corrected); rev.of RSV (1971)

The Voice

2008 (NT)

8

Paraphrase

Thomas Nelson Publishers and Ecclesia Bible Society. 27 scholars and 52 retellers from the emergent movement

not disclosed

Alban Books Ltd, 14 Belford Road, Edinburgh EH4 3BL Tel: +44(0)131 226 2217 Fax: +44(0)131 225 5999 Email: sales@albanbooks.com Web: www.albanbooks.com


FAQs The King James Version of the Bible was published in 1611. For two centuries the KJV competed for readership with the Geneva Bible. However by the nineteenth century in America, the KJV would be described as the “common English Bible,” because it was the most widely used translation of Christian Scripture. Numerous translations have appeared since that time. However, it has proven difficult to combine concern for accuracy and accessibility in one translation, which the typical reader or worshipper would be able to understand. Therefore, readers in the twenty-first century, four hundred years after the creation of the KJV, need and deserve a new translation, which is suitable for personal devotion, for communal worship, and classroom study. Q1. What is the CEB? The Common English Bible is not simply a revision or update of an existing translation. It is a bold new translation designed to meet the needs of Christians as they work to build a strong and meaningful relationship with God through Jesus Christ. A key goal of the translation team is to make the Bible accessible to a broad range of people; it's written at a comfortable level for over half of all English readers. As the translators do their work, reading specialists working with seventy-seven reading groups from more than a dozen denominations review the texts to ensure a smooth and natural reading experience. Easy readability can enhance church worship and participation, and personal Bible study. It also encourages children and youth to discover the Bible for themselves, perhaps for the very first time. Who is it for? The Common English Bible is committed to the whole church of Jesus Christ. To achieve this, the CEB represents the work of a diverse team with broad scholarship, including the work of over one hundred and seventeen scholars-men and women from twenty-two faith traditions in American, African, Asian, European and Latino communities. As a result, the English translation of ancient words has an uncommon relevance for a broad audience of Bible readers-from children to scholars.

Q2. Who sponsored the Common English Bible? The Common English Bible is sponsored by a committee of denominational publishers. The Christian Resources Development Corp was established to fund alliances and partnerships in the development of Bibles, curriculum, and music. The Committee currently has representatives from the denominational publishers who serve the Disciples of Christ, the Episcopal Church of America, the Presbyterian Church U.S.A., the United Churches of Christ, and the United Methodist Church. The translation is intended for use by all readers and speakers of English. Q3. Why does the Common English Bible translate "the Human One" as one of the titles for Jesus? ben ’adam (Hebrew) or huios tou anthropou (Greek) are translated as “human being” (rather than “son of man”) except in cases of direct address, where CEB renders "Human" (instead of "Son of Man" or “Mortal,” e.g., Ezek 2:1). When ho huios tou anthropou is used as a title for Jesus, the CEB refers to Jesus as “the Human One.” In the preface we explain why: First, ben ’adam (Hebrew) or huios tou anthrōpou (Greek) are best translated as “human being” (rather than “son of man”) except in cases of direct address, where the CEB renders “Human” (instead of “Son

of Man” or “Mortal,” e.g., Ezek 2:1). When ho huios tou anthrōpou is used as a title for Jesus, the CEB refers to Jesus as “the Human One.” People who have grown accustomed to hearing Jesus refer to himself in the Gospels as “the Son of Man” may find this jarring. Why “Human One”? Jesus’ primary language would have been Aramaic, so he would have used the Aramaic phrase bar enosha. This phrase has the sense of “a human” or “a human such as I.” This phrase was taken over into Greek in a phrase that might be translated woodenly as “son of humanity.” However, Greek usage often refers to “a son of x” in the sense of “one who has the character of ‘x.’” For example, Luke 10:6 refers to “a son of peace,” a phrase that has the sense, “one who shares in peace.” Q4. Many Bible translations are available. Why do we need different Bible translations? a. All Bible translations are interpretations of the meaning of the original languages. We need multiple interpretations to get closer to an accurate understanding of the biblical text. b. Each good translation has a different emphasis on vocabulary. This tells us a great deal about the social and economic culture of the readers and it also discloses the theological understandings of the translators.

Alban Books Ltd, 14 Belford Road, Edinburgh EH4 3BL Tel: +44(0)131 226 2217 Fax: +44(0)131 225 5999 Email: sales@albanbooks.com Web: www.albanbooks.com


Common English Bible Catalogue  

Common English Bible Catalogue

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