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DESIGN BUREAU

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 A CARDINAL COLLECTION OF ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN THAT INFLUENCES WHERE AND HOW WE EXIST


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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100

Design doesn’t happen in a bubble. Both architecture and interior design reflect places and times as well as shape the way we live and interact with one another, from sweeping cultural values down to the nitty-gritty activities of everyday life. Yet homes, hotels, restaurants, and workplaces are not just the spaces in which we live—they also inspire us to think about where we come from, who we are, and whom we want to be going forward. Here are 100 spaces that speak to the importance of design in our lives—from the biggest adventures to the smallest of moments.

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RESIDENCES / 7 MODERN LIVING AND REMODELS / 8 GREEN DESIGN / 108 NATURAL SURROUNDINGS / 140

RESTAURANTS, BARS, and SHOPS / 189 HOTELS and RESORTS / 249 WORKPLACES / 293 COMMUNITY | 331 Resource Guide / 384 INDEX / 387


DESIGNERS 1-49 / 100

Residences Designing the blueprints for everyday living requires a thorough understanding of what makes people tick. From tiny urban apartments to vast country estates, these homes both express and celebrate what it means to be human at the most personal level.

MODERN LIVING AND REMODELS p.8

GREEN DESIGN p.108

NATURAL SURROUNDINGS p.140


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Apartment Archeology A 21ST-CENTURY APARTMENT BUILDING DIGS INTO THE PAST TO REVEAL A NEW IDENTITY By Risa Seidman

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Before Beth Reader of Reader & Swartz Architects came to its rescue, one of the oldest buildings in Winchester, Virginia, was falling into disrepair. Originally built in 1810, the structure was last renovated in the 1940s, so it featured outdated wiring, ductwork, fixtures, and a tired floor plan. “The client’s primary goal was to turn two very derelict apartments in a historic building into high-end rental apartments,” says Reader, who wanted to update the space while preserving the building’s original integrity. “We took an archaeological approach to the historic building, and exposed some of the building’s old construction methods and materials while adding modern interventions.” The first task was to rearrange the layouts from single-story horizontal spaces into two-story lofts, one in the front and one in the rear of the red brick building. With the new organization in place, Reader could begin work on the interiors. The team exposed floor and ceiling joists to reveal original brick and stone constructions, and both units received modern staircases, appliances, and fixtures. Reader also re-milled timber from the demolition phase for use as shelving, bathroom vanities, and treads on the new stairs. The 200-year-old existing materials blend well with the new modern elements (such as a cracked glass floor and a steel staircase), creating two distinctly modern living spaces that still honor their shared colonial heritage. “We are proud that we were able to save the old building but make it something fresh, new, and interesting,” Reader says. The true testament to Reader’s handiwork, however, was her client’s reaction: he liked the rear apartment’s renovation so much that he moved in. aZ

Featured Company READER & SWARTZ ARCHITECTS location WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SAMUEL NOAKES RENOVATION


Photo by Nathan Webb, Reader & Swartz Architects

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residences

MODERN LIVING AND REMODELS


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Photo by Nathan Webb, Reader & Swartz Architects

Last renovated in the 1940s, this residence now features a pronounced contrast between original and modern materials, both inside and outside the building. Portions of existing brick and stone were revealed when possible and juxtaposed with newer ones for a blended aesthetic.

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Nathan Webb, Reader & Swartz Architects

In-floor tree wells bring the outdoors to the living room in this Virginia residence, designed by Reader & Swartz Architects.

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Modern Millwork and Touches of Nostalgia In the Lake Holiday House, another one of Reader & Swartz’s residential projects, the designers also worked to create an aesthetic interplay between new and old. As a nod to the clients’ past, mementos including fossils, bones, padlocks, toys and other items were embedded into the fireplace stonework. In the same space, exposed wooden beams with metal junctions contribute a lofty, modern feel to the open living room. Matthew Spence of Dovetail Millwork, who often works with Reader & Swartz, completed all the millwork in the home, including the beams in the living room and kitchen cabinetry.


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TriBeca Penthouse Becht Engineering PC is pleased to have had the opportunity to work with Steven Harris Architects, LLP on the renovation of this Penthouse. One of the more significant challenges was to provide adequate heating and cooling for the area where the large window was installed in the side of the existing building while working within the limitations of the existing building’s infrastructure. Coordination of equipment locations, types and finishes were key to achieving the desired look that the Architect chose for the project. In addition to the HVAC design, Becht Engineering PC designed the plumbing, electric and fire protection (sprinkler system) for the Penthouse renovation. The systems were designed to maximize the ceiling heights and provide a clean look to the mechanical systems.

Building On Our Reputation For Quality Engineering For 50 Years. For 50 years, Becht Engineering PC has been providing engineering services to the Building Technologies business sector which includes mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection (MEP&FP) engineering, structural & civil engineering, project management and construction management.

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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This stunning double-height window frames nearby Manhattan, bringing the pulse of the city directly into the living room of this Tribeca penthouse.

Photos by Scott Frances / OTTO, ottoarchive.com


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Lofty Perspective A PALATIAL PENTHOUSE TAKES ADVANTAGE OF AN EXCLUSIVE HIGH-RISE VANTAGE POINT By Emma Janzen

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N

ot many people have the luxury of spectacular New York City views, so when presented with the positioning of this Tribeca penthouse, Steven Harris Architects knew that it had to pull out all the stops. The family home spans from the 27th through 29th floors of a building without many tall neighbors, “So they wanted to realize its potential to become a light-filled space with a commanding view of the city,” says firm partner Steven Harris. What are your favorite parts of the penthouse design?

Conditioning Complications Incorporating such a substantial window into a penthouse on the 27th floor took more than just figuring out how to install the glass panes. Becht Engineering, the building-solutions company hired for the project, also provided “adequate heating and cooling for the area where the large window was installed,” says principal Laurie Becht, “while working within the limitations of the existing building’s infrastructure.”

The design elements that make this space unforgettable are the double-height window in the living area, the suspended stair, and the rooftop pavilion, which features an enclosed gym with sliding windows and a grassy terrace. How did the double-height window work its way into the design? It epitomizes the design objective to open the apartment to the light and the views. We replaced all of the existing fenestration with new windows that maximized the glass area and lacked a central mullion, as this would have interfered with the views. Along these lines, the double-height window is the

largest window of all and frames the historic Woolworth Building, as well as much of the southern tip of Manhattan. Light floods through the window at all times of day, brightening the entire space. What challenges arose out of including such a large window in the space? It would have been immensely risky, not to mention complicated, to crane the panes and window hardware up to the 27th floor of the building, especially because the building has multiple setbacks. Instead, we designed each of the window components to fit within the building’s freight elevators. They were brought up in the elevators and installed on scaffolding that was attached to the side of the building like a barnacle. It was quite a feat! aZ

FEATURED COMPANY STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME TRIBECA PENTHOUSE


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Photos by Scott Frances / OTTO, ottoarchive.com

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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CAREFUL CONSTRUCTION To construct a second-story unit on top of an existing structure without damaging the existing finishes, LOC Architects brought in Evergreen Construction to assist. Owner Ahmad Morshedi says that although the process was not easy, he is pleased with how the final product keeps the integrity of the original building intact while floating freestanding from the main house.


Photos by LOC Architects and Alex Staniloff, alexstaniloff.com

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Canopy Living DIFFICULT BUILDING RESTRICTIONS FORCE CREATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR ADDITION TO AIRY CALIFORNIA HOME By Risa Seidman

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H

ow do you double the size of a California ranch home that is blocked in on all sides by protected oak trees and suffers from lot-size constraints? Where many designers might see an obstacle, Poonam Sharma of LOC Architects saw an opportunity: build upward.

“The existing house did not take advantage of its unique and desirable context effectively,” Sharma says of the home, which is situated in Southern California’s San Gabriel foothills. “This 1,100-square-foot addition to a 900-square-foot existing home adds two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a new dining room, and a deck nestled in the existing roof, transforming a generic experience into one deeply rooted in the site and its natural environment.” Aptly named “The Treehouse,” Sharma’s creation incorporates a large, cedar-clad addition perched atop a traditional ranch-style house, shaded by the ancient oak in the front yard. The addition cantilevers out from the existing home to what Sharma calls the “window wall,” overlooking the tree. Made up of 28 windows, some operable and some fixed, this wall gives the master bedroom an airy, treehouse

feel, allowing fresh air and natural light to filter in through the oak leaves. Of course, the construction of such a large addition on top of a house brings its own challenges. “The existing structure was not designed to take this load,” Sharma says, “and for it to do so would have involved the reconstruction of the majority of the footings and load-bearing walls, a prohibitively expensive proposition.” Instead, LOC Architects opted to go another route. By building a second-story addition that bridges the original structure, LOC was able to blend the addition’s supports into the house, using a newly constructed dining room and a second front façade wall to bear its weight. The Treehouse is an exquisite balance of the natural and the manmade, taking root and soaring skywards in suburban Los Angeles. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY L.O.C. ARCHITECTS LOCATION LA CRESCENTA, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE TREEHOUSE


Evergreen Evergreen

Design&& Construction Construction Design 310.473.4012

310.473.4012

www.EvergreenDesignTeam.com EvergreenDesignTeam@gmail.com

www.EvergreenDesignTeam.com EvergreenDesignTeam@gmail.com

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Greg Hadley, greghadleyphotography.com

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DesignForward Yet FamilyFriendly AN ARCHITECT’S FAMILY SEEKS BOTH SPACE AND STYLE By Margaret Poe

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FEATURED COMPANY JONATHAN KUHN ARCHITECT LOCATION WASHINGTON, DC PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE RAINSCREEN HOUSE

Jonathan Kuhn’s mission was clear: transform a dark and tired 1920s house into a bright and airy home fit for a growing family. The one-story brick house in Washington, DC, simply wasn’t large enough space for the couple, which had a child on the way. But it wasn’t just space they desired. The husband, an architect himself, wanted the home to be a showpiece. Kuhn determined that a second-story addition was the best way to meet his client’s goals. The large windows flooded the house with natural light—a major plus for the wife— and the additional space allowed the interior rooms to flow in a way that would have been impossible before the new add-on. One element solidifies the whole project, says Kuhn: the rainscreen. Made of Kebony, a Norwegian wood product, the rainscreen unifies the façade and offers a welcome contrast to the original brick, exposed in part underneath. The siding, made of specially treated sustainable wood, is resistant to the elements and can last up to | Continued »

A rainscreen made of Kebony, a Norwegian wood product, offers a welcome contrast to the original brick, partially exposed beneath.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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three times as long as traditional timber. Its dark hue resembles teak or mahogany—varieties currently depleting rapidly due to deforestation.

| Continued »

The modern detailing in the siding and the coarse masonry come together in “an intersection of horizontal elements and roofs, the merging of interior spaces, and the infusion of natural light,” Kuhn says. The form of the addition—a turned gable—is recognizable, keeping the design grounded. Throughout the process, Kuhn focused on how to best present concepts and materials to a couple that already had one foot in the architectural world. “Thoughtful planning, layouts, and descriptions that fulfilled her desires also had to be presented in a way to satisfy his knowledge of the industry and pursuit of making the project an architectural gem,” Kuhn says. He pulled it off, creating a home with the panache to appeal to design-industry insiders and the practical features that a young family needs. aZ

Norwegian Wood Thomas Archer Contracting has collaborated with the architect behind this modern home, Jonathan Kuhn, on a number of projects, as the builder specializes in historic and custom work throughout the Washington, DC, metro area. “The unique use of the Norwegian Kebony to bring out the texture of the original English cottage architecture really stood out on this project,” says Thomas Archer Contracting owner John C. Moody III.


Photo by Greg Hadley, greghadleyphotography.com

Architect Jonathan Kuhn says that this 1920s residence was “dark and tired� before the update, so the goal was to provide additional space in a functional, efficient layout rendering the house bright, airy, and modern.

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Copper Iron Designs, Inc. is a custom metalworking shop located in Napa, California. We work closely with Architects, Designers and clients to produce unique, highlycrafted work throughout the United States.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Mark Luthringer, luthringer.com

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Restroom Remodel A MASTER BATH AND POWDER ROOM GET DYNAMIC MAKEOVERS IN CONTRASTING STYLES By Risa Seidman

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A

ny room in a house can show off its designer’s creative chops—even a bathroom. Or, in Patricia Motzkin’s case, two bathrooms. Motzkin’s clients hired her to remodel both their master bathroom and powder room in a way that would reflect their love for modern design yet still mesh with the 20th Century vintage feel of their Berkeley home.

Featured Company PATRICIA MOTZKIN ARCHITECTURE location BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME TANNER-SOULE BATHROOMS

“In the master [bathroom], the clients desired a luxurious, light-filled, serene space,” Motzkin says. Because of the original bathroom’s limited space, Motzkin had to reconfigure the layout of the entire room. Expanding the bathroom into the master bedroom allowed for more storage space and a larger window to let in ample daylight. The new space now features a large soaking tub beneath the window, a glass-enclosed shower, and custom cabinets. One of Motzkin’s favorite elements of the redesigned master bathroom, though, is the glass wall tiling. “It’s sophisticated, textured, reflects light, and is extremely elegant,” she says, “with a Deco-like quality that’s reminiscent of days gone by yet fitting in a contemporary setting.” For the powder room, Motzkin took a more dramatic approach. “The clients

wanted a surprising, contemporary, small space in which they could display their contemporary art,” she says. The now bronze-painted powder room boasts a video alcove behind the toilet and a "gun mirror," whose frame is made from revolvers and ammunition. Due to the powder room’s limited square footage and sloped ceiling, Motzkin had to take special care when preparing to remodel it. “Every inch had to be carefully claimed and planned to create a space full of surprises,” she says. “It’s a surprisingly rich project, yet harmonious, with all elements carefully balanced.” Juggling two very different design projects under the same roof might intimidate some, but Motzkin’s close attention to detail and proportion helped her execute the remodels with ease. aZ

Renovation RÉsumé Patricia Motzkin does her fair share of remodels, including one notable project that features a floating staircase, implemented with the help of Copper Iron Designs. “The successful execution of the stair had everything to do with Patty’s vision,” says Copper Iron Designs president Andrew Bradford, “and our collective brainstorming with the engineer and the collaboration with the glass artist.”


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 /residences / modern living and remodels

Photos by Mark Luthringer, luthringer.com

Constructing Balance For James Pennington-Kent, project manager with McCutcheon Construction, the most interesting element of the Tanner-Soule bathroom remodels was Patricia Motzkin’s ability to transform both into “wonderfully contrasting yet balanced spaces.” The master bathroom incorporates a variety of awkward spaces into a “beautiful, wide-open white [room] with lovely fixtures and tub,” while the powder room provides a striking contrast with copper-colored walls and a custom mirror over the sink. “This powder room has a delightful, dark feeling, which provided a charming balance with the large, white master bath,” Pennington-Kent says. “Together these two bathroom remodels increased the value of the home immensely.”

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Long-term Partnership After 15 years of working together, it’s no surprise that Randall Wilson of Randall Wilson and Sons—a high-end residential cabinetry- and furniture-making company—and architect Patricia Motzkin have an excellent working relationship. “Patricia is unusual for designers these days because she is incredibly thorough and thinks everything through,” Wilson says. “Her designs are fully developed when they come to us; she doesn’t set any inadvertent traps in her designs. Working with her is relaxing.”


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Every inch had claimed and plan space full of surp Patricia Motzkin Principal at Patricia Motzkin Architecture


to be carefully nned to create a prises.

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Marlborough Street Penthouse | Boston, MA Architect: Hacin +Associates, Inc. | Designer: David Hacin | Photo: Michael Stavaridis

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Maggie Morrow

TEn Tricks for Executing Big Ideas in Small Spaces by Patricia Motzkin, Owner Patricia Motzkin Architecture

There’s nothing more uncomfortable than feeling claustrophobic in a small room or building. Over the course of her professional career, Patricia Motzkin has been tasked with making many small spaces feel as though they expand beyond the confines of their restricted square footage. She shares her tips here on making small spaces feel bigger and look better.

1

Connection to the outdoors: In small spaces, large windows and doors help expand the feeling of the interior space by making a connection to its surroundings.

2 3

Daylight: Daylight always makes spaces feel brighter and larger, often achieved by item #1. Mirrors: Careful placement of a mirror also makes a space feel larger, more expansive, and more light-filled; reflections expand the sense of space as well as reflect light.

4

Careful use of color: Depending on the desired feel and character of a space, the use of color is critical. Light colors can create an expansive, airy feel; darker colors can create a vivid feeling of enlivenment or deep sense of enclosure, depending on the mood sought.

5

Scale: In small spaces, scale matters. It’s important to choose furniture and design built-ins to not overpower or dwarf a small space.

6 7

Judicious use of objects: In small spaces, it’s important to choose all objects carefully and not to use too many. Mix of old and new: I always like to combine sensibilities or have one item that might tell a slightly different story, adding a personal touch to the overall aesthetic.

8

Let architecture be the backdrop: I prefer to design strong, simple spaces that don’t compete with furnishings. I like a strong connection to the outside, daylight, scale, and all things mentioned above, but I tend to let my architectural designs be backdrop to the owner’s taste, furnishings, and art.

9

Choose the moment: If I do have a statement element, it’s carefully chosen, such as an unusual tile backsplash in a kitchen or tile pattern in a shower.

10

The unexpected: Something in the space to surprise and delight. Whether it’s an unusual or oddly placed window, an antique gilded mirror, or reupholstered cowhide foot stool, an element of surprise scaled to the space always makes it memorable.

10 BY 10

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

CERAMIC

SCULPTURE

Sculpture inspired by nature.

Made in Harmony

401.741.2473 tiffany@lamarceramicstudio.com www.lamarceramicstudio.com

The working relationship between wallcovering specialist Tiffany Adams, owner of Creative Walls by Tiffany (who worked on the walls of this residence), and designer Joshua Shockley is one of respect and professionalism. “There’s a mutual trust, which is great,” Adams says. “You have to have that when working on such high-end projects.” After more than eight projects together, Adams loves Shockley’s flexibility and says that the two have shared a harmonious relationship from the beginning.


Photos by Desdemona Burgin Photography, desdemonadigital.com

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Peeling Back the Layers A DOWNTOWN CONDO HAD PLENTY OF POTENTIAL, ONCE IT SHED THE REMNANTS OF RENOVATIONS PAST By Margaret Poe

FEATURED COMPANY JOSHUA SHOCKLEY INTERIOR DESIGN LOCATION PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME PRIVATE RESIDENCE

White laminate and endless gypsum— that’s what Joshua Shockley found when he first entered this Providence, Rhode Island, condo last renovated in the late ’80s. But once he scratched the surface, the 750-square-foot space revealed its true potential. The condo, nestled into a century-old building, boasted brick walls, great light, and a logical floor plan. “I wanted to build on these features in ways that complemented a modern urban lifestyle in a vibrant downtown environment,” he says. With that, Shockley was off and running. The kitchen posed a key challenge. Burrowed into a triangular space and set off by a two-seat bar, it lacked storage, counter space and felt cramped. Shockley raised the upper cabinets 24 inches and added open shelves to store glasses and plates, which peek out with pops of color. The counters are made of reclaimed pine, and a waterfall edge separates the kitchen from the rest of the space. Shockley says that the edge offers the illusion of separation—without the isolation that might ensue. Modern design can feel cold, Shockley observes, an effect that he counters by using wooden accents throughout the space. In the bedroom, a rustic headboard is set off by simple, stark lights suspended by a wire. The white base of the dining-room table is topped with wood too, creating a commanding focal point in a neutral room adorned with clean white columns and mouldings. Shockley’s favorite part of the finished design? The creative use of organic materials. “The sealed-wood backsplash, live-edge headboard, and the exposed brick,” he says, “all contribute to a sense of pared-down sophistication.” aZ

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Photos by Susan Brook, susanbrookinteriors.com

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Kitchen Redux

Featured Company SUSAN BROOK INTERIORS Location SEYMOUR, INDIANA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE

AN INDIANA KITCHEN GETS RETOOLED WITH A HORIZONTAL WALNUT AESTHETIC By Brendan Dabkowski

PROJECT NAME HORIZONTAL WALNUT KITCHEN

For those of sturdy Midwestern stock, the kitchen often functions as the “heart” of the home. Susan Brook of Susan Brook Interiors focused on this notion in her kitchen design in Seymour, Indiana, crafting a space where clients could both work together and entertain with ease. “The walnut has a gentle, timeless beauty,” Brook says, “but running the grain horizontally gives it a polished, contemporary look.” Functional elements also were integrated into the wood to make the space easy to work within. “The horizontal walnut stands its ground with an integrated Boos cutting board set into a curved cabinet,” she says. “That is echoed at the opposite end of the island with a circular ‘floating’ glass table.” The “fabulous” pantry was given a full-storage front design with side cabinetry that curves slightly backwards to side

glass display cabinets, and drawers also abound throughout the kitchen. “Susan Brook helped us create our dream kitchen,” the client says. “Susan was meticulous about every aspect of the design process. She brought together craftsmen and professionals and coordinated the remodel seamlessly. We were so thrilled with the incorporation of her ideas and expertise with our personal tastes and preferences.” Brook adds that she is most proud of how the connection of shapes, particularly the curves, was executed in her design. A lot of work went into the process; she had to bring in a mason to brick up part of the original exterior and completely transform a non-functioning walk-in pantry to have not only form but function. The redesigned kitchen bursts at the seams with both. aZ


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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The staggeringly geometric addition to the Sayres house—including larger bedrooms, a library, space to display art, a guest cottage, and a pool—took three years to complete.


Photo by Matthew Carbone, matthewcarbone.com

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Geometric Dissonance WILD ANGLES ADD NEW PERSONALITY TO AN EXISTING NEW YORK RESIDENCE By Emma Janzen

S

ituated on a three-acre site at the edge of a farm in Long Island, Maziar Behrooz Architecture’s expansion of the Sayres House & Hanging Garden defies convention. After hiring Behrooz for the project, the clients asked for larger bedrooms, a library for a large book collection, space to display fine art, a guest cottage, and a pool that would fit the existing aesthetic of the home. What they received was a wildly geometric design that favors interrupted movement. Behrooz explains how the design unfold| Continued » ed and highlights some of the choices below.

FEATURED COMPANY MAZIAR BEHROOZ ARCHITECTURE LOCATION WAINSCOTT, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SAYRES HOUSE & HANGING GARDEN


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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One of the clients’ main requests for the new addition to the Sayres house was a cozy library that could house a large collection of books.


Photo by Matthew Carbone, matthewcarbone.com

The new addition is an angular departure from the existing structure. How did this decision materialize in the planning stages?

| Continued »

In our first design meeting, we showed a plan that mimicked the existing house’s shape and materials. We discussed this at length. It was what the clients had envisioned. At the end of the meeting, almost on the way out, we brought out a very rough study model with no 90-degree angles. The angularity of the addition sat in strong contrast to the shaker-like geometry of the existing house. We could tell without speaking that our clients fell in love with this. How do the contrasting styles work together? The plan of the extension consists of two floor plates that crisscross one another as they meander into the landscape, guided by one’s movement towards the vistas and light. Against the backdrop of a rigorously geometric existing house, our addition hops and leaps, dancing around it. The irregular forms yielded pockets of space, niches and alcoves that, once realized and furnished, offered a surprising sense of calm and reverence. Within their spaces, one wants to be still. In what ways does the house work with the surrounding landscape? Multiple flat roofs at different heights are covered with low-maintenance sedum to help reduce water runoff (a problem in the area) and give both the impression and reality of a terraced garden. On the second floor, the roof gardens blanket the adjacent roof surfaces and create a green foreground to distant farm views. Excess rainwater is funneled into steel gutters that are designed to double-function as horizontal planters. We were happy that this feature not only helps us reduce the impact of the building on the aquifer directly below but also that it created a grounding experience. aZ

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

BRIAN Z ALLEN DESIGN

Specializing in Kitchens, Baths & Complete Interior Design Services Let’s Talk... San Francisco, CA Tel: 415.672.4025 www.brianzallendesign.com

The kitchen's Italian mosaic backsplash is balancesd out by the simplicity of a stainless-steel hood, and the black range ties it all together.


Photos by Tim Maloney, technicalimagery.com

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Black, White, and Tiled All Over A FULL KITCHEN-AND-BATH REMODEL LEADS TO A NEUTRAL PALETTE WITH MOSAICS AND POPS OF COLOR By Amanda Koellner

Completely stripping down, reconfiguring, and refinishing entire rooms from top to bottom is the stuff of which interior designer dreams are made, and that was exactly the task given to Brian Z. Allen for this California residence. Turning to stainless steel appliances and sparkling tiles, Allen started from scratch on many of the house’s rooms, completely doing away with old layouts to unify the home with specific materials. “The color scheme throughout was kept in shades of whites, greys, and dark woods, which is simple but with many touches that pop against it,” he says, “such as the sparkle of the mosaic tiles in the kitchen’s countertops.” Here Allen dishes on the decisions behind the design. Which of the house’s rooms do you think best exemplifies fantastic design? I think the kitchen has a wonderful balance of unique materials, depth, contrast, and convenience items that all come together to make not only a stunning kitchen to look at but also a highly functional space to work in. The space feels rich with sparkling components that are warm and inviting yet balance with some very clean-line elements to keep it from being overwhelming. Which specific details in the kitchen make it stand out? I think that the range wall in the kitchen represents the overall feel of the home quite well. It shows an example of a plain, nine-feet-wide stainless steel angled hood that’s balanced with a beautiful, custom-designed Italian mosaic backsplash below that shows how one extremely simple element balances a very ornate wall of tile. The stainless steel of the hood is tied together with stainless-steel tops below it and stainless-steel cabinets flanking the range. The black range ties together nicely with the black mosaic tile.

What was the client’s favorite design element of the home? One element that the client was very excited about is the dining room's builtin buffet. It was a very awkward space to work with, and they didn’t know how to address it before talking with me. The floor of the area we built in the cabinets is angled, so it was a challenge to work with building in cabinets, but the final result looks like it could have been part of the home’s original design. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY BRIAN Z. ALLEN DESIGN LOCATION HALF MOON BAY, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME HALF MOON BAY RESIDENCE

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PROFESSIONAL RESIDENTIAL DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVING DALLAS AND SURROUNDING AREAS

NYC COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL INTERIORS www.vivreinterior.com I 212.255.6706 info@vivreinterior.com

W W W. H B D A L L A S . C O M


Photos by Laure Joliet, laurejoliet.com

THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Mix and Match A SUBTLE CLASH OF PATTERNS CREATES AN INVITING ACCENT IN A GUEST BATHROOM Patrick Sisson

An object lesson in contrast and creating motion with color, Vivre Interiors’ reworking of a guest bathroom in Manhattan shows that even a subtle shift can have a massive impact. During a reboot of a 20-year-old guest bath in Manhattan, the idea to pair two tile patterns in the shower—the curvaceous, key lime Walker Zanger Vibe tile on the walls with the ivory-and-charcoal pattern on the floor—became the centerpiece of the room, giving the space a subtle edge and recalling conflicting patterns and pigments in Morocco.

Walker Zanger Vibe tile in bright key-lime green brings brightness and warmth to an otherwise dark bathroom.

“They wanted a fresh, bright, clean feel that brings a lot of light to a normally dark bathroom,” says Vivre owner Elizabeth Bomberger. “They were very open to different colors as long as they stayed on the cool side. If I had used a bolder, more solid color, which was available, it could have become more ’60s or retro. The fact that I used a normally vibrant green in a soft crackled application gave them an updated but not too modern feeling. Mixing that with the classic white Calacatta Marble marble in a contemporary chevron pattern creates a perfectly current yet classical feel— exactly what they were looking for.” The rest of the bathroom followed suit, with white onyx and hints of green running through the countertop. While little touches—the little nook in the shower for shampoo and soap, or the fixed glass door—all catch your eye, the overall effect is to steer attention to the alluring tile work. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY VIVRE INTERIORS LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME MANHATTAN GUEST BATH

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Hatfield Builders & Remodelers used the old hallway behind this kitchen to craft a large walk-in pantry and butler's pantry, resulting in vast walking and working spaces throughout.

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Photos by Lauren Brown with Versatile Imaging, versatileimaging.com

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A Place to Call My Own A REVITALIZING REMODEL INJECTS CUSTOM CHARM INTO A TEXAS HOME By Brandon Goei

FEATURED COMPANY HATFIELD BUILDERS & REMODELERS LOCATION PLANO, TEXAS PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME KELLY LANE KITCHEN AND MASTER BATH

Kitchens and bathrooms can be polarizing in the homeowner’s realm. They’re the first rooms to be loved or hated, and sales have been made and lost solely on the basis of their design. Hatfield Builders & Remodelers’ (HBR) work on the kitchen and master bathroom of a house in Plano, Texas, shows exactly how a tailor-made remodel can bring the best out in a room and showcase the sensibilities of its inhabitants. Chief among the owners’ wishes for the kitchen was “a place that allowed them to host both larger parties and family gatherings in a clean, open, and modern setting.” Ample seating

and an open plan that extends into the great room ensures their ability to do so, and a fireplace updated with large limestone slabs caps off the space opposite the clean look of the kitchen’s custom cabinetry. The theme of slick surfaces paired with bold, visual textures continues into the master bathroom, where customization takes the shape of rift-cut white oak, a steam shower, and a total of seven speakers built into the structure of the room. And if there ever was anything that echoes the sentiment of ownership and nesting in a home, it’s a steam shower with a pair of built-in speakers. aZ

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Celebrating the modern idiom

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Torsion >> Bright Nickel with Maple Blades and Light Kit

Design


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Colby Vincent Edwards, colbyedwards.com

Streamlined geometries in neutral palettes are enhanced with warm, natural materials in this small Brooklyn residence.

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Space Saver SAVVY STORAGE SOLUTIONS DOUBLE AS UNIQUE DESIGN ELEMENTS IN REDESIGNED BROOKLYN FLAT By Brendan Dabkowski

Featured Company STUDIOGREENER Location BROOKLYN, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SAINT JOHNS PLACE RESIDENCE

Making the best use of small spaces is a must not only for Manhattan high-rise dwellers but also for those residing in comparable living spaces in Brooklyn. Take for example, the St. Johns Place residence, where Studiogreener design needed to get clever to maximize storage. “Like most of the apartments in New York City, where reduced footprints and awkward layouts are at the order of the day, the St. Johns Place project posed a commonplace design challenge: to maximize tight spaces by creating much needed new storage,” Joe Franza says on behalf of Studiogreener. With space-saving ideas at the forefront of the design plans, the architecture and design laboratory transformed the dated flat into an open, inviting environment with plenty of nooks and crannies to store goods. The team started by revamping the layout of the main living areas. For example, the apartment’s once-narrow galley kitchen was stretched into an elongated dining room, reinforcing a visual axis between the U-shaped kitchen at one end and ample living

room at the other. The designers also adjusted the lighting to allow for intimacy in large and small spaces alike. Incorporating storage spaces as both functional and architectural elements drove the project aesthetics the most, Franza says. Many of the final design choices enhance the day-to-day lives of the clients while doubling as unique design elements. “The client’s favorite element was the highly functional island,” he says. A movable flip-top doubles the counter space, and built-in shelving provides lots of storage, without any additional eyesore. The wine racks were also a big hit. One rack is cleverly concealed on one side of the island, while the second is situated in a “would-be dead space” adjacent to the wall-mounted oven. Franza says aside from the ample storage, he is most proud of the successful mix of contrasting and complementary materials and textures, which come together to create an elegant and inviting space. aZ


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / Modern living and remodels

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Photos by Colby Vincent Edwards, colbyedwards.com

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Clever storage solutions were implemented in unexpected places throughout this residence. Above, drawers were segmented to fit more kitchen tools than regular drawers would have , and to the left, the kitchen island also doubles as a cookbook holder.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Contemporary artist Markus Linnenbrink created the painted, poured resin floor in this home's entry hall, setting the tone for playful elements to follow.

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Photos by Maria Quiroga, mariaquiroga-images.com

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Freedom To Play AN INTERIOR DESIGNER CREATES A WHIMSICAL YET FUNCTIONAL HOME FOR A STYLISH FAMILY OF FIVE By Risa Seidman

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ith only three months to transform a traditional pre-war apartment in New York's Lincoln Square into an upbeat contemporary residence, Kimille Taylor had to tap into the youthful exuberance of her clients—a fun-loving family with three children. Pattern, color, and quirky details were all fair game, and Taylor was afforded the flexibility to try out concepts she thought they would enjoy. “They allowed me to have complete creative freedom,” Taylor says. “They often said yes to a concept and didn’t know what they were getting until it landed.” The residence’s entry-hall floor came as one pleasant surprise to Taylor’s clients. Taylor enlisted contemporary artist Markus Linnenbrink, who works in multicolored resin, to craft a poured-resin floor that pops with an abstract painted effect. “It sets the tone for the unexpected and delightful twists in the apartment,” Taylor says. Certainly, the closer you look, the more whimsical details the residence reveals. A peek into one of the bathrooms displays a toy-like orange faucet and white backsplash tiles that read, “Please wash.” A glance upwards in a child’s bedroom shows a colorful array of curves, almost as though a free-spirited child scrawled on the ceiling with crayons. But the level of design and thought put into this project was more than just child’s play. Taylor mixed vintage furniture pieces into each room to give the starkly modern apartment “a bit of soul,” and when they couldn’t remove an existing water pipe in the dining-room ceiling, it became an element used to light the space instead of bringing in a chandelier. Taylor also designed custom millwork for each room so the cabinets and shelving would be both fashionable and functional. “It catered to my clients’ needs exactly,” she says. And that—the ability to take a client’s vision and make it reality—is what makes this project true design success. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY KIMILLE TAYLOR INTERIOR DESIGN & DECORATION LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME LINCOLN SQUARE RESIDENCE

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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beauty in simplicity SMALL, DELIBERATE DECISIONS ADD UP TO A METICULOUSLY DESIGNED TEXAS RESIDENCE BY RISA SEIDMAN

Featured Company OLSEN STUDIOS

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Location DALLAS, TEXAS PROJECT type RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME ROSA ROAD RESIDENCE

The Rosa Road residence may appear uncomplicated in its minimalism, but a closer look reveals a deliberate tension in its design. “The very simple house is stunning in its careful study of proportion and balance of masses,” says Jamie Olsen Ali, owner of Olsen Studios, the team responsible for designing the Dallas home. Olsen put every aspect of the residence under a microscope, from the pattern, size, and amount of limestone on the exterior walls down to the precise shade of white paint for the interior. “Choosing the right color white is one of the most difficult tasks set before designers,” Olsen says. “Colors look different in every light and at every time of day. It took at least 25 white paint samples to find the interior color at Rosa.” In the end, each of Olsen’s agonizing design decisions satisfied her clients, who were looking for a house that takes full advantage of the ample trees on the lot. “They sought a house that would feel very modern and current,” Olsen says, “but still have a timeless style that blended into a rural-feeling street.” The house’s minimalist interior aesthetic also was a deliberate choice, made to showcase the clients’ collection of local art. Though her clients are happy with their new home, Olsen’s pride in her work is telling of its quality. The designer sums it up perfectly: “Rosa Road residence is a beautiful example of a simple palette of materials—white painted boards, metal, gravel, and stone—organized in a simple way that creates pattern, texture, and interest from the street. It is really a delightful house to see.” aZ


Photo by Sean Gallagher, seangphoto.com

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Photos by Sean Gallagher, seangphoto.com

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A Good Match The Rosa Road project was a first-time collaboration for Olsen Studios and S&H Design Development, a small custom builder in the Dallas area. S&H owner Mark Siepiela notes that Jamie Olsen “has a great modern philosophy that is easy to execute but very specific”— reflected in the vertical siding that created a “farmhouse modern look.”


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

A simple blend of white painted boards, metal, and stone—arranged in a way that creates unexpected patterns—makes the exterior of this Texas home appealing from the road.

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Photo by Sean Gallagher, seangphoto.com

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Since 1975

PRUTTING & COMPANY CUSTOM BUILDERS, LLC

70 Pine Street, New Canaan CT P 203.972.1028 F 203.966.8471

pruttingandcompany.wordpress.com

Designs by Joeb Moore + Partners Architects

Visit Us on the Web: www.prutting.com

Photgraphy by Esto Photographics

Whether it is new construction or a Remodeling project...

Call Us to Build Your Special Home


Photo by Drew Heffron, drewheffron.com

THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

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Seamless Connections AN UPSTATE NEW YORK HOME PRESERVES MEMORIES OF THE PAST WHILE MOVING FORWARD BY BRENDAN DABKOWSKI

Tasked with breathing new life into this mid-century Bedford Hills, New York, property, Satinwood, Ltd. rose to the challenge of honoring the vision of original architect Edward Larabee Barnes, while making the home livable and comfortable for a modern family. The residence, which sits atop Davids Hill and offers remote vistas in all directions, was “an architectural treasure when it was built in 1969,” says Satinwood founder Marsha Russell, adding that “nothing had been changed | Continued » or updated since then.”

FEATURED COMPANY SATINWOOD, LTD. LOCATION BEDFORD HILLS, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME 125 DAVIDS HILL ROAD

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Keeping the “bones of the house” intact during the renovation was a top priority. Satinwood used 21st Century technology to match and improve every original detail of the house, creating a seamless look between new and existing elements. The property’s original walls and ceilings were replaced, the bathrooms were renovated, and the kitchen was updated.

| Continued »

“When the new master suite was added, it had to fit perfectly into the landscape, as well as the original part of the house, and not call attention to or detract from anything,” Russell says. Pursuant with this idea, Satinwood installed automatic glass doors through which to enter the suite, which includes a wine cellar with white floor-to-ceiling racks. Throughout the home, floor-to-ceiling doors blend into white walls, which “blur the line between inside and out.” Outside, a pool, moss garden, stonewalls, and granite reflecting pond connect owners and visitors with the natural landscape. A blend of modern and vintage furniture and furnishings create welcoming areas to sit, dine, and entertain— outside and in—and enhance the architecture and landscape without one interfering with the enjoyment of the other, Russell says. 62

“Every choice, large and small, was made with purpose and to enhance the concept of opening the spaces up to more light and views,” Russell says. “It remains a tribute to Mr. Barnes’ vision.” aZ


Photos by Drew Heffron, drewheffron.com

STAYING FLEXIBLE “Renovations are always more challenging than new construction, as there are surprises you cannot foresee until you begin work,” says David L. Prutting, owner of Prutting & Company Custom Builders. “On this project, the biggest challenge we encountered was a significant amount of rock ledge while excavating for the new addition. The foundations required a challenging underpinning process.”

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Many of the elements of this original mid-century custom home (designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Edward Larabee Barnes in 1969), were taken down or renovated, but the bones of the original structure were kept intact to honor the original structure.


EVOCATIVE . INNOVATIVE HOSPITALITY DESIGN . MODERN . FUNCTIONAL . CLASSIC RESIDENTIAL DESIGN . EVOCATIVE . INNOVATIVE . MODERN . FUNCTIONAL . CLASSIC . EVOCATIVE RESTAURANT DESIGN. INNOVATIVE . MODERN . FUNCTIONAL . CLASSIC . INFO@VLDG.COM . WWW.VLDG.COM


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Image courtesy of Jennifer Prugh Visosky

Ten Fashion Designers to Inspire Interiors BY JENNIFER PRUGH VISOSKY, OWNER Grace Home Design

Designer Jennifer Prugh Visosky, owner of Grace Home Design, dubs herself a “small mountain-town girl.” “My hometown of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is famous for expert skiing, the Grand Tetons, and the Cowboy Bar—of which the allure of Clint Eastwood’s star power still hangs in the air,” she says. “The town-boardwalk style is besotted with Patagonia, Carhartt, and Stetson. Dressed for the rugged outdoors, a catwalk we are not.” That doesn’t mean Visosky doesn’t have a keen sense of fashion that influences her work. Here she shares nine fashion designers and one chic fashion blogger that never fail to stimulate her work.

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Chloe’s fall collections are luxe layers of delicious fabrics and ardent pops of color that represent the core of design persuasion easily translated from runway to interior. Isabel Marant’s feminine style is laced with subtle hints of masculinity while remaining beautifully relaxed and approachable.

Rag & Bone’s cult-classic, urban threads are suggestive backdrops for accessories like window dressings or a raised texture in a wallcovering. The youthful spirit in the House of Nina Ricci offers a fresh lightness in aesthetic.

Though House of Nina Ricci exudes femininity, when balanced with hints from Band of Outsiders’ vintage and trendy influences, it can give more weight to the interior.

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Embellishments and kinetic color from Rochas give me ideas on how to ruffle a room with spirited accessories, such as a bed head with a Chanel jacket. Chanel, of course, is always on the edge but rooted in timeless appeal. I adore the styling of the models with the clothing, as it adds an element of surprise and makes the look ever more approachable.

Burberry Prorsum is the ultimate expression in layered dressing, not to mention this season’s polkadot-and-stripe pairing, which is a lesson on how two brave patterns can work together to create an ageless look.

Dolce & Gabbana is always breathing and spontaneous. They are pure bliss in the power of diverse color and pattern fraternization. Garance Doré is an illustrator and fashion blogger with supremely good taste—inspiring, also, for her self-deprecating humor and graceful approach to her work.

10 BY 10

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Rooms with a View A SECOND-STORY ADDITION OPENS UP A NEW VISUAL LANDSCAPE FOR THIS SEATTLE HOME BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

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Match Made in Heaven This project marks only the second collaboration between Bjarko Serra and remodeling construction company Karlstrom Associates, but that has given president Sten Karlstrom enough time to become quite the fan of Greg Bjarko. “He works and plays tirelessly as a visionary,” Karlstrom says. “What I like most is his ability to allow symbiotic ideas to evolve and pull them all back together into a homogenous design aspect.”

Featured Company BJARKO SERRA ARCHITECTS LOCATION SEATTLE, WASHINGTON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME BEACON HILL RESIDENCE

Built in 1925 and later a 1950s rambler, this originally single-story structure was transformed into a modern, multifloor home that capitalizes on the stunning views of nearby Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains. And, as one might imagine, it was no easy feat. “Many of the house’s windows still had heights of approximately five feet above the floor,” architect Greg Bjarko explains, “virtually negating the views that would otherwise be available from this location.” Much like the client’s modest budget, the home’s cramped dimensions required creative solutions that would work within clear-cut limits. In the end, Bjarko implemented a radical makeover that included a two-story, 800-squarefoot addition. “The dramatic relationship between the existing house and the two-story addition is where this project finds its success,” he says, “by maintaining interior continuity of space while having an interesting contrast of forms. The addition includes a new kitchen area and master suite, while the existing living spaces were also updated and connected to the newly created kitchen and dining spaces.” Additionally, large sliding doors facing the south and west now flood the

dining and kitchen areas with light, which reflects into the adjacent living room—a perk previously missing from the nearly 90-year-old home. Bjarko and the client also created direct access to the southernmost area of the onethird-acre lot where the client planned to plant an organic vegetable garden. For Bjarko, efficiency and limited building materials were crucial to both match the client’s budget and to meet his firm’s high standards of sustainability. He and his team utilized energy-efficient construction practices based on added insulation and heat recovery, sustainable materials such as FSC-certified framing lumber and salvaged materials, non- or low-VOC finishes, and rainscreen wall systems. “We were able to develop a scheme that has clarity and is efficient in its execution,” Bjarko says. “There is no excess space necessary to connect the spaces or to reconcile their various uses.” aZ


Images courtesy of Bjarko Serra Architects

Large sliding doors facing the south and west flood this home's kitchen and dining rooms with light, which reflects into the adjacent living room.

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206 261 3853 karlstromassociates.com


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Pam Singleton / Image Photography LLC, imagephotographyaz.com

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Growing Old Together A REMODELED CONDO WORKS LONG-TERM FUNCTIONALITY AND ACCESSIBILITY INTO A STYLISH, CONTEMPORARY DWELLING BY BRANDON GOEI

Featured Company CARLSON HOMES Location SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE ROSENSTEIN RESIDENCE

So many things today are informed by temporary status—car leases, fashion, top-40 radio—that it seems rare to have something built both to last over a long period of time and age well with its user, all while simultaneously sporting modern design and an eye-catching aesthetic. That, incidentally, is what architect Gary Carlson of Carlson Homes achieved with his remodel of the Rosenstein residence in Scottsdale, Arizona. When interior designer Cyndi Rosenstein approached Carlson, she told him that she “wanted to show how contemporary design could be combined with age-in-place concepts to create a convenient yet exciting environment,” as Carlson recalls. The result of their partnership is a home that touts the surfaces, colors, and textures of a contemporary remodel while being completely wheelchair accessible. “The kitchen is a perfect example,” Carlson says. | Continued »


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

This wheelchair-accessible house features a kitchen with lowered countertops and a barrier-free passageway between the island and cabinets.

“The countertops are lower and the passageway between the island and the cabinets is totally barrier-free. The table allows someone in a wheelchair to roll right up and enjoy a meal or a conversation.” Other details like a fully accessible master shower and sliding doors throughout the residence illustrate the home’s functional aspects, while rift-cut cabinets, dimensional tiling, and modern lighting exhibit the architect’s eye for contemporary detail. “Each room fulfills an activity that makes it distinct from the other,” Carlson says, “guaranteeing its use.”

| Continued »

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Furthermore, thorough attention was paid to augmenting the home’s spaces with lighting. Inset LEDs help to create a contemporary look, and a balance between the amount of light delivered by various sources was meticulously found. The home’s occupants also have the ability to adjust lighting based on needs and mood, providing a variety of environments within the same space and ensuring a place that remains flexible to its user over time. aZ


Photos by Pam Singleton / Image Photography LLC, imagephotographyaz.com

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257 Dunraven Drive Toronto, Ontario M6M 1H8 T. 416.564.2435 F. 647.351.3742 E. mail@epicdesignsinc.ca W. http://www.epicdesignsinc.ca/


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Image courtesy of Epic Designs, Inc.

Before this home was remodeled, low ceilings resulted in little sunlight. Because of this, its alterations focused on obtaining natural light by varying the ceiling heights and placing windows on at least two of the walls in each room.

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Modern Love A SPLIT-LEVEL RENOVATION SHOWS CONTEMPORARY DESIGN IN A NEW LIGHT BY RISA SEIDMAN

Even the most straightforward renovation can present a designer with a slew of challenges. For Marco Vieira of Epic Designs, transforming a 1960s backsplit home into an updated, modern residence proved to be the ultimate test, but one that he was ready to take. “The client wanted the addition to tie in to the existing layout of the home and mesh the modern design to the current,” he says. “The existing dwelling had a low ceiling height with limited sunlight, so the alterations focused on obtaining natural light in the new spaces. This was achieved by varying the ceiling heights of the rooms and placing windows on at least two of the walls in each room.” To let in even more natural light, Vieira’s team designed a two-story atrium to act as the house’s main hub. The atrium also serves as a point of reference when viewed from the exterior of the house,

bisecting the residence’s elevations and giving it its interesting shape. Modern design does have a stigma of coldness and sterility attached to it—an idea that Vieira hopes to dispel with his design for this residence and with his other projects. “They have modern lines and ideas but feel homey and comfortable,” he says, “a notion not often associated with modern design in the eyes of the general public.” Vieira was able to make the home feel cozy and still maintain the contemporary aesthetic with the addition of plush furnishings, natural wood floors, and warm-colored textiles, not to mention a birchlined fireplace in the sitting room. By filling the renovated dwelling with light and warmth, the Epic Designs team has presented a new, more accessible take on modern design that could be the aesthetic’s future. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY EPIC DESIGNS, INC. LOCATION MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME 48 GEORGE HENRY


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The designer made this contemporary home feel cozy with plush furnishings, natural wood floors, and warm-hued textiles.


Images courtesy of Epic Designs, Inc.

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not often associated w

the eyes of the genera Marco Vieira Owner of Epic Designs, Inc.


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DEAR GARDEN ASSOCIATES, INC.

DISTINCTIVE DESIGN, INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE Bill Dear, Horticulturist

Bucks County, PA 215.766.8110

Princeton, NJ 609.919.0050

www.deargarden.com


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Photo By John Armich, johnarmich.com

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Stone and Copper and Wood, Oh My! AN INTERIOR REMODEL USES EXISTING ELEMENTS TO CREATE A SPACE THAT’S BOLD IN PAIRINGS AND COMPATIBLE WITH THE LANDSCAPE BY BRANDON GOEI

D

rama isn’t typically something that a designer or homeowner wants to see in the process of a renovation, but it drips from the walls of this Philadelphia house. The drama, however, wasn’t the financial or interpersonal type that sends all too many projects into a tailspin. Instead, interior designer Jena Marchione found a way to incorporate it into the details of the interior with a variety of materials, textures, and more than a handful of surprising features. And though much of the project is defined by bold pairings and a daring sense of creativity, the execution and end result show just as much harmony as drama.

Featured Company JENA MARCHIONE INTERIOR DESIGN

Fine Foliage The large porch stands out as one of the homeowners’ favorite features, rendering the garden of upmost importance. Dear Garden Associates, an award-winning firm specializing in the design, construction, and maintenance of exceptional gardens, created open walls to divide spaces and add structure to the garden without creating a heavy feel. They focused on a simple plant pallet centered on perennials of different textures and heights planted in large drifts to create a relaxed and elegant look, which also served as a great platform for the Japanese Maple near the front door. “This was a great opportunity to use plants and stonework in a manner that complemented both the individual characteristics of the home and site,” says principal Bill Dear.

Location PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA PROJECT type RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME GLENN PROJECT

The design work began with a dedication to preserving much of the home’s existing structure and materials. “[The design team was] inspired to reincorporate what we could of the existing home,” Marchione says. “We found the original mahogany paneling [to be] a source of creative inspiration that we traced throughout, both inside and outside.” One of the most prominent mahogany features is a massive ridge beam that runs across the length of the ceiling of the living room and kitchen. By exposing the beam, which was large enough that it needed to be transported by train at the time of the home’s construction, the ceiling rose to a lofty height, highlighting the fireplace installation, which Marchione calls “the dominant feature of the interior space.” The contrasting play between its mahogany, limestone, and copper elements, which were executed by a local craftsman and builder, embodies

the spirit of the project while also concealing a TV behind decorative panels. Meanwhile, the kitchen features a keen balance of classic elegance and modern sophistication with white marble surfaces adjoined to a mahogany dining area, and an unassuming armoire that masks a refrigerator. Of all the rooms, it’s the kitchen that echoes the homeowner’s desire for an incorporation of “elements of traditional design in an updated and refreshingly contemporary way” and to have “a home to share with family and friends in a variety of ways, both formal and casual.” A covered porch sits next to the kitchen and serves as both an extension into the surrounding woodland landscape and as a representation of the interior’s harmony with the outdoors. According the Marchione, the porch is one of the homeowners’ favorite features due to newly created memories—no doubt enabled by its design and location. aZ

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The massive ridge beam that runs the length of the ceiling in the living room and kitchen recalls this home's original mahogany paneling, which the designer found to be a source of creative inspiration througout the design.


Photo By John Armich, johnarmich.com

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Photos by Martin King Photography, martinkingphotography.com

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Reimagining the Bachelor PaD A GAME DESIGNER’S OUTDATED HOME GETS A SLEEK UPDATE BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

FEATURED COMPANY BETH WHITLINGER INTERIOR DESIGN LOCATION TRABUCO CANYON, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME CONTEMPORARY BACHELOR PAD

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Though the idea of a “bachelor pad” conjures images of zebra-print rugs and remote-control shades, interior designer Beth Whitlinger had to toss those stereotypes aside for this Trabuco Canyon remodel. A game designer hired her to turn his home, which was purchased from a retired couple (and, as Whitlinger says, was staid and even “cookie-cutter”), into a welcoming, modern space with definably masculine touches. Whereas the home originally was characterized by peach and beige tones that Whitlinger found to be dated, now rich swathes of burgundy, black, charcoal, and metallic gray play off each other in complementary patterns across every conceivable surface. The walls, furniture, accessories, and spatial arrangements that Whitlinger assembled all foster a sense of youthful professionalism—a balance between comforts and concentration. Discreet track lighting highlights the steep angles of cathedral ceilings, rugs soften medium-gray tiled wood floors, and plush furn from Bromley and Safavieh emphasizes comfortable lounging—either for solo use or with company. Meanwhile, bay windows feature stunning views of the canyon’s hills. Whitlinger also draws attention to the sleek metal fireplace, the rough stone sinks in the remodeled master bath, and the way that the rugs “incorporate all the main elements of the project: the colors, the shapes, the variety in density and spatial organization.” Last but not least, what would a bachelor pad be without a Toto self-closing toilet? “The client loves all the features,” Whitlinger says, “but that’s his favorite.” aZ

Cut a Rug The collaboration between designer Beth Whitlinger and rug manufacturer Delos blossomed about two years ago when Delos began to focus on made-toorder and custom rugs rather than inventoried products. Leah Phillips, who co-owns Delos with husband Ivan, says Whitlinger mainly utilizes the company’s imported tufted and Tibetan hand-knotted constructions for her projects. For this particular residence, Whitlinger re-colored two patterns from the Delos library, which possessed a certain appearance of depth thanks to the yarn-system variance and use of carving that their hand-tufted rugs provide. “We love seeing our rugs in finished projects such as this,” Ivan says, “where the rugs look born there.”


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Tropical landscaping and cascading waterfalls give this home’s entryway a Zen appeal while setting the stage for what’s to come indoors.


Photos by Jon Robershaw, jonrobershawphoto.com

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Mid-century Natural A BEVERLY HILLS HOME UPDATES AN OLD CLASSIC BY RISA SEIDMAN

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FEATURED COMPANY TUGGEY CONSTRUCTION LOCATION BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME MARTIN LANE

Thanks to popularizing forces like Mad Men, mid-century modern furniture and architecture are experiencing an uptick in demand. Not all aspects of the style from the 1950s and ‘60s, however, fit with 2014 tastes. Dave Tuggey, who recently renovated a 1960s-era home in Beverly Hills, knows this all too well. “The client, a Canadian businessman and his family, wanted to update the existing 1960s mid-century modern home,” Tuggey says, “which was complete with a mirrored room and disco ball.” To effectively mesh the home’s mid-century design with today’s sensibilities, Tuggey chose to incorporate natural elements—such as hand-laid stone, European oak flooring, and calming water features—into the home’s sleek layout. Tuggey also

included east-Asian artifacts in his redesign, such as an 800-year-old Chinese window screen that he recreated into a door. That, along with tropical landscaping and cascading waterfalls, gives the home’s entryway a Zen appeal and sets the stage for what’s to come. Nature is visible throughout the house, thanks to its many large windows looking out on the greenery that makes up the property. These windows culminate in 35-foot-wide glass patio doors, which open onto the black limestone pool deck, complete with a zero-edge pool. In the center of the pool is an oversized antique-vase fountain that ties in the Eastern aesthetic from the front of the house. By melding the outdoors with the indoors and the old with the new, Tuggey created a stunning home that will stand the test of time. aZ

The Tile Files Dave Tuggey collaborator Classic Tile and Mosaic (CTM) produces a range of high-quality products that include residential and commercially viable lines of stone, glass, terracotta, ceramic, and porcelain. They provide tiles and mosaics for both the architectural and design trade as well as retail clientele.


from the first design idea to the last finishing detail...

Stellar work

Tuggey Construction!

Culver City, CA 310.391.7307 CA LICENSE #454278 tuggeyconstruction.com


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Conroy + Tanzer Photography, conroytanzer.com

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Shock Rock ERIN MARTIN DESIGN COMPLEMENTS A MODERNIST CALIFORNIA HOME WITH A WHIRLWIND OF EXTRAORDINARY FLOURISHES BY BRANDON GOEI

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The designer of this contemporary abode is most proud of the kitchen, which boasts clean and classic lines against a tribal-like monochromatic china cabinet filled with dishware.

FEATURED COMPANY ERIN MARTIN DESIGN LOCATION PORTOLA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME WE LOVE THIS WOMAN

In the picturesque Portola Valley in Northern California, a house sits in the brush of a wooded knoll overlooking the cityscape of San Francisco, which lies off in the distance. Its structure is an eccentric bundle of rolling geometry, following the gentle curve of the land. Its interior follows suit with its off-kilter sentiment—an effect of its interior designer, Erin Martin, and her team, whose work transforms every element into a work of contemporary art. Perhaps the most telltale sign of Martin’s intuitiveness comes from her statement regarding what makes for truly stunning design: “The

architecture is always key…and if all elements are represented, a project will sing.” Her elements of choice? Concrete, wood, steel, and glass. Indeed, the interior design of a project dubbed “We Love This Woman” has a special sort of interplay with the structure of the home. The crowning feature, according to Martin, is the gnarled pile of firewood wedged underneath the crisp steel and glass staircase, its organic mass supporting a functional, industrial workhorse. The rest of the design is punctuated with prime examples of rock- | Continued »


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‘n’-roll comfort, indulgent but somehow never to excess. Contrasting elements work in incremental fashion throughout the house, from tufted sofas and 1960s-type fiberglass chairs to an industrial leather-belt centerpiece and a heart-shaped steel light fixture. The walls themselves carry a sense of organized chaos from room to room, ranging from thick slabs of precast concrete to angular wooden ceilings to tooled leather.

| Continued »

Despite the copious amount of design work throughout the house, Martin seems most proud of the kitchen, which plots clean and classic lines against a tribal-like monochromatic china cabinet filled with dishware. “We call it DFP,” she says. “Designer fucking perfect.” aZ

Photo by Conroy + Tanzer Photography, conroytanzer.com


MICK HANDLEY DESIGN

Katayama Framing

www.katayamaframing.com

MURDOCH COLLECTIONS www.murdochcollections.com

Katayama Framing

www.katayamaframing.com

MICKHANDLEY@GMAIL.COM | 805.896.3270


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An eclectic blend of patterns, materials, and vintage furniture acquired from estate sales and vintage shops keeps this interior design soulful and sophisticated.


Photo by David Papazian, papazianphoto.com

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A Lasting Impression AN ECLECTIC MIXTURE OF PATTERNS, FURNISHINGS, AND MATERIALS COME TOGETHER TO CREATE A STYLISH INTERIOR BY EMMA JANZEN

How does a designer update a space so that it feels modern, without the risk of eventually looking dated? Maison, Inc. chose to go the eclectic route when tasked with designing an interior space for a residence in Columbia Gorge, Washington. The client requested a space that would be good for entertaining guests, something “chic and stylish without being ostentatious,” owner and principal Joelle Nesen says.

FEATURED COMPANY MAISON, INC. LOCATION COLUMBIA GORGE, WASHINGTON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME GORGE PROJECT

A blend of interior furnishings sourced from vintage shops, estate sales, and auctions act as a base for the design. “I think [that having] a lot of great old pieces gives the interior more soul,” Nesen says. “You can feel that every piece isn’t new, but it still looks fresh and sophisticated.” A mix of patterns in the kitchen, bathrooms, and office is the client’s favorite part of the home, as they keep things visually interesting without any one style overpowering another. The kitchen, which “used to be a jumble of little, tiny, weird dated rooms” now looks “open and magnificent,” Nesen says. To keep a feeling of cohesion through the home, Nesen selected a chiseled St. Petersburg stone for many elements instead of using simple sheet rock. “It is the core of the whole project,” Nesen says. The wall runs the length of the entire living room, is repeated in the columns in the master bathroom, and clads the fireplace that “goes all the way from the lower level into the main living room.” Ultimately, Nesen takes pride in achieving a stylistic mix that creates a comfortable and unique interior space. aZ

Artsy Details When looking for the finishing touches for the Gorge residence, Joelle Nesen of Maison, Inc. turned to Murdoch Collections and Katayama Framing in Portland. She selected more than 40 potential pieces from their respective collections before delivering them to the client for final approval. Marilyn Murdoch says, “Joelle’s decisive nature and ‘right-on’ eye makes her and her team a dream client.”

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Photo by David Papazian, papazianphoto.com

One of the client requests for the Gorge project was a great kitchen for cooking and ample space to entertain guests, styled in a chic way.

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Architectural Metal Design and Fabrication

LAS VEGAS www.martinmetaldesigns.com

I 702.873.1992


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Karyn R. Millet, karynmillet.com

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Halftime Facelift A BOXY RESIDENTIAL PROJECT GETS A WARM, FAMILYFRIENDLY IDENTITY AFTER A NEW DESIGNER TAKES OVER BY BRENDAN DABKOWSKI

Picking up a project where someone else has left off can be scary. Say you’re forced to complete the signature dish of a chef who cuts his finger, or tasked with stepping in at mid-season to replace a baseball team’s gravely ill manager—or, in the case of Taylor Borsari, asked to help rescue a half-finished, foreclosed home in the Nevada desert. It takes poise. Borsari worked with contractors to soften the interior of a West Las Vegas residence, taking care to honor the architectural “vibe of the house.” She calls it the “Soaring Bird” project. How did you approach taking over the project? The original design intent seemed vastly different from where we decided to take the project. It had been designed to be a streamlined, very contemporary structure with big windows and pretty severe exteriors. Though we were somewhat limited with the exterior structure, we worked with the clients to make practical modifications to the floor plan to suit their needs. We set out to make a family-friendly house with a contemporary edge that made sense with the overall design of the structure but didn’t feel stark and off-putting. We opted for plaster walls, Brazilian cherry floors, and oiled walnut cabinets to help give the house an elemental feel and warm up the large volumes of interior space.

What elements would you say were the most successful overall? For me, it’s the successful fusion of the different elements of this project that make it exemplary. It’s the severe, boxy structure with enormous windows that gives you these beautiful, open, well-lit rooms against the dramatic softness of simple curtain panels, warm, earthy elemental finishes, and clean-lined furnishings. The structure itself gave such wonderful spaces to furnish and a wonderful connection to the outdoors. I think you can sense that connection specifically when you step into the great room and everything just seems to coexist perfectly. What room came together in the most pleasing way for you? I love the kitchen. It exemplifies the aesthetic of the whole house to me. The oiled walnut plank cabinets are at the heart of the house and were the first of a few decisions that really set the tone for the interiors. The walnut, as a species, has a nice, traditional edge and warmth to it, but once horizontally planked and oiled with white bronze hardware, it feels perfectly fresh for the space. It’s dressy enough to hold its own in the great room, but fresh enough that it doesn’t feel dated even though it is wood-toned. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY TAYLOR BORSARI, INC. LOCATION WEST LAS VEGAS, NEVADA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SOARING BIRD


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Photos by Karyn R. Millet, karynmillet.com

Oiled plank walnut cabinets in the kitchen set the tone for other interior decisions. Designer Taylor Borsari says that the walnut has a traditional warmth to it, but when oiled and paired with white bronze hardware, it feels fresh for the space.

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Mixed Media In Tandem One of the elements that Taylor Borsari incorporated into her eclectic design program at the Soaring Bird residence was metalwork from Martin Metal Designs. Of the pieces she requested, the steel vanity was a first-time commission for owner Matthew Martin. “We take pride in approaching each project with the creativity of an artist and the functionality of an engineer,” he says. To construct the “monolithic” vanity, they welded and sanded metal from steel plate with oil-rubbed bronze patina and silicone bronze details. “We applied an extremely protective clear coat designed to protect metals from outdoor/moist environments.” Because the overall design features elements from mid-century French shop lighting to walnut plank cabinetry, making the vanity fit the rest of the features was a two-person job, Miller says. “Taylor made sure that all the metal work was cohesive with the surroundings, and I made sure that all the metals were cohesive with each other.”


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To give this home the feel of a five-star hotel, the designer introduced all-new detailed ceilings, new finishes, ambient lighting, architectural modifications, and a vibrant color palette.


Photos by Mark Boisclair, markboisclair.com

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Five-Star Design A TOTAL TRANSFORMATION GIVES A DRAB HOME THE LUXURIOUS FEEL OF A TOP HOTEL BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

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FEATURED COMPANY ANGELICA HENRY DESIGN LOCATION GILBERT, ARIZONA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME FIVE-STAR LUXURY

When a Phoenix homeowner hired Scottsdale-based interior designer Angelica Henry to give the house a facelift, Henry aimed for a total transformation. “The client,” she explains, “wanted to upgrade this lackluster production home into a modern and luxurious hotel-like atmosphere worthy of five stars.” Henry introduced all-new detailed ceilings, new finishes, ambient lighting, architectural modifications, and a vibrant color palette that gives each chamber the feel of being its own hotel room. She was going for that “wow factor.” In one bedroom, a fire-engine red light fixture resembling hanging strands of curled ribbon plays against an all-white motif, and one entire wall behind the bed is taken up by a pattern of matching red droplet shapes that resemble raining sequins. In another,

the master bedroom, Henry outfitted the wall behind the bedpost in a brilliant, glowing lime-green laser-cut wood panel. Her goal, she says, “was to make the panel slightly evocative of an Asian floral motif inspired by the client’s cultural heritage.” It’s no surprise then that Henry went for similarly dramatic gestures in the master bath. The bathroom vanities, her favorite element in the entire house, function more as an art installation than anything. “These vanities float on a backdrop of shimmering gold wallcovering and glow from behind through the use of concealed LED lighting,” she says. “Shadows are cast across wall cladding fabricated from MDF panels that were custom routed and then painted.” Wow factor, indeed. aZ

If These Walls Could Talk To be sure that the walls exuded as much luxury as the rest of this contemporary home, designer Angelica Henry called upon the textured wall paneling of Soelberg Industries. “This project has a perfect balance of tile, glass, textiles, metal, and Soelberg panels,” says Steve Soelberg, owner and head of product design and development. “My favorite design element is the juxtaposition of all these things. It’s a space I could live and relax in.” His favorite attribute in the home? The way that light showcases the walls. “The beautiful chandelier that hangs directly in front of our textured panels accentuates the texture and really brings it to life,” he says.


Texture your life.

SOELBERG | INDUSTRIES textureyourlife.com | 801-434-9450


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

Photo by Trent Bell, trentbell.com

Crisp, white walls set the stage for strategic artwork and scultpure in this Maine redesign.

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Blank Canvas A SIMPLE COLOR SCHEME COMPLEMENTS FURNISHINGS IN A CENTURY-OLD MAINE HOME BY EMMA JANZEN

Urban Dwellings design principal Tracy A. Davis is all about understated chic, a philosophy best expressed through her renovation of a 100-yearold residence in Bath, Maine. The 1,900-square-foot home needed lots of work to become contemporary. Gutting the space and creating an open, flowing floor plan was the first priority. At one point in its life, the house had been separated from a single-family layout and divided into a two-family structure, so Davis’s first task was to bring it back to a single-family home. Doors were removed, walls knocked out, and spaces enlarged. Pumpkin pine-wood floors were discovered after peeling back layers of carpet—“a great reminder of the home’s original footprint,” Davis says—but other elements like trim and moulding were left intact. Next, the color scheme of the house needed to change, Davis says. The

original home featured a rainbow palette of wall colors. ”One was dark pink, and another was duck yellow,” Davis says. ”One was lime, and another was orange. It was crazy.” To clear the clutter and start fresh, crisp white walls set the tone. The single color selection created a backdrop for artwork and other fixtures. Most of the accent pieces chosen were large-scale art and sculptures, organized in a way that would emphasize their viewing without being too obvious about the intention. Davis added both fixed and accent decorative lighting as one way to highlight “the many textural layers used in furnishings and accents.” Overall, Davis says that she is most proud of the clean, uncluttered design, which allows guests to “peacefully absorb the stillness and calm of the finished selections and art.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY URBAN DWELLINGS LOCATION BATH, MAINE PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME RESIDENTIAL RENOVATION


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / modern living and remodels

urba Courageous. Honest. Design. Portland, ME | New York, NY 877.533.6248 | urban-dwell.com Images: Darren Setlow


Photos by Pam Zimmerer, amwzphotography.com

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A New Palette COLORFUL, CUSTOM ACCENTS BRING FOCUS TO AN OPEN-ENDED ASSIGNMENT BY PATRICK SISSON

FEATURED COMPANY TIFFANY MCKINZIE INTERIOR DESIGN LOCATION SOUTHLAKE, TEXAS PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME REYNOLDS RESIDENCE

Everything is bigger, the saying goes, in Texas. But for interior designer Tiffany McKinzie, the Reynolds residence in Southlake was literally all-encompassing. Construction, floor plans, materials, furniture, paint colors, swimming-pool design, even the soap in the soap dispensers: everything was McKinzie’s to style, shape, and source. And with the verve that’s made her a D Magazine Best Designer three years running, she went about crafting a layout that blended a classic, traditional style with a slight contemporary nod. “For such a large home—approximately

10,000 square feet—it was foremost in my mind to bring a sense of comfort and scale to the rooms,” McKinzie says. “The home feels comfortable and relaxing but still elegant. It has a wonderful flow of colors and textures throughout, which create a harmony that resonates emotionally.” Stepping in during the middle stages of architectural design, McKinzie enlisted specialists to craft one-ofa-kind accents that gave the home its own personality. A painter created a black crocodile finish on the kitchen vent hood, the game-room walls were fitted with handmade padded leather tiles, and the entryway is graced with a Robert Rea painting. A glass rondelle wall sculpture on the living room fireplace wall captured the aesthetic “classic and elegant” with “a slant towards contemporary.” And though the statement is unmistakably McKenzie’s, it’s a reflection of the homeowner. “I’ve asked her a number of times what her favorite element is,” McKinzie notes, “and she says that it depends on which room she happens to be in at that moment.” aZ

Designer Tiffany McKinzie wanted to infuse a feeling of warmth to this Texas redesign so that it would feel "comfortable and relaxing but still elegant," she says.

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The stone and cedar along the front of this home present a balance of hard and soft surfaces that the designer feels best represent the project’s overall aesthetic.


Image courtesy of Epic Designs, Inc.

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Interior, Meet Exterior A STRONG CONNECTION BETWEEN THE INDOORS AND OUT DEFINES THIS FAMILY HOME BY AMANDA KOELLNER

“A home is the sum of its parts.” Such is the belief of development company EN2—an idea easily reinforced in this Canadian abode, which boasts a 35-foot atrium, master bedroom with a massive 100-square-foot walk-in closet, heated tile floors, four walkout decks, and a 450-square-foot cedar deck with a hot tub, among myriad other standout characteristics. “We wanted to create a home that was like no other—warm, with really cool features that everyone in the family can enjoy,” says Nuno Paul, owner of EN2, who completed the project in conjunction with Epic Designs, Inc. “We strived for a modern design with a clean, open concept, as well as a well-balanced design that felt warm and homey,” echoes Marco Vieira, president and CEO of Epic Designs. Vieira says that the use of materials on this project reflects a continuity of the exterior environment to the interior through the use of natural stone on the main feature walls and a finish that spreads to the interior. “This allows the extension of inside spaces to merge with the exterior,” he says. “Both the exterior and interior finishes have a warm feel so that the home feels welcoming and soothing.” Paul adds that the stone and cedar along the front of the home show a balance of hard and soft surfaces that best represent the project’s aesthetic. “The stone wall that cuts through the front of the house keeps the same line to the back of the house,” he says. “We love the fact that the stone starts outside and continues inside through the foyer, living room, and master en suite.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANIES EN2 DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION AND EPIC DESIGNS, INC. LOCATION MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME 860 GOODWIN ROAD

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This home’s open-plan concept is both functional for everday living and ideal for entertaining, and the expansive views from the large living room windows prove wonderful for either.


Photos by Larry Arnal, arnalpix.com

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Fast and Furious A LUXURY CAR COLLECTION DRIVES THE DESIGN OF THIS MODERN HOME BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

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FEATURED COMPANY ATELIER CACHET LOCATION NIAGARA-ONTHE-LAKE, ONTARIO PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME DRIVEN BY LUXURY

What do you do when a client asks you to wow him with a unique, contemporary design for his home but also stipulates that his favorite thing about that home is his collection of luxury sports cars? If you’re interior designer Nathalie Tremblay of Atelier Cachet, the firm she founded with husband Dave Nicholas, you turn your eye to the garage. A onetime choreographer with a background in art direction, Tremblay hews toward design that is sleek, edgy, and powerful—just like the client’s vehicles. In general, Tremblay favors gray as a neutral color and, though she loves the brightness of whites, tends to lean toward black for the powerful impression it can make and its grounding properties. But this client’s preferences would require that she push herself even further. “His cars are fast, bold, and low to the ground with sleek horizontal lines and gleaming finishes,” she says, “so I used them as my inspiration for the home’s interior.” Luckily, Tremblay considers asymmetrical horizontal lines among her signature motifs, and she used them to create a design that was ambitious, bold, and dynamic—all leading toward a

“sensuous experience that reflected the authenticity of the luxury cars.” Situated along an escarpment at Niagara-on-the-Lake, the location provided Tremblay with “beautiful views to the south and west as well as ample daylight.” Though the scenery helped the project along, huge renovations—including a complete makeover of the main and top floors, which involved gutting rooms and moving walls—provided a challenge. Unsurprisingly, Tremblay’s remodel prominently featured black and gray, most seen in the kitchen. It is in this layout, which she describes as “aerodynamic, sleek, and stylish while delivering superior performance,” that the automobile influence is perhaps most visible. A retractable flat-screen television monitor, for example, rises and falls out of a T-shaped island. Meanwhile, the kitchen and second-floor balcony both expose the open space of the living room and its generous view of the outside. “The open-plan concept,” she explains, “is very functional and ideal for entertaining.” That is, at least until the gathering moves to the garage. aZ


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Beauty and the Bunker A CONTEMPORARY NEW ENGLAND HOME TAKES ADVANTAGE OF THE PROPERTY’S WORLD WAR II LEGACY AND INCORPORATES MODERN, GREEN DESIGN By Margaret Poe

Featured Company FOSTER ASSOCIATES Location LITTLE COMPTON, RHODE ISLAND

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PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME LITTLE COMPTON #3

When Foster Associates set out to build an eco-friendly home in coastal Rhode Island, the company faced a few challenges. First was New England’s wariness of modern design—and its resultant zoning ordinances. And then there was the sealed World War II bunker creating a man-made hill on the property. The design team transcended those obstacles to create Little Compton #3, a three-story home with office space, ample guest rooms, and a bank of windows to soak in views of the Atlantic Ocean. Foster principal Michele Foster explains how her team pulled it off. With a flat roof, the design allowed for three full floors with 10-foot ceilings—ensuring that the 30-foot zoning height limit would not be a problem. Foster notes that building the house on the hill gives each of the three floors different views and varying levels of privacy. And the crisp lines of its cedar cladding and aluminum windows set off the surroundings. “This building’s simplicity creates a background for the larger landscape,” she says. It’s simple but sophisticated. The south-facing orientation makes the most of prevailing breezes, and solar panels top the green roof, which helps modulate the temperature. Foster incorporated recycled materials wherever possible during construction, which took just nine months thanks to the use of prefabricated wall panels and trusses. Furthermore, the home is made for entertaining, with its ample guest suite, screen porch, and deck. “The [owners] like the modern open plan—the way the house takes advantage of multiple views and allows privacy for them and their houseful of guests,” Foster says. All thanks to a savvy design—and a well-placed bunker. aZ


Photo by Warren Jagger Photography Inc., jaggerfoto.com

A bank of aluminum-clad windows on this Rhode Island home offers sweeping views of the Atlantic Ocean.

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The homeowners’ favorite design elements included the modern, open plan and the way the house takes advantage of multiple views while simultaneously allowing privacy for the family and their houseful of guests.

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Photos by Warren Jagger Photography Inc., jaggerfoto.com

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Photos by Warren Jagger Photography Inc., jaggerfoto.com


The Northwest’s Premier Builder Design Center

KIRBY PERKINS CONSTRUCTION NEWPORT, RI

401-848-0150 www.kirbyperkins.com

425-896-3600 101 10 Street South Suite 102 Kirkland, Washington 98033 th

By appointment only. Not open to the public.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / Green Design

This home’s design and construction result in a significant decrease in energy consumption, cutting heating by an estimated 90 percent.

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Photos by Aaron Leitz, aaronleitz.com

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Green is the New Black

uxury and sustainability living in harmony. Such is the mantra of Park Passive, a 2,710-square-foot home that sits on a small urban infill lot and features a modern design “as bold as the passive-house concept itself,” according to Cascade Built founder and owner of the home Sloan Ritchie. Crafted with passive-house standards—some of the most stringent energy guidelines today—this home’s design and construction result in significantly decreased energy consumption, cutting heating by an estimated 90 percent.

AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT HOME REDUCES ITS CARBON FOOTPRINT IN STYLE By Amanda Koellner FEATURED COMPANIES CASCADE BUILT AND N.K. ARCHITECTS LOCATION SEATTLE, WASHINGTON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME PARK PASSIVE

“Inefficient buildings are the number-one consumer of energy in the world, and the largest contributor to climate change,” Ritchie says. “Passive-house design standards offer a way toward net-zero building with strategies that are relatively easy to implement—better windows and doors, more insulation, improved air sealing. Unlike asking people to stop driving their cars, passive house reduces our carbon footprint while increasing comfort and quality of life.” Ritchie worked closely with Marie Ljubojevic and Lauren McCun-

ney of NK Architects to design the high-performance home; here the two talk with DB about the project. What design elements and details make this a true example of stunning design? It features an open floor plan, a strong connection to the small yard, high ceilings, and ample natural light. Using salvaged wood from a site-harvested tree, we built in storage units to create spatial separation and clean, modern lines. We designed small moments in the house, including a bay with a | Continued » reading nook and windows


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that frame views as one walks up the stairs; a barn door that doubles as a chalk board; a double-height kitchen with skylights; and a deck off the master bedroom that captures the lake views and morning lights. Also, because the owners have two small children, a play area visible from all corners of the house has easy places to store toys and a low window for small people to view out.

| Continued »

Of all those details, which do you feel best represents the project’s aesthetic? We love Park Passive’s emphasis on vertical living with its day-lit open stairwell that has punctuated views to the street. The double-height vaulted kitchen space that visually connects the main living area to the upstairs kids’ play area also really stands out, as well as several large skylights that usher light into the kitchen area. Which elements are you most proud of?

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As Seattle’s first passive house, Park Passive is a model of innovative design that distinctively combines livability with sustainability—meeting today’s most stringent energy standards. Though it emphasizes livability, we reduced the need for mechanical heating and cooling, reduced the carbon footprint, and dramatically improved indoor air quality by paying extreme attention to detail with air sealing, packing 16 inches of insulation in the walls and more than 20 inches in the lid. We also used high-performance windows, solar hot water, zero-VOC finishes, and a heat-recovery ventilator. The home’s average indoor air temperature is 70 degrees and is managed by opening and closing its Intus high-performance windows and doors in the summer and using the heat-recovery ventilator when it’s colder. aZ

This sustainable home places an emphasis on vertical living with a day-lit open starwell featuring punctuated views to the street outside.

Photos by Aaron Leitz, aaronleitz.com


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Inefficient buildings are th of energy in the world and climate change. Passiveoffer a way toward net-zer that are relatively easy to i Sloan Ritchie Founder and owner of Cascade Built


he number-one consumer d the largest contributor to -house design standards ro building with strategies implement.

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Photos by Alan Brandt, alanbrandtphoto.com

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Harmony, Thy Name is Rusty BEAUTIFUL, COMFORTABLE, AND ULTRA-GREEN, CHERYL HEINRICHS’ “RUSTY” ILLUSTRATES ONENESS WITH THE ENVIRONMENT AND COOPERATION WITH THE SUN By Brandon Goei

Outdoorsy people carry that descriptor due to the fact that they love the outdoors. Reasons for this obvious truth may vary largely, but a plausible guess is that the outdoors is fresh, open, airy, and rife with potential energy. So when architect Cheryl Heinrichs set out to build a home in Bend, Oregon, for an “outdoorsy” client, she took all these ideas to bat. And when the project took physical form, not only was it modern, practical, and intriguing—it also had just as much charm as its name: Rusty.

Sunlight and fresh air fill this home thanks to the shape and location of windows and overhangs, resulting in a sun-tempered, solar-heated house that possesses a strong indoor/outdoor connection—just what the homeowner wanted.

The home gains its allure from a combination of simplicities and complexities. The exterior façades involve a variety of repeating shapes, while three simple shed roofs of different gradients combine to create a contemporary silhouette and a butterfly roof. Similarly, the dimensions of interior spaces are informed by the interplay of the roof’s angles and a floorplan comprised of adjoining boxes, similar to what might be found in the cold expanse of a glass and steel behemoth, only to be warmed by the wooden textures in the fixtures, floorboards, and even in the soffits. Perhaps the most defining factor of Rusty is the bond it fosters between Heinrichs’s client and the outdoors. “The shape and location of windows and overhangs results in a sun-tempered/ solar-heated home, filled with sunlight and fresh air, and possessing a strong indoor/outdoor connection,” Heinrichs says. Precisely designed windows keep the summer sun out and let the winter sun in, and a combination of solar panels and super-insulated walls help keep energy consumption ultra low. As a result, Rusty is certified as Energy Star, Earth Advantage Platinum, and an Oregon High Performance Home, ensuring its occupant is connected to and respectful of the environment, both in mind and body. aZ

Featured Company CHERYL HEINRICHS ARCHITECTURE Location BEND, OREGON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME RUSTY

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For Sun Decor Fabrics, the priority for installing these curtains was to meet the client's sustainability expectations without compromising the contemporary design of the lobby.

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Photo by Marcy Feld Photography, marcyfeld.com

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Sensible Shades A CONTEMPORARY DRAPERY SCHEME ESTABLISHES A ROMANTIC TONE WHILE HIDING AN EYESORE By Brendan Dabkowski

When it comes to designing a space, no detail is too small—even aspects like the curtains must be tailored to fit the aeshetics. When Sun Decor Fabrics outfitted the Visionaire condo building’s entry lobby with new drapery, they needed to find a way to integrate the fabric, track hardware and finished curtains in a way that complemented the structure’s contemporary architecture and also conformed to its LEED Platinum certifications. The curtains were made of sustainable materials, without compromising the aesthetics of the space. “The sheer fabric allows some daylight to filter through,” says Sun Decor principal Gloria Neumann, “but at the same time, it catches a small amount [of light], making the fabric almost glow from within.” This helps set a soft and romantic atmosphere. A “wave system,” meanwhile, ensures that the curtains hang in a continuous wavy pattern, producing clean lines that accentuate the columns and beautiful finishes around the lobby. The client, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, was happier about what the curtains hide: unattractive HVAC vents. A special 18-inch-high hem that is the same color of fabric as other sheer counterparts in the room, but heavier in weight, was installed to control unwanted billowing. The drapery hardware also was important to bolstering the lobby’s look, Neumann says: “Every segment of track was different. There are short segments with sharp-angle bends, while other parts were longer and contained a gradual curve. This made it possible for the track to perfectly follow the shape of the ceiling.” Even better, she adds, it was an exciting project to see completed because “it showed that when a client and supplier work together, there are no challenges that cannot be overcome.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY SUN DECOR FABRICS LOCATION BATTERY PARK CITY, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE VISIONAIRE

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LET YOUR DREAMS LEAD YOU HOME. For over a century, Andersen has been helping people transform their dreams into homes. Our dedication to beauty and craftsmanship has made our windows and doors a favorite of builders and homeowners alike. Our uncompromising commitment to performance has earned us a reputation of trust throughout the industry. And our belief that where you live should be as individual as how you live is the reason we encourage you to imagine freely and let your dreams lead you home. To make your dream home easy to plan, easy to discuss and easy to achieve, Andersen offers the Home Style Library. This first-of-its-kind collection of Pattern Books provides detailed illustrations and extensive descriptions of each style, with an emphasis on window and door options. From basic designs and building materials to window proportions and hardware finishes, our library will show you how to bring architectural authenticity to whichever style of home you prefer.

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Photo by Uneek Image, uneekluxurytours.com

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Designing On DeadlinE FLORIDA DESIGNERS OVERCOME TIME CONSTRAINTS TO CREATE AN ELEGANT, EFFICIENT HOME IN LESS THAN 6 MONTHS By Risa Seidman

When David Pillsbury got word that his design firm, Keesee and Associates, was selected to design the Southeast Building Conference’s New Southern Home, he was presented with a seemingly insurmountable laundry list of requirements to deliver within a short five-month time frame. “The client was building a spec house in a time when the economy was just beginning to recover,” he says. “So it was paramount to develop an attractive design that is pleasing to a large demographic, to add as many practical features, to satisfy certain green building initiatives, to maximize the available building area, and somehow to do all of this without having to price the house beyond what an average family of today can afford.” Aesthetically, Pillsbury wanted to create an elegant yet understated homage to Florida architecture with a “particular charm” that would attract various kinds of people. “The idea was to create a farm house with a little sophistication,” he says. To achieve this, the team made use of neutral tones and clean lines, providing a tasteful canvas onto which the new owners can project a range of interior-design aesthetics. To ensure that the house met the sustainability requirements of the client, Pillsbury incorporated many green elements. The house was constructed using recycled wood framing, pressboard trim, and fly-ash concrete. Other elements also were incorporated, including windows with recycled composite frames, garage exhaust fans, low-flush toilets, and other fixtures that “meet or exceed EPA water-conservation standards.” Despite the numerous challenges, the design for the spec house was conceived in four hours on a Saturday morning, then completed and open for display just four months later, Pillsbury says. The New Southern Home was later certified LEED Platinum for its incorporation of sustainable design elements. “There's an almost indescribable value in good design, as became evident by the home selling only a month after it was built,” Pillsbury says. “That's value.“ aZ

Featured Company KEESEE AND ASSOCIATES Location ORLANDO, FLORIDA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE 2013 NEW SOUTHERN HOME

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SUSTAINABLE VIEWS For the 2013 New Southern Home, Minnesota-based Andersen Windows installed windows that would stay true to the American Farmhouse style (regarding window placement, proportions, grill patterns, and roof slope) while also providing high-performance, energy-efficient features. The Andersen 100 Series selected for the project is made of Fibrex material, a “proprietary wood-and-vinyl composite containing 40 percent reclaimed-wood fiber by weight,” segment marketing manager Megan Dunbar says. “It’s a unique material that’s twice as strong as vinyl and will not fade, flake, blister, chalk, or peel, no matter what the climate brings to bear.” Dunbar finds the home to be a great blend of efficiency and flexibility, “built to last, using high-quality products and craftsmanship.” To achieve the goal of sustainability while maintaining the intended style of the home makes the collaboration between Keesee and Associates and Andersen Windows— one that has already spanned 20 projects—a sustainable one for the future.


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At this green home, large bi-fold doors open to the outdoor patio area, which features a kitchen and fireplace ideal for the mild California climate.


Photos by Dennis Mayer, dennismayer.com

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Green with envy PREFAB LAYOUT MAKES AIRY BAY-AREA RESIDENCE A POSTER CHILD FOR SUSTAINABILITY By Patrick Sisson

FEATURED COMPANY TOBY LONG DESIGN LOCATION BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE GAUL RESIDENCE

San Mateo County’s climate allows for a lifestyle that many of those locked in cold latitudes covet. So when prefab architect Toby Long had the opportunity to design a single-family home in Burlingame, California for his CleverHomes brand, he decided not only to make a living space aligned with the outdoors but add another enviable trait to the forward-thinking building by utilizing the latest in green construction. Approach the Gaul residence from any angle and the appeal to nature is clear. The open floor plan boasts an operable wall system and a sleek stone-and-wood patio with a covered kitchen, which begs for

regular use. The striking interior wraps around an open metal staircase and airy strands of bamboo, which flow intuitively towards the second-story bedrooms and centers the space with Zen-like calm. Even in the midst of a more traditional neighborhood, it stands out without standing apart. “We all loved the huge bi-fold doors leading out to the outdoor living area,” Long says. “The climate is very mild, and between the outdoor fireplace and covered outdoor kitchen, the house embodies the indoor/outdoor lifestyle of northern California.” Even more impressive, the off-site fabrication methods used to build the residence represent a commitment to sustainable living. Recycled denim insulation, sustainable cabinetry, a rainwater catchment, and reuse systems and a large green roof provide energy efficiency and highlight the efficacy of prefab construction on a larger scale. “The house is unique and uses a very modern vernacular,” Long says. “But the overall composition of the façade, and the location on the site, allow for this unique house to fit well into the otherwise traditionally styled architecture of the neighborhood.” Seeing as how it sold for well above asking price on the first weekend it was for sale, it seems that many may covet a similar structure. Thankfully, for the sake of homeowners and the climate, this green home is easy to replicate. aZ

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In keeping with this home's sustainable theme, much research went into selecting furnishings that were both eco-friendly and visually appealing.

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Photos by Matthew Williams, matthewwilliamsphotographer.com

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The New Colonialism A GREEN REDESIGN UPDATES, INSTEAD OF UPENDING, A CLASSIC WESTCHESTER HOME By Patrick Sisson

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reen construction often hews towards a natural, unfinished look—shades of bamboo and rough-hewn, reclaimed materials that scream eco-chic instead of confidently showcasing alternatives to a played-out aesthetic. When Victoria Kirk began envisioning the future of an old 3,500-square-foot colonial in Larchmont, New York, she focused on fusing modern practices and minimal design without sacrificing the structure’s inherent 1920s charm.

“What I love about the overall aesthetic is that it’s clean, calm, and comfortable,” she says. “The client’s aesthetic was more modern, so the challenge was to create a contemporary look in a more traditional architecture.” With the help of junior designer Brandi Becker, Kirk didn’t let the home’s subtle color palette, the result of natural dyes, lock her into a traditional green style, instead using splashes of colors and small embellishments to accent the white walls. The calm, confident interior played off the natural materials utilized in the construction and design. Reclaimed LV Wood floors finished with natural wax, hand-woven grass window shades by Hartman & Forbes, and sustainable Pure Kitchens cabinetry with low-VOC paint met the client’s wishes for a healthy, responsible living environment, without sacrificing colonial grandeur. Even the art struck the same balance, exuding quiet personality—a family-room photo by Bastienne Schmidt of a little boy reminded the client of her son, and the Lalani Nan painting in the bedroom, a hyper-real rendition of a sheet of fabric, reinforced the minimal aesthetic. Kirk’s clients, a couple with children making their first foray into the ’burbs, raved about the finished home, especially the contemporary kitchen and breakfast banquet and the sophisticated built-ins. “Not all green design is good design and

can present challenges,” she says. “As a society, we have made great strides in improving the ‘health’ of our environment, but sustainability is still a pretty new concept that the design community needs to continually improve upon.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY VICTORIA KIRK INTERIORS LOCATION LARCHMONT, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME IDEN HOUSE

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The client's request for green elements influenced the final color scheme throughout the interiors as well. Many of the materials were made with natural dyes, resulting in a subtle, natural palette.

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Photos by Matthew Williams, matthewwilliamsphotographer.com

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Is Your Building’s

Performance as Appearance? Energy Consulting for High Performance New Construction Energy Modeling and Analysis Construction Document & Specification Review Project Management Consulting for LEED and Enterprise Green Communities Certified Passive House Consultants BPI Multifamily Building Analysts

NYSERDA Multifamily Performance Program Partner

aea.us.org

Recipient of Partner Awards for Deep Energy Savings, 2011 and 2013


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Photo by Brent Moss, brentmossphoto.com

Ten Easy Ways to Incorporate Sustainable Design in Your Work By John Cottle, principal CCY Architects

Amid all the worthy concerns about sustainable design, saving energy and reducing greenhouse-gas emissions has somewhat fallen out of focus, according to John Cottle, principal at CCY Architects. The firm holds the belief that energy conservation needs to remain central to sustainable design, and we asked Cottle to share ten tips so designers and architects can benefit from CCY’s practices.

1

Build less and build smaller: When in doubt, build smaller—both in floor area and volume. Building smaller is more affordable upfront, and less volume means that there is less to heat and cool for the life of the home. But be realistic—building smaller is like eating. A crash diet probably isn’t sustainable, but eating a little less and more responsibly are attitudes that can last a lifetime.

2

Find the sun: When a building site has abundant sunshine, passive solar design has been proven since Anasazi times. You can use the sun to your advantage by right-sizing south-facing windows, minimizing north and west windows, sizing roof overhangs to allow winter sun in and cut out summer sun, and getting enough mass in the house to store the energy.

3

Insulate, insulate, insulate: Although it isn’t exciting, insulating properly is possibly the single most cost-effective energy-conserving decision you can make. We typically spray foam insulation in the walls and roof and add a layer of rigid insulation outside of all framing. Although this is more expensive than typical installations, it will make a significant difference in the long term.

4

It’s all in the details: Paying attention to the details to create a complete thermal envelope and eliminate thermal bridging is critical in creating efficient, comfortable homes. Making sure that the details are executed in the field takes some extra vigilance and might include infrared scans and blower-door tests.

5

Buy quality windows: Large areas of glass need to have thermally broken frames and double or triple glazing. This is a double benefit that leads to energy saving and more comfortable living spaces without winter drafts.

6

Regional materials: Transportation is a significant contributor to greenhouse gases, so look for building materials that originate within 500 miles of your site.

7

Design the roof for solar panels: Even if the current owner isn’t on board, we design for future domestic hot water and photovoltaic panels. This includes south-facing pitched roofs or locations on flat roofs, and we sometimes run empty conduits to roofs for future owners or changing economic conditions.

8

Zone the house: Grouping similar spaces and providing multiple zones for the mechanical system allows the heating or cooling to be turned down in areas that are transitional (entries, stairways), for support (storage or laundry rooms), or used infrequently (guest rooms). Primary living spaces can stay comfortable and still reduce your energy footprint significantly.

9

Building commissioning: The mechanical and control systems for energy conservation are increasingly complex. Building commissioning, which includes third-party verification that the mechanical system is operating as designed and performing at an optimal level, is essential.

10

Remember, they’ve got to love it! A great house has to be smart, work effortlessly, and be beautiful. A home will be more sustainable—better cared for, remodeled less, and last longer—if it makes life better and is emotionally engaging for those who live there.

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Contemporary Colorado SUSTAINABILITY IS EVERYTHING IN THIS RIDGE-TOP HOME By Risa Seidman

FEATURED COMPANY COTTLE CARR YAW (CCY ARCHITECTS) LOCATION ASPEN, COLORADO PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME RIDGE HOUSE

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amed for the broad ridge on which it sits, the design of the aptly named Ridge House was derived directly from its dramatic Aspen, Colorado, setting. John Cottle of CCY Architects, the firm responsible for the project, refers to that kind of deep connection to place as a dance between structure and setting: “site-specific choreography.” | Continued »


Photo by Greg Watts, gnwatts.photoshelter.com

Sustainability is king in this house, which boasts gapped steel siding that peels away from windows to provide solar shading.

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Photos by Brent Moss, brentmossphoto.com

Slot windows in this home minimize window area by carefully framing the skyline, while steel window trim projects from the building face and provides solar shading.

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“It’s so quiet and tucked into the hill as you approach; it appears to grow out of the ground,” Cottle says. “At the front door you get a glimpse of what’s to come, and then the living spaces open so dramatically to the sun and stunning views. There are protected pockets outside to enjoy the vistas that change all day and all year long.” | Continued »

When designing a house around its environment, eco-friendliness plays a large role in the process. “Almost every design decision,” Cottle says, “was filtered with sustainability in mind: the way the gapped steel siding peels away from windows to provide solar shading; the concrete floors, which allow the house to have passive solar heating and cooling; the slot windows, which minimize window area by carefully framing the skyline; and the steel window trim, which projects from the building face and provides solar shading.” All of the aspects of Ridge House’s sustainable functionality come together to create a beautiful work of contemporary architecture and a gorgeous retreat for its residents. The home’s year-round outdoor shower, shaded indoor and outdoor spaces, and separation from the valley below lend an aura of privacy and relaxation

to the home. The house wasn’t meant to be enjoyed in a vacuum, however. Its residents are avid entertainers and wanted a dynamic space where they could host parties and events. “I’ve been in the house at a number of social gatherings, and it’s a real joy to hear so many people who feel so comfortable and just like it,” Cottle says. “[I’ve heard] quite a few ‘I didn’t think I liked contemporary design, but I love this house,’ comments. They don’t know about the energy or the choreography or the story, and that doesn’t matter—it feels great.” aZ


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Cut From The Earth A HARMONIOUS JUXTAPOSITION OF STEEL AND STONE REVEALS A HOME THAT SEEMS TO EMERGE FROM THE LANDSCAPE By Emma Janzen

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rchitect William Reue harnessed elements of nature and striking industrial drama to design “A House in the Woods,” a single-family home located at the base of the Shawangunk Mountains in Ulster County, New York. “The design for ‘A House in the Woods’ was grounded in the owner’s desire to build an artful home that responded to her values of order, beauty, and environmental stewardship,” Reue says. Yearning for a quiet haven away from the city, Reue’s client arrived at their first meeting armed with poetry books, music, magazine clippings, and ideas sketched out on napkins as sources of inspiration.

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FEATURED COMPANY WILLIAM REUE ARCHITECTURE LOCATION ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME A HOUSE IN THE WOODS

Situated on a densely forested 8.5-acre lot, the site combines two geometrically opposing façades to create an ongoing conversation with the surrounding landscape. The focal point of the exterior space, a stunning auburn-colored Cor-Ten steel wall, is “heroic yet pragmatically justified in that it operates as a spine that organizes the interior spaces of the house into a series of cinematic portals to the landscape,” Reue explains. “The wall is certainly a bold gesture with a tremendous presence in the building’s immediate context—but curiously, it has a way of heightening one’s perception of the nature around the house. For instance, the slight bend in the wall amplifies the sound of the nearby stream running parallel to the house, creating an incredibly welcoming and intimate entry court.” For the shell of the house, Reue and

his client hand-selected the stratified bluestone that would compose the exterior walls as a team. Although the quarry workers thought that their selection of slabs with glaring radial saw marks on the edges was curious, Reue says that they “discussed many times how we wanted the main volume of house to appear stitched into the landscape, and, using this strategy, we could literally make the house appear as if it had been cut from the earth.” Interior components—including super-efficient quadruple-pane windows, SIP wall construction, a high-efficiency mechanical system, a direct-exchange geothermal system, a rain-harvesting system, and dozens of other elements— helped the building achieve LEED Silver certification, ensuring that the home has a small environmental footprint. And yet, tastefully, it does so while visually fitting the landscape as well. aZ


Photo by Steve Freihon, stevefreihon.com

The curve in this Cor-Ten steel wall bounces the sounds of a nearby stream into the front entryway, creating a soothing first impression.

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NATURAL SURROUNDINGS


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These interior spaces are designed minimally to appeal to the client’s values of order, beauty, and environmental stewardship.

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Photos by Steve Freihon, stevefreihon.com

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Efficient quadruple-paned windows were part of the building's overall sustainable material choices that helped lead to a LEED Silver certification.


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Photos by Steve Freihon, stevefreihon.com

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Bluestone slabs were selected for the exterior of the home, to make it appear as though the building emerges right from the landscape (above).


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We wanted the main to appear stitched i and, using this s literally make the ho had been cut from th William Reue Owner of William Reue Architecture


volume of the house into the landscape, strategy, we could ouse appear as if it the earth.

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Photo by William Quarles, williamquarles.com

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A Family Affair A BEACH HOUSE’S DESIGN APPEALS TO PARENTS AND KIDS ALIKE By Amanda Koellner

Featured Company INK ARCHITECTURE + INTERIORS Location SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA PROJECT type RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SULLIVAN’S ISLAND RESIDENCE

When Ink Architecture + Interiors principal and owner Anita King was commissioned to create a timeless and understated family beach house, she called for a full programming meeting to identify her clients’ needs. That talk led to the creation of fun spaces like a playroom off the kitchen, a mudroom for when the children come home from school, an office for the wife to work from home, and a grand porch to enjoy the island breezes or relax in the shade. “With an open floor plan, we wanted to make sure that all of the design elements flowed together and that we had a cohesive design,” she says. “Since we were hired to address everything from the architecture through all of the interior selections to the final furnishings, we addressed the design as a whole.” We caught up with King about the decisions behind the top-to-bottom undertaking. What are some of your favorite aspects of the beach house? My favorite features are the ceilings, entry foyer, kitchen, living area, and playroom. The reason that these areas excite me the most is because we really made sure to think through all of the details and the first impression walking into the house through the custom-designed door. To make each space feel individual, we looked at a way to create changes in the ceiling design that allowed the space to remain open but create uniqueness for each use. The kitchen is functional, simple, and elegant with a timeless feel. The living room has custom casework that hides and incorporates need| Continued »

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ed mechanical features but allows them to be seamless and unseen. The playroom is just plain fun. With chalkboard walls and a colorful palette, we made sure that any kid would love this space—even us big kids.

| Continued »

Which details do you feel best represent the project’s aesthetics? Certainly, the shiplap walls provided a simple detail that also relates back to the historic beach houses of the area. With lots of painted white wood features, the spaces are light and airy but allow a texture and warmth to the home. What was the client’s favorite design element? As simple as it is, the wife loves her office. With semi-translucent glass doors separating her from the living space, she can leave them open to be closer to the family or close them for privacy when needed. Another great feature and extension of the office is the back porch, where she takes her laptop out during nice days and works from the seating area. Plus, when the workday is over, the couple loves to hang out on the swing bed with their kids and enjoy the fresh air. aZ

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This beach house's grand back porch juts out from the wife's home office and provides a perfect place for the couple to relax on the swing bed while their children play nearby.


Photo by William Quarles, williamquarles.com

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Photo by Paul Dyer, dyerphoto.com

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Farmhouse Chic HEAVY EXTERNAL MASONRY HELPS MODERN FAMILY HOME EVOKE FRENCH COUNTRYSIDE By Emma Janzen

For this “Stone Maison” project, Ken Linsteadt Architects brought an old-world European aesthetic to the Los Altos Hills in California. Principal Ken Linsteadt says that his clients wanted a home that had “traditional bones of a Provençal farmhouse, but with very clean lines and modern touches.” They also asked for easy access to the outdoors to accommodate their three active children. Using a variety of materials in contrasting situations, Linsteadt delivered a studied interplay of indoor and outdoor spaces that also manages to engage the surrounding landscape. How did you accommodate the clients’ request for a space that was both rustic and modern? I think that this house does strike a nice balance between vernacular and contemporary. We used very tactile materials—stone cladding, recycled barn beams, recycled terra-cotta roof tiles, antique limestone paving, recycled-oak floor planks—and contrasted these with thin steel windows and doors as well as modern lighting, clean cast-concrete countertops, modern plumbing fixtures, and clean-line furniture. The stonework in particular is pervasive throughout the design. How did you decide to use that material for the exterior? The house was originally intended to be a stucco house with only the “tower” element (to the right of the entry door) being clad in stone. After we saw how beautiful the stonework was turning out, the owners decided that the whole house just had to be clad in stone. What did you do to reinforce the connection between the interior and exterior spaces?

Large glass doors blur the lines between this courtyard and living room, and clean-line , brightly colored furniture brings a contemporary feel to the otherwise warm, rustic interior space.

The courtyard design helped achieve the indoor-outdoor spatial experience. The house was divided into public and private wings and organized around a U shape. The living room occupies the bottom of the U, with the kitchen / family room making up one side of the U and the bedroom making up the other. This courtyard space has a generous overhang at the living-room façade, which also acts as a covered breezeway connecting the public/private sides of the house. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY KEN LINSTEADT ARCHITECTS LOCATION LOS ALTOS HILLS, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME STONE MAISON

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Stone cladding, recycled barn beams, terra-cotta roof tiles, and antique limestone paving set an old-world feel to the building, contrasted by bold steel windows and doors.

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Photos by Paul Dyer, dyerphoto.com

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Laying a Solid Foundation “They used to say that once they pulled the construction supports from under a gothic arch, if it stood for five minutes it would stand for five hundred years,” says Jesse Carrington, president of Carrington Stonemasons. This anecdote speaks to the California-based company’s driving philosophy. “We lay every stone with the notion that it will be there for at least 500 years. That means that not only does it have to be structurally sound, but it also has to have enduring design.” Carrington offers installation of a high variety of stone and brickwork for projects including fireplaces, stone walls, patios, pizza ovens, and arches. In order to make sure that the design will be lasting, the company always does its homework before beginning a new project. “Before one stone is laid, we make sure that it is exactly in line with the architect’s vision and that there is a sound design principle behind the stone concept,” Carrington says.

For example, when working with Ken Lindsteadt Architects on the “Stone Maison” Los Altos Hills project, the team traveled and trained throughout the south of France to study indigenous stonework, enabling them to recreate a Provençal rustic stone wall on the property. “The house is absolutely stunning,” Carrington says. “The amount of stone on the exterior makes it a statement piece.” With a strong attention to history underpinning its work, it’s no surprise that Carrington goes to extra lengths to ensure authenticity. This dedication yields both happy clients and employees who take pride in their timeless creations. aZ


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Photos by Dennis Welsh, denniswelsh.com

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Accessible Adirondack AT THIS NEW HAMPSHIRE MOUNTAIN LODGE, WINTER SPORTS DON’T STOP AT THE FRONT DOOR By Emma Janzen

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The Vickers Mountain Retreat offers access to the outdoors on all three levels, encouraging a variety of sports and activities.

Featured Company R. WENDELL PHILLIPS & ASSOCIATES Location LINCOLN, NEW HAMPSHIRE PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME VICKERS MOUNTAIN RETREAT

Nestled in a ridge on the side of Loon Mountain, the Vickers Mountain Retreat delivers the rustic charm of the great outdoors right to the living-room hearth. The three-level family home falls neatly within the rugged Adirondack style, with a sturdy stone fireplace, cedar clapboards, dormers, and arched knee braces that compose a “camp-like charm,” architect R. Wendell Phillips says. Though the interior spaces provide a cozy respite from the cold, the client wanted easy access to the surrounding woods to take advantage of an array of winter sports as well. To accommodate this request, Phillips added entryways on each levels and a wraparound deck to encourage a natural flow between the indoor and outdoor

spaces. He also installed rough-wood floors salvaged from old farmhouses to eliminate the hassle of removing snow boots before entering the home. As if that weren’t convenient enough, because the South Peak chairlift is just a short maneuver from the house, Phillips also outfitted the home with a custom ski locker on the second floor so visitors can ski or snowshoe right into the comfort of home. aZ


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The design of William Kaven Architecture’s Elements residence harnesses the power of the surrounding Oregon wilderness through its physical orientation, as well as via ample windows.

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Photos by Jeremy Bittermann (left), bittermannphotography.com; and Daniel Kaven (right), cargocollective.com/danielkaven

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Nod to Mother Nature

is enclosed by a continuous wall of glass, mediating elements while preserving remarkable views. In elevating the most active programmatic entities of living and eating, they are in turn visually connected to the landscape below, framing everyday life via eons of geological and hydrological phenomena. The orientation of the wall of glass that is much of the home sets up an epic view down the Columbia River Gorge. On the exterior, the glass makes for an impressive reflective structure, mirroring the vast landscape back onto itself.

A HOUSE BURROWED INTO THE HILLSIDE STAYS IN TOUCH WITH THE ELEMENTS By Emma Janzen

FEATURED COMPANY WILLIAM KAVEN ARCHITECTURE LOCATION MOSIER, OREGON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME ELEMENTS

Sometimes mapping out a plan beforehand works; other times, good design comes down to being fully present in the moment. In the case of “Elements,” an impressive residence balanced on a hillside in Mosier, Oregon, Daniel Kaven, principal of William Kaven Architecture, had to see the view himself to determine the angle of the house. “We went through an exhaustive study during the design phase with maps to orient the house,” he says, “but ultimately, physical-world conditions were necessary to get the view from the terrace down the gorge just right.” It’s fitting, considering that the house itself works to be both a part of the surrounding landscape and celebrate surrounding views as well. We asked Kaven to elaborate on the ways in which the house responds to its environment. What is the main design choice that helped to enhance surrounding views? The open plan of the second level

Are there other parts of the house that achieve the same goal? The moments that are the most memorable are those that allow you to be in touch with as much of the elements as possible without the harsh weather beyond the glass, such as the cantilevered bedroom on the top floor, the seating area near the kitchen, and the freestanding tub in the master suite. These strategic locations thrust out into the landscape. On the exterior, the perch on the cantilevered terrace springs you out furthest into the valley. What does the client love best about the house? Our client often waxes poetic about sitting in the cantilevered box, watching the trains traverse the valley below and the birds of prey float high above in the sky looking below for food to strike. aZ

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This continuous wall of glass provides expansive views of the Columbia River Gorge from the inside of the house—and it makes an impressive reflective structure from the exterior.

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Photo by Daniel Kaven, cargocollective.com/danielkaven


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Photo by Mark Jackson

Ten Tips for Designing in Concert with Nature Marlon Blackwell, principal Marlon Blackwell Architect

There are many ways that a building design can interact with and take inspiration from its immediate natural surroundings. The ways that homes encourage access and views to the outside, utilize indigenous materials in the construction, and influence structural decisions make site choices crucial to the success of the final product. Architect Marlon Blackwell shares his thoughts on the best ways to make sure a home fits in and responds to its natural landscape. 161

1

The land is the first thing you must come to know. Understanding it allows you to provide a sensitive response. Learning about the topography, the soils, and even the geology of the place helps inform how a house meets the ground and the sky. Is the building engaged, disengaged, or does it hover just slightly above the earth?

2

When we talk about “the land,” we include nature, but also culture. What is man-made? It is a term that is all encompassing, and it includes the material culture of a place—what is found and what is produced—and its building traditions.

3

Know the way that air moves and changes throughout the year by learning about the climate. Summer and winter breezes often come from different directions, and this can in turn affect both form and ventilation strategies. There aren’t always great maps of these things, and they can be very localized. If possible, spend time on site over the course of a year and pay attention to the immediate trends and microclimates that exist and can be brought forth.

4

Learn about the sun’s relationship to the site, and the quality of light and shadow it produces at different times throughout the day. This affects how a house is organized and helps to establish a relationship between you, your house, and the patterns of the seasons.

5

Craft a relationship between inside and outside. Too often we are either inside or outside, but many of the best spaces are the areas of transition in between. These spaces are often the interface between our private and public lives.

6

Know where the water comes from on your site, both in terms of ground water and precipitation, as well as where it’s going (runoff). It affects the siting and detailing, and it shapes a house in direct specific ways.

7

Views should embrace both the intimacy and the immensity of a site. Views can extend you out into the site or they can bring the site to you by creating nearness with otherwise distant places. Framed views inscribe the interior with the exterior.

8 9

Go native on the landscaping. Use plants that belong where you are and you will belong there too.

Be observant of local building cultures that you can present in strangely familiar ways. Think about how you can engage all of the senses with details and materials.

10

Involve a landscape architect from the beginning. They offer another layer of insights that affect many of the points listed here and think about issues over longer periods of time. This long-term view and understanding of natural systems is invaluable in designing a house in concert with its natural surroundings.

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R. Wendell Phillips & Associates, Inc. Architecture Planning Preservation 650 Country Road, New London, NH 03257 (603)526.9636 www.rwpa-architects.com Feasibility Studies Master Plans Preservation of Historic Buildings Leed for Homes Energy Efficiency Cost Analysis Land Use Planning Construction Observation


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Photos by Pete Saloutos, petesaloutos.com

These schoolhouse windows provide expansive views out onto the Puget Sound and the head of Eagle Harbor, which separate Seattle from this house on Bainbridge Island.

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Good Things Come in Small Houses A DOWNSIZE LEADS TO A LOVELY LITTLE HOME ON THE WATER By Amanda Koellner

Featured Company B.C. & J. ARCHITECTURE’S PERFECT LITTLE HOUSE COMPANY Location BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, WASHINGTON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE MAPLE

To approach a design firm called The Perfect Little House Company and ask for a little house that’s, well, perfect, almost seems too obvious—but that’s exactly how this client ended up with a dream-like downsize. “They wanted something small but useful—not trite but quaint—a house that offered a variety of experiences,” says principal Stella Carosso. She and Peter Brachvogel started the company in 2009 as an offshoot of BC&J Architecture, which they founded back in 1990. Clients can buy PLHC plans as-is or hire BC&J for customization, as was the case for this Washington home, which shares an island with the offices of both companies.

“The clients love the master bedroom for its expansive view of the water through the large schoolhouse windows,” Carosso says. “But their favorite space is the great room. Here the husband, who loves to cook, has a large island stage facing the built-in expansive dining nook.” White cabinetry, wood floors, and stainless-steel appliances all blend for a fresh, classic kitchen look.

The design of the house began with its placement on the site in relation to the garage, as it enhances the entry sequence and directs how you experience the rest of the home’s spaces. “Separating the nocturnal side of the house from the daytime rooms with a dramatic entry was one of the most engaging elements of The Maple,” Carosso says. A large private deck with

Although the home seems like the perfect little project, designing for and building near the shoreline had its restrictions. Luckily, these potential hurdles were embraced by “increasing the aperture of the two masses of the house and cascading the deck toward the view,” as Carosso says. A problem-free project in perfect, little fashion. aZ

an expansive view of the Puget Sound and the head of Eagle Harbor, which separate Bainbridge Island and Seattle (a 30-minute ferry ride comes between the two parcels of land), also make the 1,800-square-foot house feel larger.


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Although the owners of this quaint home were downsizing, they wanted a house that offered a variety of experiences. A main deck and dramatic entrance help the home feel bigger than its 1,800 square feet.

Photos by Pete Saloutos, petesaloutos.com


Boutique architecture. Regional Southern design.

Photography by Todd Nichols

201 Main Street | Greenwod, MS 38930 | 662.455.2581 | www.beardriser.com


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Photos By Todd Nichols, mtnichols.wordpress.com

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A Rustic Retreat A MISSISSIPPI DELTA DREAM CABIN COMES TO LIFE By Saby reyes-kulkarni

FEATURED COMPANY BEARD + RISER ARCHITECTS LOCATION BETWEEN ANGUILLA AND LOUISE, MISSISSIPPI PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SUNFLOWER FARM CABIN

Drawing inspiration from several post-Depression / WPA-era cabins, Beard + Riser architect Dale Riser helped a married couple turn their 300 acres of rural Mississippi Delta land into their vision of a rustic family retreat. In creating Sunflower Farm Cabin, located between the tiny hamlets of Anguilla and Louise (populations 726 and 199, respectively, according to the 2010 census), Riser and his firm were careful to fulfill the clients’ wishes for the design to fit the agricultural landscape and the character of the region. At the same time, the clients expressed a clear desire for the cabin to foster togetherness and be equipped for group gatherings. “It needed to serve the couple and their children, as well as visiting extended family, friends, and business associates,” Riser explains. The finished result, with its wraparound screened-

in porches, exterior wood-batten siding, and rich interior wood detailing, looks like a cross between a quaint dirt-road cabin, a camping lodge, and a Southern manor. Riser feels that all of the design elements “came together in a unique architectural language,” but that the design also “provides a very warm, inviting space.” The clients wanted ample natural light, open space, and places where people would feel comfortable being together in groups. “I feel,” Riser says, “like the design was very successful in accomplishing those goals.” aZ


Photo: Brent Moss PhotograPhy


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Photo: La DaLLMan architects

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Photo by Glen Rauth

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Lakeside Living AN ARCHITECT’S RESIDENCE SWEEPS OUT INTO THE PANORAMA OF LAKESIDE MICHIGAN, AIDED BY CLASSIC DETAILS AND A VAST VIEWING WINDOW By Brandon Goei

T

here are places that exist on Earth seemingly with the sole purpose of inspiring awe in the hearts of man. Lake Michigan is one of those places. Ancient glaciers scarred the earth deep enough to make the voyages of thousand-foot-long freighters possible, and its width obscures enough of its shores to convince lifelong Midwesterners that they’ve been transported to a coastline. Though lakeside dwellers will be the first to acknowledge that supercharged winters and 80-mile-per-hour winds often can make life by Lake Michigan seemingly unbearable, the sweeping views and gentle waves on less temperamental days more than make up for it. Lou DesRosiers, president of DesRosiers Architects, paid homage to the beauty of the Lake Michigan landscape by building his residence right on the shoreline of Good Harbor Bay in Lake Leelanau, MI. From there, the sunsets fall directly into the waters, and in the foreground, two lighthouses and the North and South Manitou Islands set the scene for a breathtaking tableaux at any time of any day. Views were the focal point of the house’s design throughout the process, and the great room is the feature that makes sure the spectacle is always visible. The room is cantilevered for a maximum amount of open space, and a massive floor-to-ceiling window with 32 feet of uninterrupted glass links the expanse of the lake with the home’s viewing area. A companion piece to the great-room window, a bronze-tinted pivoting glass door and matching window measuring 16 feet across and 10 feet

high lead the way to an interior unified in style and simplicity. Mahogany accents run throughout the house, and details like a nautical stainless-steel cable railing system on the stairway and a dining area immediately adjacent to the viewing window give the feeling of having taken up residence in a luxury ocean liner. The rest of the residence follows suit with a classic feel of in-home tranquility, replete with a gently sloping roof, Fond-du-Lac stone, and a large fireplace with a monolithic chimney that also serves as an anchor for the great room. Modern details might seem like they would clash with a home storied in traditional luxury, but features like clean-cut mahogany edges and wooden fascias sit harmoniously with the décor of the house, ensuring a soothing residence in a supremely tranquil environment. aZ

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FEATURED COMPANY DESROSIERS ARCHITECTS LOCATION LAKE LEELANAU, MICHIGAN PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME DESROSIERS NORTH


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Photos by Glen Rauth

Window of Opportunity To create the illusion of continuous glass on this lakefront residence, designer and homeowner Lou DesRosier enlisted Grabill Windows and Doors, a frequent collaborator, to factory-build windows that were joined together on site. Greg Grabill, founder and president, worked closely with expert craftsmen to maintain precision in this design element—an example of the attention to detail that the company is proud to say it brings to every project. “From concept to completion, Grabill’s innovative approach and dedication to your project ensures that the architect’s vision is fulfilled,” he says. “Grabill precision-engineered windows and doors exceed the boundaries of standard sizes, offering architects an unprecedented range of design flexibility.” For this particular project, Grabill used large expanse glass and corner glazing in both the master bath and the great room to allow for unobstructed views of Lake Michigan. “The end result is a home that testifies to the care that Lou placed on every detail,” Grabill says. “This home captures the amazing views while sitting comfortably on the natural landscape.” The DesRosiers residence is just one of 10 projects on which the two companies have collaborated—a partnership that calls upon Grabill’s transformational products, built for “the discriminating homeowner interested in only the best that the market has to offer.”

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Though the surrounding Hawaiian landscape speaks volumes for itself, the Hanalei Garden Farms Estate was designed from the inside out to please the clients. A variety of materials were incorporated from around the world to keep the feeling eclectic, with the main stairs and columns (far right) made from walnut and the bedroom ceiling (near right) composed of Brazilian mahogany.


Photos by Spotlight Home Tours, spotlighthometours.com

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Island Oasis A HAWAIIAN ESTATE BLENDS LOCAL CHARM WITH INFLUENCES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE By Risa Seidman

FEATURED COMPANY MATTHEW SCHALLER ARCHITECT LOCATION PRINCEVILLE, KAUAI, HAWAII PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME HANALEI GARDEN FARMS ESTATE

When you build a home amid the lush valleys and verdant golf courses of northern Kauai, the scenery plays a major role in the design. Matthew Schaller made featuring the surrounding Hawaiian landscape a top priority when building Hanalei Garden Farms Estate in Princeville. “The residence is designed for the clients from the inside out,” Schaller says. “It captures the expansive views with large opening glass doors, and yet each separate suite has its own individual stunning views that give them the feeling of seclusion and privacy.” The great room and gourmet kitchen are two elements that capture and integrate those coveted Kauai views. “We spent a lot of time designing and fabricating the kitchen so the cooks can feel as if they are part of the outside while still enjoying the outfitted kitchen inside,” Schaller says. The great room— unlike the rest of the home—is not air-conditioned, bringing the tropical atmosphere directly into the living space.

Along with the picturesque vistas, Schaller’s clients presented him with a list of specific demands to fulfill, such as melding Polynesian building styles with the traditional flourishes of an estate home. “The roof design and construction were particularly challenging,” Schaller recalls. “The octagonal roofs over the two-bedroom suites and study are all clearspan 3-D trusses that meet at a central hub. Each truss was site-built with double-pitch rafters, the traditional tropic roof form.” Beneath the Hawaiian-style roof, the rest of the house tells a different story. Both inside and out, the master design blends multicultural influences with traditional Hawaiian flair. Rich mahogany ceilings hail from Brazil, granite columns were quarried in Connecticut and Indonesia, and some of the showers feature stone slabs from Italy and China. Outside, Schaller installed a koi pond with stone from India and a lap pool and waterfall with limestone sourced from the south side of the island. “These stones are part of the last 180 tons from that quarry that is now closed,” Schaller says. As a result, Schaller’s design for the Hanalei Garden Farm Estate seamlessly blends traditional Hawaiian architecture with other styles from around the globe, helping the clients feel connected with their location at home on the Garden Isle. aZ

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Photo by Spotlight Home Tours, spotlighthometours.com

The integration of the lap pool, spa, and waterfall on this estate was challenging because of the site’s angled topography. The pool is supported by a small group of micropiles holding it up on the slope.

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Photo by Isabelle Neylan and Julian Neylan

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Bird’s-Eye View A SWEEPING SEASCAPE FRAMES A FAMILY HOME ON THE EDGE OF LAKE MICHIGAN By Emma Janzen

Perched above the sandy beachfront of South Haven, Michigan, the angular dimensions of the Ave Aquatica (or sea bird) house reminds neighbors of a bird in flight. The illusion is fitting, considering that “the clients have a deep appreciation for nature,” architect Robert J. Neylan says. “The house not only reinforces this connection with its openness to the site but also through the use of natural materials.” Due to the site’s close proximity to Lake Michigan, Neylan’s first priority was to keep lake views at the forefront of the design. Vertical window frames hide strategically behind columns, blurring the distinction between interior and exterior space. Outside, the edge of

the two-level infinity pool merges with the skyline, making it appear as though the banks of the water flow right up to the house. Down by the water, a large party deck floats over the bluff, separated visually from the house but hovering “high enough over the beach to feel like you are the only one on Earth,” Neylan says. With visions of the beckoning water emerging from numerous angles, it’s no wonder that the clients were pleased with the final product. “The clients not only love it as a beach house in the summer,” Neylan says, “but as a place to view the power of the winter storms racing down the lakeshore.” aZ

Featured Company ROBERT J. NEYLAN ARCHITECTS Location SOUTH HAVEN, MICHIGAN PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME AVE AQUATICA

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Waterway Illusion One of the most striking elements of Ave Aquatica is the two-level pool, developed by Benchmark Pools. “We raised the spa to the level of the main floor to give an illusion of the water coming right to the house at the end of the hallway,” managing partner Bill Kantor says. “That provided a visual bridge from floor to spa to the pool level and on out to the lake itself.”


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / residences / Natural Surroundings

For this modern Maine residence, Jon Levenseller Builders was responsible for ensuring that all interior trim and mouldings were finished to match the timber frame color and finish.

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DOWN TO EARTH “The design [of the Spruce Head residence] takes advantage of how timber-frame homes can provide an open and airy feel without losing that sense of warmth and home that is so important,” say Evan Dyer and Kevin Morrissey, owners of Rockport Post and Beam. “How the light transfers from room to room throughout the timbers and upper trelliswork gives a special feel and warmth to this home.”


Photos by Thornley Hart, thornleyhart.com, Carol Liscovitz (far left)

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Rebel Geometry THE UNIQUE DESIGN OF THIS MAINE HOME FITS IN WITHOUT FOLLOWING TRADITION By Patrick Sisson

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A folksy, rustic retreat on the New England waterfront is about as surprising as a roadside stand selling lobster rolls on Route 1. So when David G. Johnson surveyed the bayfront property in rural South Thomaston, Maine, where he was commissioned to create a home, he ditched the cabin chic and played all the right angles. The resultant Spruce Head residence captures the airy feeling of a salty breeze and sunshine. The entryway to this 2,300-square-foot home, which bisects the lofty timber frame from Rockport Post and Beam into two “barns,” or wings, looks out onto the nearby lobster pound and Penobscot Bay islands. But a much more rugged concept undercuts the floorplan of this two-bedroom home. Johnson and his team were inspired by the arrow loops of castles to create a tapering view corridor, which sets the barns apart and allows them unique views of the trees and surrounding waterfront. An orthogonal scheme would have just stared into pines. “The fact that the house is composed of two wings, cranked at different

angles, affords a great deal of visual interest, both from the exterior and the interior,” Johnson says. Despite the sharp, crisp lines, Johnson’s design also subsumed the serene surroundings. Forms found on the standing-seam metal roof replicate patterns found on buildings in the lobster ponds, maximized southern exposure accentuates the landscape, and the fireplace—the home’s central focus—is an elegant jigsaw assembled from loose stone-quarry tailings found on site. “Fitting in with the local vernacular both in terms of architecture and materials was also important,” Johnson says. “They wanted the house to feel well heeled into the land and sympathetic to its topography.” If only the topography of this former quarry—an undulating ledge substrate, which required an angled floor plan—was as sympathetic to the foundation crew. Creating a series of sweeping and singular views in a small space, Johnson’s ingenious design found a new way to frame an already storied setting. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY SKAALA LOCATION SOUTH THOMASTON, MAINE PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME SPRUCE HEAD RESIDENCE


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Photo by Jeri Koegel, jerikoegel.com

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Ageless Beauty WITH LIVABLE SPACES BOTH INDOORS AND OUT, THIS CALIFORNIA HOME WON’T GO OUT OF FASHION ANY TIME SOON By Brendan Dabkowski

FEATURED COMPANY SPINNAKER DEVELOPMENT LOCATION CORONA DEL MAR, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE GALATEA ESTATE

Spinnaker Development’s guiding design principle is simple: to weave a “timeless” essence into each project so it feels like construction was completed just yesterday. The Galatea Estate, in Corona Del Mar, California, embodies this mantra, with elevated views taking precedence throughout the overall aesthetic. Spinnaker built the contemporary home with a floor plan designed “to maximize views from every angle of the property,” says owner Mike Close. Clean sightlines of Newport Beach’s jetty, Newport Harbor’s Pavilion, Catalina Island, and the Pacific Ocean were maximized through deliberate organization of space. Take, for example, the upper-level entry courtyard. After passing through a mahogany-paneled entry gate, visitors get a clear shot of the ocean through the home’s main living areas. “The doors and windows are probably the most dramatic element of the home,” Close says. “Floor-to-ceiling windows surround the entry courtyard.”

Several pocket doors were used to lend an “indoor-outdoor” feeling to those inside the house’s main living areas. In keeping with the firm’s “timeless” vision, Spinnaker used a mix of textures and building materials throughout the home’s exterior and interior. Rich mahogany wood paneling, split-face limestone, hammered limestone, copper, stucco, and striking black doors and windows all blend together to create an appealing, ageless aesthetic. Outside, owing to community roofheight restrictions, his firm chose to design a private, intimate subterranean courtyard. “Newport’s view properties can be stunning but typically lack functional outdoor space,” Close says, “so this was a strong consideration when developing the project.” The courtyard is flooded with natural light and features a living succulent wall, built-in fireplace, and two-story water feature. “It’s a very flexible space that could be used in numerous ways,” he adds. “It was executed much better than we could ever imagine.” aZ


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Views of Newport's jetty, Catalina Island, and Newport Harbor are emphasized from both inside the main home and on the adjacent outdoor patio spaces.


Photos by Jeri Koegel, jerikoegel.com

Floor-to-ceiling windows and a large steel pivot door allow for these interior and exterior spaces to merge in harmony.

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Photo by Jeri Koegel, jerikoegel.com

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Because the home was situated on a rugged bluff, a large amount of earthwork was required to create the exterior spaces. The final landscaping provides a level of privacy for the homeowners that many neighbors do not have access to.


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restaurants, bars, and shops Everyone needs an occasional reprieve from the monotony of the sleep-work cycle. Restaurants, bars, and retail outlets often feature fanciful design schemes that invite you to forget the burdens of the world while you eat, drink, and shop. We find the following projects to be particularly well executed.


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Photo by Evan Sung, evansung.com

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Uncharted Urbanism AN EARTHY HIGH-END RESTAURANT’S DESIGN TAKES CUES FROM BOTH THE CITY AND THE WILDERNESS By Emma Janzen

FEATURED COMPANY PARTS AND LABOR DESIGN Location KING AND GROVE HOTEL, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME THE ELM

In a sea of vintage-clad bars and restaurants in Brooklyn, subterranean restaurant The Elm provides an alternative vision of what it means to be an urban eatery. Instead of following Williamsburg’s rough-hewn design trends, Parts and Labor Design looked to the complex relationship between the city’s industrial landscape and the wild forests beyond to design the high-end restaurant on the cellar level of the King and Grove Hotel. Parts and Labor principal Andrew Cohen says that the company kick-started the project by painting a specific framework for the aesthetic. “The minimalist, natural architectural palette of concrete and end-grain wood floors, glass partitions, and handmade paver wall tiles lay backdrop to the design elements within,” Cohen says. The structured palette provides ample opportunity for bringing in carefully chosen details to bring The Elm’s identity to life. “Though there is a level of refinement in the overall design,” Cohen adds, “its true character is found from the most subtle of details to the most overt of sculptural installations.” Custom lighting and furniture are key elements of the design. On the industrial end of the spectrum, sculptural pendant lights reference vintage warehouse fixtures, while on the woodland side, a porcelain-dipped steel chandelier was crafted to look like branches or antlers, “complete with shotgun cartridge slots,” Cohen says. Other fixtures that evoke the outdoors are inspired by snowshoes, beehives, bird eggs, and honey jars, and a striking installation of felling and splitting axes seems “simultaneously precious and renegade.”

A masculine mix of walnut, leather, concrete, and nickel finishes lends an earthy feel to the dining space of this subterranean restaurant in Brooklyn.

“The attention to detail and combinations of unexpected and luxurious materials is a signature of our work,” Cohen says. The resultant atmosphere is warm and refined yet lively and approachable. The owner particularly likes the use of materials in the space, citing “the mix of walnut, leather, concrete, and the nickel finishes” as his favorite aspects. “It’s earthy and masculine.” aZ

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Photos by Ellen Barten (left and right) and Evan Sung (center), evansung.com

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Custom furniture and light fixtures are key elements in most Parts and Labor designs. Shallow etching of crests into the wooden table top (far left) evokes a feeling of nostalgia, while the splitting-axe installation adds an aspect of playfulness to the outdoor space.


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BACK-BAR SPOTLIGHT The expansive back bar at Hard Water comes to life when the lights turn on, thanks to energy-efficient LightRail LED lights installed by Luminas Lighting. “The challenge indoors was to provide a backlight wall to highlight the bourbon bottles without blowing out the light levels, making it difficult to see the labels,” Luminas principal Nuno Ferreira says. “The result was a truly fabulous display.” Outdoors, the company’s OLR LED light was used in conjunction with amber gels “to create signage lighting evocative of the color of the bourbon itself. When combined with the barrel staves, the result is really great.”


Photos by Dale Tan and Ryan Hughes

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Making Light of Dark Spirits AN UPDATED WHISKEY-BAR AESTHETIC BRINGS LEVITY TO DRINKING BOURBONS AND RYES By Emma Janzen

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hen San Francisco restaurateur Charles Phan set out to envision the way his new bar would look, he posed a few simple questions to design principal Olle Lundberg to spark the flames of creativity:

“Though whiskey is aged in charred oak barrels, why do we have to drink it in an environment that recalls that? Why is everything always so dark—full of oak and leather and sawdust? How can we make a modern space that works for drinking with friends?” Tasked with redefining the American whiskey bar, Lundberg says that he needed to acknowledge the history of the space and city while rethinking the typical bar atmosphere for Hard Water. To start, Lundberg left the proportions of the former Embarcadero warehouse intact and resisted the urge to fill the space with seating and clutter. Instead of focusing on dark materials and heavy wood elements, he lifted the ambiance with a light-colored marble horseshoe bar (an ode to the Grand Central Oyster Bar, where his father took him to eat oysters for the first time) and soft, strategic lighting choices. Everyone’s favorite design element, Lundberg says, is the central light that looms over the bar, which is actually half of an old steel ship’s buoy that

still has some oysters attached. “It harkens back to the history of the pier and its maritime use, it contrasts new and old, and it is a great use of a beautiful found object,” he says. The other main source of light emanates from behind the bar itself. The “bourbon wall” takes the concept of an average back bar and enlarges the structure ten times what would be considered normal. Back-lighting the bottles “makes that collection shine, literally,” Lundberg says, “and in doing so, it highlights that incredible amber color that great bourbons always have, and the subtle differences between bottles.” With strategic lighting and an uncluttered space, Hard Water welcomes guests to drink without feeling like they’re trapped inside a whiskey barrel. Lundberg says that it’s the kind of place where you’d want to take a friend visiting from out of town. “You’d want to buy him/her a glass of whiskey that they would remember the rest of their life—in part because of the quality of whiskey that we can offer, and in part because of the feeling that we’d created.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY LUNDBERG DESIGN Location SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE BAR PROJECT NAME HARD WATER


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / restaurants, bars, and shops

Photo by Dale Tan and Ryan Hughes

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The original proportions of the Hard Water space were left alone when repurposed into a bar. The former warehouse is full of light and energy.


Creating architectural LED lighting systems for discerning clients and distinctive projects.

Oakland, CA | 510.544.6652 | www.luminaslighting.com


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Though whiskey is aged why do we have to drin that recalls that? Why i dark—full of oak and How can we make a mo for drinking with friends Charles Phan Owner of Hard Water


d in charred oak barrels, nk it in an environment is everything always so leather and sawdust? odern space that works s?

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / restaurants, bars, and shops

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Photo by Jody Horton, jodyhorton.com

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Designing Dinner Conversation AN INTIMATE DINING SCHEME SPARKS DIALOGUE AROUND FLAVORFUL THAI FOOD By Emma Janzen

Sway might look more like a fortress than a restaurant from the outside, but indoors, the inviting dining room glows with subtle Asian flare. “The space needed to be relaxed, gracious, and unassuming, with décor that gives a homey South Austin feel,” architect Michael Hsu says. “It also avoids cliché Asian aesthetics while being fun, simple, edited, and carefully composed.”

Featured Company MICHAEL HSU OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE LOCATION AUSTIN, TEXAS PROJECT TYPE RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME SWAY

To achieve these goals, only a handful of materials—including concrete, steel, wood, and tile—were utilized, so the focus remains on the people and the food instead of flashy décor. A play between warm wood panels and tables and colder industrial details provides a visual contrast that keeps the space engaging yet understated. To encourage communication between customers, six oversized square tables seating up to 16 people each command the central space. Woven basket-like light fixtures loom over each table, drawing the focus to the center of the group and casting soft light on diners perched around the edges. This encourages a communal dining feel without pressuring parties to interact. Customers also can sit in front of the kitchen, which is completely open, “creating a theater-like atmosphere focusing around the preparation of the food,” Hsu says. Armed with a cohesive design that communicates its power through simplicity, Sway leaves the discussion centered around the main reason that visitors flock to the restaurant—its unique take on Thai cuisine. aZ

FITTING FURNISHINGS Furniture plays a central role in Sway’s cohesive interior scheme. “What I liked most on the Sway project was the large scale and clean lines of the tables, benches, and bar chairs,” says Ambrose Taylor, president of architectural woodworking and metalworking shop Ambrose Taylor, LLC. “The use of African mahogany wood and blackened steel was also a very effective design element.”

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Photo by Ryan Farnau, ryanfarnau.com

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At Sway, a series of operable windows and large glass and steel hydraulic hangar doors separate the warm interior from the cool, zen-like courtyard garden, creating two distinct but complementary spaces for dining.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / Restaurants, bars, and Shops

One of the design decisons that makes Sway a more social dining experience is the open kitchen. Customers can sit at a bar and watch the food be prepared before their eyes.

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Photos by Jody Horton, jodyhorton.com


Michael Hsu Office Of Architecture www.hsuoffice.com •

Austin, Texas •

(512) 706.4303

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Photos by Tony Soluri, soluriphotography.com

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Coffee Break A CHICAGO DESIGNER PROVES THAT CASUAL DINING CAN BE FUN YET ELEGANT By Risa Seidman

Featured Company O’KELLY + KASPRAK Location CHICAGO, ILLINOIS PROJECT type CAFÉ PROJECT NAME CITYFRONT CAFÉ AND ILLY ESPRESSEMENTE CAFÉ AT NBC TOWER

ORDER UP Behind the scenes at Cityfront Café, Boelter Companies designed an efficient kitchen to help accommodate menu diversity and staff efficiency. Eric Chaplick, director of contact design, says that the project was a challenge due to space restraints, but “given the limitations, we all worked hard to come up with a design that is both eye-pleasing and productive.”

Designing anything requires good communication, a task that can become challenging when dealing with parties across country boundaries. When O’Kelly + Kasprak was asked to design a new café and an Illy coffee bar for the NBC Tower in Chicago, Belinda O’Kelly found herself in communication with a number of contacts overseas. “For the project, we were working with the building’s owners out of Germany for the café and the Illy team in Italy,” O’Kelly recalls. “We learned a lot in collaborating with both international teams.” Both the Cityfront Café and the Illy Espressamente Café make use of fun, contemporary designs and colors, but each has its own distinct aesthetic. “[For the Cityfront Café] our clients wanted to bring an urban-feeling café amenity to the NBC Tower building that features an elevated level of quick service cuisine paired with a

more modern, minimal design,” O’Kelly says. Because much of its interior is monochromatic, O’Kelly added splashes of color—like a stylized map of Chicago and lime-green accent walls—to brighten up the décor. The Illy Espressamente Café’s design utilizes similar minimalism as the Cityfront Café, but its color scheme is reminiscent of its namesake Italian espresso brand. “The highlight at Illy is the special coffee bar itself, with its beautiful curved lines and reflective finish,” O’Kelly says. “Much more than a showcase for the treats inside, the coffee bar has become an iconic element of the Illy brand itself.” As for all those calls across time zones to Germany and Italy, O’Kelly doesn’t mind. “The end result made the coordination of odd-timed conference calls well worth it,” she says. aZ


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To design the interiors for the Illy Espressemente cafe, O'Kelly + Kasprak communicated with the Illy team in Italy to find the best ways to translate the brand into an American cafĂŠ environment.


Tommy Bahama

Fresh

Pierre Michel

Nobu Matsuhisa

Eventi Hotel

Radius No. 0

• 212 847 8317 • www.celadongroupny.com

custom decorative light fixtures

mradu@raduarchitects.com 212.691.1711 104 W 27th Street, New York, NY, 10001 www.raduarchitects.com


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Photos by Dean Kaufman, deankaufman.com

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Urban Resort TOMMY BAHAMA BRINGS TROPICAL FLAIR TO 5TH AVENUE By Risa Siedman

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he divide between Tommy Bahama’s island-resort vibe and Midtown Manhattan’s urban bustle is a tough gap to bridge. But by mixing building materials and architectural styles, the designers at Michael Neumann Architecture have found common ground between the cays and the city in the Tommy Bahama flagship store, bar, and restaurant in New York City.

Featured Company M.N.A. Location NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE MIXED-USE PROJECT NAME TOMMY BAHAMA BAR,RESTAURANT, AND STORE

Brass and blackened metal lanterns hanging in the central atrium are one of the standout focal points of this Tommy Bahama space, adding an urban feel to the otherwise casual environment.

“The double-height space with atrium and ipe louvers represents the airy, casual, and relaxed quality of the tropical resort,” Michael Neumann says of the clothing store’s interior. “But modern, grittier materials like the blackened metal display cages and the black metal and brass lanterns give a harder urban edge that says, ‘This store is in the city.’” The oversized black metal chandeliers that hang from the store’s ceiling are especially emblematic of the Tommy Bahama brand, as they are meant to conjure images of tea lights or camp lanterns. Beyond being evocative of an island resort, the lighting is yet another example of the store’s dynamic design. “The lanterns are set at intervals and heights that connect the dramatic entry with the second-level restaurant and create a sense of light and balance in the space,” says Peter Williamson, the lighting designer for the retail space. Neumann’s team made plenty of other stylistic choices to achieve the appropriate balance of low-key ambience and

urban sophistication. “The combination of materials and details that mix high design, [like] brass chandeliers, with low design, [like] whitewashed poplar millwork, enrich the narrative of the urban resort,” Neumann says. That narrative continues into the Marlin Bar and Restaurant, which features a hand-painted tropical mural and old surfing photographs alongside vintage pictures of New York mainstays like Coney Island and Ebbets Field. Even the wooden window louvers in the bar are made of salvaged Coney Island boardwalk wood. But perhaps the most indicative of the urban resort feel is the sweeping staircase in the Marlin Bar, which Neumann says acts as the big architectural statement of the space. “Its detailing is reminiscent of wrapped rope that one might find in a nautical setting,” he says, “but it is abstracted in an elegant and urban way.” This detail-oriented approach to design lets Tommy Bahama customers experience an island getaway that is at home in New York. aZ

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Photo by Dean Kaufman, deankaufman.com


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Photos by Paul Warchol, warcholphotography.com

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In Pursuit of Glamour A LUXURY BRAND SEEKS A DARING NEW LOOK AS IT ENTERS THE BEAUTY BUSINESS By Margaret Poe

HEAVY METAL Custom metal fabricator Wainlands, Inc. worked with Jaklitsch / Gardner on the Marc Jacobs Beauty store, which resulted in Mark Wainland’s favorite design element in the shop: the cantilever stools. He says that engineering the stability of the stools was the biggest challenge, but after more than eight collaborations with Jaklitsch / Gardner, this project proved to be another success.

B

old. Polished. Striking. So describes the azure-eyed model whose photo adorns the wall of Marc Jacobs Beauty—and the store itself. Equal parts luxury and restraint, the flagship location in Manhattan gleams from every angle.

Longtime Marc Jacobs collaborator Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects maximized the West Village real estate in the 425-square-foot corner storefront. The firm has developed Marc Jacobs retail identities across the globe for 15 years, but this posed a new challenge: creating an identity for the designer’s first freestanding cosmetics store while maintaining the Marc Jacobs look. “The design offers a continuation of the brand’s existing visual presence,” says principal Stephan Jaklitsch, “while offering an identity that clearly differentiates this new venture.” A black granite table with a handcarved, scalloped edge anchors the space—a bold statement atop a white thassos floor. But it’s not just a statement piece. The pedestal offers

structural support, and it conceals electrical and communication lines needed for the point-of-sale system. Built-in compartments hide the makeup artists’ tools and keep the tabletop clean and unadorned. Custom beauty stools and a chandelier by Kacper Dolatowski complete the room. The products themselves add a splash of color, displayed in gleaming glass and metal around the location’s perimeter. Nothing else clutters the store, giving the compact space room to breathe. As Jaklitsch explains, it “creates a simple, clean aesthetic and a grand theatrical gesture.” That aesthetic is already proving a success: the concept developed by Jaklitsch / Gardner will be integrated into nearly a dozen existing Marc Jacobs locations. aZ

Featured Company JAKLITSCH / GARDNER ARCHITECTS LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE STORE PROJECT NAME MARC JACOBS BEAUTY

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TOUGH LOVE When asked about the working relationship between BNY Construction and Jaklitsch / Gardner, BNY principal Stanley Starczewski says, “It’s tough love, and I think it’s mutual.” The two companies have collaborated on more than 10 projects, including the Jaklitsch / Gardner headquarters. Regarding the Marc Jacobs Beauty store, Starczewski points to the black marble table as his favorite design element, adding that the end result is marked with relief and pride at managing great results in just four weeks of on-site construction time.


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Each Design Within Reach store, designed by Sayigh + Duman, is laid out in groups of varying house vignettes, divided by display areas and millwork to break up the sections.

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Photo by Sharon Risedorph Photography, sharonrisedorph.com

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At Your Fingertips CATALOG ELEMENTS MATERIALIZE FROM THE PAGE TO THE STOREFRONT IN A SERIES OF DESIGN-ORIENTED RETAIL STORES By Brendan Dabkowski

219 Step into a Design Within Reach store, and the pages of a modern-furniture catalog crackle to life: customers can browse massive swatch walls decked with upholstered fabric samples, soak up the radiance of strung-together “light cloud” installations, and parse room designs through unique house vignette setups. Sayigh + Duman was commissioned to translate DWR’s refined, classic catalog design into a brick-and-mortar operation, says principal Koray Duman, and the stores—or studios—now exist in New York City; Miami; Los Angeles; San Francisco; Stamford, Connecticut; and Orange County, California. Duman is pleased with the overall store layouts. “Though the house vignettes create a beautiful story about modern furniture design, they are divided by display areas and millwork to break the monotony as well as create intriguing presentations on different capabilities and aspects of the brand,” he says. “A walk through the store becomes both exciting and educational.” Store floor plans are laid out with the aforementioned house vignettes. Each house has a theme—either a period (mid-century), region (Scandinavian), or material (American walnut)—that ties together the furniture within, creating an elegant and unified presentation. Each house consists of a living room, dining room, bedroom, and study.

The designer’s masterwork, however, and central focal point of each store is the swatch wall. The 30-foot-long wall-cabinetry system is smattered with hundreds of colorful upholstered fabric samples attached to cabinet doors that fold out. The special design “elevates each product as well as becomes a unique sculptural element,” says Duman, noting that the wall’s impact helps fuse the design into DWR’s brand identity.

FEATURED COMPANY SAYIGH + DUMAN LOCATION VARIOUS LOCATIONS, U.S.A. PROJECT TYPE RETAIL PROJECT NAME DESIGN WITHIN REACH FURNITURE STORES

Using pendant fixtures that DWR sells, Savigh + Duman also designed a large sculptural “light cloud” installation to hang in front of each swatch wall. Also of note is the “lighting wall,” which is a flexible-configuration cabinet to display light fixtures while hiding all cables and transformers. Stamped throughout DWR stores, Savigh + Duman’s conceptual artistry helps strike a balance between “an architecture that is a quiet background to showcase products and an architecture that is exciting and tells a story about the brand.” aZ

FABRICATING COMFORT Retail stores are rarely so comfortable that they are described as “homelike,” but that is certainly the case with Sayigh + Duman’s clever design of the Design Within Reach stores. Cole D. Haynes, president and COO of the Twenty Two Group, appreciates the celebrated “light clouds,” but his favorite elements of the overall design are the fabric walls and the space planning, which “lends itself to a feeling of sitting in a comfortably familiar space, while still allowing a very open, free-flowing floor plan that promotes a great visual experience.”


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When Streetsense renovated the Chevy Chase Pavilion, one of the most important restructuring projects was taking a layout of disconnected escalators and bringing them together in a centrally located atrium.


Photo by Ira Wexler, irawexler.com

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Shopping Around CIRCULAR PATTERNS OF MOVEMENT GROUND THE GUEST EXPERIENCE IN A REVAMPED RETAIL PAVILION BY BRENDAN DABKOWSKI

Creating an impression of ever-constant movement—by projecting moving images, adding vibrant colors and lighting, and forcing people’s attention toward the center of a space—is one way of retooling a dull shopping experience. In renovating the Washington, DCbased Chevy Chase Pavilion, formerly a mall and food court built in the late 1980s, design firm Streetsense focused on “revitalizing the guest experience by reinforcing the dynamic relationship between the public spaces of the atrium and the surrounding retailers,” says studio head JC Schaub. To re-route the circulation of space, the firm replaced a layout of disconnected escalators and stairs with an illuminated glass grand stairway and centralized escalator bank. To emphasize easy movement, free-flowing curves, bright materials, and natural elements intertwine around the pavilion atrium, or the “energy center of the property,” as Schaub calls it. Behind the escalator bank is the project’s masterstroke: a three-story interactive LED art installation that “connects the entire property like a nervous system,” project designer David Pilkenton says. The installation creates, harnesses, and redistributes energy, bringing the property to life from morning—with soft, ambient lighting—to night, when vibrant colors splash through the shopping area and upstairs restaurant. Every hour, the LED installation catapults a vignette light “performance” with an accompanying soundtrack through the atrium. The shows “act as another unique

feature, making the atrium feel like more of a destination and adding a fun element for guests,” Pilkenton says. Amazingly, Streetsense and project collaborators were able to implement aesthetic improvements that eased customers’ shopping experiences while the property remained occupied by retailers and an on-site hotel. “With the addition of the grand stair, new escalator bay, and elevator renovation, it is now intuitive for visitors to maneuver around the mall and to get from point A to point B,” Schaub says.

Featured Company STREETSENSE Location WASHINGTON, D.C. PROJECT TYPE RETAIL RENOVATION PROJECT NAME CHEVY CHASE PAVILION

As a result, the redesigned Chevy Chase Pavilion is now truly a vibrant “shopping center” and architectural gem. aZ

AWARD-WINNING ASSISTANCE In order to produce some of the complex surface fabrications throughout the Chevy Chase Pavilion, Streetsense worked with ASST fabricators, manufacturers, and product designers. After developing the backlit three-form media wall for the atrium (among other contributions), ASST received an “Excellence in Craftsmanship Award” from the Washington Building Congress for its work.

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AROUND THE CLOCK Streetsense hired subcontractors Chereco Co. to intersperse custom finishes throughout the Chevy Chase Pavilion. Chereco president Cheryl London notes that one of the most challenging aspects of the job was not only the volume of the specialty finishes, but also the fact that most of the high-end interior glazing and panels had to be installed at night to ensure that shopping hours remained unaffected.

Photo by Ira Wexler, irawexler.com


350 SOUTH STREET | MCSHERRYSTOWN, PA 17344 P: 717.630.1251 F: 717.630.1271 www.asst.com

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From Farm to Office A NEW EATERY BRINGS THE OUTDOORS INTO A CORPORATE SETTING By Risa Seidman

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FEATURED COMPANY BLUEMOTIF ARCHITECTURE LOCATION SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE CORPORATE CAFETERIA PROJECT NAME GREEN ACRE AT CAMPUS POINT

Corporate cafeterias generally hold a reputation for drab interiors and bland food. When creating Green Acre, the new eatery in San Diego’s Campus Point Life Sciences Building, the design team at Bluemotif decided to be anything but boring. Helmed by celebrity chef Brian Malarkey (a Top Chef finalist who also has appeared on TLC, Travel Channel, Bravo, OWN, and more), Green Acre serves farm-to-table offerings that are fresh and vibrant. We asked Matthew Ellis, president and CEO of Bluemotif, about how the company used design to fuse a professional environment with Malarkey’s exciting menu in a fun-loving restaurant. How did the project’s location play into the design?

This corporate cafeteria features flagstone flooring, steel and rock gabion walls, and boulders to connect the indoors to the outside landscape, as the building is located immediately adjacent to a coastal canyon in San Diego.

Campus Point is located immediately adjacent to a coastal canyon. The landscape architect was diligent about embracing the plants and materials of the canyon to incorporate into the landscape, hardscape, and the outdoor dining areas. We then took those elements and pulled them into the building to strengthen the connection. Elements such as flagstone flooring, steel and rock gabion walls, and boulders were used indoors to create visual and psychological continuity.

Which detail best represents the project’s aesthetic? The project has a lot of very special details. Steel caged gabions, iron guardrails with an organic patterning, AstroTurf ceiling elements, the golden swan custom artwork wall covering, and custom glass shelving units all have their own merit and story, and are supporting elements to the base concept and aesthetic. Which elements of the design are you most proud of? This is the first project where the client really allowed us to cut loose on custom furniture. We spent a lot of energy exploring our furniture selections and details to complement the space, and even to solve spatial relationships and connections. Our steel-and-white-mahogany chairs, as well as the “bird’s nest” groupings, came out very nicely and have been well received. What is the client’s favorite design element? Near the end of the project, we added a majestic blue-and-green taxidermy peacock to the space. It was a bit unexpected, but it adds a lot of life and character to the space. aZ


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This client allowed the designers to “cut loose� on custom furniture, resulting in steel-and-white-mahogany chairs.


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Photo by Tony Soluri, soluriphotography.com

Ten tips for designing spaces where people eat and drink BY BELINDA O’KELLY, PRINCIPAL O'Kelly + Kasprak

“Has someone asked if you have ever been to a particular restaurant and you can’t remember?” asks Belinda O’Kelly, principal of O’Kelly + Kasprak. “Probably not great food or great design.” When it comes to designing a bar or restaurant, every detail adds up to a memorable dining experience. Here are O’Kelly’s tips on what things to consider when approaching hospitality design.

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Have a concept. Even if it is internal to the design team, we always develop a concept for each project, usually a collection of images. We keep the board out throughout the design process to help guide us.

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Give your guests some credit. Avoid trying too hard. I walk into some spaces and feel like I have been hit over the head with design. It’s good to be a bit subtler and leave a little for the discovery and imagination to the guests.

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Lighting can make or break a design. Often overlooked, not many elements can single-handedly set a mood like lighting. It will send a strong vibe out about the mood, and when done well, it can help attract the right crowd. Nothing kills atmosphere more than bright fluorescent light spilling out of a kitchen into the dining room.

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Respect the nuisance of seating nuances. Have you ever sat in a restaurant or bar and felt uncomfortable? Chances are there is a reason. Lounge seating too close to bar height seating is awkward, and bench seating in upscale spaces can be uncomfortable for ladies wearing a skirt. The selection and spacing of seating and tables should be carefully considered.

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It has to function well for business. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how cool it is if it doesn’t work. Seat counts are important for business, and service stations are not sexy, but yes, you need them. We spend a lot of time on the flow in the kitchen because it can be critical to the success of the concept.

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Weigh the scale. Bringing the scale of a high ceiling down to make intimate settings within a big space or creating a tall space and letting someone feel small is a powerful tool to use when designing the guest experience.

Mix and rethink materials. One of the best trends still emerging is that designers are getting more creative with how and where to use different materials. Forgetting previous “rules” and mixing metals, eras of furniture, and styles adds texture to spaces and tells a more interesting story.

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Details matter. Little things like adding purse hooks or designing reveals between materials can really set a space apart. We always like to pay special attention to the bathrooms—it is a hidden design opportunity where you can have a little fun and people will appreciate it.

Mind the food. The type and refinement level of the menu should be reflected in the design, as you are basically setting the stage for the food. Great restaurant design highlights and complements the cuisine without overpowering it.

Make it memorable. I usually don’t recall the exact design components of a space years later—but I do remember the way I felt in a space, which is a direct reflection of the atmosphere. Small touches like unique art, signage fonts, or a daring color palette will help create a memorable design.

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ARCHITECTURE Innovative Spaces Shaping Design available now at wearedesignbureau.com

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Starting From Scratch SIMPLE, ORDERED INTERIORS DICTATE THE MOOD AT THIS CASUAL THAI RESTAURANT By Emma Janzen

ADDING DIVERSITY “One thing that made this project unique was the variety of materials utilized, which included polished concrete floors, concrete countertops, wood-panel walls, and suspended wood ceiling panels,” says Robert McFate, president of construction management team The McFate Group. “The use of these materials separates [No Thai!] from the other restaurants in this category.”

Featured Company O-X STUDIO LOCATION ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN PROJECT TYPE RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME NO THAI!

O-X Studio was tasked with creating a cohesive identity out of a space that was previously “just paint on drywall,” says Brian Kim, owner of No Thai! restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The studio infused a new life into the 1,600-square-foot fast-casual restaurant, using contrasting industrial concrete and soft bamboo and adding small, quirky details. What detail captures the restaurant’s new identity the best? It may be silly to reference the push-plates to the restrooms as best representing the project's aesthetic, but they do. The design mixes in a bit of whimsy with the clean forms— something that the owners feel is a part of the No Thai! brand. For the door push-plates, we laser-cut stainless steel with the words “girls” and “boys” in gigantic letters. It is indicative of the playful little details that we tried to mix into the overall design to capture the attitude of the restaurant. Are there other elements that stand out as particularly well designed? The understated point-of-sale and pick-up counters were originally designed as one element, but we separated them for programmatic flexibility, and they ended up setting the tone for all the horizontal elements in the space. LED lights are hidden, adding a soft light that contrasts with the concrete.

What kinds of effects did the use of contrasting materials create? We are most proud of the transitions between simple materials and the three-dimensional forms of the concrete with the bamboo and resin panels, especially at the concrete point-of-sale counters and the seating countertop. There is a certain spot where the concrete countertop meets the bench, and the concrete turns downwards along the side of the bench. The concrete fabricator did a great job in pouring the corner so there is no joint in the concrete, and the result is that the concrete looks like it is a very soft material, folding down against the bamboo. It is a very clean detail to resolve a rather messy situation. aZ


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Let Them Eat Cake A HOLLYWOOD NIGHTCLUB GETS THE MARIE ANTOINETTE TREATMENT By Saby Reyes-Kulkarni

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Featured Company A.V. HOSPITALITY Location SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA PROJECT type NIGHTCLUB PROJECT NAME CAKE NIGHTCLUB

Upon passing through Cake Nightclub’s velvet-rope entrance, an intimate realm that combines 17th Century architecture with the décor of a royal French boudoir manifests. Tosh Berman, creative director of LA’s EDL Management Group and AV Hospitality, designed Cake to feel like the interior of a French chateau that simultaneously evokes the fashion sense of “vintage bohemian culture and old Hollywood charm.” Yes, Berman was thinking about Marie Antoinette when he outfitted Cake with its intricate woodwork, antique mirrors, chandeliers of real crystal, hand-tooled leather banquets, and a custom-filament Edison bulb wall set. The chandeliers, Berman points out, were custom-made in Europe before being flown in and built on site. The first in a series of EDL-launched theatrical venues, Cake acts as a showcase for Berman’s design elements while setting the stage for him to apply similar concepts for future nightclubs in West Hollywood, San Diego, and Chicago. Berman, a nightclub/hospitality veteran, consistently strives to create floor plans that make efficient use of space. With Cake in particular, Berman says that he is most proud of how he juxtaposed old-world design with tasteful elements of modern technology. In the end, in spite of playing to the senses with such strong vintage flavors, Berman wants Cake to feel timeless. Apparently, he also kept his eye trained to one of most practical needs of his patrons, as Cake already has garnered ringing endorsements in one vital department: “Women,” he says, “love the bathroom.” aZ


Photo by Ryan Forbes, avablu.com

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Each Steven Alan store, found across the country, features the same general pieces but possesses a look and feel that is completely tailored to the local environment and often built with locally sourced wood.


Photos by Christian Columbres, photos.christiancolumbres.com

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Well-Fashioned Design A TEMPLATE FOR STEVEN ALAN’S SET OF STORES ALLOWS FOR COMPLETE LOCAL CUSTOMIZATION By Amanda Koellner

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hen fashion designer Steven Alan enlisted Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) to envision a national expansion for new stores in Portland, Atlanta, Dallas, and Chicago, the architecture firm’s co-founder and principal Matthias Hollwich knew that he and his team had to develop an architecture that could be tailored to each unique space and accommodate each season’s products. He succeeded. “The design is bold, appropriately flexible, and modest yet rustic,” says Steven Alan himself. “The new series of stores that Hollwich Kushner has designed creates a template, which allows us to showcase from our favorite designers around the world.” We talked with Hollwich about exactly how he made his client this happy. What are the best examples of fantastic design in this particular project?

The store’s design is a celebration of raw materials and mechanical connections. Thick steel brackets are used to connect locally sourced lumber. The system of standardized shelving is infinitely flexible to show off products both large and small. The combination of cubbies, racks, shelves, and counters offer on-demand closed and open storage and can be customized for each season’s products. By focusing on the material connections, we were able to incorporate locally sourced lumber for each store so that every store has the same general pieces, but a look and feel that is completely tailored to the local environment.

Of those details, which best represents the project’s aesthetic? Which are you most proud of? The heavy-duty hardware hinges that we use to join together all of the modular shelves. The nature of the system pushes the products to the foreground while creating a truly flexible system for Steven Alan. At each location, we also designed huge custom lights to hang over the space, which we’re very proud of. The designs are all very graphic—like massive Xs or giant squares, and the finishes match the modular shelves to tie the whole space together. aZ

Featured Company HOLLWICH KUSHNER (HWKN) LOCATION PORTLAND, OREGON PROJECT TYPE STORE PROJECT NAME STEVEN ALAN PORTLAND

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All Aboard: American-Made WESTWARD EXPANSION AND ELEMENTS OF THE AMERICAN DREAM ANCHOR A RESTAURANT’S DESIGN By Brendan Dabkowski

FEATURED COMPANY NARVAES WESTERN LOCATION DENVER, COLORADO PROJECT TYPE RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME LOWER 48

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he ingenuity of the American immigrant, Western expansion, and the Transcontinental Railroad are all inspirations embodied in the Lower 48 Kitchen, a restaurant near Coors Field in downtown Denver designed and constructed by Narvaes Western.

The minimalistic, contemporary eatery comprises the visions of owner Mario Nocifera, head chef Alex Figura, and Bray Architecture, all of who worked to create a space that is “durable yet simple in its elegance—rugged and functional,” managing partner Amory Narvaes says. A 1,100-pound railroad-art setup in the Centennial Dining Room (named after Colorado, the 38th state) epitomizes the ruggedness that inspired the design concept. The physical process of installing the art required strong backs, heavy equipment assembly, and engineering efforts, reproducing the endeavors of workers who helped build the Pacific Railroad in the 1800s. Many other details also echo the central theme. A communal table made from rich mahogany that was reclaimed from a 1930s boxcar centers the room, fitted with lighting that is supposed

to simulate that of an old train depot. The restaurant boasts a shipping-container door that was retrofitted with sliding barn-door hardware and a host stand fashioned from “cow panels” from old animal-transport trucks. The standout feature above the L-shaped cocktail bar is made from 18-foot wood planks originally used as the floor of an American-made semi-truck from the 1950s, and a separate 10-seat bar overlooks an open kitchen and cook line that connects the “modern culinary stage to the rest of the open floor plan,” Narvaes says. Narvaes is pleased with how the railroad art and other structural design elements in the space came together and are presented, he says, “because they represent our ingenuity and our design-build history—because these items represent the legacy of the restaurant and the legacy of Narvaes Western.” aZ


55 Washington Street, suite 555 Brooklyn . NY 11201 c: 917.821.5985 t: 718.858.8227


Š 2014 Devine Color


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From Plate to Palette NEW YORK DESIGN FIRM TRANSLATES A CHEF’S COOKING APPROACH INTO A RESTAURANT’S VISUAL SCHEME By Emma Janzen

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Featured Company KAVA DESIGN Location BROOKLYN, NEW YORK PROJECT type RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME LULU & PO

Each component of the pendant lights and chandeliers in this Brooklyn restaurant were sourced from the city's nearby lighting district.

It’s funny the ways in which designing and cooking intersect. Like a chef, an architect or interior designer is responsible for creating something beautiful out of raw ingredients. In the case of Brooklyn restaurant Lulu & Po, design firm KaVa was tasked with thinking like its kitchen counterparts and creating a space that would reflect owner and chef Matt Hamilton and wife Po Kutchins’s philosophy and attitude towards assembling a dish. “The food is prepared and served in a visually straightforward way, and the complexity of taste comes from the bold layering and intersection of his ingredients,” creative director Kananshree Prasse says. She was similarly tasked with the goal of transforming “ordinary materials into a rich aggregation of textures and colors” for the space. All materials, like the ingredients used to make the house cuisine, are locally sourced or on-site transformations of existing materials. The light fixtures also were purchased from the city’s nearby lighting district. Each pendant light and chandelier is

strategically placed so that “they bring the eye to specific locations in the restaurant while accent lighting gives volume to the variety of textures.” One of the main identifying features of the space—a giant rooster wall mural—was an early design decision. “The very first mood board had images of a large graphic wall mural of a farm animal to set the tone of the space and ‘animate’ the design decisions,” Prasse says. “The image was selected carefully because of the drawing’s texture and the boldness of its gaze. Set against concrete and wood paneling, it is a subtle reminder that Matt enjoys sourcing his ingredients directly from farms and is the primary food handler for many of his dishes.” Overall, Prasse is happy with how the overall aesthetic turned out. “This project is a result of a great partnership with the clients. They were actively engaged in the design process and willing to experiment with materials and finishes, hands on. The end project reflects Matt and Po’s dynamic personalities while also subtly building up the all-important anticipation for the meal to come. “ aZ


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Before this boutique got a sleek update, carpet, drapery, and numerous wooden retail fixtures were found throughout—all in grey. Interior designer Oliva Erwin introduced a clean, white palette and removed the curtains to expose large steel warehouse windows.

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A Remodel’s in Store THIS NEW ORLEANS BOUTIQUE’S UPDATE LEADS TO A FRESH, SLEEK SPACE By Amanda Koellner

When the mother and daughter duo behind New Orleans boutique Mimi decided that their store was in need of a complete remodel to create a more open, clean space similar to the New York showrooms that they so often visited, they turned to designer Olivia Erwin. “The existing space was very heavy with carpet, drapery, and numerous wooden retail fixtures dotted throughout the store—all grey,” Erwin says. “It was very choppy, mainly due to a Vera Wang bridal salon, since removed, that was portioned off and occupying a quarter of the store.” The project took only eight weeks from design development to doors being open, and we talked with Erwin about the quick, client-pleasing design. What steps did you take to refresh this space and give it an updated design? We removed the carpet and installed a warm, rich hardwood floor, and we removed the curtains, exposing very cool, large steel warehouse windows. We also painted the walls and ceiling a neutral white. We changed the floor plan by pushing most of the merchandising to the perimeter of the store, freeing up valuable space. We also created a much more curated space by sectioning it off by various groups of brands. Each vignette is anchored by large, custom backlit panels that display each brand on sheets of Lucite. We also added floating shelves between each area for continuity. Warmth and texture come from large area rugs, and the center “runway” is broken into equal parts, adding to the fluidity of the store and simultaneously allowing for multiple merchandising opportunities.

How does the shoe department stand out among the rest of the store’s sections? The shoe department, named CeCe Shoe, is a more feminine space to help separate it from the rest of the store. We floated custom fluorescent pink Lucite shelving on wallpaper with a pink damask design on mylar to add a fun, playful tone. For lighting, we hung various-sized custom handblown glass globes, giving the effect of being in a champagne glass. Which of the details do you think best represents the project’s aesthetic? The custom backlit panels because the client was craving a more organized, refined space, and these panels are the main component in achieving that goal. aZ

Featured Company OLIVIA ERWIN INTERIORS Location NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA PROJECT type STORE PROJECT NAME MIMI NOLA

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A Taste of Old Sweden in Coastal New England BOTH SEPARATION AND UNITY DEFINE THIS RESTAURANT, TAVERN, AND GARDEN By Saby Reyes-Kulkarni

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Featured Company BEINFIELD ARCHITECTURE Location SOUTHPORT, CONNECTICUT PROJECT type RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME ARTISAN

Located on the ground floor of the boutique Delamar Southport Hotel in the coastal Connecticut town of Southport, Artisan Restaurant, Tavern, and Garden exemplifies the ideal integration of indoor and outdoor spaces. Architect Mark P. Goodwin of the Norwalk firm Beinfield Architecture collaborated with Liza Laserow of Laserow Antiques and Interior Designs to create an atmosphere that incorporates classic 18th Century Scandinavian design while also staying true to the regional hallmarks of the restaurant’s New England setting. Goodwin’s emphasis on clean, understated elegance comes through in his chosen color palette. Though one is immediately struck by full-wall renderings of magnolias and tulips by Swedish muralist-painter Jonas Wickman, the space is imbued by soft and unimposing tones of green, beige, and gray. And because Artisan consists of four dining areas, including an outdoor patio, Goodwin and Laserow’s design draws on the constant transference of light and space. From any indoor location in the restaurant, one is always conscious of the outdoor elements and vice versa. Though it faces an enclosed area, the way that Goodwin nestled the patio bar into the smooth curvature of the building recalls the type of seamless storefront-sidewalk boundary that

so often renders European cities and traditional American small towns so appealing. The bar architecture in relation to the patio suggests Goodwin’s grasp on fundamental civic design principles that help humanize spaces while making them more amenable to activity. In order to create a simultaneous sense of separation and unity, Goodwin employed columns prominently throughout his plan. “The column grid and panel-infill system create order and bring calm to the active spaces, and it helped establish clearly defined zones within the space for each entrance,” he says. “The columns define the passages between the dining room and bar room on both sides of the bar, the passage to the hotel lobby, the passage to the service area and kitchen, the entrance to the private dining room, etc. Visually, the columns create a sense of place for the architectural elements of the restaurant, such as the oxidized mirrored back bar iron panels, the three large wrought-iron double doors that lead to the garden, and the antique Scandinavian sconces.” Artisan also features a kakelugn, a Swedish tile stove typically found in farmhouses. “It reminded proprietor Rick Wahlstedt of his childhood in Sweden,” Goodwin says—proving that nostalgia can be applied artfully. aZ


NATHAN LOGAN nlogan@mlrestaurant.com | www.mlrestaurant.com

Portland, OR | 503.780.3351


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Photo by Dina Avilla, dinaavilla.com

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Out of This World BEER BREWING AND ASTRONOMY COLLIDE IN THIS PORTLAND PUB By Amanda Koellner

Featured Company JULIA WOOD ARCHITECT Location PORTLAND, OREGON PROJECT type BREWING COMPANY PROJECT NAME ECLIPTIC BREWING

When Ecliptic Brewing owner John Harris asked architect Julia Wood to design a clean, modern space with nice color and copious natural light, she took the fact that the concept stemmed from Harris’s passion for both astronomy and brewing beer and made that amalgamation her muse. The restaurant celebrates the journey through the seasons by boasting beer and food menus that rotate every six weeks on the old-world calendar—something that Wood considered in the design. We chatted with her about how she outfitted the 3,000-square-foot restaurant (which falls in a 14,000-square-feet building found thanks to the tireless work of real-estate agent Josh Bean of Doug Bean and Associates) to reflect the interests of its owner. Which of Ecliptic Brewing’s design elements make it unique?

DRINK UP Ecliptic Brewing isn’t the only beer-centric project that Julia Wood has tackled. She collaborated with Antonov Construction on Portland’s Imperial Bottle Shop & Tap Room, which featured reclaimed wood, recycled electrical spools, and light fixtures custom-made from glass jars. “All of Julia’s projects have been unique,” says owner Peter Antonov. “We always accommodate each customer’s needs and desires.”

I had the choice to place the restaurant in any part of the larger building. By placing it along the southwest wall and by carving out huge new openings in the wall with dramatic roll-up doors, the pub and dining rooms are now literally part inside and part outside. Dramatic lighting is essential to create a space with lots of moods. During the day, the sun is the showcase, and at night, the custom chandeliers create soft, scalloped lighting that has active bright areas at the communal table and center bar, and snuggly shaded areas in the cozy corners of the upholstered banquette. There are two enormous custom chandeliers: the solar system, which is 16 feet in diameter, and the Annalemma, which is a 54-footlong, figure-eight-like creation.

Which element of the design are you most proud of? I am enormously proud of the Annalemma because it took a vision, a bit of randomness, collaboration, and trust in the process to create. First, I knew it would take a lot of nerve and vision to design the lighting solution for this huge, airy space, and I had very little budget to work with. My go-to solution in this kind of predicament is to make something custom instead of using a series of ready-made fixtures. I had a contractor colleague that was removing hundreds of outdated 160-watt Holophane lights from a clean-room renovation, and voila! An idea started to emerge. After obtaining hundreds of these ribbed, polycarbonate Holophane shades, I drew on John’s knowledge of astronomy and began to learn about the Annalemma, which was a short-list name for the brewery. How did that knowledge come to fruition in the form of the lighting piece? Fascinated by its lyrical shape, I created a 20-light fixture design and sized it large enough to stitch the pub and dining rooms together, which became 54 by 8 feet. In the end, we produced the fixtures to use about 10 percent of the code-mandated maximum wattage allowance, which allowed us to receive thousands of dollars back from Energy Trust of Oregon. aZ

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W W W. T E D D E S I G N . C O M

CAFE

SANDWICH SHOP

SPA

FINE DINING

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INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES H O S P I TA L I T Y | R E TA I L | C O R P O R AT E O F F I C E B E A U T Y S PA | E N T E RTA I N M E N T A N D B A R

BUFFET (BEST OF CANADA 2011DESIGN AWARD)

PETER YIP asid, idc, arido Interior Designer Director

p 905-475-7388 f 905-475-7385 e design@teddesign.com

www.teddesign.com 1 S t e e l c a s e R o a d We s t , U n i t 1 0 , M a r h k a m , O n t a r i o, C a n a d a L 3 R 0 T 3


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Eastern Infusion FRESH DETAILS CRAFT A NEW IDENTITY FOR AN ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT JAPANESE BUFFET By Emma Janzen

Featured Company TED DESIGN Location CAMBRIDGE, ONTARIO PROJECT type RESTAURANT PROJECT NAME BRILLIANT KITCHEN TEPPANYAKI & SAKE BAR

To connect the slightly disparate bar and dining spaces of the Brilliant Kitchen Teppanyaki & Sake Bar, Ted Design opted to install a curvy bulkhead that spans the length of the room, which features classic Oriental artwork to stay in tune with the overall theme of the restaurant.

Tasked with morphing an existing 13,000-square-foot buffet into a more refined open-concept Japanese-cuisine restaurant, Ted Design demolished and rebuilt much of the floor plan but kept many of the original interior finishes of the space, adding new details for a fresh identity. The original buffet concept had a small kitchen and series of segregated dining rooms, all of which were torn down to create the more welcoming open concept. A new raised-platform dining section was added to create a space with slightly more privacy, and fiberglass torches were installed to create natural separation between the dining and bar section. The porcelain-tiling floor and drywall ceiling stayed intact, and the original central fishpond was expanded 30 percent in the new plans. In order to make the pond fit within the new aesthetic, new landscaping, stones, and artificial plants were added. The resultant area features a substantial multi-level water feature, faux cranes, and a linear chandelier made from 800 flying-bird figurines finished in red and silver chrome. “It really matches the overall Oriental touch,” Yip says. The restaurant also plays home to two bars—a traditional bar near the entrance (to generate more beverage sales) and another specializing in sake towards the other end of the space. To tie the bar and restaurant spaces together visually, Yip included a curvy bulkhead that spans 160 feet from the beginning of the bar to the end of the dining area. The drywall bulkhead is “imprinted with golden-color Oriental artworks,” Yip says—a further addition of Eastern flair to the space. aZ

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Hotels and resorts Whether visiting for business or pleasure, hotels and resorts provide an experience that’s very different from where you normally hang your hat. Here are some spirited designs that make the stopover an exciting, and sometimes extravagant, escape from the ordinary.


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Let’s Get Digital To spruce up the walls of Hotel Indigo, AI3 Architects enlisted the help of collaborator Duggal Visual Solutions to create digital wallcoverings throughout the hotel’s lobby, restaurants, and guestrooms. Duggal’s vast array of services spans interactive, print, technological leadership, and graphics, and the company “helps the world’s leading brands, organizations, museums, galleries, and creative professionals communicate visually with their customers and audiences.” Based in Manhattan’s Flatiron District, the company has been installing graphics worldwide for more than 45 years, and corporate clients include Polo Ralph Lauren, Disney, The Gap, Lancome, Verizon, The Museum of Modern Art, and Tiffany’s.


Photo by Patrick Williams of PWP Studio, pwpstudio.com

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The Rest Is History A NASHVILLE HOTEL EMBODIES THE DEEP-ROOTED TALES OF THE CITY’S PRINTER’S ALLEY By Amanda Koellner

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hen Winston Hospitality charged AI3 Architects with developing a “neighborhood story” to guide the design of the new Hotel Indigo on the world-famous Printer’s Alley, principal Lucy Aiken-Johnson and her team couldn’t have foreseen the narrative at their fingertips. Unfamiliar with Nashville, they learned of the city’s rich printing history, tales of 1800s speakeasies filled with the city’s “movers and shakers,” and the BYOB culture of prohibition. Full of new knowledge, the team set out to embrace the local fabric and celebrate the inherent beauty and details of their historic blank canvas of a building without using a theme or playing up the location’s history as a bank in a too-discernable way. Aiken-Johnson shares with us the inspiration and thought behind the design. What else did the AI3 team learn about the city during this project? Had country music not come to Nashville, the city would have become the printing capital of the world, as it was home to more than 36 printers and publishers located on Printer’s Alley. How did you incorporate the area’s history into the hotel’s design? We created a finish palette and design details that would accentuate the dramatic windows and highlight the two-story view of Printer’s Alley—our conversation piece for the staff and guests. Throughout the lobby, restaurant, and guest rooms, we referenced printing machines and block-printing techniques to share the history. The dramatic backdrop of the guest-services desk is created by custom, large-scale wood-letter

blocks, which are designed to emulate the printing block letters once used by the many printers located on Printer’s Alley. Large-scale images of printing machines create vibrant wall murals throughout the hotel, and bold fabric and custom carpet patterns were created to emulate printed textiles. What about the hotel’s bar area? To create the cozy, intimate environment for the bar and lounge, we drew inspiration from the 1800s phase of Printer’s Alley, which became a speakeasy for a mix of locals including businessmen and politicians. The Men’s District created a place that everyone wanted to frequent, and BYOB advertisements allowed patrons to bring tightly wrapped beverages in brown paper bags to sit on the back bar with their names written on them, now showcased in an art installation on the back bar. aZ

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Featured Company AI3 ARCHITECTS Location NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME HOTEL INDIGO NASHVILLE


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Photo by Patrick Williams of PWP Studio, pwpstudio.com

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The architects behind this hotel wanted to avoid a design that’s so specifically inspired by a period of time—in this case, the 1800s—that it feels “themed,” so they went for a cozy, timeless approach.


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Photo by THE Patrick Williams of PWP pwpstudio.com DESIGN BUREAU 100 /Studio, HOTELS AND RESORTS

Vibrant murals comprised of largescale images of printing machines nod to this hotel’s location on Nashville’s historic Printer’s Alley.

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Photo by Shawn O’Connor Photography, shawnoconnorphoto.com

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Altitude Appeal A COLORADO SKI RESORT ESCHEWS TIRED LODGE TROPES FOR A HEIGHTENED SENSE OF STYLE By Margaret Poe

A fireplace is pretty typical in a Vail ski resort—as are well-stocked wine racks, wood trim, and plush lounge chairs. But The Sebastian – Vail — A Timbers Resort transcends typicality. That fireplace is a strikingly modern centerpiece, with its stacked logs anchoring a warm stone lobby. Above hangs a delicate metal twig chandelier, manufactured by a local artisan. And that wine rack? It’s a towering silo anchoring Leonora, the resort’s restaurant inspired by not only the Rockies but the Alps and Pyrenees. It conspires to create a “hip mountain” ambiance, the goal of the J Banks project team, which renovated the resort.

FEATURED COMPANY J BANKS DESIGN GROUP LOCATION VAIL, COLORADO PROJECT TYPE RESORT PROJECT NAME THE SEBASTIAN – VAIL — A TIMBERS RESORT

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The designers drew inspiration from the prized snow and sky that lures skiers to Vail, as seen in the stainless finishes and icy blues and grays. They’re a counterpoint to the abundant terra cotta in the sculptural pieces by famed Mexican artist Manuel Felguérez. The works, part of the owner’s personal collection, impart radiance throughout the space and accent the carefully chosen selection of books filling the library, a completely new addition to the resort. The intimate space lures guests from the moment they arrive, says Anna Ruby, J Banks’s vice president of creative. “The Manuel Felguérez paintings make the library truly spectacular,” she says. The paintings stand out against the custom-designed bookshelves, some of which are painted black. It’s just one reason that the design team gives credit where it’s due: to the resort owner’s willingness to take risks. “It is not often that you can talk a client into taking out a stone fireplace or painting existing wood trim,” Ruby says. “We were fortunate to have very creative clients with an overall vision and the ability to visualize.” The vision is now shared by the resort’s celebrity guests and luxury vacationers. Among those that The Sebastian – Vail has wowed? None other than Michelle Obama and her daughters. Whether you’re an A-lister or an average Joe, you’ll enter an elevated state of design the moment that you step into the lobby—and that’s not just the altitude. aZ

Drink Up To house The Sebastian – Vail’s expensive wine collection, J Banks enlisted the help of VintageView Wine Storage Solutions, who used a wine tower as the focal point of the resort’s restaurant. “This was really a great example of an interactive display that invites people in and lets them have a more meaningful experience,” says Charles Malek, president of VintageView.


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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / HOTELS AND RESORTS

Image courtesy of C3D Architecture

The Gotham Hotel’s Juliet balconies serve as the focal point of the façade and, according to principal Dan Sehic, give guests a place to “pay respect to the city streetscape.”

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Beauty by the Book DESPITE COPIOUS CITY RESTRICTIONS AND REGULATIONS, C3D ARCHITECTURE TURNS A HISTORIC BOOK MART INTO THE GLEAMING GOTHAM HOTEL By Brandon Goei

FEATURED COMPANY C3D ARCHITECTURE LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME THE GOTHAM HOTEL

A sliver of machined metal shines on 46th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenue in New York City, rising with a jagged slant and radiating Midtown’s sunlight across its bustling streets. This is C3D Architecture’s Gotham Hotel, a 23-story, 260-foot structure containing a lobby, a restaurant, and 67 guest rooms, all within a 100-by-25-foot plot. Until 2007, this was the site of the Gotham Book Mart, a legendary bookstore dating back to 1920 that served as headquarters for the various incarnations of New York’s literati. Though the bookstore now is gone, the hotel that takes its place bears its name respectfully. If Gotham Book Mart was a symbol of the old city, full of thinkers and dreamers, then The Gotham Hotel is a symbol of the people and places of the new city—a project that, in finding itself bound by its sides, shoots straight up into the open air as a gleaming modern tower. The highest priority went to the interior design of the guest rooms, which

utilize custom-made beds, cabinets, closets, mirrors, and lighting, while the exterior of the hotel is a symphony of geometry, metal, and glass, incorporating clean lines into its variety of windows and balconies. Juliet balconies serve as the focal point of the façade and, according to principal Dan Sehic, give guests a place to “pay respect to the city streetscape.” Stunning views of the Manhattan skyline also can be enjoyed on the 12-by-7-foot upper balconies. The hotel owes its unique shape to myriad zoning laws, which made design a challenge. The architects had to follow rules of the NYC Building Code as well as parameters set by New York City zoning text, Life Safety, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the NYC Fire Department, and more. “This was not an easy task considering the fact that the site was 25 feet wide,” Sehic says. “At the start of schematic design, it seemed to be an almost impossible task. But following great effort, everybody was pleased with the result.” aZ


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The design of the hotel rooms and bathrooms was given the highest priority, and custom-made beds, side cabinets, closet mirrors, and lighting all topped the owner’s list of favorite attributes.

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Images courtesy of C3D Architecture

This gun-metal faรงade, punctuated by sleek metal balconies, arches backwards and toward the sky in celebration of the strict NYC zoning requirements around which the architects had to work. 261


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Image courtesy of Flick Mars

From hot to cold, the colors that resulted from this resort’s renovation were chosen to harmonize with nature—a necessary consideration, as the picturesque cliffs of Boynton Canyon sit just outside.

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Sedona Style RESORT GUESTROOMS EMBODY SOUTHWESTERN DESIGN WHILE DEFYING ITS EXPECTATIONS By Risa Seidman

Featured Company FLICK MARS Location SEDONA, ARIZONA PROJECT TYPE RESORT PROJECT NAME ENCHANTMENT RESORT

With the striated red cliffs of Boynton Canyon towering just outside, the interiors of Enchantment Resort’s guestrooms had to be pretty spectacular to even begin to compete. Enter Flick Mars, a boutique interior-design firm out of Dallas, Texas, brought in to renovate the existing rooms and suites. “[The client wanted] a complete renovation of the guestrooms and suites to ensure that the interior design was brought to the same standard as the resort’s locale and target market,” says James Flick, architect and partner at the firm. The trick was to avoid kitsch. “The look is fresh without being trendy, soothing without being dull, and works for all four seasons that occur in Sedona,” Flick says. “So, from cold to hot and in between, the colors chosen harmonize with nature.” Flick used locally sourced materials and artifacts to echo the resort’s rugged backdrop. Each room features authentic art from local Native American communities, as well as kiva fireplaces and latilla-clad ceilings.

But not everything that was needed to refurbish the guestrooms could be found in Sedona. The onyx used for the bathroom counters came from elsewhere, but with good reason. “This was a very important detail because the onyx, in a way, mimics what the canyon walls look like when the sun hits them just right,” Flick says. “All the horizontal layers of the rock are breathtaking. Boynton Canyon is one of those places on the planet where photographs truly do not do justice to the natural splendor. It sounds corny, but I defy anyone to travel there if you are able and prove me wrong.” Staying true to Southwestern aesthetics while maintaining an elevated taste level is a razor’s-edge balancing act, but Flick Mars’s transformation of Enchantment Resort’s guestrooms makes it look positively effortless. The rooms exude luxury and style, with an appropriate amount of local flavor—that is, just enough to remind resort guests of their gorgeous natural surroundings. aZ


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riveting Rugs For more than a decade, Meridien Accents has provided custom handmade area rugs to high-end hotel properties around the globe, and Enchantment Resort was one of four projects on which the company collaborated with Flick Mars. “Our mission is to bring comparable quality products to the US with the added benefit of offshore economics and excellent customer service,” says Daisa Condit, director of design and operations, who loves working with Flick Mars. “They are a creative team that’s very easy to work with.”

Texas Traditional Closer to home than the red cliffs of Arizona, Flick Mars collaborated with Tri-Kes, a designer and distributor of fashion-forward contract wallcoverings, fabrics, and interior finishings, on the Fairmont Dallas hotel. “The wallcovering designed to look like hand-tooled leather that was installed in the bathrooms provided just a hint of the Texas tradition that the owners desire to brand their hotel and locale,” says Tricia Salyer of Tri-Kes. “Flick Mars is a highly creative firm that understands the client’s needs and wants and does what it takes to design the space within budget.” 264

Images courtesy of Flick Mars


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The Jay Hotel’s connecting Pump House waterpark boasts a wave machine for surfing and the country’s first indoor 360-degree looping body slide.


Photos by Martin King Photography, martinkingphotography.com

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Slope ’n’ Slide A HOTEL / WATERPARK RESORT PAIRS RUGGED CHARM WITH THE ALL-SEASON BEAUTY OF NORTHERN VERMONT By Brandon Goei

FEATURED COMPANY BLACK RIVER DESIGN ARCHITECTS LOCATION JAY, VERMONT PROJECT TYPE HOTEL / WATERPARK PROJECT NAME HOTEL JAY AND PUMP HOUSE WATERPARK

Vermont is a land of seasons. Between the blossoms of spring and the falling colors of autumn are the lazy lakeside days of summer, and of course there’s winter: the slope-carver’s paradise. The only possible issue with the seasons is that they are, for lack of a better word, seasonal. So when Black River Design Architects set out to build a resort on Jay Peak in the Green Mountain Range of Northern Vermont, there was a clear focus on making an all-season destination—a microcosm of every type of Vermont vacation, complete with a sleek hotel and an indoor waterpark. The Hotel Jay is a 223,000-squarefoot structure—a size that betrays its simple forms and refined, minimalist architecture—informed by rugged, natural materials and an organic palette that’s inspired by the region’s historical mills. Jay Peak is and has always been about the mountain slopes, and the hotel serves as a beacon to the wants and needs of the region’s snow-sport purists. An unconventional complement to a mountainside hotel is the Pump House waterpark, a feat of design and architecture on its own, featuring a swimming hole with an

attached rock-climbing wall, a wave machine for surfing (when snowboards just won’t do), and the country’s first indoor 360-degree looping body slide. An unorthodox après-ski, indeed. But despite the hotel and its 51,000-square-foot waterpark’s impressive scale and execution, the focal point of the complex remains its location. “The design goal for the new hotel and waterpark was to leverage the natural beauty of this Northern Vermont site by honoring the local vernacular and blurring the lines between indoors and out,” says partner and project architect Mark Montminy. “Floor-to-ceiling windows, transitional spaces, balconies, and careful site planning provide 360-degree vistas of the Green Mountain range.” Also featuring a glass-and-aluminum enclosure and a retractable polycarbonate roof, the Pump House stays at a balmy and near-tropical state in white-out conditions. Alternatively, it also puts the top down to let its guests bask in the rays of the summer sun, all while making breathtaking views of Jay Peak and its signature aerial tram abundant at all times, in all seasons. aZ.

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Floor-to-ceiling windows, transitional spaces, balconies, and careful site planning provide 360-degree vistas from this resort out to the Green Mountain range.


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Photo by Henry Fechtman, henry-fechtman.com

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Hip Hospitality ABUNDANT ARTWORK HELPS A BOUTIQUE HOTEL DOUBLE AS AN ART GALLERY By Brendan Dabkowski

This Hotel Indigo keeps art at the forefront of the design. Colorful furniture and rotating artwork keep the vibe in vogue with hip Southern California.

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Featured Company LEVEL 3 DESIGN GROUP PROJECT TYPE SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME HOTEL INDIGO SANTA BARBARA

Between an on-site art library and 41 guest rooms that feature gorgeous exposed-brick walls and custom murals, it’s evident that art is at the center of the design experience at Hotel Indigo Santa Barbara at the State House. The boutique hotel is, in fact, a satellite location of the Museum of Contemporary Art of Santa Barbara and includes rotating exhibits as well as permanent artwork throughout its lobby, guest rooms, and other areas. “The harmonious union of art, natural elements, and cutting-edge materials all spotlight the project’s art-themed articulation of the client’s vision and design implementation,” says Cheryl Hillberry of Level 3 Design Group, which redesigned the space. Level 3 engraved a modern boutique-hotel experience into a spatially challenged historic structure, Hillberry says, adding that in implementing their vision, the designers paid mind to the

building’s original beauty and integrity. “The history of the building was honored in the creation of the guestrooms in particular,” Hillberry says. Custom-designed casegoods and furniture fit perfectly into these compact spaces, and unique floor-to-ceiling murals act as graceful backdrops in each room. Clean lines, copious artwork, and other elements “blend flawlessly,” Hillberry says, and organic elements such as a “living wall” of greenery in the lobby make the environment really pop. “The well-thought-out design pays attention to details while embracing the history,” Hillberry notes, “which is a source of pride.” aZ

Blending In Los Angeles-based hospitality manufacturing company C F Kent brought 25 years of experience to the table when faced with the task of making furniture for the Hotel Indigo in Santa Barbara. General manager Lawrence Fu says that the company worked closely with the designers at Level 3 to ensure that each guest-room addition would be elegant but functional. His favorite design elements are the desks and wardrobes. “Once the furniture was installed into the rooms and incorporated with all the other pieces of the hotel,” he says, “it was exciting to see our product blend into the theme and style that Level 3 envisioned.”


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Though bright, attractive furnishings populate guest rooms throughout the hotel, historic elements like exposed brick were left intact as a nod to the building’s history.


Photo by Henry Fechtman, henry-fechtman.com

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One of the signature motifs of the Aloft hotel chain is a neutral, almost industrial color palette with bright accent colors. On the patios at the Miami Brickell location, bubble-gum pink and coral sofa cushions fit the bill.

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Photos by Noel Torres

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Turning Up The Heat HOT SPLASHES OF COLOR BRING MIAMI MOXIE TO A HOTEL CHAIN’S TRADITIONALLY COOL PALETTE By Brendan Dabkowski

Establishing a distinctive identity within the confines of a branded enterprise can be a challenge. But Studio 5 Design + Architecture managed to put a fresh spin on Aloft’s Miami-Brickell hotel while still adhering to the chain’s brand standards. “The client wanted an inviting space with the tech-forward, vibrant experience and edge that defines Aloft’s identity,” says Studio 5 principal Nelson Goris. With that in mind, his firm transformed a building that formerly housed condo units into a hip hotel with 22 different room types, an austere but colorful lobby, garden terrace, pool, and neon-backlit W XYZ Bar area.

Featured Company STUDIO 5 DESIGN + ARCHITECTURE Location MIAMI, FLORIDA PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME ALOFT BRICKELL HOTEL

The garden terrace adjacent to the bar is a great spot for a comfortable break and exemplifies Aloft’s trademark of using neutral, “almost industrial surroundings with accents of vivid colors,” Goris says. Breaking away from the cool tones that the hotel chain often selects for patios, Studio 5 chose to add a sense of Miami glamour with colors like fuchsia and orange.

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“Once we presented the idea of the built-in backyard bench and colorful combinations on the cushions, both the owners and the brand-design team were instantly on board,” Goris says. The terrace and W XYZ area are the client’s two favorite spots, says Goris, who adds that the terrace is a continuation of the lounge, with the glass-window wall blurring the boundaries between interior and exterior space. And how about those 22 different room types? Almost every room offers guests a view of Miami’s skyline or west Miami, and many are generous in square footage, making them feel like suites, Goris says. Studio 5 also leaves its mark on this project via the firm’s selection of guest-room art packages. “This gave us a wonderful opportunity to establish a Miami atmosphere,” he says. “We chose abstract photos and compositions of iconic elements found in the Miami landscape.” Though Aloft has hotels across the country, Studio 5 did its best to infuse a sense of the local flavor to the Brickell hotel—ensuring that guests get the classic Aloft experience without forgetting which city they’re visiting. aZ

Fitting the Mold Because this Aloft hotel was a condo building prior to Studio 5’s renovation, every unit differs in size and shape, which posed a unique challenge to the project’s casegoods manufacturers, IMSS. Every piece of furniture required a special design and dimensioning before being integrated into the finished rooms.


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At the heart of this hotel’s atrium is the Orb Lounge, a circular bar that sits directly beneath a 60-foot-tall custom light sculpture that is visible from anywhere in the hotel.


Images courtesy of Design Duncan Miller Ullmann

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Greenville by Night A HOTEL’S ATRIUM BREATHES LIFE INTO A SOUTHERN CITY By Risa Seidman

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or the Hyatt Regency in Greenville, South Carolina, a downtown location was one of the main inspirations for its renovation. “The client wished to revitalize this urban property and transform the public spaces into vibrant energizing areas to eat, drink, socialize, and meet,” says Kimberley Miller, CEO and design principal at Design Duncan Miller Ullmann (Design DMU), the firm responsible for the Hyatt’s redesign. When embarking on the project, Miller and her team centered on the hotel’s focal point: the atrium. “Being an atrium hotel with multiple connections to the outside made it both challenging and exciting to reinvent such a large, voluminous space,” she says. Design DMU recalibrated the existing atrium’s layout and architecture, making a more innovative and usable space. Now the Orb Lounge’s circular bar sits at the atrium’s heart, directly beneath a 60-foot-tall custom light sculpture that’s visible from anywhere in the hotel. “To be able to take what was previously a divided and disjointed experience for the guest and bring a whole new flow via creative space planning was a true achievement,” Miller says. Also included in the atrium renovation were a redesigned fountain feature, updated landscaping, and an elevator bank reclad in stone. Of course, a project of this magnitude brought unforeseen hurdles. “The fountain in the atrium [presented] a major challenge to figure out how to bring it back to life from its former partially

functioning state and make it aesthetically pleasing,” says Jim Halloran, senior architectural and technical designer for Design DMU, adding, “cladding the elevator in stone was a daunting task.” But for all the challenges that the Hyatt Regency redesign brought with it, the results have proven successful. “Design DMU was very proud of the lighting design and the ability to bring a great nighttime vibe, which is not always easy in atrium architecture,” Miller says. For a building that is credited for its major role in revitalizing downtown Greenville, a good vibe can be all that matters. aZ

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Photo by Katie Ambrose, katieambrose.com

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Buffalo Boutique A 110-YEAR-OLD WESTERN NEW YORK HOTEL HONORS HISTORY By Brendan Dabkowski

Featured Company ROOM Location BUFFALO, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME HOTEL AT THE LAFAYETTE

By transforming archival images from the Buffalo History Museum into largescale murals on the walls of every room of Hotel at The Lafayette in Buffalo, New York, Michael Poczkalski paid heed to the history of the early 20th Century building and put his personal stamp on redesigning its interior. Tasked with helping to restore the hotel to its former grandeur, Poczkalski, partner and senior designer of Room Buffalo, executed a design that blends modern-day style trends and technologies with the building’s French Renaissance architectural style. This created a “unique and first-class destination retreat like no other in Buffalo.” The custom wallpaper above the bed in each room best represents the project’s aesthetic, says Poczkalski. The hand-selected images are a nice visual accent to the spacious rooms and an ode to the history of the building. “Historically, the Lafayette Hotel holds a great significance—the architect, Louise Bethune, is the first officially recognized female architect in the United States,” Poczkalski notes. Depicted in some of the portrait-murals are images of the Pan-American Exposition held in 1901, “another shining

moment in the history of Buffalo.” In addition to highlighting history, making every guestroom one of a kind was part of Poczkalski’s vision. Each room— there are 367 total—is “different and unique, while simultaneously providing a comfortable and spacious environment for the guest,” he says. “Touches of whimsy”—like the non-sequitur “signature” porcelain greyhound statues that welcome each guest back home— are the finishing touch that will “put a smile on your face,” Poczkalski says. Refashioning cramped hotel rooms into spacious, glamorous suites did not occur without minor headaches. “Adapting a building that’s over 100 years old to work in current day always presents challenges,” he says. “For example, all the new piping and electrical could not be hidden below or between the floors, resulting in destroying the ornate original ceilings. We dealt with this issue by creating a step-up in the flooring within half of the guest rooms. This created a distinguished separation in space between the bedroom and sitting room, which in the end also became another favored design element.” aZ


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Photos by Katie Ambrose, katieambrose.com

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Images from the Buffalo History Museum’s archives were selected and transformed into large-scale wallpaper for every hotel room as an ode to the historic hotel building.


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / HOTELS AND RESORTS

Photo by Katie Ambrose, katieambrose.com

Maintaining a sense of the building’s original grandeur and elegance was one of the major design goals for the restoration of Hotel at The Lafayette.

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The Art of Design A FRENCH QUARTER RESORT IS SPICED WITH LOCAL FLAVOR À LA NOLA ARTISANS By Amanda Koellner

“Everyone and everything in New Orleans has a story to tell.” Such are the words of Ann Borrelli Smith of DPOV Interiors, which was commissioned by Bluegreen Vacations Club La Pension’s senior director of planning and design, Tim Scherwing, to create a unique story for the New Orleans resort. “They didn’t want it to be safe, and they also didn’t want it to look like everything was picked out of a catalog,” she says. “The only way to accomplish the client’s main goal was to hire local artists and artisans where feasible.” Originally designing the casegoods and seating further added to the unique flavor of the 63-room hotel, which shut down for a year during the renovation to “revitalize its elegant soul,” as Smith says. Here she talks with us about designing for the jubilant French Quarter, using art to save materials from the landfill, and the joy of collaborating.

team that helps make it a success. This project could not have been done without the owner’s senior director of planning and design, Tim Scherwing, and the local architecture firm, SCNZ. What other collaborations did this renovation bring about?

FEATURED COMPANY D.P.O.V. INTERIORS LOCATION NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA PROJECT TYPE RESORT

The most endearing impact was the collaboration with YAYA, which stands for Young Aspirations / Young Artists. This organization was created in order to empower young artists to find an outlet and blossom into successful adults. Their creations were a refreshing representation of New Orleans. And some of the chairs ended up installed on the ceilings, which provided a wonderful surprise to the guests. aZ

PROJECT NAME BLUEGREEN VACATIONS CLUB LA PENSION

What specific design elements do you think really make this project stand out?

Such Great Heights Marking the first collaboration between Destination Designs and DPOV Interiors, Club La Pension saw the two companies coming together to outfit a 100-year-old building in masculine furnishings paired with feminine upholstery selections. The building’s age provided no shortage of challenges, according to Bobby Underdown, project manager and designer at Destination Designs, such as placing products in inaccessible areas. “One of our solutions included hoisting furniture with a street-side crane up to the seventh-floor balcony,” he says.

To enhance the commissioned work, we created a soft, soothing neutral background to contrast with the vibrant art or stunning photography. The importance of the commissioned artwork was never more apparent than in this project. It was going to tell a story and be a tribute to New Orleans. In doing so, the design team was able to create an unforgettable experience for the guests. Every corner you turn, original artwork has been integrated—from the lobby to the corridors to the guest-rooms. Some of the pieces used were re-purposed materials, too, so items were prevented from ending up in landfills. Which elements of this project’s design are you most proud of? Every piece of artwork and the collaboration with the artists. It helped create an environment in which the guests staying in these units may gain true appreciation for talented artist, craftsmen, and one-of-a-kind creations. Also, I’m always proud of working on a project with a design

Cape Cod Connection Far from the streets of NOLA, DPOV Interiors collaborated with Dan Dixon Architect (DDA), a boutique architecture firm based in Orlando, Florida, on two phases of renovations for the Soundings Seaside Resort in Dennisport, Massachusetts. “The boutique hotel constructed in the mid-1950s was demolished to the structural framing and then reconstructed,” Dixon says. “Ann of DPOV worked with our architectural designing to help capture the character of a charming beach-front property in Cape Cod.”

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Our mantra becam rather than replace Dr. Louis Paul Bentel Partner at Bentel & Bentel


me ‘transformation ement.’

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CHANGE THE WORLD

around you FOR THE BETTER Before

dda

SOUNDINGS SEASIDE RESORT | DENNIS PORT, MA

dda

DAN DIXON ARCHITECT, LLC ARCHITECTURE

URBAN DESIGN

Orlando, Florida | 407.513.2631 | www.dandixonarchitect.com AA26002139

Facet in Belting Leather from the Genevieve Bennett Studio Collection spinneybeck.com

(800) 482-7777


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The Grand Hyatt New York’s lobby was designed to be a memorable urban space on par with the waiting room at the nearby Grand Central Terminal or the garden at the Museum of Modern Art.

Haute Hotel NYC’S GRAND HYATT HOTEL WOWS WITH STRIKING NEW PUBLIC SPACES By Risa Seidman

Featured Company BENTEL & BENTEL ARCHITECTS / PLANNERS Location NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE HOTEL PROJECT NAME GRAND HYATT NEW YORK

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he Grand Hyatt Hotel has been a Midtown Manhattan mainstay since its early days as The Commodore Hotel, established back in 1919. The design team at Bentel & Bentel Architects / Planners was aware of the iconic hotel’s nearly 100-year history and took that into account when redesigning its public spaces. “We envisioned the lobby as a memorable urban space on par with the waiting room at the nearby Grand Central Terminal or the garden at the Museum of Modern Art,” says Dr. Louis Paul Bentel, partner at Bentel & Bentel. | Continued »


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Along with an appropriately grand lobby and reception area, Bentel & Bentel renovated the hotel’s restaurant, wine bar, and meeting spaces, and created a brand-new 24-hour market. The size and scope of the project was staggering (the lobby itself encompasses 20,000 square feet), but Bentel had a larger challenge to deal with: how to implement a massive renovation without closing the Grand Hyatt Hotel’s doors. He came up with a two-year plan that would allow his team to complete the redesign while the hotel continued to accept reservations without pause. The secret to this plan came in using building materials that the lobby already featured.

| Continued »

“Though dated, the existing finishes were authentic and well done,” Bentel says. “Half-inch-thick solid-bronze column covers and two-inch-thick solid-stone paving are featured prominently. Our mantra became ‘transformation rather than replacement.’ So we spent time examining patination methods to create the cool, dark finish on the columns.”

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Architectural details such as the bronze’s new patina mesh with the lobby’s dramatic artwork to create a space that, along with being striking and memorable, also is user friendly. “For us, the artwork had to perform two basic functions apart from being great artwork in itself,” Bentel says. “First, it had to create a thematic identity or narrative, which would give meaning to the place. Second, it had to assist guests in navigating the space.” The hanging lamps and female busts that now adorn the Grand Hyatt’s lobby give it a new spatial order, making it easier to get around than the previous design. Not that New York City needed it, but thanks to Bentel & Bentel’s completed renovation, the city that never sleeps has added yet another impressive space to its ever-expanding ranks. aZ

Quite the Team Collaborators for the past 14 years, Bentel & Bentel again teamed up with Spinneybeck Leather on the Grand Hyatt project, whose biggest challenge was manufacturing two-sided upholstered leather bands with metal buckles to fit on the lobby’s millwork pedestals with custom metal latches. “When it came to the belting leather, their challenge became ours,” says Sharon O’Rourke of Spinneybeck. “But the result is a wonderful combination of design novelty and beautiful craftsmanship.”


Photos by Eduard Hueber of Archphoto, archphoto.com

A two-year plan allowed the design team to complete the Grand Hyatt redesign while the hotel continued to accept reservations without pause, largely thanks to using materials already found in the lobby.

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Photo by Eduard Hueber of Archphoto, archphoto.com

The lighting in the lobby is programmed to vary over the course of the day, transitioning from cool, low light in the morning as the sun rises to a warm glow as it sets in the evening.

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Photos by Romina Tonucci

Ten top global Hotel Designs By Joe Valerio, principal; Louis Ray, principal; and Joe Lawton, director of graphic design Valerio Dewalt Train Associates

Hotels whisk us away from everyday life, and the enchantment factor of staying in a place far from home is directly influenced by the design and architecture of where you’re laying your head while away. To get a grasp on the best hotels that the world has to offer, we turned to Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, an award-winning architecture firm based in Chicago, Illinois, and Palo Alto, California. Don’t blame them for picking a hotel and hotel restaurant that they themselves designed—the stunning work speaks for itself.

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Hotel Alfonso XIII (Seville, Spain): Built for the 1929 World’s Fair in Seville, this hotel was completely updated in 2012 and now has the best of everything. But part of the experience is to revisit a moment in European history when everything previous was ending and everything we now know was beginning. Hotel Therme Vals (Vals, Switzerland): This ‘60s-era hotel was renovated by Peter Zumthor as part of the construction of his world famous baths in Vals. Originally designed in 1969, the building form is reserved as it sits nestled into the hills. Everything about the hotel and theme centers on modern design, minimalism, and luxury.

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Trump International Hotel (Chicago, IL): Travel and Leisure Magazine has rated this the top city hotel, and it’s easy to see why. The stainless-steel, glassy tower stretches tall above the Chicago River, seen from many vantage points around the city. Our design for Sixteen, the hotel’s premier Michelin two-star restaurant, is an important contributor to the Trump’s high ranking.

The Godfrey Hotel (Chicago, IL): When we conceived of the design of this hotel, we wanted an iconic form that would become part of the memory of every guest. Recently opened on February 1, 2014, the initial reviews suggest that we achieved this goal. Hotel Marqués de Riscal (Elciego, Spain): Frank Gehry’s curving exterior design rolls with the Spanish hills surrounding the hotel. The main experience, though, is taking in all of the great wine that is fermented on site—some vintages date back to 1862.

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Lapostolle Residence (Santa Cruz, Chile): Located in a Chilean vineyard, this hotel provides a much more intimate escape, backed into the hills of the Colchagua Valley. Guests can take in spectacular views from the infinity pool, and soaring ceilings make for a spacious guest suite.

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Cavas Wine Lodge (Mendoza, Argentina): This hotel provides another great South American vineyard experience (which we love) at the foothill of the Andes in the heart of Argentina’s wine country. The hotel itself features a twist on traditional stucco architecture, and the guest rooms feature a strong use of natural stone that flows from the interior to the exterior. Singita Ebony Lodge (Sabi Sand, South Africa): Located in the Sand River area, this lodge has the comfortable feel of a home but provides a global experience. The architecture resembles early colonial design with many local art pieces and furniture filling the interiors with rich colors. The back deck provides close encounters with the wildlife, leaving you with a unique South African experience after your stay.

Ace Hotel Portland (Portland, OR): The moment you enter this hotel’s lobby, you feel like you’ve been transported to a time once lost. It’s a fully thought-out experience from the green velvet stools in the lobby to the lofted library you pass by as you take the stairs to your room. The bedrooms have a classic campy feel, and everything has been perfectly curated to create a unique experience. Heritance Kandalama Hotel (Sigiriya, Sri Lanka): This beautiful five-star hotel is perched in the trees on the Kandalama rock overlooking Kandalama tank and surrounded by jungle. The architectural design takes on a very simple yet brutalist form. The lobby is open air, and the rocks of the mountain create the walls surrounding you—while warm wood tones adorn the hotel rooms and floor-to-ceiling glass walls provide uninterrupted views of the rainforest.

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workplaces Office aesthetics are rarely considered the most beautiful examples of architecture and interior design. Yet a new school of designers is creating workplaces that are a far departure from the drab cubiclebased atmospheres of the past. Here are a few that we think capture a refreshing spirit of collaboration and creativity.


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Clean lines and modern shapes inhabit this 7,000-square-foot dentist’s office, and blocks of primary colors keep the space feeling whimsical and fun.


Photo by Geoffrey Hodgdon, geoffreyhodgdon.com

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Tooth Dreams A DENTAL CLINIC BLENDS TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN By risa seidman

Featured Company FORMA DESIGN Location FALLS CHURCH, VIRGINIA PROJECT TYPE DENTIST’S OFFICE PROJECT NAME BANAJI PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS

Examples of stunning design can be found anywhere, even in many people’s most dreaded place—the dentist’s office. Banaji Pediatric Dental Specialists’ office in Falls Church, Virginia, breaks the mold when it comes to healthcare design. Focused around a central reception hub, the 7,000-square-foot office space makes use of clean lines and modern shapes. Its use of block primary colors keeps the space looking whimsical and fun—it is a pediatric clinic, after all—but the minimalist approach lends some maturity to the design. When envisioning the office, Forma Design principal Andreas Charalambous accounted for the age range of Dr. Banaji’s patients. “Each age group is housed in a color-coded section of the practice, structured to address the dental needs of that specific group,” Charalambous says. Along with a modern aesthetic, the technology aspect of Charalambous’s design is firmly rooted in the 21st Century. “[Dr. Banaji’s] wish was to create a forward-thinking, paperless, and totally digital practice that would help redefine the process of providing dental care to kids of all ages,” he says. The waiting room also is thoroughly modernized, with video games and movies to keep kids and parents occupied before their appointments. Because of the office’s ample square footage, Charalambous was able to add an innovative mixed-use space to his design. “The multi-purpose room is enclosed with a glass-door system that folds away and becomes part of the reception area for large gatherings or ‘meet the dentist’ informational field trips for school groups,” he says. Who knows? A school field trip to Dr. Banaji’s office could inspire the next generation of dentists—or, we hope, the next generation of designers. aZ

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Photos by Geoffrey Hodgdon, geoffreyhodgdon.com

This dentist’s office is color-coded by age group to address the specific dental needs of the range of children visiting the practice.

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The Writing’s on the Wall THE BALANCED REMODEL OF A SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING’S LOBBY PROVIDES A REFRESHING PAIRING OF COOLNESS AND WARMTH By Brandon Goei

Featured Company BRERETON ARCHITECTS Location SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA PROJECT type OFFICE PROJECT NAME 44 MONTGOMERY

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Buildings are like bodies. Each room, like each part of the human body, fulfills a duty or a purpose, and focusing on the whole is the best way to ensure a healthy, functional existence. Balance is key. And yet not all body parts are created equally. The “face” of a building’s interior is its lobby—its eyes and ears to the outside world as well as where most first impressions are made. Brereton Architects seemed to understand this when the company took on a remodel of the 44 Montgomery Street building in San Francisco. Principal David Peebles’s choice was a textbook shape-up of the space: a focus on “balanced lighting, simplicity of detail, and a timeless look,” among a short list of other tried-and-true hallmarks of good contemporary design. In particular, the execution of simultaneous warmth and modernism comes through as the space’s key feature. “There is a richness and timelessness that happens when the right balance is achieved between modernism (cool) and classic (warm) elements in design of space,” Peebles says. This keystone juxtaposition appears in the interior elements of the lobby, including a variety of simple and useable surfaces for reception and a waiting area that looks inviting and comfortable while radiating a sleek aura. Steam practically escapes from the areas where steel and glass meld into wood and marble. The most obvious pairing of cool and warm comes with the largest installation in the lobby: the custom wood art element that bears the name of the building. Angular and exquisitely brutal, the grain of the work lines up with the flooring, lighting, and finishes, directing the flow and energy of the space towards a cadre of hallways and elevators soon to bear similar designs. In effect, 44 Montgomery Street is revitalized by its new remodel. A new vibrancy reaches into the veins of this center of commerce, giving the statuesque modern exterior new lifeblood. aZ


Photo by CĂŠsar Rubio, cesarrubio.com

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san francisco | www.brereton.com


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Where Every Office is a Corner Office BIRCHBOX’S FRESH NEW YORK CITY HEADQUARTERS REDEFINES THE CONCEPT OF A DEMOCRATIC WORKPLACE By Brandon Goei

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t’s not hard to imagine the dream office: tucked away in the corner with two walls of windows and two walls of privacy, including every cube-jockey’s dream—a door. But when online commerce platform Birchbox needed to expand its office space, it approached Design 3 with a novel idea.

“Their culture didn’t subscribe to the conventional office, especially one defined by private offices,” says principal Manny Enriquez. “There are no private offices—zero. Everyone, from the founders, CEO, management, and staff, sits on the same size bench—democracy at its best.” When Birchbox first met with Design 3, the company still was in the early days of its startup phase, only 22 months old and cramming 80 employees into an 11,000-square-foot space. The move to a new office would more than double the size of the workspace and accommodate up to 190 workers. This step up was the young brand’s first move toward real estate that defines what it is as a company. “It was important that our new office create an environment of creativity, open communication, and collaboration,” says Katia Beauchamp, co-founder and co-CEO of Birchbox. Her desires ultimately took form in the flow of the workspace, which is informed by an

open work area with unobstructed sight lines, more than a dozen meeting rooms, two large conference rooms, and an eccentric array of breakout areas, including lounges, phone booths, and a café. Texture and palette contrasts mirror the company’s brand identity and define the interior of the space, with an arsenal of pop colors shaking up a muted, earthy spectrum and wooden accents. The reception area anchors a sense of arrival with a collection of birch tree trunks with wood-pendant lighting as a backdrop, while accent walls, dynamic TV displays, and the adjoining café area inject a cheerful energy into the space. With all the spectacle of the end result, it might come as a surprise that Design 3 was an even newer company than Birchbox at the time of their first meeting. “We were only six months into our practice,” Enriquez recalls. But the two, it seems, found a new stride through the same project. “Birchbox,” he adds, “was a great start.” aZ

Featured Company DESIGN 3 Location NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE OFFICE PROJECT NAME BIRCHBOX


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Photo by Eric Laignel, ericlaignel.com

The founders of Birchbox wanted an open office that would “create an environment of creativity, open communication, and collaboration.” An eccentric array of breakout areas, including lounges, phone booths, and the café, all culminate to make this possible.

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Photos by Eric Laignel, ericlaignel.com

The office’s reception area (pictured left) features wood-pendant LED light fixtures, a dynamic TV display that remains invisible behind glass, and birch tree trunks as a backdrop.

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[Our clients’] culture d conventional office, esp private offices. There a zero. Everyone, from management, and staff bench—democracy at it Manny Enriquez Principal at Design 3


didn’t subscribe to the pecially one defined by are no private offices— the founders, CEO, f, sits on the same size ts best.

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delivering perfect

Empire Office is the largest commercial furniture dealer in the world, but we’re more than just an office furniture dealer. We partner with business leaders, architects, designers, brokers and manufacturers to deliver real solutions to real business challenges. What’s your challenge? Everyone has their own vision of the perfect office environment. It’s our job to help you achieve it. Our goal is to deliver the perfect office furniture experience from the initial drawings to the final installation.

empireoffice.com © Matt Greenslade Photography

Company Headquarters in New York With Showrooms in Hollywood, Orlando and Tampa, FL


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From Cars to Cabinetry A CANADIAN AUTO-PARTS PLANT TRANSFORMS INTO A KITCHEN COMPANY’S SHOWROOM/OFFICE, COMPLETE WITH MADE-IN-HOUSE, ECO-FRIENDLY CASEGOODS By Saby Reyes-Kulkarni

Featured Company AMANTEA ARCHITECTS Location VAUGHAN, ONTARIO, CANADA PROJECT TYPE SHOWROOM/OFFICE PROJECT NAME Q.T.K. SHOWROOM/ OFFICE

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hen Michael Amantea was tasked with converting a 45,000-square-foot auto-parts plant north of Toronto into a space that would serve as a one-stop-shop—manufacturing facility, showroom, and central office—for QTK Fine Cabinetry, he knew he was in for a challenge. | Continued »


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Photo by Bryan Groulx

“They wanted a modern, open environment that would best showcase their product range and foster productive communication between the engineering and design staffs,” Amantea says. The logistical concerns were clear to the architect from the start, as he wondered how he and his team would provide an open environment while accommodating both public and private functions in a space with limited exposure to natural light.

| Continued »

“Our strategy was to contain all of the private offices and semi-private meeting rooms within a volume of translucent and transparent glass located in the center of the space,” Amantea says. “These offices give structure to the plan, but more importantly provide light and framed views into other spaces. A glimpse of the exterior can be seen from almost every desk and workstation.” He adds that the configuration of the program elements lets the entire space function as one large showroom while allowing for moments of privacy without total separation.

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To keep in line with its firm sustainability ethics, QTK requested that all of the project’s custom casegood furniture be fabricated on site, using only QTK’s own materials. “This meant that all components had to be designed and engineered specifically to suit their manufacturing capabilities,” Amantea says. Fortunately, he already had founded his practice on the belief that “collaboration is essential to the making of a successful building.” The prescribed guidelines were clear: QTK voiced its support of the use of reconstituted veneer, formaldehyde-free, low-pressure laminate interiors, zero-emission finishes, and products that come from locally controlled forest environments. “They have invested in the industry’s most advanced automated machinery in an effort to minimize material waste,” Amantea says. “Their commitment to sustainable practice influenced the choices we made when undertaking the renovation of the existing building.” He also notes that the team used a combination of skylights and LED fixtures throughout the entire showroom and office space to reduce energy consumption and eliminated the need for new flooring by polishing the existing concrete slab. Additionally, Amantea was able to strike a balance between handcrafted and machined finishes. “We collaborated with local artisans Scott Eunson and Lubo Brezina on the custom entry furniture, door pulls, reception desk, and an ‘end grain’ wall installation built using reclaimed timber sourced from old warehouse structures in Toronto.” A complete makeover, done with Mother Earth in mind. aZ

For its showroom and office, QTK wanted a modern, open environment that would best showcase its product range and foster productive communication between the engineering and design staffs.


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A DREARY OFFICE ENVIRONMENT IS A THING OF THE PAST AT INNOVATIVE CALIFORNIA COMPANY By Emma Janzen

Featured Company NICHOLSBOOTH ARCHITECTS Location SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA PROJECT type OFFICE PROJECT NAME CONSTANT CONTACT

The working conditions at the new Constant Contact offices in San Francisco are enviable. The company hired Nicholsbooth Architects and Visnick & Caulfield Associates to create an office where cubicles and corner offices are antiquated things of the past, and collaboration and innovation stand at the forefront of the design.

“Its 20-foot-high exposed ceilings and mixed-concrete floors give the location an industrial feel,” says Mark Schmulen, general manager at Constant Contact. “But the natural light and sidewalk views of one of San Francisco’s busiest street corners provide the space with an energetic and productive work environment as well.”

“The new office facilitates a collaborative culture by balancing ‘me’ spaces with ‘we’ spaces,” Nicholsbooth marketing director Liesel Wallace says. Custom-made white boards anchor the central flexible area, where meetings take place. The boards allow for easy idea generation while also buffering the sound, allowing activities in the space to not bother workers in adjacent areas. In the nearby spaces, moveable furniture and adjustable-height desks keep individual movement easy and flexible.

Though it’s all well and good to encourage good business, Constant Contact also believes that the workday should be fun. “The first thing that comes to mind as you walk into Constant Contact’s San Francisco office is that this is a place where I want to both work and play,” Schmulen says. The space includes a Ping-Pong table, basketball hoops, and arcade machines for employees. “Don't be surprised to see toy helicopters and Nerf-gun darts flying through the air.”aZ


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Ten Tips for Designing a Showroom By Amy Youngblood Schuermann, owner Amy Schuermann Interiors

A designer’s showroom is the face of the firm—it gives potential clients a little taste of what they’re in for if they decide to put their home, office, or commercial building in the hands of that designer. Cincinnati-based designer Amy Youngblood Schuermann turned an ugly, damaged space into a chic, eclectic office/showroom when she decided to go into business for herself. Consequently, we decided that she was the perfect person to share the most important tips to consider when undertaking a showroom design of your own.

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Know your audience / target clientele. When deciding on the location of your space, choose a location that your clients will see and be able to access. When you decorate your space with the ultimate look that you want to achieve, also remember their tastes.

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Understand your costs upfront. Even if you are in the business of building, properly budgeting for yourself can get away from us designers. Don’t underestimate your total costs, including the cost of accessories. Creating a beautiful space can be expensive, and properly allocating funds will alleviate a lot of stress when those bills start coming in.

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Be efficient in your deign. When it comes to getting up and running in your space, you want to get it completed as quickly as possible. Start planning your product selections well in advance and line up your contractors even before you have a location.

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Plan for expansion. If you plan on adding more employees and product lines due to your increased exposure, you’ll want to make sure that you have enough room to grow without breaking the bank. With the investment that it takes to design and decorate a stunning space, you don’t want to be moving in a year.

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When looking at potential spaces, measure and space plan just like you would for a client. Make sure that the space has affordable potential to be designed around the way your firm works and interacts with clients (think private offices, common work areas, conference rooms, lounge areas, etc.).

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Ask your vendors for a showroom discount. Many furniture companies are happy to do this in exchange for the exposure. Make your space a cutting-edge refection of your personal style. Show off the most current products from lighting, furniture, flooring, wallpaper, tile, and rugs—just to name a few.

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Create great visibility. Ideally and practically, it’s nice to have a space on the first floor, even if you aren’t a retail store. Make sure to have attractive and clear signage. If you have a front window, decorate it with window treatments, artwork, hip lighting, accessories, and smaller furniture pieces.

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Market your new space! When it’s finally completed, the work is not over. Send out press releases and utilize social media and your website to leverage your new space. You need to get the maximum exposure for all of your hard work.

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Host regular or semi-regular events at your space. Whether it’s a fundraiser, design-themed event, or opening party, getting new faces into your showroom only helps promote new business.

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Branching Out AFTER YEARS OF WORKING FOR OTHERS, THIS INTERIOR DESIGNER ESTABLISHED HER OWN FIRM, COMPLETE WITH AN ECLECTIC SHOWROOM/OFFICE By Saby Reyes-Kulkarni

Featured Company AMY SCHUERMANN INTERIORS Location CINCINNATI, OHIO PROJECT type SHOWROOM/OFFICE PROJECT NAME AMY SCHUERMANN SHOWROOM

There comes a time in an interior designer’s life where a fork in the road presents the choice to continue working under someone else’s firm or branch out and create a solo venture. In 2009, Amy Youngblood Schuermann took the latter path after years of working for others. “I decided that it couldn’t get any worse to be on my own, so I made the move,” she says. Her company has since grown from a one-person operation to a staff of four—marking the second time that Schuermann has redirected her career track. After graduating from college with a communications degree, Schuermann slowly realized her love of design as she “did the corporate thing,” which eventually pushed her to pursue a degree in interior design. She is drawn to the way that the work engages her on two levels. “I love the mix of creative work and client interaction,” she says. “There are so many professions where one of those aspects is predominant, and it’s not a nice mix. I have a strong sales and business background, so I love discussing design and listening to clients.”

The owner of this showroom/office created a front sitting area with a mix of post-modern and contemporary furniture and refaced the old transaction counter toward the rear with a metallic textural solid surface, complete with cool pendant lighting and bar stools.

Schuermann places particular emphasis on the latter aspect. “We strive for a creative, usually clean-lined, sophisticated look,” she explains. “But I hesitate to say that we have a certain ‘look’ because each project we do is customized to the client. Plus, I never want to do the same thing twice.” Of course, for obvious reasons, interior design is not a field where the old truism “cobbler’s children have no shoes” tends to apply. Unsurprisingly, Schuermann receives copious com| Continued » pliments for her charming

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showroom/office, which is located in a brick-façade building that once housed a bank and, on first glance, now looks from the outside like a cozy first-floor apartment.

| Continued »

“The space was honestly very ugly,” she recalls, “and damaged from the previous tenant’s décor. So I laid the space out on paper and went to work! I created a front sitting area with a mix of post-modern and contemporary furniture, as well as a meeting/work conference area with a vintage white Parsons table and regency-style chair— very eclectic.” Schuermann also hung a mix of elegant and industrial-style chandeliers and created a gallery-like space in the back with an integrated kitchen for entertaining. “And I turned the old safe into a hip private office for two,” she says. “Of course, we have lots of cool fabric racks and bookshelves for our product binders. And we host a lot of events and clients, so we took the old transaction counter in the front and refaced it with a metallic textural solid surface and added cool pendant lighting and bar stools.”

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Schuermann expects her firm to take on at least two more staffers this year, and she seeks to diversify the projects that it takes on. “Eventually,” she says, “we’ll organize the business into two specialties: high-end residential and commercial. I also see us venturing into fabric and furniture design. And yes—I’d love to host an interior-design television show!” aZ


Photos by Josh Beeman Photography, joshbeemanphotography.com and Robin Victor Goetz, gorvgp.com

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This interior designer’s office/showroom boasts a mix of elegant and industrial-style chandeliers as well as a gallery-like space (above) in the back with an integrated kitchen for entertaining.


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Illuminating Aluminum

isually, the most striking feature of the EcoHawks Research Facility is its glimmering aluminum exterior. Using recycled aluminum, University of Kansas School of Architecture graduate students dirtied their hands by weaving aluminum “skin” to gild the building’s surface. Inside, the story also centers on recycled materials and shiny sustainability.

STUDENT ARCHITECTS FABRICATE A FUNCTIONAL, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FOR A UNIVERSITY RESEARCH FACILITY By Brendan Dabkowski

Featured Company STUDIO 804 LOCATION UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS, LAWRENCE, KANSAS PROJECT TYPE RESEARCH FACILITY PROJECT NAME ECOHAWKS RESEARCH FACILITY

Source of Light “It is not just the sun gleaming off the woven metal façade” that makes the EcoHawks research facility glow, says Sunlite Science and Technology marketing manager Kirsten Oschwald. “The timeline, attention to detail, and dedication of this group of students really shines through in every corner of the design.”

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The KU School of Engineering runs the EcoHawks student research program, the focus of which is studying the use of alternative energy with regard to transportation, fuel, and mechanical systems. When EcoHawks were in need of a new facility to house their work, Studio 804 was enlisted to create an iconic building to promote the endeavors of the program while making it conducive to researching, fabricating, and refurbishing electric vehicles.

work areas designed to showcase the students’ work,” he says. “The building also contains space for a conference room, computer workstations, and an area for students to test and research various forms of alternative energy.”

Studio 804, composed of University of Kansas architecture students, made sure that the new facility incorporated “passive and sophisticated active sustainable systems and technologies” that helped it achieve LEED Platinum certification, says Studio 804 director Dan Rockhill.

One element of the building’s design of which Rockhill is particularly proud, with regard to sustainability, is the inclusion of insulated panels that improve thermal quality. Studio 804 developed a system through which Aerogel-filled panels can be raised and lowered on the interior, depending on seasonal insulation needs, and “without compromising the high-quality illumination in the space.” Studio 804 designed the panels, which brought to the forefront seven different corporations to create the final result, Rockhill notes.

The resultant building was a resounding success, says Rockhill, who also is JL Constant Distinguished Professor of Architecture at the university. “Their new facility incorporates indoor and outdoor

Looking out for their own, these student designers created a functional, well-lit space for EcoHawks to thrive and continue to advance alternative, sustainable sources of energy. aZ


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Much of the exterior of the EcoHawks research facility is composed of recycled aluminum.


Image courtesy of Studio 804, studio804.com

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Photo by David Agnello, davidagnello.com

The designer tackling this renovation wanted to amplify the original layout with dynamic lighting, loads of color, and a few playful details, such as the artwork displayed in this seating area.

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From Drab to Fab A TITLE-AND-ESCROW BUSINESS LOOKS LIKE ANYTHING BUT By Amanda Koellner

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or Nancy Hughes, who founded Jackson Hole Title & Escrow 20 years ago, the biggest challenges she faced in her company’s building before Jennifer Prugh Visosky of Grace Home Design got her hands on it were poor lighting, dying bamboo in the third-story atrium (as Visosky says, “Bamboo in Wyoming? Really?”), and overall wear and tear on the space. The 1990s Will Bruder-designed building, considered unconventional with its abrupt angles and interesting window placement, needed an update. | Continued »

Featured Company GRACE HOME DESIGN Location JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING PROJECT type OFFICE PROJECT NAME JACKSON HOLE TITLE & ESCROW


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“Nancy was keen on creating a lively experience for her clients that debunked all the suits-and-paperwork seriousness of her business,” Visosky says. “We wanted to amplify the original design with dynamic lighting, loads of color, and a few playful details.” When we asked Hughes which part of her new space she favors, she could hardly choose. “That’s not fair—like asking a woman to pick her favorite child,” she says. We probed Visosky to find out just how she made her client this happy.

| Continued »

Which specific elements do you think make this space stand out after the redesign?

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The use of contemporary patterns, colors, and dramatic lighting fixtures enhance the unusual design of the space. A simple detail that I love is the metallic chevron painted in the entry hallway. We gave it a linen texture to add depth and aligned it with the subtle slope of the wall—simple but effective. The addition of Flavor Paper’s Coco Loco wallpaper in the lobby was a risk because it’s so in-your-face. It went against the very nature of the building as it sings with color and wild pattern. But I think that it has helped bring the space to life. Lighting, however, is the major element that takes this space to another level. Every shy corner is now filled with an exuberant fixture that glows and reflects patterns on the walls surrounding it. The main lobby that once felt hollow now feels intimate and warm. Of those elements, which detail do you think best represents the project’s aesthetic? I think that the satellite chandelier reflects the style of the project. The fixture was inspired by space travel, and in this building, it does just that; it orbits around the central interior, checking everything out. It’s funky, glamorous, and totally unpretentious. aZ


Photos by David Agnello, davidagnello.com

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Lighting stands out as “the major element that takes this space to another level,� according to designer Jennifer Prugh Visosky. Every corner now features an exuberant fixture, meant to glow and reflect the patterns on the surrounding walls.


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Community Civic spaces are all about connection. Memorials, parks, and museums bring people from all walks of life together to experience a shared vision of what it means to be part of a society. These designers invoke history, cultural values, and patterns of human behavior to design spaces that encourage feelings of connectedness.


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Image courtesy of Asymptote Architecture

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Rolling on the River A MULTIMEDIA THEATER PAVILION OFFERS UNMATCHED ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIENCES—BOTH INDOORS AND OUT By Amanda Koellner

FEATURED COMPANY ASYMPTOTE ARCHITECTURE LOCATION DAEGU, SOUTH KOREA PROJECT TYPE MULTIMEDIA THEATER PAVILION PROJECT NAME THE ARC (ARCHITECTURE RIVER CULTURE) PAVILION

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t’s no coincidence that South Korea’s ARC (Architecture River Culture) Pavilion resembles a giant stone skipping across a body of water. It was created to celebrate the four rivers that converge at its site, and the panoramic landscape that surrounds the pavilion’s home on a jutting peninsula is a large part of why it inspires such awe. Well, that and the fact that it resembles a giant spaceship. | Continued »

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South Korea’s ARC was mandated by K-Water (the Korean Water Resources Corporation) to be a powerful, formal statement about nature, technology, and exhibition space.


Image courtesy of Asymptote Architecture

Built in just six months from start to finish, this vessel-shaped form is clad in silver-fritted ETFE pillows that, through a place of transparency and geometry, “create an ephemeral effect,” according to Asymptote Architecture co-founder and design partner Hani Rashid. And though the building offers more than enough to gawk at from the outside, the inside boats a 360-degree cinema, galleries, and ancillary spaces for art exhibitions. We caught up with Rashid to learn more about this mind-boggling structure.

| Continued »

What did the client desire for this project? The project was mandated by K-Water (the Korean Water Resources Corporation) to be a powerful, formal statement about nature, technology, and exhibition space. The building is sited on a strong focal point set against a stunning panoramic landscape. What do you think makes this project a true example of stunning design? The atmospheric quality of the building enclosure is heightened by light reflections from a shallow pool of water that surrounds the base. While the visible portion of the building sits atop an artificially formed landscape, the exhibition gallery concealed below is the space through which the visitors enter. Though the exterior of the ETFE-clad structure captures the quality of the changing light with the open sky and river landscape as the backdrop, the darkened and hermetic interior of the main structure houses an immersive multimedia environment illuminated only by projections of the abstracted and reconceptualized qualities of the surrounding site. How do the inside and outside of the structure relate? The architecture enables the visitor’s experience to be an alternating play between a “real” experience of the water, sky, and landscape that surrounds the building and a virtual experience as presented through multimedia. This experience culminates on the roof where a large reflecting pond reflects the sky and an observation terrace enables the visitor to overlook the site and its natural surroundings from yet another perspective. aZ

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More Than A Pretty Façade A 100-YEAR-OLD LANDMARK MAINTAINS ITS AUTHENTIC SPIRIT WHEN REBORN AS CONTEMPORARY TOWNHOMES BY EMMA JANZEN

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n one of the oldest neighborhoods in Seattle, the Sanctuary building started life as a place of worship. Now the former First Church of Christ, Scientist functions as a house of a different kind—12 townhomes, to be specific. Runberg Architecture Group principal Brian Runberg took care to preserve the historic old-world craftsmanship when he turned the sacred space into a livable community. Here Runberg answers our questions about the adaptive-reuse project.

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FEATURED COMPANY RUNBERG ARCHITECTURE GROUP LOCATION SEATTLE, WASHINGTON PROJECT TYPE RESIDENCE PROJECT NAME THE SANCTUARY

What elements of the original building were preserved? The original church structure was remarkable not only for its period details but also for the experiential qualities of the soaring central space graced by a stained-glass domed skylight. Both the client and the design team felt strongly that this central space should be preserved as open interior space, even though it meant giving up otherwise sellable square footage on the interior. The result is a structure that retains much of the original spatial qualities of the original building and a stronger connection to its history. This is preservation that is much more meaningful than preserving a series of façades. In what ways did you alter the structure to make the church a livable place for residents? As a show of respect, contemporary interventions have a modern expression and do not try to replicate the historic language of the past. The church basement was excavated and transformed into a parking garage with the only change needed to the exterior being the addition of a garage door. In select homes, the original century-old, stained-glass windows were transformed into an interior sliding-window system. In this way, new vision glass on the exterior allowed

natural light and fresh air in, while the stained-glass panels act as window treatments that a resident is free to open or close. The result is a hybrid of old and new, preserving the integrity of the building’s exterior façade while enhancing the livability of the interior. Did you run into any issues with building codes and landuse code requirements? The City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) and the Landmark Preservation Board were both very supportive of the project from the very beginning. In order to meet the definition of a “townhouse,” each residence was required to have its own exterior entrance and landscaped exterior open space at grade; however, opportunities for exterior openings in the historic structure were limited. The DPD was able to allow minor deviations in size from these requirements in order to protect the historic appearance of the exterior. Building-code requirements related to access to natural daylight were relaxed to allow “filtered light” through stained glass. The Seattle Fire Department relaxed a requirement that would have caused an unsightly safety net to be hung beneath the historic stained glass dome as long as the design of the atrium could prevent people from standing directly below it. aZ

The spatial quality of this former church’s central auditorium and stained-glass dome were kept intact during the renovation. The area now serves as a residential atrium.


Photo by Michael Walmsley, michaelwalmsleyphotography.com

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Photos by Michael Walmsley, michaelwalmsleyphotography.com

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Modern residential units were created with a language of cool glass and steel to bring a contemporary look to this former church building.


restoring the past, sustaining the future u r b a n h o u s i n g • a da p t i v e r e u s e • m i x e d u s e

w w w. r u n b e r g . c o m

AKT II supported Zaha Hadid Architects as Structural Consultants on the Broad Art Museum from competition in 2007 to completion in 2011. Achieving another collaborative success on this complex, highly constrained building, we used bespoke in-house 3D design tools, and our unrivalled understanding of “how to”, to create the pleated façade and ambitious cantilevers which set this structure apart.

www.akt-uk.com


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MSU EEBAM Certified LEED Silver Project Heather M Marquard AIA, LEED AP + Faculty greenscape@highstream.net 586.354.8026 www.architectxx.com

The Eli & Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University serves as both an educational resource for the campus and also as a cultural hub for the entire mid-Michigan region, architect Zaha Hadid says.


Photo by Hufton + Crow, huftonandcrow.com

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Bending Expectations A BOLD MUSEUM DESIGN USES NEW TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE INSPIRATION By Emma Janzen

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useum architecture usually falls into one of two categories: clean-lined, passive structures that present a blank canvas to showcase the art inside, or museums where the building itself is a work of art. When it comes to the case of the Eli & Edythe Broad Art Museum, designed by internationally acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid, the building falls squarely in the latter category.

The 46,000-square-foot museum, which sits on the Michigan State University campus, presents a striking façade of pleated stainless steel and glass emerging from the traditional Gothic-style buildings of the north campus, creating a gateway between the university and the East Lansing community, Hadid says. The external design was influenced by a set of movement paths that traverse and border the site, helping the museum to both reflect and fit into the surroundings on a very basic level, Hadid says. “Its outer skin echoes these different directions and orientations— giving the building an ever-changing appearance that arouses curiosity yet never quite reveals its content.” Creating the angles and directional pleats that define the project was no easy feat. “Generating two-dimensional planes from these lines of circulation and visual connections, the formal composition of the museum | Continued » is achieved by folding

FEATURED COMPANY ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS LOCATION MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY, EAST LANSING, MICHIGAN PROJECT TYPE MUSEUM PROJECT NAME ELI & EDYTHE BROAD ART MUSEUM

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Photos by Hufton + Crow, huftonandcrow.com

343 these planes in three-dimensional space,” Hadid says, “to define an interior landscape that brings together and negotiates the different pathways on which people move through and around the site.”

| Continued »

To help negotiate the logistical issues with creating such an unusual, angular metal surface, Hadid partnered with the A. Zahner Company. The engineering and fabrication company had to develop an entirely new process of machining large stainless-steel plates to deliver the final product. “The Broad Art Museum was one of the most exacting architectural-metal projects we have ever undertaken,” Bill Zahner says. “The challenge was to take thin metal plates and make it look as if it was milled from a large block of stainless steel. We were able to achieve a highly refined stainless-steel surface by scaling up technology that once was stuck in the confines of fine machinery or jewelry.” Through her audacious design and innovative implementation, Hadid succeeded at creating a work of art that reflects the university’s priorities. MSU president Lou Anna K. Simon agrees, saying, “Great art deserves great architecture, and so does a great university. The Broad Art Museum’s bold concept and design reflect Michigan State’s ethos of connecting both campus and community to world-class innovation, global vision, and transformative opportunity.” aZ

Fixed Attraction Heather Marquard, LEED consultant on the Broad Art Museum, felt so drawn to Zaha Hadid’s initial design that she wrote a letter to Michigan State University stating her preferences for the submission before it was selected. “The design was not only innovative and interesting, but truly representative of a state whose name was most closely associated with the automotive industry,” Marquard says. “It had the industrial look in a more polished form and a feeling of movement and speed that really resonated with me.”


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Photo by Hufton + Crow, huftonandcrow.com

Manufacturing the Vision “The biggest challenge was to realize a stunning but expensive competition design into a final built project that lost nothing of its stunning nature,” says Gary Lynch, director of AKT II, a structural- and civil-engineering consultancy who worked to realize Hadid’s vision. “This took forensic examination of every aspect of the building fabric to ensure that everything is efficiently performed and supports the aesthetic ambitions of the building design.”

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Photo by Edward Wheeler

Ten Considerations for Developers Planning Green Multifamily Housing By gina buffone and the staff of the Association for Energy Affordability Director of the new-construction unit

Multifamily housing buildings can use massive amounts of energy, so we turned to The Association for Energy Affordability, a non-profit resource for residential, new, and existing multifamily and commercial buildings, to learn how to approach these projects with a green mindset and a focus on sustainability.

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Conduct a charrette. This collaborative planning approach promotes team input and understanding of goals at the beginning of a project. You should clearly define functional requirements for building performance and energy savings, setting expectations for subsequent testing and commissioning. For a smoother commissioning process, involve your commissioning agent in this phase.

2

Confirm design of central-heating, domestic hot-water, and air-conditioning systems. Check for proper sizing and distribution balance, and verify the design of mechanical equipment and distribution systems with your energy consultant before you order equipment. Then ensure that the design intent is carried out during installation.

3

Make your goals inspirational but keep them practical. Research the program requirements before selecting goals for certifications or ratings. Make sure project team members understand and agree that they are achievable. Beginning with a lighter shade of green as team members increase their knowledge is often wise.

4

Focus on the basics. Photovoltaics, geothermal systems, and combined heat and power (CHP) are all great, but good sustainable buildings start more fundamentally. Optimized siting and orientation (where possible), a high-performing building envelope, well-designed heating and hot-water systems, and energy-efficient appliances and lighting will reduce the energy that your building consumes year after year.

5

Get testing and construction oversight. Beautiful designs with aggressive energy-reduction plans alone won’t meet performance goals. Obtain construction oversight and testing throughout the project, and watch out for shortcuts in plans or installation that will increase energy use. Also be sure to hold contractors accountable for adhering to project requirements. Commission installed building systems and make the necessary adjustments.

6

Train building operators to maintain and control systems that are consistent with equipment requirements as designed, and to recognize maintenance issues early on. Teach property and building managers to read reports from energy-management systems and building controls, and utilize data to optimize building performance.

7

Train the trades. Experienced contractors may resist updating “tried and true” construction techniques. Getting workers to accept new advances in materials and processes requires educating them on the sustainability goals of your project and best approaches for implementation. Contractors trained in the logic behind energy saving and sustainable methods often become advocates themselves.

8

Stretch yourself and your team. You are building for future generations. Design and installation best practices are evolving. What is energy efficient today should become commonplace tomorrow. Look into Passive House and ABAA standards. Pursue deep energy savings wherever possible.

9

Don’t overlook occupant education. This is often the crucial missing link for a successful project, so be sure to conduct resident orientations on the purpose and functionality of the building’s energy-saving and green components. Teach occupants that they benefit directly, not just the environment, and how to optimize those benefits. Seek out occupants who will partner with you to achieve sustainability goals.

10

Sow and nourish a resilient mindset across your team. Anticipate future site conditions resulting from extreme weather. Protect your building and your investment with pre-construction site development and construction plans that exceed code and flood-zone requirements. Also make sure to locate building systems out of harm’s way.

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This 19-home community boasts tri-level residences in two- and three-bedroom options with stunning rooftop terraces.

INTRACORP COMPANIES 4041 MACARTHUR BLVD., SUITE 250 NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 T 949.955.2370 F 949.955.2380 WWW.INTRACORPCOMPANIES.COM


Photos by Eric Staudenmaier & Mike McNamara

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California Dreaming A 19-HOME COMMUNITY OFF SUNSET BOULEVARD GOES GREEN WHILE MAINTAINING STYLE By Amanda Koellner

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estled on the outskirts of West Hollywood and mere steps from LA’s Sunset Boulevard, the community of Row3 aims to “cultivate a lifestyle infused with the height of contemporary design and luxury.” To achieve this, builder Intracorp Companies turned what once comprised 35 condo units into 19 small-lot, single-family homes that blend urban, contemporary design sophistication with the area’s hip location.

But style wasn’t the only thing occupying the minds of the project leads, as Row3 meets the stringent Cal Green standards and also features Energy Star appliances, water-conserving plumbing fixtures, solar-ready roof panels, and only materials that meet or exceed current environmental pollutant-control requirements, among many other green attributes. “Row3’s infill location is adjacent to transit lines and numerous shops and restaurants, which supports the idea of a walkable city,” says Peter Lauener, regional president of Intracorp Southern California. “The west-facing

windows feature slated sunscreens to reduce solar-heat gain and improve privacy for the street-facing homes.” Row3 boasts tri-level residences in two- and three-bedroom options, stunning rooftop terraces, open kitchens with large islands and gourmet appliances from the likes of Bertazzoni and Bosch, and convenient two-car attached garages (something that one cannot take for granted in LA). The biggest win for Intracorp, though? Proving that despite small lot size, you can deliver a luxurious home that’s flexible in space. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY INTRACORP COMPANIES LOCATION LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE COMMUNITY PROJECT NAME ROW3

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This airstream trailer was gutted and refinished with a fresh new interior to serve as the official green room for Stubb’s concert amphitheater in Austin, Texas. The glass-andsteel entry box was added as a visual contrast to the curves of the trailer, and to provide a wider entrance for artists and guests.


Photo by Casey Dunn, caseydunn.net

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Fit For a Rock Star AN ICONIC AUSTIN MUSIC VENUE CREATES A ONE-OF-A-KIND GREEN ROOM By Emma Janzen

Pilgrim Building Company in Austin, Texas, normally constructs residential projects that incorporate green technologies. So when architect Burton Baldridge hired the company to work on an unusual project for one of the city’s most prominent music venues, president Branson J. Fustes had to think outside the box—and fast. A requested new green room needed to be completed in just three weeks. Because Stubb’s BBQ (the venue in question) is situated in the flood zone of Austin’s Waller Creek, the structure needed to be mobile, hence the decision to outfit an old airstream trailer. “The exterior of airstreams has such a distinct look and identity that the architect, Burton Baldridge, envisioned an equally dramatic feel inside, but with a warm wooden cladding,” Fustes says. “Of course, making wood conform to non-rectilinear forms is easier said than done.” The interior wood cladding, made of mahogany veneer, was installed in strips, which had to be scribed board by board so they would curve, taper, and twist to achieve the interior of the dome. “This was very intensive design-build process,” Fustes says. “We as the builders/craftspeople were developing this on a daily and sometimes hourly basis with the designers. We had renderings, but there wasn’t time to develop formal plans, so it became one long, intense design-build charrette.” Though Austin plays home to its fair share of airstreams that serve as food trailers, the Stubb’s green room likely is the only one in the city where you’ll find famous musicians like Ray Benson, Manu Chao, or Snoop Dogg playing Xbox or sipping a vodka soda before they go on stage. “We’ve heard that several artists really like it,” Fustes says. “It’s unlike any other green room in the country.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY PILGRIM BUILDING COMPANY LOCATION AUSTIN, TEXAS PROJECT TYPE AIRSTREAM TRAILER PROJECT NAME STUBB’S GREEN ROOM

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The interior wood cladding in this unique concert-venue green room is made of curved strips of mahogany veneer. To make the wood conform to the curve of the airstream trailer, PIlgrim Building’s sister company, Enabler LLC, had a crew scribing the wood, piece by piece, on a tight three-week deadline.

www.pilgrimbuilding.com 512.707.0760


Photo by Casey Dunn, caseydunn.net

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WILLOW ELECTRIC Willow Electrical Supply Co. partners with the industry’s best manufacturers to provide architects, designers, contractors, and electricians with a broad range of high quality electrical equipment at low, affordable prices.

P 847.801.5010 F 847.801.5021 3828 Des Plaines River Rd Schiller Park, IL 60176


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Photo by Robert Harshman, robertharshman.com

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EcoFriendly Meets Opulence AN APARTMENT COMPLEX GOES GREEN WITHOUT SACRIFICING LUXURY BY SABY REYES-KULKARNI

Jennifer A. Banks, owner of Chicago-based Bella Maison Interior Design, realized she’d fallen into the perfect partnership when she was hired by M&R Development to custom-make all the furniture and casegoods for a luxury apartment building in Evanston, Illinois. “Tony Rossi Sr. and Tony Rossi Jr. of M&R are committed to progressive design,” she says. “They have an appreciation and dedication to elegant urban residences that is unparalleled in the Midwest.” Such is seen through the project’s use of high-end finishes like Italian mosaic tile in the cyber café, a French chandelier in the lobby, and custom furniture upholstered in mohair and silk fabric throughout the first floor. “Central Station,” Banks points out, “is not only an eco-friendly, energy-efficient green building, but it also features refined use of materials, high-end finishes, sophistication of color, and strong silhouettes”—all of which suit the culturally refined personality of the surrounding community (which is home to Northwestern University).

A Breath of Fresh Air Though the typical construction project can be “filled with logistical nightmares,” as Willow Electric manager Mark Matoga says, Central Station Luxury Apartments was completed without a hitch. “From a standpoint of an electrical distributor, it is very refreshing to work with a designer with such commitment, perfection, and style,” he says. “Jennifer Banks [of Bella Maison] also has an easygoing nature that made this project fun.” Matoga’s favorite element is the modern lighting design. “Jennifer and her design studio moved apartment living into a whole new level,” he says. “The modern and functional design is a breath of fresh air.”

Throughout her career, Banks has focused mainly on commercial properties because, as she explains, she is drawn to “the challenge of meshing together the complexity involved with large-scale projects.” At 80 units, and with common areas such as the cyber café, fitness room, and 10,000 square feet of commercial space on the first floor, the four-story Central Station certainly fit that challenge. The fact that her tastes aligned with the Rossis served as an added bonus. “At Central Station,” Banks says, “we wanted to establish both comfort and opulence.” She points back to the cyber café’s Italian mosaic tile as most emblematic of the overall design aesthetic that she and the Rossis were aiming for. With its “juxtaposition of polished marble, honed granite, and glass—coupled with its unique shape—the tile sets the tone for the progressive design character of the entire building.” aZ

FEATURED COMPANY BELLA MAISON INTERIOR DESIGN LOCATION EVANSTON, ILLINOIS PROJECT TYPE APARTMENTS PROJECT NAME CENTRAL STATION LUXURY APARTMENTS

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WWW.CENTRALSTATIONAPARTMENTS.COM

Central Station, Evanston’s newest luxury rental property, combines classic and sophisticated style with cutting edge technology and high-end finishes. 1720 CENTRAL STATION • EVANSTON, IL 60201 FOR LEASING AND INFORMATION: 847-864-8500

WWW.RMK.COM

oslund.and.assoc. 115 Washington Ave N Minneapolis MN 55401 612.359.9144 tel www.oaala.com


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Healing Garden MARKERS COMMEMORATING VICTIMS OF BRIDGE COLLAPSE ENCOURAGE PEACEFUL CONTEMPLATION AT MEMORIAL PARK By Brendan Dabkowski

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t’s a day that those who call Minneapolis home will never forget: on Aug. 1, 2007, the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge collapsed during rush hour, killing 13 people and injuring many more.

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Four years later, Oslund and Associates created the I-35W Remembrance Garden to commemorate the victims and their families, remember the survivors, and honor rescue workers. The garden’s lively but respectful design sidesteps the notion that memorials have to be stark and dismal. “The design needed to embrace the idea of individuals or groups of people gathering at a place to draw on communal strength and support,” says the landscape-architecture firm’s principal, Thomas Oslund. “The site overlooks the river and is accessible, welcoming, relaxing, and peaceful.” The central pieces of the project are 13 steel and opaque glass columns, which recall the structural elements of the former bridge, Oslund says. Each beam is engraved with the name of one of the victims on translucent glass that covers the inside face of the column. At the center of the linear plaza, flowing water cascades over the polished surface of a wall on which the names of every survivor are etched. The quiet waterfall is a “visual and auditory meditative focal point of the project,” says Oslund, who adds that inspirational quotes and dedications appear as well. Benches bookend the plaza, offering visitors places to rest and contemplate their surroundings, and a path leads from the fountain to the bluff edge, where an observation deck allows views of the river up and downstream. Dramatic lighting on the water wall, lights along the path, and the illuminated I-beams coalesce to soften the entire space in early evening. The way that the I-beams are laid out gently compels people to interact with more than just a single part of

the garden, says Oslund, who notes that the beams were placed “somewhat” tightly together so that a visitor might “brush up against the column and become more aware of the person than just a name on a plaque.” It’s a tribute designed to educate and heal. Shortly after the garden opened, a survivor thanked Oslund for creating a “beautifully simple place that is appropriate and reflective, rather than so literal, like many similar memorials.” For other survivors and victims’ kin, it has become a place where they can gain strength, remember their loved ones, and quietly participate in the process of healing. aZ

FEATURED COMPANY OSLUND AND ASSOCIATES LOCATION MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA PROJECT TYPE MEMORIAL PROJECT NAME THE I-35W REMEMBRANCE GARDEN

Thirteen columns were installed into this memorial space to commemorate the 13 lives lost when a bridge collapsed over the Mississippi River in 2007.


Photos by George Heinrich, heinrichphotography.com

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The water wall, which features a sheet flow of water over a polished surface, was incorporated to provide a central meditative point of the I-35W Remembrance Garden.


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Ten moving Memorials By Thomas Oslund, Principal Oslund and Associates

Memorial architecture can be one of the most powerful and evocative kinds of design, sparking a range of emotions from inspiration and hope to reflection, despair, or anger. Thomas Oslund of Oslund and Associates designed a memorial site in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to pay tribute to 13 lives lost in a tragic bridge collapse. We asked him to tell us about the memorials around the world that he believes are effective at capturing the spirit of the event that they are designed to commemorate.

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Vietnam Memorial (Washington, DC): This memorial transformed all previous ideas about what a memorial should be. It creates an intimate relationship with the viewer and allows for contemplation and an intimate engagement of those individuals who were lost.

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911 Memorial (New York, NY): This memorial creates a sense of emptiness, loss, and reflection while simultaneously conveying a sprit of hope and renewal. The powerful nature of the site sits on more than eight acres where once stood the twin towers. More than 400 trees surrounding the two-acre-sized waterfalls and reflecting pools create a contemplative park space separate from the city’s frenetic activity. That contrast is brilliant.

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Pyramids of Giza (Cairo, Egypt): The Pyramids of Giza are the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the World. Not much else needs to be said.

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Holocaust Memorial (Berlin, Germany): The memorial conveys a sense of instability, disorientation, and uneasiness. The success of the memorial is the maze-like quality and varying undulations of the ground plane to simulate the feeling of confusion and uncertainty that the Jewish community of Europe had experienced. JFK Grave Site, Arlington Cemetery (Washington, DC): This memorial is simple, minimal, and intimate. As one approaches the gravesite, the view is subtly controlled to look back towards the mall. You then turn around and view the simple markers of JFK’s family members made of rough-cut Quincy granite, raised slightly off the surface with the eternal flame located within it. This creates a powerfully intimate moment for the visitor.

Gettysburg National Military Park (Gettysburg, PA): This place just has a spirit about it. You can feel the loss and pain and hear the gunfire and the cannon blasts. It has been referred to as the “birth place of freedom” in a nation that was no longer new but newly mature. Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (Crow Agency, MT): This place has the same sense of spirit as Gettysburg, with a similar ability to emotionally feel the loss of life from both sides of the conflict. It’s a very spiritual experience that is hard to put into words.

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San Cataldo Cemetery (Modena, Italy): This cemetery designed by Aldo Rossi is provoking and rather overwhelming. It explores Rossi’s ideas of “the city of the dead” by utilizing the form of memory and meaning. It works on various scales from the intimate to the grand gesture of a place of respite—a very urban solution but also very powerful.

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Lincoln Memorial (Washington, DC): The Columbian Exposition in Chicago influenced the appearance of the memorial; the neoclassical style illustrates beauty, simplicity, and strength. The memorial located on the east end of the Mall symbolizes Lincoln’s moral consciousness of the nation and the climb/struggles of emancipation. It’s one of my favorites because it has evolved not just as a memorial to Lincoln but also as the “place for assembly” to voice inequalities.

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Brion Cemetery (Treviso, Italy): This cemetery again is a memorable place due to the simplicity and detail of the elements, both manmade and natural. Designed by Carlo Scarpa, the space becomes one of reflection and beauty; the balance and scale of the chapel with the two covered burial areas, reflecting pools, and grove of cypress make for an unforgettable visit. Scarpa also just happens to be buried there.

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Parts of the USC John McKay Center were designed in a way that would bring in elements of school pride without distrupting the campus’s overall architectural style.

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Trojan Tradition U.S.C. SPORTS COMPLEX INTEGRATES STORIED FOOTBALL HISTORY INTO PUNCHY NEW DESIGN By Emma Janzen

FEATURED COMPANY RA-DA LOCATION LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA PROJECT TYPE SPORTS BUILDING PROJECT NAME THE JOHN MCKAY CENTER, USC CAMPUS

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hen RA-DA principal designer Rania Alomar was hired by architecture firm HNTB to design the interiors for the University of Southern California’s John McKay Center, she was tasked with capturing the vibrancy of the sports program while staying true to the university’s overarching architectural style. “The aesthetic is very much about the balance of the old and new aesthetics in order to meet the building’s needs and fit well on campus,” Alomar says. | Continued »

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Photo by Ralf Strathmann, ralfstrathmann.com

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Because the complex serves multiple functions for both staff and students, Alomar used different materials and lighting options in each area to signal the intended use of each space. She wanted the overall scheme to feel dynamic and fluid. The lowest level— where locker rooms, strength-training equipment, and the main field exist— features bold graphics of former sports stars, heavy integration of school colors, and inspirational quotes plastered on floors and walls to establish a modern exuberance intended to inspire athletes. On the upper floors, where students study and sports staff work, heavy stone, marble, and wood interact to create a feeling more cohesive with the campus’s overall architectural personality. “With a balance of materials, graphics, and color, the interior is at once vibrant and elegant,” Alomar says.

In order to ease the transitions between a potentially jarring juxtaposition of spaces, Alomar placed red nodes at key intervals throughout the building, to highlight entry- and exit-ways and identify points of intended movement. Because “the building is experienced by moving through the spaces and experiencing the different treatments to different areas,” she also used lines of light at these marks, intended to “strengthen any existing pattern in the ceiling” and help guide one’s journey, Alomar says. The blending of the opposing aesthetics—old and new, modern and classic, vibrant and soft—helps the overall look of the sports center successfully bridge the gap between past and present to create a timeless vision of what it means to be a USC Trojan. aZ

Pathways of Pride At the John McKay Center, USC’s iconic branding was expressed throughout the building using color, graphics, and even custom rubber flooring. Oklahoma City-based To Market developed environmentally friendly commercial floors that would stand up to heavy traffic, high-impact gym equipment, and weight racks. “One of the best examples of the way we incorporated USC’s colors and logos can be seen in their locker room, which features a massive waterjet-cut football icon in the center of the room,” says Gina Hendron, director of media communications. “We were very excited to see our flooring featured in such a fabulous, state-of-the-art facility.”


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / community

The layout of this public park in Chelsea, Massachusetts, forms around a 100,000-ton pile of salt. The lot includes both a dock that distributes said salt and a public park space designed to honor the maritime industry of the area.

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Photos by Landing Studio, landing-studio.com

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Salt of the City A COASTAL PARK STRIKES A BALANCE BETWEEN RECREATION AND INDUSTRY By Risa Seidman

FEATURED COMPANY LANDING STUDIO LOCATION CHELSEA, MASSACHUSETTS PROJECT TYPE PARK PROJECT NAME ROCK CHAPEL MARINE

Under any other circumstance, a 100,000-ton pile of salt sitting on Chelsea, Massachusetts’s waterfront would be an eyesore. But Daniel Adams of Landing Studio has woven Eastern Minerals’ salt mound into Chelsea’s maritime landscape by creating a waterfront park within the industrial zone. “This design aims to retune and choreograph the industrial operation as a visible, integrated, and compelling character of the urban landscape,” Adams says. In a balancing act to rival most tightrope walkers, Adams set about designing a mixed-use outdoor space that would act as both an attractive public park and a fully functioning salt dock. “The goal of this project was to carefully design an international salt-dock facility that both improved the efficiency and performance of marine industrial operations,” Adams says, “while also creating a positive community landscape for the urban waterfront.” The park, known as the PORT (Publicly Organized Recreation Territory), does not interfere with Eastern Minerals’ salt operations. Rather, Adams’s new building and infrastructure along the shared waterfront expedites the company’s operations— importing, storing, and allocating the salt that’s used to treat northeastern cities’ treacherous winter roads. By the same token, the PORT takes much of its aesthetic from the surrounding coastal industry. Before Eastern Minerals moved in, Chelsea’s waterfront was home to an asphalt- and oil-storage facility. Early in the project, one of Eastern Minerals’ managers suggested repurposing the building material from the old storage tanks for the park, because the metal already had proven to hold up to the coastal environment. In his designs, Adams made use of the geodesic domed lids from the tops of three oil-storage tanks for the PORT, recreating them

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as light scaffolds and vine trellises to delineate the park’s various recreational areas. “The close proximity of the recycled and repurposed domes creates an overhead topography that unifies the landscape,” Adams says, “and provides a visual identity to the public-access portion of the dock.” The PORT has been compared to Manhattan’s High Line; both repurpose industrial zones into inviting public parks. The High Line, however, no longer is a working train line, while the PORT still is an active heavy-industrial site. Instead of concealing the salt industry from view, the PORT celebrates it—and inextricably links it to the DNA of Chelsea itself. aZ


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / community

This planned community’s architectural components were developed around the critical threads in the local community. The structures, hardscapes, and bulkheads around the marina all add to the aesthetic while serving their respective purposes.

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Carolina Classic A NEW DEVELOPMENT EVOKES THE EAST COAST’S MARITIME HERITAGE By Risa Seidman

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iver Dunes’ gorgeous location on the Pamlico Sound in North Carolina provided the design team at Palm Hill with its source of inspiration for the coastal vacation rentals and event space. Because of its natural setting, however, River Dunes required extra planning. “[Sites like River Dunes] may be beautiful, but they are often located in pristine areas...where 14 miles of waterfront and critical habitat mean meeting the challenge of overcoming environmental regulations,” says Alex Brittian, chief financial officer of Palm Hill, which handled the project in conjunction with the Ark Development Group.


Image courtesy of Palm Hill

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FEATURED COMPANIES ARK DEVELOPMENT GROUP AND PALM HILL LOCATION ORIENTAL, NORTH CAROLINA PROJECT TYPE PLANNED COMMUNITY PROJECT NAME RIVER DUNES

By utilizing building materials and architectural components that work in harmony with North Carolina’s coastal environment, the team at Palm Hill was able to create a sustainable design that does not sacrifice luxury. River Dunes’ harbor makes use of stone bulkheads, and its facilities feature reclaimed beams and antique lumber, creating a classic coastal aesthetic while remaining eco-friendly. “The goal was to provide structures that feel like they belong, creating a sense of place that gives the appearance of a long evolution,” Brittian says. “Living on the water should feel like you’re on vacation every day.” Indeed, the throwback maritime

designs of River Dunes’ cottages, residences, and clubhouse lend a decidedly relaxed feel to the development. Its white picket fences, manicured lawns, and floating-dock sailboat marina are reminiscent of an East Coast fishing village. “Palm Hill develops in sites known for their incredible beauty and need for innovative design,” Brittian says. “This means the right mix of all the elements working together seamlessly like a well-oiled machine. You have to keep your sight on the overall vision, knowing that each element is a factor in the big picture. When all the elements come together, as they have at River Dunes, you have something to be proud of.” aZ


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / community

Image courtesy of Palm Hill

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It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood INSPIRED BY THE FRENCH COUNTRYSIDE, A GATED COMMUNITY GETS THE PICTURESQUE THOMAS KINKADE TREATMENT By Amanda Koellner

368 FEATURED COMPANIES PALM HILL AND ARK DEVELOPMENT GROUP LOCATION ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA PROJECT TYPE PLANNED COMMUNITY / NEIGHBORHOOD PROJECT NAME THE VILLAGE AT THE THOMS ESTATE

France’s historic Château de Chantilly is more than 4,000 miles from Asheville, North Carolina, but that didn’t stop the planned community’s developers from finding a muse in Chantilly Drive, a street named for the château and found in the center of the the Thoms Estate. “We drew inspiration from French country homes with natural materials and melded it with Asheville’s own North Carolina-inspired architectural styles and concepts to add vibrancy and originality to the community,” says Alex Brittian, CFO at real-estate developer Palm Hill. Along with partner company Ark Development and local firm Samsel Architects, Palm Hill aimed to capture the “neighborhood feel” that Asheville boasts with walking trails, fire pits, a pavilion playground, and other amenities throughout the Thoms Estate and one of its neighborhoods, The Village at the Thoms Estate. How did you prepare to embark on this project? We conducted interviews with potential buyers to determine their needs and desires: to downsize while maintaining the quality finishes to which they are accustomed, to utilize eco-friendly and energy-efficient technologies, and to have services available that offer a low-maintenance, worry-free lifestyle where they can focus on enjoying their home, social life, and traveling. We worked with Samsel to create open floor plans with flexible layouts—optional lower levels, optional rooms, and two exterior elevations for every floor plan to

ensure that the community will have variety and fit the tastes of any customer. What specific design elements make this an example of excellent design? For the village, we expanded on the French country and provincial design elements found in the gatehouse, bridge, amenities, and the original house design concepts and plans. We like to say that we added a Western North Carolina twist to French country by incorporating other European design influences such as arts and crafts stylings. We effectively maximized natural light and enhanced the views for each home’s special situation, as the neighborhood is designed so that each residence will be able to make the best use of the views offered on the lot. The overall effect when driving through the village will offer visitors and residents an iconic, well-appointed community that is always picture perfect—like one of those Thomas Kinkade paintings you see on postcards. Which detail best represents the project’s aesthetic? French country design is inspired by the homes in the rural areas of France and combines a genuine love for the land and its natural elements with respect for good craftsmanship, traditional and natural elements, and a sense of harmony and balance. The spirit of Asheville always has emphasized enjoying nature and neighbors, and the village was designed from the start to incorporate this lifestyle and embrace the city’s love of the environment. aZ

Homes For Sale Realizing that buyers are looking to the Web, Ark Development Group turned to Bullman Design to build this community a sleek and user-friendly website. It features a custom-built interactive map that shows which homes and properties in the Thoms Estate are sold and pending. “Successful websites deliver results and achieve a goal,” says owner and operator Corey Bullman. “The Thoms Estate site is doing just that.”


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / community

In the Rheanne White Salon, SunTect implemented a linear system of Aamsco and Bartco lights that would provide an even glow throughout the space, creating ideal conditions for cutting and styling hair.


Photo by Andrew Parsons, andrewparsonsphoto.com

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High Fashion, Low Maintenance STRATEGIC LIGHTING AND WARM MATERIALS STYLE A TRIBECA SALON By Brendan Dabkowski

FEATURED COMPANY SUN-TECT LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE COMMERCIAL PROJECT NAME RHEANNE WHITE SALON

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ike many hair stylists, Rheanne White’s professional lifeblood begins with perfect lighting…and chairs. “We picked the chairs before we picked the architect,” says Andrew Parsons only half-jokingly. Parsons represents Rheanne White Salon in the TriBeCa area of Manhattan in New York City. “Rheanne wanted a salon she could work in,” he says. “It was so important to create an environment where the experience was as important as the service.” | Continued »

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Photo by Andrew Parsons, andrewparsonsphoto.com

White selected Sun-Tect to execute her vision. The architectural firm managed to emphasize the natural beauty of the site—an airy loft space— while boiling the design down to its most essential elements. “This project had a very aggressive budget, and we had to accomplish maximum impact at minimal cost,” says Sun-Tect principal Andrew Haner. “We pursued a minimal, modern design with clean lines and warm materials. This sort of aesthetic matches Rheanne really well in that it is high fashion but low maintenance.”

| Continued »

Sun-Tect and collaborators restored vintage wood floors to their former glory, installed LED linear lighting to provide an even glow conducive to styling hair, and installed custom hickory millwork to add warmth to the clean white lines and finish accents. Installed in the lobby is a gorgeous custom light fixture by Michelle James, and other vendor collaborators that performed high-quality work include Bilt NYC, Takara Belmont, Flat Vernacular, and Aamsco Lighting. Haner is particularly fond of the collaboration on the front desk between himself and fabricator Herlander Passos. “The front desk was sketched over at length between myself and the client, and then Herlander was brought in to fabricate it,” he says.

Passos distilled original drawings down to their most elemental statements, preserving Haner’s intent while still “invigorating it with his own flavor and tone to make a huge impact,” Haner says. “It was a huge honor to work with so many great professionals in accomplishing this goal.” aZ

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Photo by David Humphreys

Ten Audacious Museum Designs Victor F. “Trey” TrAhan, president and principal Trahan Architects

The landscape of museum design might as well be the Wild West of the architecture world. No concept is too obscure, no geometry too outlandish. After designing the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame & Northwest Louisiana History Museum, architect Trey Trahan secured his place on the list of the world’s most inventive museum spaces. We asked him to share 10 from around the world that he believes are particularly bold.

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Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (New York, NY): The circular form of the museum stands in direct contrast to New York’s historical city grid. The spiraling circulation sequence and arrangement of gallery spaces allows for a very different reading of works of art previously seen in museums, one best experienced in section rather than horizontally in plan.

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Kolumba Museum by Peter Zumthor (Cologne, Germany): The building was stitched into its existing context with a restrained reverence towards the church ruins on site. Through the careful orchestration of material, form, and light, Zumthor imbues the museum with a sense of serenity and meditation. It transcends the boundaries of a specific religion to imbue the visitor with an atmosphere of spirituality away from the bustling city beyond.

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Guggenheim Museum Bilbao by Frank Gehry (Bilbao, Spain): This building redefined the transformative and economic

impact that architecture can have on cities. At one scale, the building acts as a large piece of urban sculpture. At another, the undulations of the reflective skin provide for multiple readings of the building from various vistas.

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Clyfford Still Museum by Allied Works Architecture (Denver, CO): This museum captures an intimate interplay between natural light and raw materiality. Through the careful manipulation of surface, the building harnesses a diversity of scales and textures that combine to create a varied reading on both the inside and out of the building. The chipped concrete striations that are prevalent throughout the museum harken back to Still’s own work, where vertical lines and tactile surfaces were common themes throughout.

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Soumaya Museum by FR-EE (Mexico City, Mexico): The amorphic form of the museum stands in contrast to the surrounding context, creating a dynamic experience at the scale of the city.

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MAXXI Museum by Zaha Hadid (Rome, Italy): The design team had to deal with the uncertainty of the artwork to be displayed. The length of time to complete the project and the intimate size of the firm at the beginning allowed them to thoughtfully respond to this. The museum’s design inevitably affects the type of artwork displayed and thus in a way influences art itself. Kimbell Art Museum by Louis Kahn (Fort Worth, TX): The quietness of the concrete, travertine, and white oak form gives way to light being the primary material of the art gallery. The careful use of light as materiality allows the artwork to transcend the physical space.

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Nelson-Atkins Museum by Steven Holl (Kansas City, MO): The experience of the gallery spaces is dynamic despite the architecture’s reverently restrained form. Even without aggressive form, the interior experience transforms as the exterior environment changes from dawn to dusk.

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The Centre Pompidou by Richard Rogers & Renzo Piano (Paris, France): The revolutionary impact that the museum’s design had on architecture spoke to the impact that art continually brings to itself. The design could not have been more apt as a podium for art. The building redefined the delineation of interior and exterior. De Young Museum by Herzog & De Mueron (San Francisco, CA): The choice of a transformative material for the building exterior was very poetic and appropriate for the museum’s setting. The museum is a dynamic object, continuously receding in the middle of an urban park. The metal exterior and the sharp angles of the building, though camouflaging over time with the backdrop of trees because of its patina, rings back to the fact that the natural setting of the park is actually surrounded by an urban environment.

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The entryway to the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame & Northwest Louisiana History Museum is made up of 1,100 digitally milled cast-stone panels, each weighing somewhere between five and seven tons. Each panel was created and placed into the space as an individual piece of the puzzle.


Photos by Tim Hursley, timothyhursley.com

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Heavy Connections SPORTS, HISTORY, AND CAST STONE UNITE IN ONE MIND-OPENING DESIGN By Lesley Stanley

FEATURED COMPANY TRAHAN ARCHITECTS LOCATION NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA PROJECT TYPE MUSEUM PROJECT NAME LOUISIANA SPORTS HALL OF FAME & NORTHWEST LOUISIANA HISTORY MUSEUM

Creating a space that honors both historical artifacts and notable sports figures may seem like an unlikely pairing, but for principal architect Trey Trahan of New Orleans-based Trahan Architects, the unexplored interconnection drove the design behind the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame & Northwest Louisiana History Museum. “In some ways, the success of athletes and sports teams are a result of history in the culture,” Trahan says. “The more we explored those relationships, we investigated how to weave these two together and connect them.” Located on the riverfront in historic downtown Natchitoches, the 28,000-square-foot facility’s blueprint is rooted in the area’s rich culture—

something that came easy to Trahan, who grew up in Crowly, Louisiana. The exterior’s cladded copper paneling system, which controls ventilation and natural light, is indicative of cypress shutters found on traditional Southern plantation homes. The entryway features a stunning, curved, and flawy pathway made up of 1,100 digitally milled cast-stone panels—which Trahan says is evocative of 18th Century bousillage, a malleable infill mixture of clay, horsehair, and moss. The walkway guides visitors through the facility’s first level, where exhibits are housed, and continues upward to an outdoor balcony that overlooks the river. It has a seamless, flowing nature reminiscent of a slow-moving current that takes you on a historical journey while also being mindful of the future and how we help sculpt it. “We’re always looking for ways to innovate or create structure that is optimistic about the future and also connects physically and emotionally to many elements of our past,” he says. Likewise, Trahan hopes that the building is around for future generations to enjoy and experience. “It was important to have the space feel permanent and like stone—I love the thought of buildings one day being thought of as a ruin,” he says. “Though to us now it seems futuristic, hopefully it will seem rich and affect people very differently within their context.” aZ

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / community

Photos by Tim Hursley, timothyhursley.com

Architect Trey Trahan says that visitors of the museum often hesitate to touch the stone walls, but he hopes that over time they will feel comfortable directly interacting with the space and materials.

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Photo by Groana Melendez, groanamelendez.com, and Halstead Property, halstead.com

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Small Luxuries AN URBAN APARTMENT COMPLEX MAKES THE MOST OF LIMITED SQUARE FOOTAGE WITHOUT SACRIFICING STYLE By Risa Seidman

FEATURED COMPANY MIHAI RADU ARCHITECTS LOCATION NEW YORK, NEW YORK PROJECT TYPE APARTMENTS PROJECT NAME COLUMBIA HOUSE

Space in Manhattan is hard to come by, so architect Mihai Radu had to make due with what he was presented in the Columbia House project—12,500 gross square feet split between six apartments on six floors. His design for the apartments in New York’s Upper West Side makes the most of the building’s narrowness, maximizing space through use of simple, clean lines. “We always thought about our design philosophy as one of quiet elegance,” Radu says. “[The façade] is sophisticated in its simplicity and makes our building stand out in its surroundings but not clash with them.” Radu’s understated approach also is apparent inside the units, which feature a balance of dark bamboo flooring and light-colored cabinets and fixtures. “Regarding the interiors, we wanted to create clear, well-proportioned, and functional layouts, which will make a pleasant living experience,” he says. “We did not want to add frivolous decorations as is fashionable these days. We wanted the building proportions to be the defining factor.” To remedy the Columbia House’s natural-light deficiency (the building only has windows on two sides), Radu made the few existing windows as big as possible. “We gave a lot of thought to the proportions between the glass plane and the heavy concrete planes,” he says, “to create a graceful building that will stand out in the bleak environment surrounding it.” Beyond the Columbia House’s easy grace, Radu is most proud of achieving a luxury apartment building—one with high-end appliances and fixtures—while still using all green building materials. The Columbia House proves not only that beauty can exist in dense urban climate, but that it can be eco-friendly as well. aZ

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Photo by Groana Melendez, groanamelendez.com, and Halstead Property, halstead.com

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / RESOURCE GUIDE

RESOURCE GUIDE

ARIZONA Angelica Henry Design 15551 N. Greenway Hayden Loop, Ste. 155 Scottsdale, AZ 85260 480-502-6605 angelicahenrydesign.com Carlson Homes 17199 N. 77th Way Scottsdale, AZ 85255 602-321-1381 carlsonhomesscottsdale.com

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Ken Linsteadt Architects 1462 Pine St. San Francisco, CA 94109 415-351-1018 kenlinsteadt.com Level 3 Design Group 610 South Main St., Ste. 213 Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-769-4035 level3dg.com

COLORADO

GEORGIA

CCY Architects 228 Midland Ave., PO Box 529 Basalt, CO 81621 970-927-4925 ccyarchitects.com

AI3 Architects 916 Joseph E. Lowery Blvd., Ste. 1 Atlanta, GA 30318 404-223-3304 ai3online.com

Narvaes Western 3020 Carbon Place, Ste. 102 Boulder, CO 80301 303-786-8061 narvaes.com

HAWAII

CALIFORNIA

LOC Architects 453 S. Spring St., Ste. 1126 Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-537-0480 loc-arch.com

AV Hospitality 1605 N. Cahuenga Blvd. Hollywood, CA 90028 323-466-1400 avhospitality.com

Lundberg Design 2620 Third St. San Francisco, CA 94107 415-695-0110 lundbergdesign.com

Beinfield Architecture 1 Marshall Street, Ste. 202 South Norwalk, CT 06854 203-838-5789 beinfield.com

Beth Whitlinger Interior Design 27061 Burbank Foothill Ranch, CA 92610 949-916-4551 bwid.com

Nicholsbooth Architects 221 Main St., Ste. 525 San Francisco, CA 94105 415-230-7000 nicholsbooth.com

Forma Design 1524 U St., NW, Ste. 200 Washington, DC 20009 202-265-2625 formaonline.com

Bluemotif Architecture 2311 Kettner Blvd. San Diego, CA 92101 619-269-5288 bluemotifarchitecture.com

Patricia Motzkin Architecture 2927 Newbury St. Berkeley, CA 94705 510-649-7708 pmotzkinaia.com

Jonathan Kuhn Architect 1611 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 200 Washington, DC 20009 202-494-5061 kuhnarchitect.com

Brereton Architects 909 Montgomery St., Ste. 260 San Francisco, CA 94133 415-546-1212 brereton.com

RA-DA 7523 Norton Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90046 323-851-4040 ra-da.com

FLORIDA

Brian Z. Allen Design 8 10th St., Ste. 605 San Francisco, CA 94103 415-672-4025 brianzallendesign.com

Spinnaker Development 428 32nd St. Newport Beach, CA 92663 949-544-5800 spinndev.com

Erin Martin Design 1118 Hunt Ave. St. Helena, CA 94574 707-963-4141 erinmartindesign.com

Toby Long Design 6114 LaSalle Ave., Ste. 552 Oakland, CA 94611 415-905-9030 cleverhomes.net

Intracorp Companies 4041 MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 250 Newport Beach, CA 92660 949-757-8472 intracorpcompanies.com

Tuggey Construction 5422 Janisann Ave. Culver City, CA 90230 310-391-7307 tuggeyconstruction.com

CONNECTICUT

Keesee and Associates 945 S. Orange Blossom Trail Apopka, FL 32703 407-880-2333 gokeesee.com Palm Hill 850 NW Federal Highway, Ste. 225 Stuart, FL 34994 772-497-5001 palmhill.com Studio 5 Design + Architecture 112 Madeira Ave. Coral Gables, FL 33134 305-456-5273 s5da.com

Matthew Schaller Architect 5-5008 Kuhio Hwy., PO Box 120 Hanalei, HI 96714 808-826-4699 matthewschallerarchitect.com

ILLINOIS Bella Maison Interior Design 1610 N. Honore St. Chicago, IL 60622 312-286-1999 bellamaisonltd.com O’Kelly + Kasprak 940 W. Adams St. Ste. 102 Chicago, IL 60607 312-962-5977 okellykasprak.com Robert J. Neylan Architects 2622 N. Burling St. Chicago, IL 60614 773-477-2901 rjnarch.com

INDIANA Susan Brook Interiors 2729 Riverside Dr. Columbus, IN 47201 812-374-4323 susanbrookinteriors.com

KANSAS Studio 804 1465 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 105 Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-4024 studio804.com


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / RESOURCE GUIDE

LOUISIANA

MISSISSIPPI

Olivia Erwin Interiors 1128 Peniston St. New Orleans, LA 70115 310-487-8753 oliviaerwin.com

Beard + Riser Architects 201 S. Main St. Greenwood, MS 38930 662-455-2581 beardriser.com

Trahan Architects One Shell Square 701 Poydras St., Ste. 150P New Orleans, LA 70139 225-924-6333 trahanarchitects.com

NEVADA

Kimille Taylor Interior Design and Decoration 375 Riverside Dr., Apt. 9E New York, NY 10025 917-361-3058 kimilletaylor.com

Taylor Borsari, Inc. 7752 Roaring Springs Circle Las Vegas, NV 702-263-2664 taylorborsari.com

Marlon Blackwell Architect 217 East Dickson St., Ste. 104 Fayetteville, AR 72701 479-973-9121 marlonblackwell.com

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Maziar Behrooz Architecture 36 West 20th St. New York, NY 10011 631-329-2983 mbarchitecture.com

MAINE Skaala 58 Bayview St. Camden, ME 04843 774-392-0700 skaala.us Urban Dwellings 422 1/2 Fore St., 2nd Floor Portland, ME 04101 207-780-6136 urban-dwell.com

R. Wendell Phillips & Associates 650 County Rd. New London, NH 03257 603-526-9636

KaVa Design 55 Washington St., Ste. 555 Brooklyn, NY 11201 718-858-8227 kananshree.com

Mihai Radu Architects 104 West 27th St., 10th Floor New York, NY 10001 212-691-1711 lausterradu.com

NEW YORK

MARYLAND Streetsense 3 Bethesda Metro #140 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-652-9020 streetsense.com

Association for Energy Affordability 105 Bruckner Blvd. Bronx, NY 10454 718-292-6733 ext. 8020 aea.us.org Asymptote Architecture 11-45 46th Avenue LIC New York, NY 11101 212-343-7333 asymptote.net

MASSACHUSSETS Landing Studio 561 Windsor St., Ste. A304 Somerville, MA 02143 617-955-4569 landing-studio.com

MICHIGAN DesRosiers Architects 36330 Woodward Ave. Ste., 100 Bloomfield Hills, MI 43408 248-642-7771 desarch.com O-X Studio 308 S. State St., Ste. 30 Ann Arbor, MI 48104 734-929-9800 oxstudioinc.com

MINNESOTA Oslund and Associates 115 Washington Ave. N. Minneapolis, MN 55401 612-359-9144 oaala.com

Bentel & Bentel Architects / Planners 22 Buckram Road Locust Valley, NY 11560 516-676-2880 bentelandbentel.com C3D Architecture 307 7th Ave., Ste. 1407 New York, NY 10001 212-233-3103 c3darchitecture.com Design 3 49 West 37th St., 6th Floor New York, NY 10001 212-840-1720 design3-inc.com HWKN 281 5th Ave., Floor 2 New York, NY 10016 212-625-2320 hwkn.com Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects 115 West 27th St., 9th Floor New York, NY 10001 212-620-9166 jaklitschgardner.com Jena Marchione Interior Design 27 W. 20th St., Ste. 601 New York, NY 10011 646-442-5731 jenamarchione.com

MNA 127 West 24th St., 7th Floor New York, NY 10011 212-675-2285 mnarch.com

Sun-Tect Brooklyn, NY 11218 917-668-7234 sun-tect.com Victoria Kirk Interiors 169 Maple Ave. Mamaroneck, NY 10543 917-721-8936 victoriakirkinteriors.com Vivre Interiors 34 N. 7th St. Brooklyn, NY 11249 212-255-6706 vivreinterior.com William Reue Architecture 1123 Broadway, Ste. 904 New York, NY 10010 212-727-1039 wreue.com

NORTH CAROLINA Ark Development Group 46 Haywood St., Ste. 358 Asheville, NC 28801 828-330-4888 palmhill.com

OHIO Parts and Labor Design 627 Broadway, Floor 9 New York, NY 10012 646-812-8120 pldnyc.com Room 1400 Hertel Ave. Buffalo, NY 14216 716-939-2692 room-buffalo.com Satinwood, Ltd. 125 Davids Hill Rd. Bedford Hills, NY 10507 914-232-2907 satinwood-ltd.com Sayigh + Duman 866 6th Ave., 11th Floor New York, NY 10001 212-686-6875 sayighduman.com Steven Harris Architects 50 Warren Street New York, NY 10007 212-587-1108 stevenharrisarchitects.com Studiogreener 1133 Broadway, Ste. 1607 New York, NY 10010 646-823-9335 studiogreener.com Sun Decor Fabrics 200 Lexington Ave., Ste. 417A New York, NY 10016 212-213-2703 sundecorfabrics.com

Amy Schuermann Interiors 3165 Linwood Ave. Cincinatti, OH 45208 513-807-8870 amyschuermann.com

OREGON Cheryl Heinrichs Architecture 1965 NW 2nd St. Bend, OR 97701 541-382-8914 charchitecture.com Julia Wood Architect 333 S. State St. V-192 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 503-750-5672 juliawoodarchitect.com Maison, Inc. 1611 NW Northrup St. Portland, OR 97209 503-295-0151 maisoninc.com William Kaven Architecture 8371 N. Interstate Ave. #5 Portland, OR 97217 503-806-5334 williamkaven.com

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THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / RESOURCE GUIDE

RHODE ISLAND Foster Associates 111 Glen Rd. Portsmouth, RI 02871 401-682-1633 mfosterassociates.com

Tiffany McKinzie Interior Design Colleyville, TX 76034 214-883-5473 tiffanymckinzie.com

VERMONT Joshua Shockley Interior Design 75 Weybosset St. Providence, RI 02903 401-743-6296 joshuashockleyinteriordesign.com

Black River Design Architects 73 Main St., Ste. 9 Montpelier, VT 05602 802-223-2044 blackriverdesign.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

Atelier Cachet 45 Avocet Dr. Vaughan, ON L4H 2H3 416-805-1573 ateliercachet.com EN2 Development Corporation 1655 Dupont St., Ste. 320 Toronto, ON M6P 3S9 416-949-5229 en2.ca Epic Designs, Inc. 257 Dunraven Drive Toronto, ON M6M 1H8 416-564-2435 epicdesignsinc.ca

VIRGINIA Ink Architecture + Interiors 245 Seven Farms Dr., Ste. 230 Daniel Island, SC 29492 843-882-7810 inkarchitecturellc.com J Banks Design Group 35 Main Street Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 843-681-5122 jbanksdesign.com

TENNESSEE

386

DPOV Interiors 2116 Fairmont Blvd Knoxville, TN 37917 865-591-1715 dpovinteriors.com

TEXAS Design Duncan Miller Ullmann 1203 Dragon St. Dallas, TX 75207 214-748-5944 designdmu.com Flick Mars 5646 Milton St. Dallas, TX 75206 214-653-1900 flickmars.com Hatfield Builders & Remodelers 701 E. Plano Pkwy., Ste. 410 Plano, TX 214-281-8800 hbdallas.com Michael Hsu Office of Architecture 4910 Burnet Rd. Austin, TX 78756 512-706-4303 hsuoffice.com Olsen Studios 9636 Tarleton St., Ste. 101 Dallas, TX 75218 214-293-3540 olsenstudios.com Pilgrim Building Company PO Box 90385 Austin, TX 78709 512-707-0760 pilgrimbuilding.com

Reader & Swartz Architects 213 N. Cameron St. Winchester, VA 22601 540-665-0212 readerswartz.com

Ted Design 1 Steelcase Rd. W., Unit 10 Markham, ON L3R 0T3 866-375-6131 teddesign.com

UNITED KINGDOM WASHINGTON BC&J Architects 197 Parfitt Way, Ste. 120 Bainbridge Isle, WA 98110 206-780-9113 bcandj.com Bjarko Serra Architects 2 Nickerson St., Ste. 100 Seattle, WA 98109 206-545-1443 bjarkoserra.com Cascade Built 4111 E. Madison St. #104 Seattle, WA 98112 206-354-3455 cascadebuilt.com NK Architects 310 First Ave., Ste. 225 Seattle, WA 98104 Runberg Architecture Group 1 Yesler Way, Ste. 200 Seattle, WA 98104 206-956-1970 runberg.com

WYOMING Grace Home Design PO Box 6938 Jackson, WY 83002 307-733-9893 gracehomedesign.com

CANADA Amantea Architects 12 Ellis Park Road Toronto, ON M6S 2V3 416-807-9772 amarchitects.ca

Zaha Hadid Architects 10 Bowling Green Lane London, UK EC1R 0BQ 44-20-7253-5147 zaha-hadid.com


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / INDEX

Index ADVERTISERS

Aamsco Lighting .........................................................................................................372 ABR Builders................................................................................................................. 145 Adams Kara Taylor.......................................................................................................339 Amy Schuermann Interiors ........................................................................................316 Andersen Windows .....................................................................................................125 Antonov Construction................................................................................................241 Ark Development Group..............................................................................................369 Association for Energy Affordability .......................................................................134 ASST...............................................................................................................................223 Atelier.............................................................................................................................. 24 Atelier Cachet ..............................................................................................................104 BC&J Architecture ......................................................................................................162 Beard + Riser Architects............................................................................................165 Becht Engineering ........................................................................................................ 13 Benchmark Pools ........................................................................................................ 178 Black River Design Architects...................................................................................265 BNY Construction ........................................................................................................213 Boelter Contract / Design Chicago ..........................................................................205 Brereton Architects....................................................................................................302 Brian Z. Allen Design ..................................................................................................... 42 Bullman Design............................................................................................................370 C3D Architecture.........................................................................................................258 Capitol Light.................................................................................................................157 Carlson Homes............................................................................................................... 68 Carrington Stone Masons ..........................................................................................155 The Celadon Group......................................................................................................209 CF Kent ..........................................................................................................................268 Charles Ray & Associates.......................................................................................... 145 Chereco Co., Inc...........................................................................................................223 CHJ3 Architecture............................................................... ..................................296 Christian Duvernois Gardens ....................................................................................134 Classic Tile & Mosaic .................................................................................................... 86 Clayton-Miller ..............................................................................................................276 Copper Iron Designs...................................................................................................... 26 Creative Walls by Tiffany ............................................................................................. 34 Dan Dixon Architect ....................................................................................................286 Dear Garden Associates .............................................................................................. 78 Delos Rugs...................................................................................................................... 83 Destination Designs ...................................................................................................282 Devine Color / Valspar................................................................................................236 Dovetail Millwork............................................................................................................ 13 Duggal Visual Solutions.............................................................................................255 Eastern Salt Company ................................................................................................363 Eaton’s Cooper Lighting Business ...........................................................................313 Empire Office ...............................................................................................................310 Epic Designs, Inc ........................................................................................................... 72 Evergreen Design & Construction.............................................................................. 20 Gentner .........................................................................................................................358 Grabill Windows and Doors ........................................................................................168 Grace Home Design .....................................................................................................326 Gyro / Johns Manville .................................................................................................380 Hatfield Builders & Remodelers ................................................................................. 44 Heather Marguard, AIA, LEED.....................................................................................340 International Manufacturing Source Solutions.....................................................272 Interserv LP ..................................................................................................................262 Intracorp Companies..................................................................................................346 Karlstrom Associates................................................................................................... 68 KaVa Design..................................................................................................................235 Kirby Perkins Construction........................................................................................113 Lee Supply ...................................................................................................................... 36

Luminas Lighting ........................................................................................................197 Macadam Floor and Design .......................................................................................113 Martin Metal Designs .................................................................................................... 94 Matthew Schaller Architect ...................................................................................... 176 MBI (Media Brokers International)............................................................................... 32 McCutcheon Construction .......................................................................................... 29 The McFate Group........................................................................................................228 Meridien Accents ........................................................................................................265 Michael Hsu Office of Architecture .........................................................................205 Mick Handley .................................................................................................................. 89 Mihai Radu Architects ................................................................................................209 ML Restaurant Solutions ...........................................................................................241 The Modern Fan Co........................................................................................................ 48 Murdoch Gallery & Katayama Designs....................................................................... 89 Narvaes Western.........................................................................................................235 Oslund and Associates ..............................................................................................355 Pilgrim Building Company ..........................................................................................350 Prutting & Co. Custom Builders .................................................................................. 60 RA-DA ............................................................................................................................162 Randall Wilson & Sons.................................................................................................. 26 RMK Management / M&R Development....................................................................355 Rockport Post and Beam ...........................................................................................182 Room..............................................................................................................................281 Runberg Architecture Group .....................................................................................339 R. Wendell Phillips & Associates..............................................................................162 S&H Design Development ............................................................................................ 60 Sierra Pacific Windows............................................................................................... 117 Soelberg Industries ....................................................................................................100 Spinnaker Development.............................................................................................182 Spinneybeck Leather .................................................................................................286 Sunlite Science & Technology ..................................................................................322 Ted Design ....................................................................................................................244 Thomas Archer Contracting ........................................................................................ 20 Tremco...........................................................................................................................377 Tri Kes ............................................................................................................................262 Tuggey Construction .................................................................................................... 86 Twenty Two Group........................................................................................................ 217 Urban Dwellings...........................................................................................................102 Vintage Material Supply .............................................................................................200 Vintage View ................................................................................................................258 Vivre Interiors ................................................................................................................ 44 VLDG................................................................................................................................. 64 Wainlands.....................................................................................................................213 Willow Electric .............................................................................................................352

387


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / index

Index FEATURED COMPANIES

388

AI3 Architects ..............................................................................................................250 Amantea Architects ...................................................................................................311 Amy Schuermann Interiors ........................................................................................318 Angelica Henry Design ................................................................................................. 98 Ark Development Group..............................................................................................366 Asymptote Architecture ............................................................................................332 Atelier Cachet ..............................................................................................................106 AV Hospitality ..............................................................................................................230 BC&J Architecture ......................................................................................................163 Beard + Riser Architects............................................................................................166 Beinfield Architecture ...............................................................................................240 Bella Maison Interior Design......................................................................................353 Bentel & Bentel Architects / Planners....................................................................287 Beth Whitlinger Interior Design .................................................................................. 82 Bjarko Serra Architects................................................................................................ 66 Black River Design Architects...................................................................................266 Bluemotif Architecture ..............................................................................................224 Brereton Architects....................................................................................................300 Brian Z. Allen Design ..................................................................................................... 42 C3D Architecture.........................................................................................................259 Carlson Homes............................................................................................................... 69 Cascade Built............................................................................................................... 114 CCY Architects .............................................................................................................136 Cheryl Heinrichs Architecture ..................................................................................120 Design 3 ........................................................................................................................303 Design Duncan Miller Ullmann................................................................................... 274 DesRosiers Architects ............................................................................................... 170 DPOV Interiors ..............................................................................................................282 Epic Designs, Inc........................................................................................................... 73 EN2 Development Corporation..................................................................................104 Erin Martin Design ......................................................................................................... 87 Flick Mars......................................................................................................................263 Forma Design ...............................................................................................................294 Foster Associates.......................................................................................................108 Grace Home Design .....................................................................................................327 Hatfield Builders & Remodelers ................................................................................. 46 HWKN .............................................................................................................................232 Ink Architecture + Interiors ....................................................................................... 148 Intracorp Companies..................................................................................................346 Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects................................................................................. 214 J Banks Design Group .................................................................................................256 Jena Marchione Interior Design .................................................................................. 79 Jonathan Kuhn Architect............................................................................................. 21 Joshua Shockley Interior Design................................................................................ 34 Julia Wood Architect ..................................................................................................242 KaVa Design..................................................................................................................237 Keesee and Associates .............................................................................................126 Ken Linsteadt Architects ..........................................................................................152 Kimille Taylor Interior Design and Decoration .......................................................... 52 Landing Studio ............................................................................................................364 Level 3 Design Group ..................................................................................................269 LOC Architects ............................................................................................................... 18 Lundberg Design .........................................................................................................194 Maison, Inc. .................................................................................................................... 90 Matthew Schaller Architect ...................................................................................... 174 Marlon Blackwell Architect .......................................................................................161 Maziar Behrooz Architecture ...................................................................................... 38 Michael Hsu Office of Architecture..........................................................................200 Mihai Radu Architects ................................................................................................380 MNA ................................................................................................................................210

Narvaes Western.........................................................................................................234 Nicholsbooth Architects ........................................................................................... 314 O’Kelly + Kasprak .........................................................................................................206 Olivia Erwin Interiors...................................................................................................238 Olsen Studios................................................................................................................. 54 Oslund and Associates ..............................................................................................356 O-X Studio.....................................................................................................................229 Palm Hill ........................................................................................................................368 Parts and Labor Design..............................................................................................190 Patricia Motzkin Architecture..................................................................................... 27 Pilgrim Building Company ..........................................................................................348 RA-DA ............................................................................................................................361 Reader & Swartz Architects .......................................................................................... 8 Robert J. Neylan Architects ...................................................................................... 178 Room..............................................................................................................................277 Runberg Architecture Group .....................................................................................336 R. Wendell Phillips & Associates..............................................................................156 Satinwood, Ltd............................................................................................................... 61 Sayigh + Duman...........................................................................................................218 Skaala............................................................................................................................180 Spinnaker Development.............................................................................................183 Steven Harris Architects ............................................................................................. 14 Streetsense .................................................................................................................220 Studio 5 Design + Architecture ................................................................................272 Studio 804 ....................................................................................................................323 Studiogreener................................................................................................................ 49 Sun Decor Fabrics .......................................................................................................122 Sun-Tect .......................................................................................................................370 Susan Brook Interiors ................................................................................................... 36 Taylor Borsari, Inc. ........................................................................................................ 95 Ted Design ....................................................................................................................244 Tiffany McKinzie Interior Design...............................................................................102 Toby Long Design ........................................................................................................128 Trahan Architects ....................................................................................................... 374 Tuggey Construction .................................................................................................... 84 Urban Dwellings...........................................................................................................101 Victoria Kirk Interiors..................................................................................................130 Vivre Interiors ................................................................................................................ 45 William Kaven Architecture.......................................................................................158 William Reue Architecture......................................................................................... 140 Zaha Hadid Architects................................................................................................340


Lorem Ipsum

389


THE DESIGN BUREAU 100 / Lorem ipsum

At Design Bureau, we are presented with a staggering amount of stunning architecture and interior design on a daily basis. So much so, in fact, that we cannot begin to fit every deserving project into our bimonthly issues of the magazine. This inaugural edition of The Design Bureau 100 reflects everything that we love about design, architecture, and interiors. It features 100 projects that exist in every facet of our lives: homes, hotels, restaurants, workplaces, and more. They shape the ways that we live and 390

interact with one another and inspire us to be better versions of ourselves. These are 100 spaces that speak to the importance of design in our lives—from the biggest adventures to the smallest of moments.

The Design Bureau 100  
The Design Bureau 100  
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