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PRECISELY POISED PERFECTION

REVOLUTIONARY ILLUMINATION

Ultra-bright, glare-free illumination from revolutionary LED Flat Panel Technology ...eliminates the hot spots and multiple shadows from the multiple point sources of light, unlike other LED lamps.

Brightness controlled from a touchless optical sensor.

Ingenious articulating arm adjusts free of external components.

www.sonnemanawayoflight.com Copyright Š2013 Sonneman - A Way of Light

www.ylighting.com

U.S. and Foreign Patents Pending.


Introducing the Chinoiseries Collection

www.taipingcarpets.com/chinoiseries


Custom Cabinetry and Architectural Millwork

Market Fresh, EWR Airport Newark, NJ 225 Grand Jersey City, NJ

Transforming architectural designs into reality For more information visit us at www.gtmillwork.com or call 609.291.9222

Axis Insurance Berkley Heights, NJ


114

Work Hard The colorful Quicken Qube in Detroit is one of four awesome office spaces we show off

CONTENTS issue 21 FEATURES 110

114

120

Ryan Korban The dark horse of the interior design world opens up about his aesthetic, the tricky role of the tastemaker, and where he’s heading Quirk at Work Scooter breaks, foosball, and free slushies—it’s all part of a day’s work at Quicken Loans’ new Detroit office, where the decor is as unorthodox as the culture

DIALOGUE & DESIGN THINKING 58

64

Eight industry pros tell us what inspires them to create amazing interiors

Welcome to Wonderland The new Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitors Center takes you through the looking glass to another side of the city

14

Pixels & Print

21

Objects & Gear

27

Fashion & Beauty

Picnic for a Cause Take part in some sweet charity at DIFFA’s newest event

33

Travel & Culture

43

Structures & Spaces

68

Island Living Waterfront homes that wow— from the mountains of Hawaii to the shores of the Hamptons

88

Space Odyssey How Kubrik’s cryptic classic inspired an architect’s spacetacular home

Interior Designers Speak

INFORMER

PLUS 6 8 10 92 143 144

Contributors Letter From the Editor Letters Notes From the Bureau This Issue’s Best Albums For Hire

Quicken Qube photo by Dave Burk of Hedrich Blessing Ltd.


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August 2013

Boutique spotlight

Man’s World Chicago’s Isle of Man provides the ultimate in-store experience for the man who appreciates style but hates to shop 31

Conversion

Water Works A century-old water processing plant on the Cote d’Azur emerges fabulously from a 16-year renovation 43

restaurant design

Dining Out Four big-city restaurants marry metal and wood to give bygone architectural styles a modern twist 38


August 2013

DESIGN BUREAU

Beautifully imagined

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DESIGN BUREAU CONTRIBUTORS

Photo by Eric Laignel

Saundra Marcel wrote this issue’s feature on interior designer (and then some) Ryan Korban. The NYCbased designer and writer has written for Metropolis Magazine, Domus, AIGA Voice, and is co-editor of the book At Water’s Edge. She is writing a book about her hometown called Islander: Life on a Pork Chop. thedesignminded.com

Matthew Williams shot this issue’s cover with Ryan Korban. Born in New Zealand, the landscapes of his homeland still influence his work today. He now lives in Brooklyn in a loft overlooking Manhattan. Each day he gets to wake up with his two favorite people: his beautiful wife and Lady Liberty. matthewwilliams photographer.com

Lesley Stanley is a writer living and working in Chicago. For this issue she spoke with eight top design pros in our “Interior Designers Speak” feature. In addition to covering design, she writes fiction, primarily short stories. In her spare time, Stanley enjoys volunteering at 826CHI, a nonprofit writing and tutoring center in Chicago.

Rebecca Powers describes the colorful and unexpected spaces inside the Quicken offices in downtown Detroit’s mid-century Chase Tower. Powers has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine editor, and university journalism instructor. She now is a freelancer whose stories often focus on topics of design.

Serving NYC for over 25 years

224 West 29th Street | New York, NY 10001 tel 212.268.2886 | fax 212.268.1611

www.pfinyc.com


cool by Publisher & editor-in-chief Chris Force chris@alarmpress.com ----MANAGING EDITOR

Kristin Larson kristin@alarmpress.com associate editor

Joel Hoglund joel@alarmpress.com Features Editor

Elizabeth Hall lhall@alarmpress.com editorial intern

Margot Brody -----

ART DIRECTOR

Spencer Matern spencer@alarmpress.com

DESIGNER

Kady Dennell kady@alarmpress.com DESIGN intern

Ashley Kuhn -----

contributors

Penelope Bartlett, Gem Barton, Kimberlie Birks, Jeremy Brautman, Zack Burris, Amber Gibson, Amanda Koellner, Ryan Lowry, Jordan Mainzer, Saundra Marcel, Jill McDonnell, Kaitlyn McQuaid, Sarah Murray, Rebecca Powers, Gwendolyn Purdom, John F. Rizor, Lesley Stanley, Dr. Rob Tannen, Matthew Williams, J. Michael Welton

----Assistant to the Publisher

Kate Moore kate@alarmpress.com

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Ellie Fehd ellie@alarmpress.com

de-

ACCOUNT DIRECTOR

Tarra Kieckhaefer tarra@alarmpress.com

account managers

Jill Berris, Joel Bednarz, Krystle Blume, Lindsay DeCarlo, Kevin Graham, Matthew Hord, Kyle Johnson, Brianna Jordan, Moira Kelley, Natalie Valliere-Kelley, Caitlin Kerr, Mallory Wegner, Xavier Winslow New Business Development

Shannon Painter shannon@alarmpress.com Account EXECUTIVEs

Alyssa Erickson, Gail Francis, Isabella Gutowski, Miranda Myers, Elizabeth Pivoriunas, Courtney Schiffres, Allison Weaver production manager

Lauren Carroll laurenc@alarmpress.com

Marketing coordinator

Jenny Palmer jenny@alarmpress.com ----Human resources

Lauren Miller lmiller@alarmpress.com STAFF ACCOUNTANT

Mokena Trigueros ----on the cover

design Designer Ryan Korban photographed by Matthew Williams on location at Edon Manor, 391 Greenwich St., New York. Stylist: Lexyrose Boiardo. Hair/makeup: Yuco Kokita. Model: Alex at Major Model Management. Clothing: top by Lanvin; skirt by Alice Roi; shoes by Balenciaga from Edon Manor; rings by Bande Des Quatres and Catbird

A one-year subscription to Design Bureau is US $40 (international $80). Visit our website at wearedesignbureau.com or send a check or money order to: Design Bureau 205 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 3200 Chicago, IL 60601

T 312.386.7932 F 312.276.8085 info@alarmpress.com

Design Bureau (ISSN 2154-4441) is published monthly with the exception of May/June and Nov/Dec, by ALARM Press at 205 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 3200, Chicago, IL 60601. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing office(s). POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to Design Bureau at 205 N. Michigan Ave, Suite 3200, Chicago, IL 60601 Retailers: To carry Design Bureau in your store, please call 201.634.7411. Š 2013 Design Bureau. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. DESIGN BUREAU is a trademark of Design Bureau.

modernfan.com | 888.588.3267


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August 2013

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

what they do look easy. That sexy hotel lobby, that gorgeous home in the Hollywood Hills, that chic modern urban apartment—they look effortlessly cool. In reality, those designs took skill and tremendous effort. A professional has done a good job when his or her work is enjoyed and undervalued. Ever think to yourself, “Damn, Picasso, those are just some scribbles that look like a naked lady”? Well, try it yourself sometime. Shit is impossible. Picasso must have been part angel. The trick is to make it look easy.

There’s no one right answer to anything. That’s what makes design so fascinating. Interior designers are tasked with designing spaces. They’re asked to provide answers to problems that clients can’t identify. They’re given vague concepts (make it warm) and, often, unreasonable budgets. On top of it all, there’s the universal demand for a unique, custom solution.

Some of the interiors we present in this issue are absolutely effective. The spaces spark our imaginations—what it would be like to live in them, to host guests in them, to own them. What kind of person lives in a space like that? What kind of person would I be if I lived in a space like that? Others change our mood, our perception. What should a financial company’s office look like? Bold, stark, clean, and corporate? Sure—or (page 114) something more like a video game come to life. There are no rules to this thing, and that’s just the way we like it. -----

Somehow, the interior designers we spoke to pull it off—and with stunning style and skill. Ask anyone who ever tried to furnish and decorate a space—it’s not easy. And that’s the thing: skilled people make

Chris Force Publisher & Editor-in-Chief chris@alarmpress.com


August 2013

DESIGN BUREAU

Johnson Residence Chicago IL Architect: Studio Dwell, Inc. Mark Peters/ Gary Stoltz Interiors & Photo: ID Chicago Steven Burgert

Fire,Perfect modern fires

Fire from two rooms...SPARK’s new Vu Thru Vent Free fireplace is a natural fit in any contemporary space. With a refined design and new burner for the sleekest fire yet. See our photo gallery at www.sparkfires.com or contact us directly at 866.938.3846 Footer Sentinel Book Italic lorem ipsum dit endent eped quias di consent, as dictor a di consequiae Bea dolorpo

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August 2013

LETTErs to design bureau SOUND BITES

DB shout-outs from the Twitterverse

Join the conversation at twitter.com/DesignBureauMag

We’re all about pro interior designers this month, but we spent July checking out how musicians design their own digs, and we caught a rising star(chitect) on the cover. letters@wearedesignbureau.com

Sonneman age “Thanks for the Robert Sonneman story. I’ve been waiting to read about a designer who was born before MTV.” (D.H., via Email)

musicians at home

awesome asif

DB TWEETS @m2them Quite possibly the only design subscription we need. It has us fully #inspired & #awakened @jolocktov Is there some sort of award we can give @DesignBureauMag for their For Hire feature in every issue? They deserve one. Or two. Or a drink.. @molly_taaffe I just undressed the new @DesignBureauMag and it smells like high quality paper heaven.

“I’ve been a fan of [DB’s sister music publication] ALARM for like a decade, so I think it’s awesome that you find a ‘design’ angle to feature cool indie bands like The Faint and Django Django.”

“I’m in love with [architect] Asif Khan after reading your story. I love that he gets that brand integration, like at his Coca-Cola pavilion, doesn’t have to mean just slapping logos all over the thing.” (M.R., via Email)

(B.B., via email)

“the idea of the tastemaker has died, the way designers in the past did it. for all the articles magazines do on tastemakers, i don’t know any.” Ryan korban P. 110

DB ON INSTAGRAM @TheDraftery spotted one of Design Bureau’s famous(?) stickers at a coffee shop

Ciao from Milano! @iSaloniOfficial #SaloneDelMobile

See more of our photos on Instagram. Follow us @designbureaumag

For the record: Rants, ramblings, and random facts from behind the scenes of this issue

16 years

2001

Bleachers

5,000

That’s the amount of time owner Philippe Tondeur spent rehabbing a century-old water cleaning plant on the Cote d’Azur into his stunning loft-style home p. 43

Architect Alex Gil designed a dining table inspired by the monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey for his Brooklyn townhouse renovation. p. 88

The unlikely office furniture you’ll find in the Lamar Advertising HQ in Baton Rouge. Employees gather for meetings and LSU ball games, of course. p. 48

The number of LED lights that create a colorful, computerlike display across the 35-story exterior façade of the InterConinental Miami hotel p. 36


August 2013

DESIGN BUREAU

Featured daily in The Rachael Ray Show!

Counter-Depth French Door Refrigerator has the look of a Custom On Door, Tall, Built-In External Ice and Water Dispenser with Temperature Display

GE Café restaurant inspired appliances takes food further. Meals can be made into masterpieces with the help of GE’s most advanced cooking technology. From ranges and cooktops that precisely simmer, sauté and sear, to innovative speedcook ovens that can evenly cook delicious meals nearly four times faster than conventional ovens, your inner chef has all the inspiration needed to kick things up a notch.

Visit AJMadison.com/ge for a limited time to receive special pricing on GE 4 PC Kitchen Packages. Plus, enter code “freeship” for free next day delivery  on all orders in the NY Metro Area.

www.ajmadison.com 1416 38th Street, Brooklyn, NY

718.732.4951

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August 2013

design bureau recommends…

Summer makes us want to surround ourselves with clean and green product design. Send us your recos at letters@wearedesignbureau.com.

kristin Larson, managing editor

tree vase “Designer Vanessa Mirtrani uses a mouth-blown glass technique to make each one of these elegant vases look unique.“ $280, luminaire.com

elizabeth hall, features editor

Bulled LED lightbulb “My best ‘lightbulb moments’ happen in the presence of really cool lightbulbs, and these LED beauties from German firm LEDO are supposed to last 80 years.“ $91, ledo-led.com

spencer matern, art director

heavy stock “This tidy modular shelving unit from multidisciplinary Vancouver firm Knauf and Brown disassembles and packs flat easily when you’re on the move.“ From $980, knaufandbrown.com

joel Hoglund, associate editor

Pino Solo Wine Tree kady dennell, designer

cork planter bookend “The Nicole Collection Planter Set from SCAD’s Working Class Studio keeps me seeing green while I’m chained to my desk doing layouts.“ $50, canoeonline.net

Images courtesy of the designers/brands

“Furniture designer Derek Chen reuses wood from the oak chardonnay barrels used at Newton Vineyard for the base of this beautiful limited-edition wine rack.“ $299, newtonvineyard.com


D E TA I L AT EVE RY S CALE NANO approaches each project at not only the scale of the city, the block, and the street, but also at the level of the smallest essentials – the joint, the reveal, and the grain. In the process of developing a project, no scale holds supremacy, but must inform one another to structure the overall design concept. www.nanollc.net

Ar c h i t ec t u r e | In t e r ior D e s ig n | C u s t om F u rni tu re a nd C a b i netry | Ma ster Pla nni ng | H i storic R e n ov ation s H is t or ic Fe d e r a l a n d S ta te T a x C redi ts | C onstru cti on A dmi ni stra ti on


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Transforming Environments Enhancing Lives

Chicago

Harbor Country

Milwaukee

susanfredman.com


PIXELS & PRINT

Photography

Natural Beauty Celebs and models get back to nature for a good cause

A

cclaimed photographer James Houston is one of the world’s best at finding beauty in the human form—now he’s merging it with the beauty of nature for a star-studded multimedia project. CONTINUED

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The best of the best in graphics and photos


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Pixels & Print

Photography

August 2013

(CONTINUED)

Book

index by design Matteo Thun creates an architecture and design book without the ego

M “Natural Beauty was created to celebrate the beauty of nature, emphasizing what we still have versus what we have lost.” Teaming with Milk Studios and environmental nonprofit Global Green, Houston created 120 images of top celebrities and models including Emma Watson, Christy Turlington, Adrian Grenier, Karlie Kloss, Coco Rocha, Brooke Shields, Arizona Muse, and Elle Macpherson. The striking shots— ranging from surreal setups to gentle black-and-white portraits—debuted as a gallery exhibition at New York’s

Milk Gallery before being released in the 200-page hardcover book Natural Beauty. A 12-episode web series available on YouTube goes behind the scenes of the entire project, including interviews with the high-profile people involved and footage from the photo shoots. “Natural Beauty was created to celebrate the beauty of nature, emphasizing what we still have versus what we have lost,” Houston says. a

atteo Thun swore off the idea of releasing books in the 1990s, citing his distaste for “showing your muscles.” So what makes The Index Book different? “More echo, less ego,” Thun says. To make the prolific Italian designer’s work—30 years of architecture, products, furniture, and interiors—speak for itself, it’s built around a half-dozen indexes. Want to see quirky, colorful highlights from his days with the influential post-modernist Memphis Group he co-founded in 1981? There’s a chronological index. His larch-wood bathtub for Rapsel? Try the typological index, or the visual index. The client index points you to the HQ he designed for Hugo Boss or coffee cups for Rosenthal, the topographic index to his Side Hotel in Hamburg. The structure, Thun says, purposely speaks more to CEOs than creatives, giving potential clients an introduction to his range of work. a

Natural Beauty, $50, damianieditore.com. View the Natural Beauty web series at youtube.com/thehoustoneffect. Images by James Houston, houstonphoto.com The Index Book, $70, hatjecantz.de. Images courtesy of the publisher


August 2013

fill in the blank

Maricor/maricar Twin sisters make embroidery, graphic design, animation, and illustration— sometimes all at the same time

T

win sisters Maricor and Maricar Manolo’s introduction to the concept of graphic design came from their high school art teacher and Neil Gaiman’s graphic novel series The Sandman, with its cover

art by Dave McKean. “We were particularly drawn to his mix of hand-generated graphics and digital art,” Mari-

car says. The inspiration stuck. The sisters started off as “traditional graphic designers,” but since founding their Sydney, Australia-based studio Maricor/Maricar, they’ve incorporated colorful hand-embroidery into design work for clients like TOMS, Levi’s, and the Hong Kong Airport. “We’d love to work on designing textiles and creating a product line eventually,” Maricor says. “Weaving and rug making are a couple of things we’re very keen to experiment with as well—it’s something we could potentially combine with our embroidery.” CONTINUED

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Pixels & Print

August 2013

fill in the blank

(CONTINUED)

1

2

3

We would love to design embroidery for…

4

a Wes Anderson film.

5

If we had only a week left to live…

we’d rent a place in Italy or Spain and invite all our family and friends to spend the week in the sun enjoying the great food. The movie title that best describes our lives is…

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs since food features often in our work and we’re constantly thinking about food.

6

The best thing about being twins is…

we can borrow each other’s clothes. 1 Window display for the TOMS holiday campaign 2 Embroidered type for TOMS shoes 3 Watercolor illustration for TOMS 4 Embroidered infographic for Good magazine and Levi’s

5 The word ‘delicious’ embroidered in six languages for Hong Kong International Airport 6 Foods special to each region were used in the type design for the Delicious project 7 A winter-sweaterstyled embroidered headline and drop cap for a January issue of Esquire UK

If we were two animals we’d be…

a monkey and a mouse.

If we weren’t designers we would be…

bean counters.

In the year 2100 design will be…

as multifaceted as it is today. Maricor is…

the evil twin (depending on who you ask)

But Maricar is…

also the evil twin (depending on who you ask).a

Portrait by Lucy Leonardi, lucyleonardi.com; images courtesy of Maricor/Maricar, maricormaricar.com

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August 2013

Pixels & Print

DESIGN BUREAU

Packaging

Beer Me, Beautiful These six custom-designed beer bottle labels make it worth falling off the wagon By Sarah Murray

Sanda IPA Design: Matt Burns, mattburns.com.au

Glasgow-based designer Matt Burns plays up the American-ness of this IPA from Scottish brand Fyne Ales. Bold type and colors get right in your face while the detail on the label references the brand’s origins in Loch Fyne with illustrations of the iconic Highland cow, tree farms, salmon, rain, and stags. fyneales.com

The New Black

Hitachino Nest

R&B Brewing Co.

Design: Shunji Sakai

Design: Saint Bernadine Mission Communications, stbernadine.com Creative Directors: Andrew Samuel, David Walker

We love the super recognizable and totally adorable owl logo on this spicy craft beer from Japan’s Kiuchi Brewery. It plays up the trippy, almost retro feel. The creative typography on the White Ale, Non Ale, and Red Rice in particular add to the ’60s vibe created by the textured background patterns. hitachinonest.com

A special shout-out goes to best-selling German brand Beck’s for the sleek all-black bottle it spent two years designing and

BoB

Omission

Design: Distil Studio, U.K., distilstudio.co.uk Creative Director: Neil Hedger

Design: Hornall Anderson, hornallanderson.com Art Director: Jay Hilburn

Short for “Best of British,” BoB’s seasonalinspired labels are designed to promote the simplicity and honesty of the product from this tiny private brewery in St. Albans. The BoB logotype is strong yet playful—especially when combined with the quirky British phrases from which the brews take their names in big block letters. bob-brewery.co.uk

Omission is the first craft beer brand in the United States that exclusively brews gluten-free beer while still using traditional ingredients like malted barley. Global design and branding firm Hornall Anderson seized on this practice, creating a design that whimsically portrays a UFO, bird, helicopter, hot air balloon, magnet, and magic wand taking the gluten out of the beer. omissionbeer.com

Fittingly, every element of the packaging for R&B Brewing Co.’s handcrafted product is rendered by hand, right down to the freaking bar code. The bold silhouette illustrations take their cues from the beers’ quirky names. Key facts about the brew in expressive type create cool infographics on the cases. r-and-b.com

developing for its distinctive new Beck’s Sapphire brew. Just be wary of losing it in the dark nightclub where you’re drinking it.

Schooner Exact Design: Taphandles, taphandles.com Creative Director: Oceania Eagan

Seattle’s Schooner Exact Brewing Company turned to beer-centric design agency Taphandles for a logo reboot. The Seattle firm started out making, yep, custom beer tap handles but now designs everything from products to websites for beers worldwide. Schooner’s new branding has its roots in the nautical heritage of Seattle but spices it up with punchy typography and colors. schoonerexact.com

Images courtesy of the designers; Beck’s Sapphire bottle image courtesy of Beck’s Sapphire, becks.com/sapphire

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DESIGN BUREAU

Pixels & Print

August 2013

Top 5: Typography

We love fonts. We need ’em. We use ’em. We can never have enough of ’em. We ask Alex Haigh, the fontloving founder and creative director of U.K. foundry Hype For Type, to share his five favorites. A

Alicia

This geometric font from Venezuelan designer Alexander Wright (modovisual.com) is exclusive to Hype for Type. $56

B

NewModern

Designed by the Londonbased duo Rob Gonzalez and Jonathan Quainton, better known as Sawdust (madebysawdust.co.uk). $56

C

Neo Deco

Designed by Barcelonaborn illustrator and graphic and type designer Alex Trochut (alextrochut.com). $56

D

F37 Bella

Designed by Londonbased freelance designer Rick Banks (face37.com). Four weights from $56

E

Otto

Designed by Kjell Ekhorn and Jon Forss of the acclaimed studio Non-Format. $56

Alicia

F37 Bella

“W

Neo Deco

ith thousands upon thousands of fonts available to the masses, the days of the traditional typographer are over. Creative people are constantly looking for creative solutions, and this is one of the reasons why display typography has exploded in recent times.

All fonts available on hypefortype.com. Images courtesy of Alex Haigh

Otto

NewModern

Non-Format, Alex Trochut, and Rick Banks are just a handful of worldrenowned graphic designers who have transitioned into the type scene, and with unique display typography more popular than ever, surely it’s only a matter of time before others follow suit.” –Alex Haigh


objectS & gear

Things that make us drool, covet, and go broke

substance

Hard Core Our interior design issue got us thinking about cool copper, aluminum, concrete, and steel decor that can add an edge to living spaces CONTINUED

Rose Li Collection lamps Designed by Albi for Aqua Creations and inspired by Tai Chi, these signed and numbered copper table lamps are cordless and rechargeable. $1,081 per lamp, aquagallery.com

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substance

Objects & Gear

August 2013

(CONTINUED)

 Favorite decor shopping 

Alar Double Stemmed Floor Lamp

“Paris’ multiple markets, Alfies Antique Market in London, JF Chen in Los Angeles, Mantiques Modern in New York, and 1stDibs (1stdibs.com) for online finds.” – Kelly Wearstler, Los Angeles

This futuristic yet warm piece from designer Joshua Howe is quite dynamic for a lamp—each stem rising from the concrete base can rotate and curve depending on the position of the adjustable light. $5,400, joshuahowedesign.com

Rough & Smooth Collection Tom Dixon’s new collection of angular lights, tables, and mirrors was inspired by gemstones and cast from nickel-plated aluminum. Price on request, tomdixon.net

Stone Age wall clock Brightly colored hands punch up this sturdy concrete clock designed by Florian Haller under the new German label Urform and produced by Harr Betondesign. $312, urform-haller.de

 Interior Designer Pick  “I love the impact of these Andy Fleishman concrete tiles at Ann Sacks. From afar, their large scale catches your eye; close up, the intricate artistry and movement of the carved pattern keeps your attention.” – Aimee Wertepny, PROjECT. interiors, Chicago

Poliform Soori table This coffee table from Poliform is made out of hammer stone copper in antique finish and inspired by the shape of traditional water vessels used on the island of Bali. Price on request, poliform.com

Concrete Wall wallpaper Norwegian designer and photographer Tom Haga shoots concrete walls throughout Norway to create this incredible high-resolution wallpaper that looks just like the real thing—without the coldness or the constant concrete dust, of course. $143 per square meter, tomhaga.com


August 2013

Objects & Gear

DESIGN BUREAU

 Interior Designer Pick 

Pebble stool This piece from Portuguese brand Ginger & Jagger stacks a hammered copper “pebble” between Brazilian and chestnut wood. $1,280, gingerandjagger.com

“I just came across the Confetti Glass lighting collection from Avram Rusu Studio in Brooklyn. She creates beautiful lights mixing colored glass and metal in a modern way.” – Tamara Eaton, Tamara Eaton Design, New York

chippensteel 0.5 chair Polish designer Oskar Zieta does awesome things with metal—like his Chippensteel 0.5 chair line, shown here in a limited-edition, highly polished copper. From $710, zieta.pl

Trabant pendant lamp Designed by Joachim Manz for German brand Technolumen, this comely concrete sphere is uniquely pocked with blow holes and air bubbles from being cast by hand. $815$920, tecnolumen.de

 Interior Designer Pick 

“Tom Dixon’s gold bowls are delicate and unmistakable.” – Paige Loczi, LOCZI Design, San Francisco

All images courtesy of the designers/brands. Kelly Wearstler portrait by Thomas Whiteside

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Objects & Gear

August 2013

auto design

building an icon

Process “Each car is a totally unique process,” Ward says. The designer takes us through the process of building an ICON from a vintage car.

Although automobiles are synonymous with the assembly line, these 4x4s are handmade one at a time

1

T

hey don’t make ’em like they used to. At least that’s what Jonathan Ward thinks. The CEO and lead designer of Los Angeles-based ICON creates rugged, one-of-a-kind 4x4s that aren’t just inspired by the designs of vintage Ford Broncos, Toyota Land Cruises, and other workhorses—most of the time they’re the real thing, rebuilt.

DB: What design customization options do your clients have? Jonathan Ward: We have the capability of working with our clients to select a wide range of vehicles as the foundation for our builds, all the way through to building the vehicle from scratch. Many times, the oneoff, scratch-built cars are based on vehicle variations that never got built back in the day, perhaps based on a rendering done and discarded by the designer.

DB: What sort of clientele are your vehicles geared toward? JW: Generally speaking, our customers have (or have had) the traditional luxury and exotic cars and are now becoming a bit more evolved in their taste, looking for something that will last and reflect more character. Less ‘look at me and my expensive car,’ and a bit more ‘I am an individual.’ Generally not new wealth.

DB: What does an ICON offer a design-minded buyer? JW: More personality, more durability and longevity, more ‘story’ and romance. Simpler systems and architecture focused more purely on building the best. Most, if not all, of the big companies have to make content and design decisions based on the shareholders and Wall Street, not based on the pure focus of what is best for the design goals.

2

3

DB: Who would you most like to see cruising around in an ICON? JW: Anyone whose face we can put a smile on. It is about the vibe, the purpose and clarity of the design, with a sense of humor. I think Brad Pitt would appreciate our work, although we have not met him yet. DB: Imagine you could build any kind of car, no limitations whatsoever… JW: It’d be inspired by the late-deco machine age. Streamlined design, a bit of WWII through to Harrier Jet design, some belly tanker salt flat racer influences, a little bit steampunk. I’m working on it now… a

For information on how to purchase an ICON, visit icon4x4.com. All images courtesy of ICON

Once we buy the car the outline of the design and renderings are completed. We lift off the vintage body and digitally map the platform in CAD to design a chassis that incorporates modern solutions for steering, suspension, brakes, etc.

4

We first get to know the client and what is best for them: 1930s? ’60s? Sedan, wagon, truck, convertible? Hunting down the car can take several months.

We fit the vintage body on the modern chassis and build out the A/C, fuel system, exhaust, audio, NAV, etc.

Now we disassemble the entire vehicle for surface coatings, rebuild all of the latches and hinges, replace all the rubber and glass, apply a hydrophobic clear coat to protect the patina, Dynamat line the inside of the body, and then reassemble everything to appear as if we had done nothing.

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After we affix the body to the chassis the final steps are the electrical system and upholstery.


August 2013

Objects & Gear

DESIGN BUREAU

Toys By Design

The Vinyl Frontier Vinyl toy maker Pete Fowler looks ahead to new design horizons By Jeremy Brautman

Pete Fowler was an early instigator of what would become known as “urban vinyl.” For more than a decade, he’s designed colorfully collectible toys—first with Sony Creative Products, then through growing his own independent “Monsterism” universe. But the prolific Welsh designer doesn’t confine himself just to the toy-design mold. When we caught up with him,

“I think by working hard, you can make your own luck and opportunities.” he had recently become hooked on crossstitch embroidery, with wood carving next on the horizon, and more music and artwork ahead. Fowler is particularly enthusiastic about an upcoming collaboration with The Charlatans UK singer Tim Burgess on his Tim Peaks coffee brand, which will include biodegradable coffee cups featuring Fowler’s character designs. “With any new medium,” he says, “there’s a sense of excitement in seeing how my images will translate.” a

Jeremy Brautman is a Bay Area writer who chronicles the intersection of pop culture and design. Image from Pete Fowler, monsterism.net

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Objects & Gear

August 2013

Office Gear

Home Work

Photography by Zack Burris Styling by Miriam Bouleanu

It’s back to school for the kids, but why should they get all the fun new supplies? Amp up your home office this season with these designer products.

Portica Desk, stainless steel with white glass top, by Room & Board, $699; Eames Molded Plastic Armchair by Herman Miller, $369; Byrd & Belle Medium Kindling Tote bag, $149; Cowhide Natural XL Rug, $699; and Link Medium Table Lamp by by Peter Stathis, $380, all at Room & Board, roomandboard.com. Jorgen leather notebook in blue, $16-$30; Notes spiral

cloth notebook in blue (small) and orange (large), $10-$20; Notes 16-month planner in blue, $14-$18; Rondo mechanical pencils and pens, $4; Stockholm acrylic pen pot, $10; and stapler, $12, all at Ordning & Reda, ordning-reda.com. Eileen 3 Cup French Press by Bodum, $30, at bodum.com. Book Darts, 75-count metal bookmarks, $11, at

bookdarts.com. Scout Books composition notebook, $10 for pack of three, scoutbooks.com. Desk easel/pin board from CB2, cb2.com. Terrarium from Sprout Home, sprouthome.com. White blocks from Stitch, Chicago, stitchchicago.com. Coffee mug from Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Bookend busts from Blick Art Materials, dickblick.com


fashion & beauty

Q&A

Sartorial Supremacy Master tailor Ichiro Suzuki marries his Savile Row training and quirky imagination in avant-garde menswear By Gem Barton

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Because style never goes out of‌ style


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Suzuki stumbled on an old patchwork made by an elder tailor that inspired this boldly patterned collection

Fashion & Beauty

August 2013


August 2013

Fashion & Beauty

q&A

DESIGN BUREAU

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hen Ichiro Suzuki arrived at London’s legendary Savile Row tailor Henry Poole & Co., he admits he was a little nervous. “When I first came here I had never known any Japanese cutter at Savile Row, and English people dominate most of the cutters’ positions, so I must say I was extremely lucky to have a job,” Suzuki says. “I am quite conservative myself so I do enjoy using old traditional methods.” We ask the London College of Fashion grad about his own designs, which are anything but “old” and “traditional.”

GB: Where does your interest in fine tailoring come from? Ichiro Suzuki: My first memory of fashion was that I used to spend money on designer clothes and wear suits with the tag left on the sleeve, so I can show people what I could afford to buy. I was so vain and shallow back then. All those designers’ clothes became worn out pretty quickly and I realized they were not very well made: That was the starting point for me and made me want to know how clothes are engineered, the structure of the garments. My hobby became a bit extreme. GB: Geometry is a key foundation for your work— can you explain why? IS: I love the illusion that the patterns can create; some look 3-D but they are actually 2-D and vice versa. The main inspiration is a patchwork that I found that was covered in dust. I was mesmerized by the fact that it was made entirely by hand by an elder tailor. He was 70-something when he made it and it somehow became my inspiration for the collection. GB: Does your Japanese heritage inform your style? IS: I do not think there is a lot of Japanese influence in my work. I used to avoid anything that had a connotation of Japanese-ness and tried not to allow it to come into my design, which I reckon some people would not agree with. I used to hate Japanese designers using kimono material to make

normal garments. I use tartan, tweed, and men’s suiting a lot. I interpret and use them in my own way and that is because I am not Scottish or English. How I understand and revitalize them is important and different to European designers. To some extent, there is still Japanese quirkiness and idiosyncrasy in my design. a

Ichiro’s Firsts & Favorites Favorite designer: Alexander McQueen and Aitor Throup First item of clothing you ever bought? Levi’s jeans. “Bought when I was 14, and I still have them!” First item of clothing you ever made? A pair of tailored trousers at age 25 Favorite material to work with? Fine worsted Favorite music to listen to whilst creating? “Paranoid” by Black Sabbath and “Perry Mason” by Ozzy Osbourne

Looks from Iciro Suzuki’s RCA Graduate Collection. Photos by Kodai, kodai-i.com

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Fashion & Beauty

August 2013

bitter rose, broker spear hylnds

embers

wild mountain thyme

cubeb

MDlnds

bitter rose

thistle

nutmeg

lwlnds

Scent design

Myth Misters Smelted iron notes in a perfume? Brooklyn-based fragrance designer D.S. & Durga looks to ancient Norse civilizations to inspire its latest line By Margot Brody

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any scientists believe smell is the most ancient of the senses. So it seems appropriate that fragrance designers David Moltz and Kavi Ahuja search for aromatic inspiration in the arcane regions of mythology, lore, and legend. “Our ideas come from various sources including books, memories, and travel,” Moltz says. “We will stumble upon a small fragment or occurrence that triggers an idea for a new scent.” After creating their first fragrances as holiday gifts for friends, Moltz and Ahuja founded D.S. & Durga in 2007 with a focus on slow methods, raw materials, and narrative concepts. “A single scent goes through countless versions until it’s right,” says Moltz. “It

takes about three months to get all the work done for one batch.” “Our package design is based on a woodcut from John Gerard’s [late 16th-century botany book] Herball,” Ahuja says. “We are inspired by history and craft, but like to interpret ideas through a modern lens.” D.S. & Durga’s newest line, HYLNDS, was inspired by the ancient Norse, Celtic, and Angle civilizations of Northern Europe, with aromas of smelted iron, bitter rose, marsh violet, and wild mountain thyme. Says Moltz, “The scents evoke the plants, the cultures, the landscapes, and the thin line between history and myth.” a

HYLNDS, 1.7 fl. oz., $180, available at Barneys. Photos courtesy of D.S. & Durga, dsanddurga.com

smelted iron

amber

larch


August 2013

Fashion & Beauty

DESIGN BUREAU

Boutique Spotlight

Man’s World Guys, you might as well just move into Chicago’s Isle of Man By Margot Brody

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he team behind Chicago’s self-proclaimed “mantique” retail store Isle of Man designed the ultimate in-store experience for the man who appreciates style but hates to shop. A smooth blend of vintage cool and contemporary edge, this man cave is stocked with everything from buck knives and leather jackets to

high-end grooming products and vintage Playboy mags. And the look of the store fits its products to a T: Motorcycles adorn the burly wood and metal display tables that were built in the store’s on-site workshop.

the store with his business partner and friend Jim Bechtold. Along with their general manager and co-stylist Catherine Pham, the team stocks seasonal menswear from heritage brands including Barbour, Woolrich, and Red Wing. They also scour the country for unique vintage items like their awesome neon-lit “mascot” sign behind the counter—a rare find from a Masonic temple in Rockford, Illinois.

“We love the classic look, but we also like to get our hands a dirty,” says Arthur Holstein, who opened

“We offer our customers more than just clothes,” Pham says. “Men actually like to come here and hang out.” a

Collaboration

Jean Machine X Missoni

The English denim brand teams with the Italian fashion house for a fun new line Jean Machine and Missoni have more in common than you’d think— like a fanatic attention to detail. In their first collaboration, the two iconic brands maintain their own identities while blending together beautifully. A classic Jean Machine jacket is reworked to include a detachable Missoni zigzag felted wool waistcoat whose blue and camel-colored knit pattern looks just like we imagined their love child would. Other accents are found on the pockets and patches

of a straight-leg jean. The look is a tad more understated than you’d normally expect from Missoni, but ease and unfussy confidence is the trademark of the Jean Machine brand, launched in 2008 by MiH Jeans founder and creative director Chloe Lonsdale. The men’s line is named after her father’s store, which imported U.S. denim to the U.K. in the ‘70s. That original boutique was called—you guessed it—Jean Machine, and the wellbuilt concept still works today. a

Isle of Man (iomamerica.com) photos by Ryan Lowry, ryanlowry.org JM-4 Jean Machine x Missoni jacket, $540, at thejeanmachine.com

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Fashion & Beauty

August 2013

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Shoes

Happy Feet

Bright colors, bold patterns, and natural materials make these flats a treat for your feet

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1. Rainbow high-tops by Inkkas, made in South America using authentic South American textiles. $65, inkkas.com 2. Doodle Dot Original by Soludos, 100 percent cotton upper and eco-friendly jute fiber sole. $42, soludos.com

Contest! We’re giving away three DB iPhone cases! Enter to win by emailing letters@alarmpress.com

Photography by Kaitlyn McQuaid; Styling by Miriam Bouleanu

3. Bora Bora by Kaanas, handmade in Colombia and inspired by textiles of its Wayuu tribe. $69, kaanas.com 4. Ray-Ban sunglasses from Windy City Eyes, Chicago, windycityeyes.com


travel & culture

Eat, shop, explore, do what you do

Ultimate Day Trip

Awesome Austin From its world-renowned music scene to its celebrity-magnet festivals, Texas’ hippest city has reached almost mythological proportions. Here’s five of our favorite real-life Austin stops By Penelope Bartlett

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Inside the Nannie Inez design concept store in Austin, Texas

Nannie Inez photo by Jessica Pages, jessicapages.com


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Travel & Culture

August 2013

Ultimate Day Trip

Shop: Nannie Inez

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vid travelers and co-owners Deeyn Rhodes and Lonzo Jackson scour the globe looking for offbeat, beautifully designed products, including clothing, art, furniture, and gifts, to bring to their loyal community in South Austin. Not only do they have an impeccable eye for gorgeous pieces, but the interior design of the store itself—by Clarissa Hulsey Bailey of Ecru Moderne—is made to be a vibrant, welcoming environment that perfectly complements their eclectic finds. “The design has an international feel that is pretty unique in Austin,” says architect Christian

Clarissa Hulsey Bailey, designer and owner of Ecru Moderne, worked with Drophouse to realize her vision for the Nannie Inez store. “I designed these super fun fixtures for merchandise display and the multicolored acrylic origami ceiling panel,” says Bailey. “I contacted Drophouse because I knew the team could get it built.”

Klein of design-build firm Drophouse, who created Nannie Inez’s angular, asymmetrical shelving displays and unusual ceiling installation, made of plywood and fiberglass. “It’s very sculptural and organic.” Deeyn and Lonzo’s thoughtful, curatorial approach and their showcasing of both local and international artists has resulted in a unique space where retail, art, and design converge. Where else could you pick up a hand-woven basket from Swaziland, an ashtray featuring the artwork of Japanese pop artist Yoshitomo Nara, and a Ryan Gosling coloring book in one shopping trip?

Eat Dinner: Lenoir Conceived by local rock star designer Chris McCray, Lenoir’s distinctive interior features—including the striking centerpiece light fixtures and the cabinets behind the bar—are made from reused materials sustainably sourced from nonprofit organization Austin Creative Reuse. The glassware was discovered in the basement of the Four Seasons, where co-owner Todd Duplechan honed his impeccable culinary skills. McCray’s DIY approach and use of recycled materials have created a vibe that is elegant, fresh, and forms the perfect backdrop for Lenoir’s French-inspired cuisine with a Southwest kick. Go for the romantic, one-of-akind surroundings, stay for the duck gumbo.

Nannie Inez photo by Jessica Pages, jessicapages.com; Lenoir photo by Ryann Ford, ryannford.com


August 2013

Travel & Culture

DESIGN BUREAU

(CONTINUED)

Eat Brunch: Hillside Farmacy Housed in a former 1950s drugstore, this recent addition to the trendy East Austin area has been lovingly restored using classic pharmaceutical cabinets from another vintage pharmacy that co-owner Greg Matthews serendipitously happened upon while searching

for a place to open his dream restaurant with his wife, Jade. Other period features include the original tin ceiling and gorgeous hexagonal tiled floor, and the theme even carries over to charming details like the salt and pepper shakers, made from old apothecary bottles.

Drink: HandleBar

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hemed playfully around the ironic love of facial hair that permeates hipster culture, HandleBar is a downtown Austin nightspot devoted to “the smooth-faced patron’s admiration for all things mustache, and to having a damn good time.” “HandleBar’s premises may have once housed an old Studebaker dealership,” says architect Tray Toungate of designtrait, who created the homey interiors. “The exterior walls and floor plates are a very solid construction made of cast-in-place concrete and brick façades, so we wanted to work with these features, but also to add some softer elements to the space.” Hence the decor, which includes locally commissioned mustache-themed art works throughout the bar, and reclaimed items like children’s spring horses and a see-saw installed on the roof deck to create a sense of whimsy—literally a playground for adults. By projecting movies, sports, and viral video clips onto other buildings surrounding the roof deck, the bar creates an interaction with patrons passing by and draws them in to join the fun.

Sleep: W Austin Hotel Steps from Sixth Street and the hip Warehouse District, W Austin is ideally located next door to the iconic Austin City Limits music venue. With spacious rooms adorned with red chaise lounges, custom designed wallpaper and photography by ACL house photographer Scott Newton, and a bar that is home to collection of a staggering 8,000 records and a vintage McIntosh stereo, the W Austin is a perfect fusion of urban sophistication and the grassroots rock ’n’ roll spirit that Austin embodies.

Hillside Farmacy photo by Mark Calley; HandleBar photo by Reagan Hackleman, crhphotos.com; W Austin photo courtesy of W Austin, whotelaustin.com

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Travel & Culture

August 2013

Hotel spotlight

Electric Light Hotel Thomas Roszak’s redesign of the InterContinental Miami could rival a Pink Floyd light show

execution “Thomas Roszak was a pleasure to work with because he wanted to create something that stands out from the crowd,” says Bernd Rennebeck, president of Specialty Structures & Installations, a Florida-based company that assists architects in researching, selecting, and installing the best products for their projects. With its larger-than-life aesthetic, the InterContinental Hotel project required the help of Rennebeck and his team at Specialty Structures in order to ensure that complicated structural elements within the design could be properly executed with quality materials. “We prefer to work on unusual projects where we can use our experience in many different disciplines of construction,” he says. “In the near future we will be installing 7,000 linear feet of LED lighting on a 500-foot-tall steel tower in Dallas. We are always looking at new technologies to improve the reliability and efficiency of our installations.”

By Margot Brody

I Inventive LED lighting pervades the interior and exterior design at the InterContinental Miami.

Photos by Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing 2012

t takes a lot to stand out in a city known for its parties and wild ways, something architect Thomas Roszak of Chicagobased Thomas Roszak Architecture knew when he was hired to transform the InterContinental Miami hotel into the city’s premier tourist destination. He knew the job required a design that would outshine the industry’s seriously blinged-out competition. “The hotel needed to make a big impression, as many of the buildings in the area were either new or recently renovated,” Roszak says. “The idea was to create an ‘electric’ hotel.”

is controlled by a smart system, which allows the colors to swoosh across the entire property in perfect concert creating an orchestra of lights,” he says. Roszak and his team also designed a complete welcome sequence with a new porte cochere made of glass containing thousands of white lights. The travertine floors in the lobby were kept intact, but the space was illuminated with interactive display screens and colorfully lit wall panels that reflect off of the many highfinish surfaces used throughout the hotel.

In collaboration with his Chicago-based firm Lohan Anderson + Roszak, he installed 5,000 LED lights through hotel windows creating a colorful, computer-like display across the 35-story exterior façade. “All of the lighting

“This was a complex rebranding exercise that has put the InterContinental firmly at the top of their game and set a new marker for the total hotel experience,” says Roszak. As Will Smith says, welcome to Miami. a


August 2013

Travel & Culture

DESIGN BUREAU

Installation

Light Bright Space and light bring these shimmering sculptures to life

L

ike any good designer, installation an invitation to consider the ways design artist Soo Sunny Park has a sixth and the built environment interact with sense for the way her work inter- light and the natural environment. “Like acts with the architecture of a a net, the sculpture is a filter that is meant space. For her newest installation, Unwo- to capture the light that is already there ven Light (on view through August 30 at and force it to reveal itself,” says Park, Rice University Art Gallery in Houston), whose initial inspiration for working with the Korean-born, New Hampshire-based chain link came after seeing a Styrofoam artist fills an expansive space with an un- cup stuck on a fence—it acted as a bounddulating abstract sculpture constructed ary, but retained the illusion of openness. from chain link fence and thousands of “Now we can see it, the light, in purple iridescent acrylic Plexiglas shapes. The shadows and yellow-green reflections shimmering, constantly changing world that both mirror the shape of the fence created when light strikes the structure is and restructure the space they inhabit.” a

art for any situation JA N E LUPI A Owner/Artist

512.740.5761

seejanepaint@gmail.com MURALS

|

HAND PAINTED ART

SPECIALTY PLASTER FAKE BRICK/STONE | FAUX FINISHING Soo Sunny Park, Unwoven Light, 2013 Commission, Rice University Art Gallery, Houston, Texas Photo by Nash Baker, nashbaker.com


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Travel & Culture

August 2013

restaurant spotlight

opposing elements Four big-city restaurants marry metal and wood to give bygone architectural styles a modern twist By Amber Gibson

Go for the: Blood + Sand cocktail with Chivas, Cincano Sweet Vermouth, and Cherry Heering

What: Municipal Bar + Dining Co. / Where: Chicago / Who: Brandner Design

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unicipal’s design resembles an industrial-style 1930s police station courtesy of furniture designer Jeff Brandner. “There’s a lot of steel because the structure of the building had a lot of steel,” Brandner says. “And we use a lot of reclaimed woods in our furniture.” Case in point: the restaurant’s tables are made of steel I-beams with tabletops made from reclaimed oak. The chairs bear the restaurant’s MNCPL logo, which was laser-cut into the backs and treated with acids like ferric

nitrate to age the raw steel and give it a bluish purple hue. “We mix different acids that react with the steel and change the color,” Brandner says. “It’s not a paint. It actually changes the molecular structure of the steel. Understanding how it all works is an art in itself.” To finish the chairs, Brandner used sanding discs to wear down the metal. “We really wanted the chairs and stools to look like they weren’t brand-new,” he says. “To give them an antique look that would come after years and years of use.” a

Municipal Bar + Dining Co. photos by Alex Goykhman, alexgoykhman.com; R+D Kitchen photos by Tim Street-Porter, timstreetporterphotography.com


August 2013

Travel & Culture

DESIGN BUREAU

Go for the: Veggie Burger with mushrooms

What: R+D Kitchen / Where: Santa Monica / Who: Stenfors Associates Architects

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he big garage door at R+D Kitchen in Santa Monica opens the restaurant to the city streets. Principal architect Jeff Stenfors worked closely with Hillstone Restaurant Group’s in-house design team to capture the town’s mid-century modern ideas and warm materials in R+D’s design. “We started with a much more raw aesthetic,” Stenfors says. “We were thinking raw plywood, but gradually over time, we went to higher-end oak, walnut, and Douglas fir.” A stacked norman brick chimney and

thin but durable copper canopy are visible from outside. “Over time, the copper will patina and turn bronze,” Stenfors says. Inside, glulam beams cut across the space, effectively lowering the high ceilings. “We cut the old structure and put in this lower diaphragm,” Stenfors says. “You can look through it and see the skylight, but the theatrical lighting and essential mechanical and electrical treatments are up high in the space so you don’t notice them so much. I think that sort of compression creates an intimacy in the restaurant.” a

wall space “We all benefit from exposure to daylight and improved views,” says Beverly Sherrin of Sherrin Glass and Metal, the high-end glazing contractor who installed the aluminum and glass curtain wall between the kitchen and the

dining area at R+D Kitchen. “The design provides diners a view of everyone’s favorite place—the kitchen,” says Sherrin. The company has created its one-of-a-kind windows and entranceways for numerous projects, including the Getty Villa Museum in L.A.

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Travel & Culture

August 2013

restaurant spotlight

(CONTINUED)

Go for the: Seasonal Chef's Menu that changes nightly

What: Saison / Where: San Francisco / Who: Samaha + Hart Architecture

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t’s one of the most expensive restaurants in San Francisco, yet there’s no dress code. It’s just one of the many noticeable juxtapositions of casual and luxurious happening at Saison. “The space is a big, raw shell,” says project designer Bassel Samaha of Samaha + Hart Architecture. “But the refinement happens down at a human scale.” Samaha and his partners, including kitchen designer Tim Harrison, architect Michael Gibson, and interior designer Jiun Ho, brought that spirit to life with elements like an entry wall of stacked firewood, a precise spotlight on each diner’s food, cashmere throws, and comfortable Danish chairs from Saison’s previous location.

Saison photos by Bruce Damonte, brucedamonte.com

Custom-made walnut tables from Original Timber with live edges and steel legs were one of the first pieces of furniture completed, and the metal and wood combination inspired the rest of the restaurant’s design, including a copper back bar. “We love the idea of reflecting all the copper pots in the kitchen in a subtle copper mirror,” Samaha says. Chef/owner Joshua Skenes also had an “outrageous” amount of input, according to Samaha. Skenes suggested the foyer’s dramatic but economical firewood wall. Guests also have a straight view into the expansive open kitchen to begin salivating over the meal to come. a


ENERGE Construction is a cutting edge, energy solution and construction company. Providing service and value is a driving force for all members of our team. We stay customer focused to make fair, honest and quality-based decisions—all of which leads to clients who trust us and continue to come back.

p. 866.742.7358 ext. 703 e. db@energeconstruction.com CA license# 949021

www.energeconstruction.com a division of Energe Corporation

Residential + Commercial Interior Design alydalydesign.com | 310.463.1221 LOS ANGELES, CA


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Travel & Culture

August 2013

restaurant spotlight

(CONTINUED)

What: Ichabod’s / Where: New York City / Who: Method Architects

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chabod’s matches hemlock with blackened steel in a modern space that retains a barn aesthetic. This wood is significantly lighter than the darker, richer woods used at sister tavern, The Headless Horseman, next door. “The restaurant is more fine dining [than the tavern],” says Carlos Macias, founding partner at Method Architects. “It’s geared toward Ichabod Crane, who’s a school teacher, so the details are a little more refined.” The literary allusions to Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow are fitting, considering the restaurant is located on Irving Plaza, named for the author. All the wood is reclaimed from Western Pennsylvania and vintage wall hooks display animals that appear on the menu. The decor is not strictly colonial, though. The custom wine display above the raw bar adds a playful touch of color. “The bottles resemble a school of fish swimming over the raw bar,” says Macia’s partner at Method, Johan Reyes. Upholstered Italian leather banquettes are another sleek touch. Beveled glass in the entry vestibule creates a pixilated effect at night, with city lights streaming in. “It brings the city back into the restaurant,” Macias says. a

Photos by Guenter Knop Photography, guenterknop.com

Go for the: Spinach Linguini with mint and walnut pesto


structures & spaces

Enviable interiors to shamelessly ogle

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Water Works A loft-loving design novice teams with an interior expert to create a truly oneof-a-kind home on the Cote d’Azur CONTINUED

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Photos Š 3mille.com


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hilippe Tondeur loves New York City lofts, but a building suited to that urban style is not something you find very often on the Cote d’Azur. So when an abandoned century-old water cleaning station came up for auction, he decided to improvise. “The first time I saw it I realized this water factory was just perfect for my project,” Tondeur says. After buying the decrepit building, Tondeur, who used to fly military helicopters and now works as a private pilot, realized its meticulous transformation into a loft-like living space would take some time. “I had to accept that sometimes I was not really sure that I would finish it,” he says. “I had a feeling like I was painting a cargo ship with a little brush.” CONTINUED

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But he finished it. It just took 16 years. Looking over the results, it was time (and money) well spent. For the interior design, Tondeur enlisted Belgian designer Bernadette Jacques. “I was personally responsible for the work but the design was completely done by Bernadette,” he says. “I told her what I was looking for but gave her the freedom to decide how to do it. She designed everything in this loft.” From the kitchen built by ECHR (the French company behind superstar chef Alain Ducasse’s kitchens) to the bulletproof windows, custom was the word. But the star, of course, is the antique water pumping equipment left over from the home’s past life. “It’s true that if I have to compare the quality of this restoration with the few lofts that I have visited in New York, this one is amazing.” Tondeur says. “I have no talent—I just did it because I didn’t know that it was impossible, and once I started it was too late to stop!” a

“Sometimes I was not really sure that I would finish it. I had a feeling like I was painting a cargo ship with a little brush.”

Top and far right: Antique water pumping gear from the century-old water cleaning station became an unlikely focal point of the interior design. Belgian designer

Photos © 3mille.com

Bernadette Jacques used comfy, contemporary, and decidedly masculine furniture to soften the heavymetal equipment and create a livable environment.

Philippe Tondeur’s Cote d’Azur home features a custom kitchen built by ECHR, African wenge wood floors, Boffi bathrooms, 40 speakers installed in the walls (not to mention top-shelf Wilson Audio Alexandria speakers), and his collection of more than 100 hundred military jet pilot helmets.


Structures & Spaces

DESIGN BUREAU

Wallpaper

Buddha WallS Christopher Jenner moves from wild retail interiors to peaceful Asian-influenced patterns in his debut wallpaper collection

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est known for his luxuriant, ornately patterned, and a wee bit eccentric retail interiors at Diptyque candle and fragrance boutiques around the world, British designer Christopher Jenner has launched his first wallpaper collection. And, not surprisingly, it shows a fascination with patterns. Named Devisor, the collection (which also includes a complementary line of shelving with brass, steel, and copper finishes) was inspired by classical Buddhist teachings. From farther away, the pattern plays subtly, but up close the interrelated horizontal and vertical planes appear to expand and unite in perfect harmony. The four color schemes reflect the seasons at some of Asia’s most revered Buddhist temple sites. Time to convert the kids’ room into a meditation space? a Christopher Jenner Devisor Collection wallpaper, $200 per 33-foot roll, shop.christopher-jenner.com

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Structures & Spaces

August 2013

office tour

You Work Where?!

Creating an office environment that reflects a business’ mission is tricky enough, but one that sparks productivity and innovation, too? File that under “a job well done.” See what happened when these designers helped three companies think outside the cubicle By Gwendolyn Purdom

Employees Love...

The View

“You can always get a glimpse of the outside no matter where you are.” Lamar Advertising HQ photos by Timothy Hursley, timothyhursley.com, courtesy of Eskew + Dumez + Ripple, eskewdumezripple.com


August 2013

Structures & Spaces

DESIGN BUREAU

Office Space:

Lamar Advertising Corporate Headquarters Location:

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 411:

Light-filled new digs for the nation’s largest outdoor advertiser Design:

Eskew + Dumez + Ripple

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ith a behemoth 1970s former data center to work with, the EDR design team brought the outdoors in. “The idea was to create energy and excitement by opening up the inside, bringing landscape into the middle of the building, and really creating an environment that connected all three floors,” director of design Steve Dumez says. Aside from the central atrium, the renovation incorporated an oak-shaded patio, billboard imagery, and playful bleachers for company-wide meetings (and the occasional LSU football game screening). Employees appreciate the added natural light. As one staff member commented: “You can always get a glimpse of the outside no matter where you are.”

structure “A major accomplishment achieved by the project team was the swift construction of the concrete structure, says Susan Matherne, marketing and business development manager at Gibbs Construction, who built out the design. “Through teamwork and collaboration, the 21story structure went up in nine months and three weeks. Every 11 days a floor was complete.”


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office tour

You Work Where?!

Employees Love...

The Gathering Space

“We wanted to take inspiration from places where people congregate and share ideas, so we thought about cafÉs, great hotel lobbies, and residential environments.” Office Space:

?What If! Innovation Partners Location:

New York, New York With no assigned desks, employees are free to roam from workspace to workspace. Phone booths, complete with iPad-controlled vacancy signs, offer privacy in the lobby and on the third floor.

411:

A distinctively New York home for a brand innovation firm with offices in Europe and Asia Design:

Studio Mapos

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paces that allow for collaboration, diverse work styles, and personalized touches were key in this historic East Village hospital turned office. That meant a small group work area laid out like a café, colorful wooden tables to share, and custom details like graphic-upholstered sound panels designed by ?What If! employees. “We wanted to take inspiration from places where people congregate and share ideas, so we thought about cafés, great hotel lobbies, and residential environments,” ?What If! inventing director Bart Higgins says. Uncovering original cast iron capitals and crown molding added character, too. “One of the things that we said to the client when we were getting started was, ‘Your biggest asset is the building itself,’” Studio Mapos principal Colin Brice says. “You don’t have a big budget; let’s leverage what you’re already paying money for in these great details.”

engineering JFK&M Engineers worked with Studio Mapos on another project, the LivePerson office. Their role included mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering services. “It was a standout project that was very unique to us with the collaborative involvement of all,” says JFK&M partner Michael Jacob. “Here all the ductwork and mechanical work was exposed so you can see the work we did on the project.”

?What If! office photos by James Chororos, jameschororos.com, courtesy of Studio Mapos, studiomapos.com


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Comprehensive Engineering DesignServices

Each of the nine meetings rooms is decorated with custom wall coverings and ceiling panels and named for a different place in New York such as “Downtown,” “The U.N.,” and “The Upper East Side.”

The reception area is meant to mimic a boutique hotel lobby. A custom chandelier of steel, globe lights, a recycled paper shade, and gold acrylic fins serves as its dramatic centerpiece.

Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection, IT, Sustainable Design, and Commissioning 212.792.8700 | WWW.JFKMCG.COM JFK&M is a Women’s Business Enterprise


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office tour

You Work Where?!

Elements in the space Phillips calls “modern with a whimsical spirit,” like a Corian ribbon by Vision Woodworking and purple upholstery, are consistent with the brand’s retail store designs.

Check out the Quicken Qube on p. 114

Want to see another amazing office?

Don’t forget the landscape When TPG Architecture needed a firm to design and install the terrace on another office project, for Irving Place Capital, it turned to Manhattan-based landscape design/build firm PFI, which was founded by president and owner Teresa Carleo. “The challenge was to translate TPG’s vision—integrating plants and paving in a largely exposed space—within the 1,000-squarefoot, partially shaded terrace,” says PFI’s landscape production manager MacKenzie Sharp. “Through the use of pavers and plantings, we made the greenery appear to be growing from the hardscape in a slightly asymmetrical pattern,” says lead landscape designer Michael Tull.

Office Space:

special touches

Employees Love...

Stuart Weitzman Showroom and Headquarters

Open Space

Location:

New York City-based engineering firm Robert Derector Associates seamlessly incorporated the audio-visual and telecommunications systems at the Stuart Weitzman showroom and headquarters so as not to take away from the striking visual effect of the space. “We coordinated all equipment with TPG to ensure we achieved the cutting-edge look Weitzman was going for,” says Anthony Lonigro, managing partner of the firm.

New York, New York

“it’s really nice to have a much more flexible and open space and be able to walk around the corner and talk to any department.”

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Fun, personal touches in a high-end shoe designer’s new HQ Design:

TPG Architecture

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igh-end footwear wasn’t the only passion Stuart Weitzman wanted to showcase in his Manhattan headquarters. Nods to the shoe designer’s lifelong love of ping-pong are apparent in a conference room table that doubles as a playing surface and a reception area wall accented with white plastic balls. “It brought that personal statement of the founder front and center,” TPG principal Jim Phillips says. For Gary Rissler, director of store planning, the open floor plan is an upgrade. “We were in a pretty dysfunctional space before,” Rissler says, “so it’s really nice to have a much more flexible and open space and be able to walk around the corner and talk to any department.”

Stuart Weitzman HQ photos by Peter Margonelli, petermargonelli.com, courtesy of TPG Architecture, tpgarchitecture.com

Vision Woodworking also added to the cuttingedge look. In the firm’s 19 years of manufacturing for retail stores, this was the first project that required them to make a ping-pong ball wall. “To ensure the maximum ‘wow factor’ we had custom ping-pong balls with the Stuart Weitzman logo incorporated into the project,” says Mary Hornby-Kirkendall, Vision Woodworking national account executive.


Congratulations TPG Architecture on being featured in this month’s issue of Design Bureau. We are proud to be a part of the Stuart Weitzman team.

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get the look The kitchen, previously located in a dark corner in the back of the house, was moved to the middle of the floor plan and given a large central island with ample seating and a view of the yard. “It now functions as the command center for the entire house,” Leckie says.

Kitchen Command Center A 100-year-old Portland house gets a modern makeover thanks to an open floor plan and a wallet-friendly kitchen By Margot Brody

O

ne of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, the culturally rich Alberta Arts District, has witnessed a period of revitalization over the past two decades, making it a residential destination for both artist-types and young families.

Inspired by the neighborhood’s eclectic mixture of old and new, Michael Leckie of Vancouverbased design firm Campos Leckie Studio converted space inside a traditional 1909 Portland cottage into an open-plan living area tailored to modern family life for his clients. “We removed the partition walls and archways that had divided the main floor into several small rooms,” Leckie says. “The result is a long great room that opens

Photos by Shawn Records, shawnrecords.org, courtesy of Campos Leckie Studio, camposleckie.ca

the house up and allows light in on three sides.” Though the designer used a clean modernist aesthetic for the interior additions, Leckie deliberately retained the original detailing, such as window casings, baseboards, and crown moldings, to acknowledge the existing character of the house. And the finished product only looks like a million bucks. The CONTINUED

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Professional engineers offering design services for: Mechanical Systems, Electrical Systems, Fire Protection & Plumbing, IT Infrastructure, Telecommunications, Multimedia, Security, Mission Critical, Commissioning & Peer Review. We also offer turn-key design/build services for all low-voltage scope. Ask us about it!

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Structures & Spaces

get the look

(CONTINUED)

IKEA MEETS kokeena To create a custom-looking kitchen without a big budget, Campos Leckie Studio turned to Kokeena, which sells doors made for IKEA’s Akurum modular kitchen system. “We’re big fans of the robustness and flexibility the IKEA system provides,” says founder/CEO Aaron Gray, “but we felt that the door options from IKEA are limiting for people who care deeply about style, fit, and finish. We offer a broader range of styles. Besides ultra-modern, we also provide great options for people doing more traditional kitchens.” “The modern aesthetic of the kitchen millwork contrasts against the traditional built-in window bench and storage unit that sits opposite the island,” he says. A chalkboard wall and Woods Contemporary II wallpaper by Cole & Son add some fun and a regional touch.

project had to fit a very tight budget, so Leckie used an IKEA kitchen system for the cabinets and inserts. The visible door and drawer covers were custom-designed in collaboration with Kokeena, a Portland startup that specializes in custom-made panels for IKEA units. “Ultimately,” says Leckie, “this project demonstrates the potential for ‘everyday’ modern family living within the older housing stock of the Pacific Northwest.” a

The larger appliances, including the refrigerator, washer, and dryer, are hidden within the large bank of cabinets. The smaller appliances are concealed in the kitchen island, where they are still easily accessible for daily use.


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Project spotlight

Welcome to wonderland

experimental architecture

The new Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center is a portal to another side of the city by Kimberlie Birks

T

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden changed the way architect Marion Weiss felt about New York. “It was my first feeling of welcome in a scary city,” the California native explains. Weiss distinctly recalls the fairy tale-like journey of “going through a funny portal that was not particularly an entry and arriving—almost like Alice in Wonderland—in this other world that didn’t feel like any place I’d ever been.” It therefore seems a fittingly fabled ending that years later, Weiss’ namesake firm Weiss/Manfredi should be tapped to shape the new Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center and given the chance to transform that ‘funny portal’ into a place of welcome and wonder for countless others. “The Visitor Center project really struck a chord for us in terms of what we felt was crucial to our own work and how we feel architecture should go,” says Weiss’ co-principal Michael Manfredi. Known for their seamless melding of architecture and landscape,

Weiss and Manfredi believe that buildings should be viewed not as large-scale sculpture but rather as part of a greater urban system; living entities that both reflect and affect the social, economic, and urban fabric. “Our sense of architecture is that it’s part of something quite a bit larger,” Weiss says. “There is a kind of aikido relationship when you leverage the things that are already in play rather than resisting them.” Opened in May 2012, the $28 million center, originally envisioned at the end of the Cherry Esplanade within the heart of the garden, stands instead at the landscape’s northeast tip. “We felt it was terribly wrong and antithetical to the magic of the garden to make such an overtly architectural gesture,” explains Manfredi. “By coming to the edge you could actually welcome people from the city.” Like an unfurling tendril, the entrance pathway sweeps past the glass walls and accordion-folded copper roof of the gift shop, curving around a tree-covered berm. Only as the path unfolds does the arcing glass curtain wall façade appear from the front of the berm, like the Cheshire Cat’s disembodied grin. “It’s the seduction of coming here that the building should highlight,” Manfredi notes, stressing, CONTINUED

Given the botanical bent of Weiss/Manfredi’s recent workr, it may be tempting to assume that partners Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi are happiest when tripping through the tulips. A glimpse, however, at their glowing new Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania reveals that the duo is equally at home in the hard sciences. As with the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, it is the challenges of the project that have produced its defining triumphs. Due to unique vibrational and electro-magnetic constraints, the scientific research labs needed to be situated at the back of the site. While traditionally laboratories are neither open nor communal in feel, Weiss and Manfredi desired to create a space equally conducive to solitary study and social interaction. Arranged around a central quad, the laboratories are visible to the public through a radiant wall of saffron-colored glass. “When we were told we would need to work with the amber glass due to its ability to cut a specific light frequency harmful to experiments, we said, ‘We love it—let’s use it to our advantage,’” says Manfredi, who calls it their “Tiffany window.”

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Photos © Albert Vecerka/ESTO; sidebar rendering courtesy of Weiss/Mandfredi Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism

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The visitor center has an exhibition gallery, information lobby, orientation room, gift shop, café, and this glass-enclosed, doubleheight event space that envelopes visitors in garden views.

“we really wanted to blur the distinctions between what is architecture and what is landscape.”

(CONTINUED)

In subject, structure, and infrastructure, the visitor center celebrates the organic. From the tactile twist of the elegant reed-like door handles, to the radiant wood flooring and sweep of the leaf-shaped atrium, the natureinspired details in the building not only bow to existing pathways and plantings, but also celebrate the garden’s seasonal variations. Sustainable infrastructure underfoot and overhead—most notably evident in the 10,000-square-foot living roof that is home to more than 40,000 curated seasonal plantings—further accentuates the symbiotic relationship between the built and botanic environments. “You look at the history of the subject, the physicality of the place, and its constraints,” says Weiss, “and you start to find that there are things that can do a lot with very little effort if you work hard enough.” Weiss/Manfredi’s work paid off. With Cheshire-like effortlessness and agility, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden knows just when to appear and disappear, and always falls on its feet. a Photos © Albert Vecerka/ESTO

“we wanted to blur the distinctions between architecture and landscape.” – Michael manfredi

When world-class research facilities and labs need protection from EMF/RFI interference, they call Vitatech Electromagnetics LLC. “Our mission is to protect our clients from intangible threats and risks in regards to human health and scientific instrumentation,” says business development

manager Christina Vitale. Founded in 1984, Vitatech Electromagnetics provides full-spectrum EMF services, including surveys, assessments, shield designs and magnetic shielding system installations to research centers, medical facilities, laboratories, and commercial and residential buildings.


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acht architects Setzer Design and yacht builder NISI Yachts build dream boats. Their first collaboration, the 80-foot custom NISI 2400, was honored with bestin-class design awards from the International Superyachts Society, World Yachts Trophies committee, and the Robb Report. Joshua Setzer of Setzer Yachts and Katerina Cozias of NISI Yachts talk yacht design.

Q&A

rocking the boat How one design-build team creates the ideal yacht

Photos courtesy of NISI Yachts, nisiyachts.com

DB: The NISI 2400 was your first project together. How did you team up? Katerina Cozias: The collaboration between NISI and Setzer was a natural match; NISI was looking for an architect who would take the risk in cutting-edge hull design and styling, and Setzer was seeking a yard that is willing to take risks with technically challenging concepts that require strong attention to detail, weight control, and finding new ways to deliver on performance targets while maintaining traditional values in build quality. DB: What goes into designing and building custom yachts? Joshua Setzer: As custom yacht architects, the work we do is in some ways very similar to that of a custom home architect. We produce highly innovative, one-of-a-kind yacht designs. We work with [our clients] to understand and articulate what an ‘ideal yacht’ would look like for themselves and their family. This includes both the form

and the function of the yacht, as it must fit not only their unique style and taste, but also their lifestyle and usage patterns. KC: We build custom projects and provide full engineering support for naval architecture, hydrodynamics, composites, and mechanical and electrical systems. DB: Does the marine environment affect the design choices? JS: I once was aboard one of our projects in a heavy Pacific swell and saw an entire, freshly prepared dinner spread, wine glasses and all, slide right off the table and crash onto the floor. So, yes, securing the interior space can be a challenge. [Storage] is designed to always be latched when not in use. Because saltwater is a constant source of corrosion and spotting, special care is put into designing the yacht exterior so that drip lines are minimized and all surfaces are easy for crew members to access and clean. a

New Zealand-based Specialist Marine Interiors designed custom interiors for the awardwinning NISI 2400GT. “SMI leverages a perfect balance of technology and craftsmanship, which results in the finest interiors, crafted in New Zealand and installed anywhere in the world,” says design and CAD manager, Scott Moyse.


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Q&A

Picnic for a Cause Designers turn a summer pastime into a chance to raise AIDS awareness

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f the waning warm weather isn’t enough of an excuse to head outdoors for one last summer shindig, designers Brooke Lichtenstein and Yiannos Vrousgos have sweetened the pot. Along with several other volunteer designers, the founders of Input Creative Studio created Picnic by Design, a New York City event that benefits the Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA). Lichtenstein and Vrousgos dish on DIFFA and why you should join them for some truly sweet charity. DB: What is Picnic by Design?

Brooke Lichtenstein: Picnic by Design is exactly what it sounds like, a designer picnic. This year, 60 New York design talents have been commissioned to design a fully tricked out picnic experience for two. Each [basket] has its own unique identity and story. Last year’s baskets ranged from a watermelon wagon to a basket inspired by a Swiss army knife. [They are] sold in advance online, and when guests arrive they are escorted to their one-of-a-kind designer picnic and enjoy a night under the stars full of food, drinks, live entertainment, and fun.

The 2012 event included VIP picnic baskets created by celebrity and designer teams like Eric Ripert and Marie Aiello

And the entrance for Dining by Design this year was a collaborative effort between our firm, Clark Gaynor Interiors, and Corse Design Factory. It was a tunnel created out of 272 mirrored lightbulbs that drew guests into the event as they looked up to reflect— literally and figuratively—on the cause. 

DB: How was the idea for Picnic by Design born?

Yiannos Vrousgos: It began last summer when we were invited, along with four other designers, to form a Young Professionals group for DIFFA. Our first task was to come up with a summer soirée that could introduce a new crowd to DIFFA. Brooke and I had gone to the Polo Match on Governors Island in New York for years and always thought that it would be great to involve designers in an outdoor summer event on this scale. DB: Had you designed a DIFFA event before?

BL: We first got involved with DIFFA as students at The New York School of Interior Photos by Becky Yee, beckyyee.com

DB: How is this event different than Dining by Design?

Design. The booth that we designed for Dining by Design was a huge success, and Yiannos and I discovered that we had great ‘design chemistry.’ Ultimately our experience prompted us to form a partnership and open our own studio, which specializes in retail design, experience design, office design, and architectural branding.

YV: This year will be the Second Annual Picnic by Design, and it has doubled in size since last year. We want to open DIFFA up to other design disciplines, [and it’s] a great opportunity to invite product designers, graphic designers, fashion designers, industrial designers, stylists, and photographers to participate. The idea is to grow the picnic within the industry as a collaborative endeavor that excites and engrosses the design community. a


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Danforth Neighborhood Pharmacy Care

Sick Kids Boomerang Clinic

Pure Health Pharmacy

care was synonymous with institutional design. Architects focused on technical requirements that produced functional environments. Clients weren't presented with alternatives, and failed to see how aesthetics, lighting, and interior finishes could enhance patient care.

space. To encourage collaboration and dialogue among practitioners, we created offices that can be connected via a common corridor, separated by doors. We also paid attention to how parents will use this space. Parents in the waiting area can use the docking station with computers.

Today, we work with our clients, many of whom are in the private sector, to produce holistic health care design. Care will become tailored for the individual, with multiple points of contact with medical professionals. Waiting for a prescription or appointment should not be a negative or stressful experience, but instead should be viewed as a journey towards better health.

JR: Can design help to engage patients outside of the doctor’s office?

Q&A

Critical Care Patient-centric design is the future of health care By John F. Rizor

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ith the advent of electronic medical records, web-based patient portals, and WebMD, technology has changed the face of health care. So, too, will design, believes architect Aaron Cheng of the Toronto, Ontario-based C& Partners Architects. Cheng and his partners are ushering in a new era of health care design, one in which pharmacies are personalized and hospitals are anything but clinical. JR: What's next for health care design?

Aaron Cheng: To look to the future, we need to examine the past when health

AC: All of our projects explore holistic health care design in various scales and via various design methods. Pure Health Pharmacy explored this notion of personal care by providing individual consultation rooms for pharmacists and patients. We created an integrated compounding and dispensing pharmacy for greater control and personalization for drug dispensing.

JR: How can design engage patients?

AC: Architecturally, this means providing spaces that allow for private conversation and consultation. This also means understanding how different spaces are used, both by practitioners like pharmacists and doctors, and by patients. We applied this [approach] to Sick Kids Boomerang clinic, where we studied how patients (in this case the children) used the space and how practitioners used the

Photos by Victoria Cheng and C& Partners, candpartnersinc.com

When we designed the Danforth Neighborhood Pharmacy Care store, we worked with our client to create a welcoming space with natural light, unique elements, and highquality finishes that redefine the phrase ‘neighborhood pharmacy.’ Patients are now greeted with a dispensing counter that is at their level. The future of health care in Canada is one that focuses on the patient as an individual, and one that will continue to inspire confidence through design. a


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Island living

Whether they’re perched on the tidal marshes of Chesapeake Bay or nestled in the lush mountains of Kaui‘i, these retreats are all about the views CONTINUED

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“The house is somewhat of a bridge between the two bodies of water—one rough and endless, the other finite and serene. We wanted to maximize views while limiting any visual obstructions, maintaining the visual connection to these bodies of water with limited interruptions.” – Michael Lomont


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Photo by Matthew Carbone, matthewcarbone.com

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Seaside Residence DESIGN: Stelle Lomont Rouhani / Location: Long Island, ny

The exterior features cement board and weathered cedar siding, with portions installed as a rain screen to lighten the overall impact and help delineate the volumes of the structure. Impact-resistant, anodized aluminum glazing is low maintenance and sustainable.

Photos by Matthew Carbone, matthewcarbone.com

“How the structure relates to the site is a direct response to the site itself,” says Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects’ Michael Lomont of this sleek Southampton beach house, which is perched on a dune between the ocean and the bay. Materials were chosen for their simplicity, sustainability, low maintainability, and harmony with the sea, sand, and vegetation. A wooden cantilevered trellis provides sun protection on both the ocean and bay sides, and is extended throughout the entire ceiling, blurring boundaries between

inside and out. Public spaces are located on the upper floor, extending out onto a series of decks, while the lower floor is separated into guest and owner spaces. One of the biggest design challenges was having to reuse the existing pilings and footprint from the original structure, with a minor addition, and designing a house that didn’t feel compromised by this. “Being extremely limited in the size and location of the footprint actually informed a lot of the design decisions,” Lomont says. a


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prentissarchitects.com 206.283.9930


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“The goal was to create a weekend retreat that put guests in the most dramatic part of the site—a prominent point of land in Virginia where the Potomac River meets the Chesapeake Bay.” – Dale Overmyer

Oyster House DESIGN: Dale Overmyer Architects / Location: Honest Point, Virginia

Although it’s a thoroughly modern home, Dale It’s encrusted with the oyster shells upon which Overmyer Architects’ Oyster House is sol- the concrete was originally poured,” Overmyer idly rooted in the past. The steel, glass, and says. He divided the house into two distinct wood structure sits on the footprint of an old structures that are connected by a glass bridge. oyster processing plant on a narrow strip of The first is an airy, glass-enclosed, sloped-roof land—accessible only by pedestrian bridge or “pavilion” that houses the kitchen, dining and boat—where the Potomac River flows into the living rooms, and outdoor areas for entertaining. Chesapeake Bay. The site’s history is visible in The second contains bedrooms and provides vithe home: “The fireplace surround is made from sual and acoustic privacy. Both offer panoramic the old concrete foundation of the oyster plant. water views. a

Photos © Maxwell MacKenzie, maxwellmackenzie.com


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One building serves as a gathering and entertaining space with concrete floors and NanaWall doors that can open partially or completely to the adjacent deck. The second building has four en suite bedrooms with balconies.

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“The site is situated between a low ridge line to the south and the ocean to the north. There exists a sense of balance between mountains and ocean— maybe it’s the feeling that the distance from site to mountains and site to ocean are equal, or maybe it’s the gentle slope of the site.” – Tony De Jesus


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Engineered Control Solutions System Design, Engineering & Programming Audio/Video, Lighting Control, & Communications Native rock garden walls are mixed with a smooth stucco finish to define interior spaces that bleed into the garden. A fire pit is ideal for toasting s’mores.

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Ko’olau Residence DESIGN: De Jesus Architecture & Design / Location: Kaua‘i, Hawaii

Cooling trade winds blow through this Hawaiian retreat on a gently sloping piece of land between the mountains and the ocean. “There are three powerful geographic elements of the site: the mountains, the ocean, and the open, gentle slope between them,” says architect Tony De Jesus of De Jesus Architecture & Design. The house and its water features— from the entry to the pool—were designed to flow downward, mirroring the natural flow of water from mountains to ocean. As a gathering place for a family with young children, there had to be plenty of common spaces and room for extended family and friends. De

Jesus organized the house into four pavilions: a living pavilion with a common living, dining, and kitchen area that opens to terraces on either side; a guest pavilion with three guest suites and a kitchenette; a family pavilion with a kids’ bunk room and master suite; and an office pavilion. The siting for each provides shelter from forceful storms and access to trade winds for passive cooling. The house is well appointed with all the luxuries of a small resort (pool, fire pit, outdoor showers, yoga deck, private gardens), but still feels like a home. “If luxury is accommodation,” says De Jesus, “this house has it all.” a

Photots by Ryan Siphers Photography, ryansiphersphotography.com

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North Bay Residence DESIGN: Prentiss Architects, Inc. / Location: San Juan Island, WAshington

Elm flooring, cherry cabinetry, and fir paneling bring the natural elements to the interior, designed by Holly McKinley.

Photos by Jay Goodrich, jaygoodrich.com

Part rocky shore, part sandy beach, this property on San Juan Island off the coast of Seattle is blasted by sun in the summer, and pounded by wind in the winter. To make the most of the stunning views and solidify the structure’s position within the landscape, Geoffrey Prentiss of Prentiss Architects bolstered the house with a long curved stone wall and low roof in the back.

In the front of the home, facing the water, he designed a large glass, steel, and wood pavilion that serves as a dining and living area with a protected outdoor fireplace. A vegetated roof integrates the house into the site from the road. “It softens the feel,” Prentiss says, “and makes the house part of the original natural fabric and less of a man-made, imposed creation.” a


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“The property was narrow to the water, with the county road directly behind it. I wanted to create something that felt its back was secure and its front open—thus the long, curved stone wall at the back and lots of glass on the water side.” – Geoffrey Prentiss

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Island living

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(CONTINUED)

At the North Bay residence, a green roof helps the house blend into its surroundings from the road. A long curved stone wall fortifies the back of the house, while the front is open to the water.


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Photo by Jay Goodrich, jaygoodrich.com

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IN THE DETAILS Exploring the key elements of uncommon spaces

Yee opted for more inviting textures in this TV room/office space like a sheepskin rug and linen upholstery.

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Rather than adorn a living room corner with artwork or furniture, Yee made the most of the space with a built-in bookshelf, complete with inset lighting to make the owner’s reading collection glow.

Understated Elegance

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rowing up among the ornate furnishings and jewel-hued finishes of India, the homeowner of this Manhattan condo was looking for a change. “He wanted to tone it down a lot,” designer Matthew Yee says. But with the condo's sweeping skyline views and clean, contemporary lines, the homeowner's original all-white vision started to feel too cold. “It came to the point where everything became almost too linear, so we needed to jazz it

up,” Yee says. The designer did so by opening the floor plan and infusing the home with pops of earthy grays, sands, and cream tones, and adding organic pieces like petrified wood seating and fox-fur throws. His client’s burgeoning art collection, with its sculptural finds and colorful Damien Hirst prints, also helped to liven up the simple twobedroom space, making it feel just warm enough—without the excess spice. – Gwendolyn Purdom

Project: Manhattan Condo Renovation / Location: New York City Designer: Matthew Yee of Matthew Yee Interiors Photos: Brett Beyer Photography, brettbeyer.com

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Floating wire lights illuminate Ilit Azoulay works above the sofa.

Pebble-like cushions double as sculptural pieces in the condo’s living room. The natural vibe continues with a cowhide rug.

A condo owner trades the colorful decor of India for a more subtle approach

Design Thinking

Poggenpohl kitchen cabinetry adds warmth while staying within the understated palette.

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IN THE DETAILS

With most of the house’s floorplan only one room deep, Montenegro and his colleagues were able to incorporate windows on multiple sides of each room, maximizing light.

A backlit mirror in the house’s powder room appears to be floating.

One Stop Style A Dallas architecture firm tries its hand at interior design that’s traditional with a twist

Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects may have added interior design to their scope on the Caruth residence, but the firm relied on the professionals at Bonick Landscaping to create the outdoor environment, which includes a limestone gravel patio and a black steel fire pit that overlooks the pool. “We met with the owner and architects to understand the architecture of the home, materials being used, and how the owner envisioned using their outdoor spaces,” president Glenn J. Bonick says.

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or its first foray into in- space with local limestone details, house interior design, Stoc- understated light fixtures, and an ker Hoesterey Montenegro airy, monochromatic color scheme. Architects balanced the classic Consolidating interior and archicontext of the city’s University tectural design decisions under Park neighborhood with the mod- one roof resulted in some creative ern feel the owners wanted for their collaborations: Among other unique single-family home. “It has a very features, the floor plan is anchored traditional palette of materials, yet with a one-of-a-kind wine room with they’re done in a way that’s clean, backlit shelving to display premium contemporary, and minimal,” prin- vintages. “The best projects,” Moncipal architect Enrique Montene- tenegro says, “are the ones where gro says. The design team custom- everybody’s on the same page.” ized the roughly 7,000-square-foot – Gwendolyn Purdom

Project: Caruth Residence / Location: Dallas, Texas Designer: Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects Photos: piassick Photography, piassick.com

Four-and-ahalf-foot-tall wire lanterns in front of the house mimic the discreet interior chandeliers.


Andrea Meislin Gallery 534 West 24th Street New York, New York 10011 USA T 212-627-2552 F 646-513-2824 E info@andreameislin.com www.andreameislin.com

Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pm

Michal Chelbin, Alicia, Ukraine, 2005


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IN THE DETAILS

Urbane Living

“We represented their Southern California roots by incorporating colors native to that landscape—the rusts of the cliffs and the varying blues of the Pacific Ocean,” Toledo says.

A chic home away from home puts a California couple in a New York state of mind

Project: Lincoln Center Condo / Location: New York City Designers: Jessica Geller and Virginia Toledo of id 810 Design Group, Inc. Photos: Jacob Snavely Photography, jacobsnavely.net


August 2013

Home is where the hearth is at this Manhattan condo, where a cozy fireplace was a must. “The designers from id 810 see it as an important part of New York City living,” says Arthur Lasky, president of Hearth Cabinet, which provided the safe, ventless fireplace. “Our ventless fireplaces don’t require gas, electricity, flues, or chimneys; they have a real, crackling flame; and they are the only ventless fireplaces approved for use by the NYC building and fire departments.”

The designers added open storage and walnut built-in cabinetry. “It helps make the apartment feel more like a home and less like a hotel,” Geller says. They also added a deep window seat with daybed proportions for lounging.

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anting the occasional break from the La-La lifestyle (but not necessarily its laid-back look), two empty-nesters contacted interior design firm id 810 to transform their recently purchased New York City condo from a blank white box to a cozy second home that combines

California cool with East Coast sophistication. Designers Jessica Geller and Virginia Toledo knocked out the kitchen doorway to open up the space, and chose a color palette of white with pops of color to merge the owners’ two favorite zip codes. – Jill McDonnell

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The team used the same Maya Romanoff wallpaper in the living room and master bedroom. “It’s a white on white palette with a textural quality that can be interpreted as a luxurious tie-dye or even Venetian plaster,” Geller says. A splash of blue on the wing-backed chair and amusement park photos give off a relaxed vibe.

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IN THE DETAILS

Forget the microwave. This kitchen boasts a custombuilt brick oven. Sachs says the kitchen appliances were designed to be out of direct eyesight from the living room to keep the two adjoining areas separate.

“Going through a home renovation is a long and complex process. I have been in the architecture business for more than 10 years, and Laura is a very trained and efficient

owner’s rep. I highly recommend her,” says the homeowner, who worked with owner’s representative Laura Ianuly on this Greenwich Village townhouse.

A Hybrid Home Loft living meets classic townhouse style

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rchitecturally, this home is a comfort and simple sophistication hybrid between open loft liv- balance the owners’ active lifestyle. ing and a townhouse with a Sachs designed the ground floor balance of modern and traditional for casual entertaining, creating details,” architect Jane Sachs says a seamless flow between the livof the Greenwich Village home she ing room and kitchen, which opens designed. “With our clients, the ul- onto the outdoor patio (one of four timate goal was to create a comfort- outdoor areas in the home). They’re able home that wasn’t too formal.” the perfect spot to enjoy nature… With its spacious 5,000-square-foot and the spectacular city views. floor plan, which spans four floors – Lesley Stanley and a garden level, the home’s

Project: Greenwich Village Townhouse Location: New York, New York Designer: Jane Sachs of HS2 Architecture Photos: GROSS & DALEY, grossanddaleyphoto.blogspot.com


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The steel and walnut bookshelf in the living room is not only a storage unit, but also a sculptural object that extends from the ground floor upstairs to the second level, where it also serves as a stair rail, says Sachs.

The dining room is one of the best spots in the house to soak up some rays. The floor-toceiling windowed walls and roof not only shower the space with natural light, but also open up, allowing in fresh air on sunny days. Brick and limestone flooring complete the quaint area.

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Architecture Eye Candy

Space odyssey A classic film is the muse for an architect's enigmatic designs

Project: Carved Duplex / Location: Brooklyn, New York Architect: Alex Gil of SPACECUTTER Photos: Michael Vahrenwald, michaelvahrenwald.com


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Architecture Eye Candy

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nspiration can come in strange forms. Architect Alex Gil was struck by the abstract black block featured in the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which drove him to design the massive “Monolith” table that anchors the open dining area in his newly redesigned townhouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “In the movie, it’s this black abstract thing with incredible presence, and you just don’t know what it is. It appears [to be] floating in space,” says Gil. “For the Monolith Table, I wanted to consider the table and chairs as one eroded form that is likewise abstract. When the four chairs, two benches and two end booths are all tucked in you aren't sure what it is. It's a large, unknowable object that elicits a psychological reaction.” Made of whitewashed red cedar, the 11-foot-long table looms large in the open, minimalist space, which was gutted along with the rest of the third floor and redesigned by Gil. The renovation also included a new fourth-floor addition, which features a living room and outdoor deck. Contrasting elements include the black bedroom, gray-stained, wax-finished oak floors, original brick fireplaces (which date back to the 1880s) and the blue bathroom, whose 6,000 tiles were handcrafted by Claudia DeSimio, Gil’s wife.

Photos by Michael Vahrenwald, michaelvahrenwald.com

Through his creative use of materials, Gil provided some inspiration of his own. His friend, fashion designer Jonathan Cohen, was so taken with the rust progression on the Cor-ten deck that he photographed it and digitally printed it onto flowing silk dresses for his 2012 spring/summer collection. “I wouldn’t say it was a collaboration, as much as one creative discipline speaking to another,” Gil says. “I take a lot of inspiration from art, so I think it’s nice to see ideas translated from one discipline to another.” – Amanda Koellner

“I aimed to create something that was spatially rich with material integrity at an attainable price point,” Gil says of his new home. The architect used diverse

materials throughout the townhouse, including Corten siding on the outdoor deck. Gil's wife handcrafted 6,000 blue scalloped tiles for the fourth-floor bathroom.


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“I take a lot of inspiration from art, so I think it’s nice that these ideas can move from one to another.”

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Notes From the Bureau News and Musings from the world of architecture and design

Tree House Haven Surrounded by woodland, a British Columbia refuge invites rest and relaxation

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his Victoria, British Columbia, home elevates the “tree house.” Tucked away from the city in a glen of fir trees, the space channels its bucolic environment, while giving its owners all the comforts of a sophisticated home. Antonieta D’Introno of D’Introno Interior Design is the dream weaver who made her clients’ peaceful vision a reality. “It begins with the front entrance to the house, which thanks to the adjacent Zen garden, still feels like you’re outside,” she says. The homeowners wanted to make the house work with the land, she adds, which is why the relationship between the two is so strong, from the color palette that mimics the beauty of nature to the windows that bring the outdoors in. The outside influence is also visible in the stairway lighting. D’Introno selected globes

Photos by Dan Anthon

The peaceful setting extends into the heart of the home, its kitchen, which features walnut cabinetry, an open floor plan, and a large island for entertaining.

Natural materials, neutral colors, and even a welcoming Zen garden make this home amid the trees a picture of peaceful living.

in all different sizes, and then positioned them randomly throughout the stairwell, as if they were clouds. Tranquility took a different turn in the bathrooms. “The green guest bathroom is at the end of the entryway to the Zen garden, and it really adds a nice punch of color,” says D’Introno. She added a pale aqua color in the master bathroom for a unique touch that harks back to a different era. “It’s like the color of a vintage Lincoln,” she says. “It’s both calm and pretty.” – Jill McDonnell


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August 2013

Notes From the Bureau

The New Museum A museum designer explores interactive exhibits for the digital age Four-dimensional theater displays and interactive touch screens... these kinds of engaging elements are part of museum design and planning firm Gallagher & Associates’ efforts to usher museums into the digital age. Firm principal Patrick Gallagher shares how his team leverages technology to attract a new generation of museumgoers. JM: How has museum design, and museums in general, evolved?

Patrick Gallagher: Modern museums are becoming a more intergenerational experience. This means museums are becoming a place for discussion, debate, and interaction. If children have questions or concepts they want to discuss with their parents or grandparents about something they experienced in an exhibition, there needs to be a way to interact and communicate. This is when a designer must consider the layering of content and experiences to keep the dynamic and always be a part of the conversation. JM: What are today’s museumgoers looking for in an exhibit?

PG: What viewers are looking for in museums today is an authentic experience. Images courtesy of Local Projects

Whether it’s the schol- “With a professional, arship of the content creative staff of project managers, estior the entertainment mators, researchers, value of an experience graphic technicians, it must always support builders, artisans, and installers, we are the authentic nature dedicated to producof the storyline. We ing state-of-the-art can consider the ad- museum exhibit experiences,” says 1220 dition of interactivity Exhibits senior vice and media to enhance president Craig Dunn. the authenticity and The Nashville-based has worked engagement. Visitors fabricator with Gallagher & Astoday have limited sociates on numerous free time and if they design-build projects. are choosing to spend some of that time at a museum, as designers, we want to be sure it is a rich and fulfilling experience. JM: How do you strike a balance between entertainment and education?

PG: Of course the designer must be very careful in balancing scholarship with entertainment and interactivity. At the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, we created a 4-D theater experience of WWII. The techniques are big and sweeping, bringing the visitor into the emotion and drama of the storyline. At one moment it literally snows on the visitor. There is an entertainment factor to how we tell this story, but we also want to invite the viewer to take part in the story on an emotional level, to not just tell them what happened, but use it as a lens into their lives. – Jordan Mainzer


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Into the Blue The bold colors of this New Jersey country house reflect its unconventional owners

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hat’s blue and green and quirky all over? This funky, 1960s, rambler-style New Jersey home. Designer Christina Salway of Eleven Two Eleven Design was tasked with finding cool elements befitting the kooky aesthetic of the owners, fun-loving former school teachers with a love of color and kitsch. Salway captured the colorful personalities of her clients with the bold greens and blues that permeate the house. Where she left the walls white, she painted the ceilings a sky blue so the homeowners could enjoy their beloved color without it competing with the exterior views framed by large vista windows.

“Each room recalls the pleasures from the clients’ past travels,” Salway says, and throughout the home you can see Florida’s art deco influence, as well as the owners’ unique New York City style. The mechanical drapes in the master bedroom also were inspired by a trip out of town: the clients’ stay in a hotel room.

In a guest bathroom, floor-to-ceiling glass tiles wrap guests in the owners’ signature color palette. Broadway Carpet & Window Treatments custom-dyed and installed the wall-towall carpeting in the basement billiard room and gym. “We also worked with Eleven

Two Eleven to find the perfect black-and-white carpeting that would link the basement den to the playful basement bathroom,” says Sara Koening, owner of the NYC-based company.

In a nod to her clients’ past career as schoolteachers, Salway created a downstairs bathroom that brings you back to the days of recess and cafeteria lunches with its air blower, soap dispenser, and black-andwhite tile. “I would lay awake at night thinking of the craziest things I could do designwise,” she says. Being given permission to use color outside of the lines? Now that’s a dream assignment. – Jill McDonnell Photos by Emily Pober Higgins

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Notes From the Bureau

Putting a Church to Work A historic New Jersey church building is converted to an office space—but it’s still keeping the faith

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orship and work may seem like an unlikely pairing, but the two go perfectly together at the LEED Silver-certified Hillside Square, a historic church turned office space in Montclair, New Jersey. Designed by RHG Architecture and Design, the adaptive reuse project began when a developer purchased the existing church building from the Christian Scientist Membership (CSM) under the agreement that the building would be turned into contemporary office space and a portion would be leased back to CSM for its new chapel. To maintain and enhance a sense of spirituality within the building, RHG kept historic details where appropriate, reused items harvested from the existing building, and balanced these elements with a fresh aesthetic more in line with the future of the building and its tenants. “When addressing a traditional architectural language, it is ideal to leap toward the minimalist realm. Each piece stands out and stands on its own, and the delineation between the two is clear,” says RHG principal Rachael Grochowski. Many of the existing building’s elements—the pipe organ, lumber, and pediments—reappear in the new architectural scheme, showing reverence for the building history while acknowledging the need to evolve. Each of the building’s leased spaces was specifically designed for the end user, including CSM’s new chapel space. “The church membership believes in looking to the future, which allowed both the release of ownership of the building and for us to establish a modern design for their chapel,” Grochowski says. Clean lines, coupled with contemporary materials and furnishings, strike a brilliant balance between old and new design elements and bring CSM and its congregation into the 21st century. – John F. Rizor

Photos by Emily Gilbert Photography, emilygilbertphotography.com

Constructing the exposed metal and glass rotunda was a challenge, says Joseph Cano, president and owner of Glass Crafters. Cano provided glass for the project, including the extra-large rotunda panes, which had to be lifted to the third floor by crane. “Our dedicated crew worked above and beyond to make this project come to life,” he says.


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` Modular store fixtures that feature simplicity, flexibility and seamlessly interconnect

EYE Film Institute, Netherlands

Family Fun Two siblings create a cheerful store concept with help from their friends

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isters and Freedlove owners Aril and Nadine didn’t have a big budget for their new flagship store in Scranton, Pennsylvania. But with hard work, creative thinking, and some help from their friends they created a store that is as fun, energetic, and youthful as the women’s clothing and accessories it carries.

Architect Michele Dempsey of DxDempsey Architecture Design and Planning worked with the owners to design the store, focusing on creating signature elements like the staggered wood ceiling that would add visual interest to the long, narrow space without breaking the

The custom wood panels with an integrated puck system from CUBIC give the store owners flexibility for merchandising. “We understand the aesthetics of good design. Our modular

store fixtures are simple, flexible, and seamlessly interconnected,” says Scott Parizek, principal of CUBIC Visual Systems. “They allow the product to become the focal point.”

budget. “The ceiling really pulls you into the store and creates a clear identity,” says Dempsey. To save money, the team worked with the existing layout and reused the built-in wood cabinetry. Custom wood panels with an integrated puck system from CUBIC were added to give the owners flexibility for merchandising. DxDempsey designed custom modular wood displays that line the floor, which were fabricated by the owners’ family friend. “We had wonderful partners,” says Dempsey. “The process was really uplifting and fun.” a Photos by Guy Cali Associates, guycali.com

Let’s chat. info@cubic.co 1-888-445-4876 cubic.co


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Notes From the Bureau Robert Cole loves to collaborate with builders, even inviting them to sit in at design sessions. He invites the builder’s perspective and ideas and works with them to find creative solutions to design challenges. “Collaborating with ColePrévost from schematic sketches and throughout the construction process makes our projects unique because they are the product of true collaboration between the architect’s skills and knowledge combined with that of the builder’s,” says Tom Glass, owner of Cole’s collaborator Glass Construction (GCI). “The sensitivity and appreciation of ColePrévost to the knowledge and skill of GCI allows us both to become better at what we do,” says Glass, “and this collaborative teamwork is evident in the completed product—a true combination of architecture, design, and construction where all shine through.”

Montana Modern A little house captures the spirit of Big Sky Country with minimalist updates

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his compact 1,200-square-foot home in Alexandria, Virginia proves that size doesn’t have to dictate style. “The homeowner is from Montana and he wanted this space to feel as open as the plains,” says architect Robert Cole of D.C. design firm ColePrévost. Cole and his partner Sophie Prévost helped the owner achieve his vision with a series of phased renovations that included transforming the top floor into an expansive master suite. The team reconfigured the floor to open up the space, combining the two existing bedrooms and one bathroom into one large room and exposing the ceiling beams. The

Photos courtesy of ColePrévost, coleprevost.com

bathroom is separated from the sleeping area by a frosted glass wall. “We used a rubber-textured tile in the shower to give it that pounded-earth feeling of the plains,” says Cole. As a finishing touch, the suite was outfitted in the homeowner’s favorite color palette: black and white. Although the monochromatic scheme dominates the interior, the exterior is all about color. After the design team transformed the garage into a home office, the owner wanted additional amenities to make the

backyard a bona fide living space. In addition to a movie projection system, Cole added landscaping, a fire pit, an outdoor shower, and—the pièce de résistance—a glass fence backlit by color-changing LEDs. It’s a bold gesture, even on a small scale. a


For nearly twenty years, Glass Construction (GCI) has collaborated with architects and owners to produce unique, award-winning, nationally recognized residences. We focus on architect-designed, new homes, and full house renovations across the spectrum of architectural periods and styles with a particular expertise in historic restoration, preservation, and adaptive reuse.

Tom Glass

202.362.6012

WWW.GlassconsTrucTion.biz


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Notes From the Bureau

Design by the Numbers

Molloy College

LCD TVs that cover the walls of the simulation room in the Information Commons, a combination printing room, Internet library, and group study area. “The goal was to build a collaborative and technologically enabled environment,” Maljanian says.

A long-awaited new campus center turns a Long Island college into a destination

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ight years—that’s how long it took BRB Architects to realize its design for Molloy College’s new campus center. Delayed multiple times, the center, whose planning started in 2004, finally opened last year to rave reviews from students. The space has helped transform Molloy from a commuter college to a 24-hour learning community. BRB Architects design director Mark Maljanian tells us about the digits that made this one-ofa-kind campus center worth the wait. – Jordan Mainzer

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Photos by Woodruff/Brown Architectural Photography, woodruff-brown.com

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Beds in the new residence hall built simultaneously with the campus center. “[It gives] Molloy the ability to offer on-campus living to those who wish to have a more complete campus experience,” Maljanian says.

Square footage of the new campus center. “The design of the campus center is considerably more expressive than anything on campus previously,” Maljanian says. “Students’ response to the building has been overwhelmingly positive. The place is packed at all hours.”

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Seats in the new campus center theater. “The Madison Theater allows more folks from the surrounding community to visit Molloy College and to experience the vibrant learning community it has become,” Maljanian says.


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NILU Home Improvement, Inc. GENERAL CONTRACTOR

Kitchen Continuity One successful renovation inspired another at this Upper West Side space

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ome say that the kitchen is the most important room in a house. The owners of this 4,000-squarefoot apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan would doubtless agree. The family of three hired New York City architecture firm DAS Studio to revamp their kitchen and quickly realized that the rest of the apartment would have to follow suit to preserve the aesthetic continuity of the space.

“One of our main concerns was to create an open and coherent look for the entire apartment,” DAS Studio partner Stefanie Werner says. “It’s important that the kitchen looks like it is part of the living room instead of having a kitchen in the corner of the living room.” Werner, DAS Studio partner David Burdett, and interior designer Donna Perry chose a singular color scheme and added complementary millwork and finishes

DAS Studio worked with general contractor NILU Home Improvement, Inc. to renovate this Upper West Side apartment. “It is always a pleasure working with Stefanie

and David from DAS Studio,” owner Dragan Stojanovic says. “They are organized and prepare plans very well, which fits well with the way I work.”

throughout the space. The team was also playful with their material selection by using the same finishes in different applications, further strengthening the overall coherence of the space. – John F. Rizor Photos by DAS Studio, das-studio.us

Dragan Stojanovic

P.O. Box 195, New York, NY 10028

917.365.2573 nilu9497@yahoo.com


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Notes From the Bureau

Open Office A tech-savvy venture capital firm gets a sociable new space

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t Union Square Ventures it’s OK to text, tweet, and Tumblr at work. That’s because the New York City venture capital firm invests in Internet companies like FourSquare, Twitter, Kickstarter, and Etsy. Architect Mary Burnham discusses how Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects designed the firm a collaborative new office space that fosters communication. DB: How did the nature of Union Square Ventures’ business shape its new space?

Mary Burnham: Their business relies heavily on synergy, communication, spontaneity, flexibility, and networks. This sense of creativity and communication is very conspicuous in the work culture at Union Square Ventures, and we wanted to design a space that reflected this.

Renovation and Construction of Fine Luxury Residences since 1977

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DB: How does the design foster communication?

MB: Partner offices and a conference room are faced in clear glass that allows for easy communication and shared views. Ancillary hubs and lounges are positioned to encourage collaboration and the flow of ideas. Photos by Frank Oudeman, frankoudeman.com

“Glass partitions divide the space acoustically but not visually, affording stunning views and allowing daylight to penetrate deep into the space,” says architect Mary Burnham.

The large conference space has transformed the way Union Square Ventures interfaces with its startup portfolio companies and the public. Moveable furniture, integrated technology, and a gracious layout adapt easily to accommodate board meetings for 20 and allday symposia for 70, as well as movies, concerts, and cocktail parties. DB: What role did technology play in the design?

MB: The space is very connected technologically and yet mobile, flexible, and as wireless as possible. The seamless integration of technology and variety of Skype-enabled spaces encourages a constant dialogue with innovators downtown, on the West Coast, and throughout the world. a To achieve the highend workmanship and top-grade finishes for this project, Murphy Burnham & Buttrick selected DiSalvo Contracting, a New York-based company that specializes in luxury renovations

and construction. “We knew this was not an ordinary office project, and we made extraordinary quality our number one priority,” says principal contractor Vincent DiSalvo.


August 2013

Historic Hospitality Designers usher a 19th century boutique hotel into the 21st century

To carry out K2 Design’s chic new look, the owner of the Chestnut Hill Hotel recommended James Van Etten Furniture by Design, which created the custom furniture for

the hotel. “We used drawings, pictures, samples, and had many conversations to pinpoint their vision,” says master craftsman and designer Van Etten.

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n a small suburb outside of Philadelphia stands a charming 19th century hotel that has been a fixture of Chestnut Hill’s historic downtown for nearly 120 years. Arizona-based design firm K2 Design and principal designers Sharon Kindred and Zahra Karimi were tasked with transforming the property, built in 1894, into a chic boutique hotel. The design duo knew they wanted to create a style that would pay homage the building’s past while giving it a distinctive, modern spin. “We wanted to reflect that era in our furnishings and finishes yet still give it a place in the 21st century,” Kindred says. Since the hotel is located within the historically intact hub of the community (originally settled as a retreat from industrial-era Philadelphia), the designers avoided modifying the building’s exterior. Instead, they opted for a dramatic fusion of old and new within the interior spaces, combining Victorian fashions with contemporary accents and up-to-date accommodations. The designers used two half poufs with 8-inch fringe to break up the long, narrow lobby. “The furnishings were inspired by various 19th century styles,” Karimi

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“Boutique hotels need to offer a distinctive guest experience, and there is no better way to do that than with quirky details.” says. “We used a lot of deep reds and gold, velvets for the upholstery fabric, elegant tapestries for the throw pillows, and even added antique reproduction buffets in many of the rooms.” For a more modern touch, Kindred and Karimi commissioned Philadelphia fiber sculptor Leslie Pontz to turn her art into attention-grabbing light fixtures that are displayed prominently in the lobby and dotted throughout the hotel. “Boutique hotels need to offer a distinctive guest experience, and there is no better way to do that than with quirky details,” explains Kindred. “These unique touches carry into every one of the rooms.” – Margot Brody Photos by Mateusz Krzesiczan

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DESIGN BUREAU

Design Thinking

August 2013

Notes From the Bureau

Private Light An architect opens up a Long Island City condo to natural light—but keeps the neighbors out

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aterfront living is all about the views… except when the view is your neighbor’s apartment. Architect Devin O’Neill of Brooklyn-based O’Neill Rose Architects crafted a clever solution that gave the owners of this two-bedroom condo in Long Island City, Queens, the East River views and great light they craved with the privacy they needed.

O’Neill designed a screen that blocks the view of the neighboring building to the right, while letting in copious amounts of natural light. “The owners loved the light that came off the river, so we designed something that would reflect the light off the water and give an extra layer of privacy,” he says. Made of anodized aluminum, the silver screen comprises bendable tabs that O’Neill adjusted on-site to bounce light into the space. “As the light shifts during the day, the color of the screen changes to silver, bronze, and then blue,” he adds. Best of all, the focus is now on the river view seen from the front-facing windows. To make the inside of the 1,200-squarefoot space feel as expansive as the city views, O’Neill and contractor MC Squared stripped away some of the developer’s unecessary additions. “We tried to get rid of the extras to make the space bigger and more enjoyable,” he says. One such extra was the oversized kitchen island, which was cut in half and refinished in a calming, cornflower blue lacquer. The kitchen cabinets were likewise reworked in minimalist white lacquer. Standing in contrast to the clean white background, the blue island is a powerful pop. “Color has more impact when it’s used in small amounts,” O’Neill says. “We spent time choosing the right colors for this space. It’s used playfully here.” a Photos by Elizabeth Felicella, elizabethfelicella.com

“They loved the light off the river, so we designed something that would reflect light off the water.”

O’Neill worked with local fabricators to create the one-of-akind aluminum screen, which was laser cut in upstate New York and anodized in Queens. “I like finding small companies that make unexpected materials,” he says.

The screen O’Neill built filters in silver, bronze, and blue light off the East River as the sun shifts throughout the day. The architect stripped away unnecessary elements to create a more open feeling in the space.


August 2013

Design Thinking

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Brewshot carries Blue Bottle coffee, currently sold in only four locations in the NYC area.

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BC

BROADWAY CARPET

& WINDOW TREATMENTS

A coffee shop with such a custom interior design should carry custom products as well, no? Brewshot also has custom tea blends made specifically for the shop.

Designer Joshua Cummings looked to stained-glass windows of cathedrals for design inspiration. “I wanted Brewshot to have that same familiar warmth and feeling,” he says. Now, the inspiring interior of the coffee shop makes it a place of pilgrimage for creative professionals.

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Cummings’ friend, graphic designer Ross Clugston, designed Brewshot’s typeface to mirror the architecture, design, and even coffee culture of 1950s Milan. He took a standard typeface and gave it a contemporary spin. “It’s modern at the same time,” Cummings says.

Coffee House Cool

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The walls were painted with a special dichroic automobile paint that changes color with the lighting. Eight pendant lights in wooden frames give the walls an ombré effect. The positioning of the lights references the classic urban diner, a la Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks.”

Manhattan Location

Head to Jersey City for design inspiration and a damn good cup of joe

“T

he coffee shop should be the third place in one’s life after work and home,” says designer Joshua Cummings of Grey Office, a Brooklyn-based architecture firm that recently designed Brewshot, a new gourmet coffee spot just across the bay in Jersey City, New Jersey. Indeed, Brewshot’s goal is to not only introduce a highend coffee culture to Jersey City, but to introduce the coffee shop as the primary public place in one’s life, a hub for creativity and intellectualism. The muchraved-about espresso is just one reason to visit Brewshot; here are five more. – Jordan Mainzer

4

Exposed wooden shelving unifies the space. “The idea was to create a geometry that really ties the space together,” Cummings says. The exposed wooden shelves tie into the wood used in the chairs and tabletops.

5

The Salt Chair from Design Within Reach, featured prominently in the shop, echoes the geometry of Brewshot’s design. “They’re simple and you might find them in a classic, old-world establishment,” Cummings says.

Photos by Grey Office Ltd., Joshua Cummings and Andrew Cummings, greyoffice.net

1285 Second Avenue New York, NY 10065 212.472.6900 Hours: M - F 9:30 - 6:30 Saturday 9:30 - 6:00 | Sunday Closed

Bronx Location 5790 Broadway Bronx, NY 10463 718.884.0999 Hours: M-F 8:30 - 6:30 Saturday 8:30 - 6:00 | Sunday Closed

info@broadwaycarpet.com

www.broadwaycarpet.com 212.472.6900


DESIGN BUREAU

Design Thinking

August 2013

Notes From the Bureau

Vancouver Views Lush scenery inspires the design of this elegant hotel Strong geometric designs and understated elegance reflect the cosmopolitan Vancouver location of the Fairmont Pacific Rim. “This project really reflects the best of the Vancouver landscape,” says Claudia Leccacorvi, a senior associate at architecture firm B+H CHIL Design. “The surrounding nature was a huge inspiration for the palette and natural patterning of the fabrics, carpet, and art.” The hotel showcases 20 types of stone, including an Italian marble staircase that forms the centerpiece of the lobby and the onyx presidential master bathroom. Custom millwork and American walnut furniture complement the granite and limestone used in public spaces.

www.st-damase.com

Standard guest suites deliver fresh, silvery champagne tones while gold suites deepen the level of extravagance with a richer palette. “The layering of rich materials and the attention to detail elevate Photos courtesy of B+H CHIL Design, bharchitects.com

Saint-Damase Hotel Furniture has been manufacturing custom furniture and millwork for top hotels for more 25 years. “When working on Fairmont Hotel our drawings

were detailed and precise,” says Marc Soucy, vice president of Saint-Damase. “Our goal was simply to integrate their vision into our production methodology.”

the overall aesthetic of the space without overwhelming the guest,” Leccacorvi says. “The design invites the fantastic views of the Vancouver skyline into the hotel by incorporating the color, textures and lines of the exterior landscape.” She describes the overall minimalist theme of the hotel as “West Coast modern.” – Amber Gibson


modern rock-’n’-roll culture.

IN PRINT AND ON THE IPAD. ALARM-MAGAZINE.COM


EMI/RFI Surveys, Simulations, Shield Design Services

This is an example of an AC ELF magnetic shielding system used to mitigate power frequency sources and not affiliated with the Weiss/Manfredi project.

Ambient EMI/RFI site survey & assessment EMF simulations of electrical distribution system Evaluated EMI impact on scientific tools (i.e., TEMs, SEMs, NMRs, SQUID, etc.)

FERRANTE

manufacturing company

Designed AC ELF/DC magnetic shielding with active compensation system for TEMs/SEMs; Vitatech withdrew from Weiss/Manfredi project.

115 Juliad Court, Suite 105 Fredericksburg VA, 22406 Phone 540 286 1984 Fax 540 268 1865 www.vitatech.net

6626 Gratiot Detriot, Michigan 48207 www.ferrantemfg.com 313.571.1111 | 313.571.0325


August 2013

Design Thinking

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Notes From the Bureau

Before & After

Mall Makeover Retail design pros give Calgary’s outdated mall an à la mode overhaul

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or office workers taking midday breaks and shoppers scooping up the latest fashions, the Core, Calgary’s only downtown shopping center, is the place to have their lunchtime hunger and desire for luxury goods fulfilled. MMC International Architects and international retail design firm GH+A stepped in to give the center, which was built in 1977, a much deserved face-lift. – Jill McDonnell

AFTER

before Glass bridges connected the three separate Core properties. While the interconnected skyways helped protect Calgarians from the elements, they also added to the disjointed effect between the buildings. Inside the buildings, there was minimal visibility between floors. The fourth floor contained a garden, but by the late 2000s it had become outdated and overgrown. “We wanted to create one single retail destination with a cohesive identity,” Debbie Kalinsky, director of retail development for GH+A, says. MMC transformed the architectural shell, while GH+A developed the retail storefront design criteria, finishes, amenities, and wayfinding.

To create a seamless transition from one building to another, the steps between each property were demolished and sloped. “The building’s ceiling was blasted away so that you could get a sense of the excitement and retail activity all throughout the four levels of the complex,” Kalinsky says. While the glass walkways remain, there are now tenants on either side of the glass bridge, so that passersby never miss an opportunity to shop. Lush greenery is once again alive and well: The city of Calgary invested $40 million to demolish the old garden and rebuild a 2.5-acre exotic indoor oasis. But the crown jewel of the Core is its new glass point support structure, which was constructed on top of the existing roof before it was removed. The structural supports are located on the glass exterior to allow shoppers an up-close-and-personal look at the dramatic Calgary skyline. a

The result of a $40 million investment from the city, a lush indoor green space adds an open, airy quality to the Core not typically found in indoor malls.

Photos by John Bilodeau, johnbilodeau.com

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Who

am I

A

lthough he’s one of the interior design industry’s hottest new talents, Ryan Korban seems to be having an identity crisis. This 28-year old self-taught designer doesn’t identify with interior designers as the title is typically defined. He doesn’t like to be called “tastemaker,” either. Perhaps because he didn’t arrive by the typical path; he just knows he has a passion for creating beautiful spaces. “For me, it’s more about style and taste than design specifically. I’ll see something glamorous, and I’ll think, ‘how can I turn this into a room?’ It almost feels like the interior design is secondary.” Korban’s is co-owner of the New York boutique Edon Manor. This interior was his first ever endeavor, and the one that got him noticed. He’s since worked with Alexander Wang (who is a personal friend), luxury brands like Balenciaga, and done celebrity homes. Korban tells us in his own words about his aesthetic, his dreams, and why he wants to redefine the “decorator” title.

Interview by Saundra Marcel

Portrait by Matthew Williams

Interior photo by ditte isager


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“Sometimes I forget that people need to exist in these spaces. You know, comfort and functionality is sometimes not at the forefront.

But with every project you have to strike a balance,

and that’s something I’m still learning.” “I’m so not a decorator, but I so am a decorator.” When I think of decorators, I think of bow ties and old people. But I’ve actually grown to really like the title. I really do decorate. I’d rather take the title and redefine it than say I don’t want to be called that.

“It’s impossible for there to be a young tastemaker of today.” The idea of the tastemaker has died, the way designers in the past did it. Someone like Tony Duquette: He wasn’t really an interior designer, he was a tastemaker. That shone through in everything he did and he would very deservingly get a title like that. I’ve done articles and things where people say ‘the tastemakers,’ and I’m one of them. But I feel sad about that. People use that term too loosely. When you step back and think about it, who is a young tastemaker today? For all the articles magazines do on tastemakers, I don’t know any.

“I’m not fashion obsessed.” I think I have a healthy relationship with fashion. I’ve always loved everything to do with design, and that includes the clothing you wear. It’s actually that I love retail; I love the idea of luxury goods. Even when I travel, my first thing has always been to stop by every luxury store I could. ‘I’ve got to stop by this store, and I’ve got to see what that store looks like. What does Prada in Tokyo look like?’ How do I integrate interior design into my other disciplines? Because those are the disciplines I was exploring before interior design.

“Aesthetic is not something you can learn in school.” There are definitely times when I wish I knew a certain computer program. But what I can offer—and I don’t mean to sound obnoxious—is not something you can learn in school. My friends in architecture and interior design majors had time to develop their skill. I had time to develop my aesthetic. Those are two different things. It was important for me to understand my own point of view, to study European history, to study cultural media studies, important to know all about fashion. To know what all those things meant and how they could be brought together into building this aesthetic and this vision that is mine.

“I will always have the same look.” I’m very much a creature of habit. It’s not going to change—I just don’t think that’s possible. What I do tend to do is really explore material. When I make a decision to do something, I just want it. I’m obsessed with it. I’m going to cover every inch in zebra. Or velvet. Or marble. The most interesting thing to do is to take a material and to really go as far as you can with it.

“My biggest dream is that I stay here.” If I could just know that there was another project—that this career isn’t going to come to an end—that’s what I covet the most. You put everything into something, and when it comes to an end, usually there’s something else you’re working on, but there’s that anxiety. There could be a lull, but it always comes. You just have to tell yourself that. The next best thing is always around the corner. For me, it’s a miracle, but it’s been true. Just when I thought it couldn’t get any better, it always does. a

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Business gets playful at Quicken Loans’ HeadQuarters By Rebecca Powers / Photos by Dave Burk/Hedrich Blessing Ltd.


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ike a flash of boldly patterned socks peeking from beneath the cuffs of a sedate business suit, splashes of exuberant color are making surprise appearances among downtown Detroit’s classic office towers. For Detroiters, it’s no surprise the hyper hues belong to the companies of Dan Gilbert, the high-powered Quicken Loans founder and chairman who, at times, seems to buy skyscrapers for breakfast.


Rossetti trusted Ferrante Manufacturing Co. to produce custom cabinetry for The Qube. The architectural millwork fabricator has been in business since 1946, and specializes in custom woodworking, seating, cabinetry, and commercial furnishing. “Rossetti is one of the easiest firms to work with,” says Daniel Friedel, Ferrante’s vice president. “They really take the time to explain their vision.”

Among the 20-plus downtown properties he has acquired in the last two years is the 14-floor, 500,000-square-foot Chase Tower, Quicken Loans’ colorful new office space known as The Qube, where the employee cafeteria is called Qzine. (If “brought to you by the letter Q” comes to mind, you get the drift—Quicken Loans’ corporate culture is unabashedly youth-oriented.) The Qube occupies a modernist Albert Kahn Associates-designed structure built in 1959. But the interior of the stylistically restrained, mid-century edifice is more Pee-wee’s Playhouse than Mad Men. That decor is the result of a risk-embracing collaboration between Quicken and metro Detroit-based architecture, planning, and interior design firm Rossetti. The appearance of an acid green painted ceiling in the sunlit, marble-floored Chase Tower lobby was the first clue to casual observers that something different was afoot. Within five months, The Qube was nearly complete and had interior design groupies talking (in some cases, clucking).

As it turns out, the green was just the beginning. “It’s like the White House,” says Kelly Deines, Rossetti’s director of creative design and lead project designer for The Qube. “Every room has a color.” Colors include cyan blue, orangey-red, lime, and a purplepink-red. The palette reflects the man at the top: Gilbert’s affection for brilliant tones and bright illumination is well documented. (CONTINUED)


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Left: Qzine’s floor-to-ceiling columns are oversize sculptural elements coated in “writable” paint. “[They’re] exploded Noguchi forms,” Deines says. Although physically impressive, they also provide a visual break, as do the white perimeter walls.

Cruising the elevator mimics the video gaming experience, with doors sliding open at each stop to reveal a new “level.”

The floors are also distinguished by gaming themes. “Video games are unedited worlds of interior design,” says Deines. Cruising The Qube via elevator mimics the gaming experience, with doors sliding open at each stop to reveal a new “level.” There’s a textural expanse of shimmering sequins on nine; on eight, a pruned shrubbery wall appears. Comfort was also a consideration. “Our design staff studied what people gravitate toward, where they feel comfortable,” says Denise Drach, Rossetti’s director of business development and marketing. Because there’s no place like home, the team created a version of a living room, patio, and den in the building. The Qzine cafeteria is the spot for comfort food. “So many cafeterias are used 11 AM to 2 PM and after that, they’re useless, big spaces,” Deines says. “This is sort of a 24/7 space.” In addition to featuring a coffee bar and candy bar, Qzine has a ventless ribbon fireplace and contemporary wingback chairs that accommodate personal cell phone breaks.

games, and TV-equipped kitchens, where slushies, cappuccinos, and popcorn all are free. (No wonder Quicken requested a durable interior.)

Even business spaces are dressed down. It’s not uncommon to see coworkers tossing footballs near a sea of headset-wearing staffers stationed at sit-to-stand desks. The carpet in at least one work area reveals skid marks from an EVO scooter provided for staff use—same as the foosball tables, video

“Stimulating” is the word Deines uses to describe the visual extravaganza. It’s a look, says Quicken Loans’ director of facilities Melissa Price, that meets the company’s need to compete with Google and Facebook. “If this isn’t for you,” she says of the office, “I don’t know that our culture would be.” a


interior designers

speak Inspiration: It’s where every design project begins. Finding it is the easy part. It’s the process that comes next—the nurturing of that lightbulb of an idea and the challenges that arise—that tests the creative mind. We asked nine of the industry’s top professionals to tell us what exactly it is that inspires them, and when they follow it, where it leads. By Lesley Stanley

Elizabeth Gordon Founder @ Elizabeth Gordon Studio Location: Los Angeles, California

“I

n a creative field, if you ever get to the point in your profession and say, ‘I’m there, I’ve created my aesthetic and no longer need to pursue new avenues of design,’ you become stagnant.”

LS: What inspires you? Elizabeth Gordon: I come into contact with things that sometimes I don’t think will have an influence, but I will return to them and use it as a detail or approach in my work. For example, I once saw a model walking down a runway wearing this

exquisite, streamlined and detailed dress. The way it folded and molded around her body became the inspiration for a chair, and how particular pieces attach and interact with one another. I also love (Jean-Michel) Basquiat. His art is like looking into his mind. The pattern, color, or motion will

inspire me on how to use textures, pattern, or color in a space. LS: What helped you develop your voice in this industry? EG: I feel like I’m still developing my voice. In a creative field, if you ever get to the point in your profession and say, ‘I’m there, I’ve created my

aesthetic and no longer need to pursue new avenues of design,’ you become stagnant. I don’t ever want to get to the point where I feel like I’ve gotten there. That scares me more than anything. Whether it’s writing, design, or art, people are more interested in your work if it evolves and is not just the same old same old.


Photos by Grey Crawford

Hollywood Hills project You won’t see any white walls in this 3,800-squarefoot neoclassical home located in the Hollywood Hills. Since its owners wanted the interior to be reflective of their eclectic taste and lifestyle, Gordon says she went with a mix of creative and sculptural artifacts that are either vintage or custom-made. “The more eclectic, the more fun I have,” says Gordon.


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Tracy Davis Principal @ Urban Dwellings Location: New York, New York

Portrait by Emilie Inc.; interior photos by Brian Vanden Brink

LS: What challenges you most? Tracy Davis: The challenge of a new project. In your mind, you’re evoking a scene—that’s what gets the juices flowing. I love finding new materials and products for each design. I prefer not to duplicate materials, and I go out of my way to remove those from my library. It keeps us fresh.

“I prefer not to duplicate materials, and I go out of my way to remove those from my library. It keeps us fresh.”

LS: Do you feel it took you time to develop your voice, or was it something you felt strongly about from the get-go? TD: Finding my voice has always been more about being different and separating myself from the visuals that are expected. I think often there is a dogma around interior designers, and I try to bust through those myths. There are a lot of designers that are gifted in their design aesthetic, but I like to

stand outside of the box and look in. LS: Do you have any guiding design principles? TD: You have to look at the strength of the object or material you’re using—can it stand alone as a visual or aesthetic detail in the room, uncluttered? I believe less is more and oftentimes we cover up things that embrace beauty. These elements need to be strong enough to stand alone so they can be admired for what they are.

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Richter Residence The 15,000-square-foot multi-level home’s neutral color palette and natural finishes complement the landscape. “We tried to pay homage to the changing seasons in different parts of the home,” says Lisman. With its magnificent views, the mountains become artwork.

Interior photos by Scot at Scot Zimmerman Photography, scotzimmermanphotography.com; portrait by Adilfa at Don Polo Photography, donpolo.com

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LaMar Lisman CEO/Interior Designer @ Lisman Studio Interior Design Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

nyone can throw money at things, but it takes a qualified professional to achieve goals in design and still be in budget.”

still expecting that, and a great designer should be able to do that. Anyone can throw money at things, but it takes a qualified professional to achieve goals in design and still be in budget.

LS: How has the industry changed over the course of your career? LaMar Lisman: As design professionals, we now need to show and provide more value to our clients. The challenge has

LS: Where does your personal inspiration come from? LL: Inspiration is always influenced by nature and is derived a lot from my surroundings. Living in this region of the country, we have four seasons, which provide endless opportunities because

“A

become working with tighter budgets and high expectations and not having our design compromised. When I first started 25 years ago, design influences were more driven by aesthetics than they are now. The client is

the environment is constantly changing. Additional inspiration comes from clients. In the past, I would always present to clients what I felt they should have, and now it’s much more interactive. They have particular styles of furnishings, paint color, or artwork that are significant and meaningful and want it to be a part of the design. A lot of that can provide inspiration for an entire project. LS: How do you address a situation

where the client likes an element that may be aesthetically pleasing but not quite functional? LL: The client’s needs are always paramount, but you have to make them aware that a certain design element that may not be incredibly practical might affect functionality and require upkeep. If they are driven by that aesthetic, and they think it will inspire them, then I’m going to incorporate it.


Torek Project The 3,000-square-foot Torek Residence combines mid-century charm with a modern, eclectic flare and an emphasis on functionality.

lighting design Lighting specialist Melissa McDermott of the Utah-based Lighting Design Company helped to turn the Lisman Studio’s inspiration into a reality on the Torek residence project. “I tracked down light fixtures [the designers] had seen in magazines, displays, homes, and the Internet,” says McDermott. “ I also offered other possibilities that aligned with [their] vision.”


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992 Oceanfront Fischbeck says she wanted a warm, laidback feeling for the 992 Oceanfront project. Clean lines and a neutral color palette bring an airy feeling that doesn’t detract from the beautiful beach views.

Photos courtesy of Abodwell Interior Design, abodwell.com

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Brittney Fischbeck Founder/Interior Designer @ Abodwell Interior Design Location: Laguna Beach, California

“D

esign is in my blood, and is my passion. I have to remind myself that it is actually work.”

LS: Did you feel pressure to develop your voice early on? Brittney Fischbeck: Southern California is a mecca for design and there are so many talented architects and designers within a few square miles of Laguna Beach, where I live and work. My dad is a contractor so I spent many a summer vacation on construction sites— design is in my DNA. My parents encouraged my creativity, but were not totally thrilled when I announced, ‘I want to be an architect when I grow up.’ My dad said, ‘You’ll get stuck behind a desk all day drafting

and be broke! You need to be a designer, it’s more rewarding and fun.’ What's the saying? ‘Father knows best.’ LS: What helped you to develop your voice? BF: The projects I’ve been involved in. In the beginning my niche was historic cottages and traditional design. In recent years, I have been designing homes in the contemporary and minimalist style well enough that I have established a mini following. Fellow designers even refer potential clients to me if this is the style they desire.


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stone work “What we do best is working with natural stone... it’s my passion,” says Carlos Aquino, owner of OC Marmol, which manufactures and installs natural stone for high-end commercial and residential projects like 992 Oceanfront. “Abodwell was looking for someone with an artistic eye and creative ideas, and I knew we could accomplish their vision.”


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Photos by A.Langford photography

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Penthouse West Residence Inspired by the ocean view, Gorsline pulled the outdoors in with a calming color palette to create a relaxed vibe at the Penthouse West Residence. She even had the mirrors angled just right so you can see the ocean’s reflection upon entering the space.

Marcie Gorsline Founder/Interior Designer @ Marcie Gorsline Designs Location: Bay Shore, New York

“P

eople spend their lives in this space, raise their kids, entertain their friends in this space—and you are a part of that.”

LS: What strikes you first about a room? Marcie Gorsline: It’s the mood or lighting. When I meet a client and see their space—it speaks to me, and I try and honor the space. If I put down a fabric that I thought might look good, I’ll know right away if it’s a big ‘no.’ My gut tells me this. That comes from building confidence in the beginning of my career. You have to listen to those little cues. LS: Not only are you a designer, but

you’re also an artist, and you started your career painting. Do you use your fine art skills in your design work? MG: In the beginning, being able to picture a completed project helped me transition because that’s what I did with my art. People ask me if I miss art, but there is something about design, especially projects that I get to design from the ground up, that give me that same high. When things go wrong, I get an adrenaline rush from it. I

think, how are we going to fix it? The challenges that come along inspire and reinvigorate me. And it’s not only the challenges; I love seeing a client live in a house they are happy with. People spend their lives in this space, raise their kids, entertain their friends in this space— and you are a part of that.

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Joyce Romanoff President @ Maya Romanoff Location: Chicago, Illinois

“T

hrough collaboration, we have created unique, custom product designs with visionary interior designers who use our design studio as a workshop.”

LS: You’re actually not an interior designer, but rather the president of Maya Romanoff, helping to create some of the industry’s most beautiful wall coverings and surfacing materials. Have you always been passionate about design? Joyce Romanoff: I’ve always been interested in art and design, but never thought I would make it my career. But meeting [husband and business partner] Maya opened up a whole world of entrepreneurship, as well as art and beauty. He taught me how to look and recognize texture, color, and the nature of things. LS: What inspires the Maya Romanoff collections? JR: We find inspiration for new products from three main sources: nature, play, and collaboration. Our company has always focused on natural materials; we have collections made from hemp, seashell, glass, stone, and wood. In play, we are constantly experimenting with our current products, changing base material, pigments, top coats, and arriving at new products that we never could have predicted. And through collaboration, we have created unique, custom product designs with visionary interior

designers who use our design studio as a workshop. LS: Tell us about some of those collaborations. JR: Our Spring 2013 collection includes Groove-V, a highly metallic, deeply embossed, modern vinyl that is the newest product from our ongoing David Rockwell for Maya Romanoff series. The collaboration has proven to be a fantastic match— David and Maya are both visionaries that surround themselves with a group of talented creative professionals who help support and realize their vision. LS: When you look at a blank wall or floor, what do you see? JR: A blank canvas! I see a chance to fill the void with beauty or ‘something that will inspire the viewer again and again,’ to quote Maya.

Maya Romanoff's Ajiro Chevron wall covering is featured in the Jenner home designed by Jeff Andrews Design and photographed by Gray Crawford.


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Lakeside Retreat The spacious and comfortable 6,000-squarefoot home combines nostalgic mid-century style with a modernday Asian arts and crafts influence.

Photos by Tyler Mallory, www.tylermallory.com

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Tai Kojro-Badziak & Adam Wilmot Co-owners/founder @ RoomTEN Design Location: Chicago, Illinois

“I

t’s not like we are traditional artists staring at a blank canvas, wondering what the statement is going to be, or who our audience will be. Our canvas comes with color, light, and texture already applied.” –Adam Wilmot

LS: What inspires you? Tai Kojro-Badziak: Humans throughout history are a fascinating inspiration for me. I love geography, history, and how trader groups affected cities then and how that affects our lives today. I love people, and the footprint of what we’ve done creatively for as long as we’ve been around. I believe true inspiration comes from creative expression. LS: How does a project’s site shape its design? Adam Wilmot: The inspiration comes from the site itself. It’s not like we are

traditional artists staring at a blank canvas, wondering what the statement is going to be, or who our audience will be. Our canvas comes with color, light, and texture already applied. LS: What do you do when an idea in your head doesn’t translate well into a project? TKB: We trust our intuition and either create it or readjust the design. If an element is fighting back, our approach is not dogmatic. We address the situation, question it with all parties involved, and adjust as necessary.

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interior designers

Photos courtesy of Angela Dechard, angeladechard.com

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Angela Dechard Founder/Interior Designer @ Angela Dechard Interior Architectural Design Location: Portland, Oregon

LS: How do you get started on a project? Angela Dechard: Most of the time the lightbulb comes on at times when I’m not intentionally thinking, ‘What am I gonna do here?’ If I’m trying hard to find that thing that’s going to be the touchstone of a project, it will never happen. I once had a professor who said that we all needed to

“People are so much more creative than they realize, but not comfortable tapping into it. Ninety-five percent of the time your initial idea is the right one.”

take a break and have some playtime if we wanted ideas to come to us. Creativity could not be forced; it had to happen organically. It took me years to get it. But I finally did, and it’s a principle I live and work by now. LS: Where do you think your design voice comes from? AD: Clients have asked me about that—if it’s an innate thing or if it is something you develop and learn. I say I was definitely born with

it. I’ve always had this desire to design and collect and draw, but it’s also something you can learn and appreciate. It’s not an elite thing. People are so much more creative than they realize, but not comfortable tapping into it. Ninetyfive percent of the time your initial idea is the right one. You can waste a whole lot of time just going all the way around to infinite possibilities and end up right back where you started.

Glam in L.A. Inspired by Old Hollywood glam, Dechard says she combined modern pieces with vintage charm when designing the comfortable 2,000-square-foot home located in the hills of Los Angeles.

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1 5 2 3 W S t r u ck Ave, U ni t H • Ora ng e, CA 92867 • (714) 771-5063 www.ocm a rm ol .com


August 2013

Columns

DESIGN BUREAU

image, style, design

Interior Design: An Architectural Afterthought? WHY THESE HIGHLY TRAINED DESIGN PROFESSIONALS GET A BAD RAP By Steven Fischer

I

nterior design holds a rather odd relationship with the rest of the professional design community. It’s not exactly a secret that the discipline has gotten a bit of a reputation as the redheaded stepchild of design, simply relegated as a pastime for wealthy housewives. But the truth is that interior appointments actually have the closest and most immediate impact on our senses. Imagine a fine leather chair in an otherwise plain, empty room. Your senses immediately absorb the smell of the tanned hide, and upon sitting, your hands feel the unique texture of the leather. And what do your senses pick up about the rest of the room? Odds are not much other than just visually taking in the walls and floor. You’ve already strengthened your connection with the piece of furniture through multiple senses as opposed to the room in which it sits. Why is it that some in the design community look down on the interior decoration process? In part because of the stringent licensing requirements that other disciplines require. To become an architect, landscape architect, or engineer, you need a four-year college education, in many cases a post-graduate degree, and then you must pass a licensing exam to become certified. And after that, it’s necessary for these professionals to keep up with important professional training, for

consider that historically many of the great architects designed the furniture to be placed in the home.

their decisions can affect people’s lives and safety. Although interior design doesn’t hold such life and property implications, it influences and informs our emotions about being in a particular space. Keep in mind that interior design has also had some big architectural support. Legendary architects Mies van de Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier often designed the furniture that went into the homes and buildings they designed. From metal desks and chairs he designed for the Larkin building to stools and seats for his residential work, Wright designed was

carefully crafted his pieces with consideration for how the inhabitants would exist within his design, completing the human experience of their architecture. So, although interior design might not have the front-end qualification requirements that other design disciplines do, it is still as important as architecture, graphic design, or any other formal design discipline. It’s what our senses connect with about a space; it’s how we feel “at home” in an environment. If it was good enough for Mr. Wright, it should be good enough for all of us. a

Steven Fischer is Director of Image, Style & Design Studio and Lecturer at Northwestern University. For more information go to imagestyledesign.com.

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DESIGN BUREAU

Columns

August 2013

architects & artisans

A Slender Home for a Slender Lot At a slim $117 per square foot, In Situ Studio designs a home that turns on a dime by J. Michael Welton

The design of the Raleigh house uses space economically over its quarteracre lot.

N

ot long ago, Raleigh architect Matthew Griffith told me a story that could serve as primer for any new firm just starting out.

In 2011, six months after he and co-principal Erin Lewis established In Situ Studio, a new client walked through the door. A young couple, their project had been declined by six other firms. “Everyone turned them away because the project wasn’t big enough, which translates into a fee that wasn’t big enough,” Griffith says.

They owned a long, thin lot in downtown Raleigh, and wanted a modern, sustainable, and affordable home there. In Situ took on the project for the challenge, rather than the fee. “We designed a house for a couple who probably couldn’t afford an architect,” he says.

The result is a two-story, shingles, and sheetrock are 1,450 square-foot residence used. The basic driver for with three bedrooms and the design was the standard two and a half baths—a slen- four-foot by eight-foot plyder home for a slender lot wood sheet. Economy was that’s a quarter-acre in size. the watchword here. “It’s basically a Monopoly house,” Griffith says of the “They wanted to do it for $100,000, but we set the Chasen Residence. tone by saying, ‘No way... Downstairs, the stairwell, but if you give us $150,000, hallway, kitchen, and half- we could probably make it bath are placed to one side, work,’” he says. “It crept up opening up the rest of the to $168,000 when they despace for living. The upper cided on an air conditioning floor is pushed towards the system and solar hot water back of the lot to create a panel.” But still, the project double-height living space came in at a slim $117 per at the street, and a screened square foot. porch fronting the backyard. And the word’s gotten out. The west wall features a Since its completion, Griffin number of operable win- says their firm has taken on dows, while the east wall has eight similar projects, most few. So when wind slips into of them renovations. the porous west wall, it accelerates to escape through All in all, it’s a win/win situsmaller openings on the east, ation: the client got the house generating a draft through- they wanted, and the new firm out, even on days with a established a solid reputation slight breeze. as architects who can get the most from a tight budget. a Elswhere inside the home, humble materials like Hardie Plank and panel siding, For more on In Situ Studio, vinyl windows, asphalt roof visit insitustudio.us.

J. Michael Welton writes about architecture, art, and design for a number of national and international publications. He also publishes an online design magazine at architectsandartisans.com. Portions of this article appeared there previously.


HINKLEY L I G H T I N G design

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Courageous.Honest.Design. Portland, ME | New York, NY 877.533.6248 | urban-dwell.com

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LIGHTING Lighting Design, LLC 11538 S State Street, Ste 100 Draper, UT 84020 801.495.1948 www.lightingdesign.com Melissa (Mac) McDermott Lighting & Design Specialist cell 801.209.4822 work 801.495.1948 x111 mac@lightingdesign.com


Rigo’s g go’s Custom Furniture INC.

Sculptor Jess LaRotonda, spotlighted last month for her Chandelier installation which serves as the visual centerpiece at the Ippolita flagship store on Madison Avenue, answers additional questions about her work. What's your favorite medium?

I love working in three dimensions because it's all fair game. Metal, wood, wax, whatever the project calls for.

What was your favorite part of creating the chandelier sculpture?

I really enjoyed every step of the process, but a major highlight was final install. Seeing people react to the piece was so rewarding.

Are you interested in design work?

I am! I loved the problem solving involved in creating a custom object for the space, and making a client's vision come to life.

Make sure to keep track of this emerging artist!

JESS LaROTONDA www.jesslarotonda.com

Leading the industry in excellence for over 28 years Specializing in hand crafted furniture, Rigo's Custom Furniture works with a variety of the finest imported woods and beautiful veneers. From intricate carvings to contemporary styles, each piece is as unique as their customers. Rigo's is proud to make furniture for designers in several cities across the U.S.A. and counts amongst their clientele several of the finest retail showrooms in L.A. Rigo’s has made several hand crafted pieces for Elizabeth Gordon. Rigo's has been selected by L.A. city as the Best Wood Maker and Cabinet Maker in 2012.

Rigo's Custom Furniture Inc. 4464 W. Adams Blvd. | Los Angeles, CA 90016 Rigitousa@aol.com | 323-730-1039

www.rigosfurniture.com


August 2013

This issue’s best Albums

DESIGN BUREAU

Presented by

ALARMPRESS

Queens of the Stone Age

01/

…Like Clockwork (Matador) Named after a propensity for its recording to be derailed “like clockwork,” the first album in six years from Queens of the Stone Age finds front man Josh Homme back with his primary outfit following records with Them Crooked Vultures and Eagles of Death Metal. Off the bat, it’s vintage QOTSA, with alternately slinky and classic rock-’n’-roll riffs topped by Homme’s wavy, oft-falsettoed vocals. But the album’s style quickly expands, and not just from

high-profile guests Trent Reznor, Dave Grohl, Elton John, Mark Lanegan, and others. Swelling synths and a bouncy bass line lead “The Vampyre of Time and Memory,” a spacey and ever-so-jazzy intro/ bridge mark “Kalopsia,” and a-cappella harmonies introduce “Fairweather Friends.” Like its predecessors, …Like Clockwork features a unique palette of guitar tones, exemplified by the alien-harmony effects on the stomping “Smooth Sailing.” They also aid the hard-charging moments, which, despite down-tempo jams, are many. In all, …Like Clockwork is a welcome return. [SM]

Shining

Dessa

Integrity

One One One (Prosthetic)

Parts of Speech (Doomtree)

YPLL (A389 / Magic Bullet)

02/ When Norway’s Shining released Blackjazz in 2010, it marked more than a bold new direction in progressive metal—it was the final phase of transformation of a former acoustic jazz outfit that had delved into classical melodies, prog rock, and synth-driven industrial madness. One One One, the latest from Shining songwriter Jørgen Munkeby, isn’t another shock to the system; instead it refines and streamlines, pairing more rock-’n’-roll grooves, blazing tempos, and traditional song structures with the brutality. The tracks here are all “ones”—each a singularly digestible piece, each a miniature masterpiece of metallic, fist-pumping avant-rock. [SM]

03/ Parts of Speech is as much a polymath as Dessa herself. A noted lecturer, spoken-word artist and singer, poet, and part of the Doomtree hip-hop collective, Dessa holds an eclectic background that coalesces in her work. Her third full-length keeps some of Castor, the Twin’s echoing orchestrals but splices in electronic DNA—a symbiosis akin to Dessa’s mix of spitting and crooning. “The Man I Knew” and “Call Off Your Ghost” set up this relationship, as letters to a former lover are backed by live-band melodicism and skittering kicks. A bared Dessa lives in her lyrics, her voice alternately purring and cutting. Parts of Speech is a self-portrait: a person loving, posturing, vulnerable, and imperfectly beautiful. [LE]

04/ With an ever-shifting lineup held together by vocalist Dwid Hellion, legendary Cleveland band Integrity has helped shape metalcore for 25 years. Suicide Black Snake again calls on guitarist Robert Orr, whose hellacious riffs led the thunderous beats and harrowing screams of 2010’s The Blackest Curse, the band’s first full album since 2003. Stylistically, Suicide Black Snake doesn’t fall far from the tree that the duo began planting five years ago—blazing speed riffs, chugging breakdowns, and squealing high notes are the main course once more. But every now and then we hear a track like “There Ain’t No Living in life,” with a harmonica part and clean guitar melody to pair with dueling rock-solo riffs. If you like Integrity, have a little more. [SM]

02/

03/

04/

05/

06/

07/

John Vanderslice

The Octopus Project

Rose Windows

Dagger Beach (Tiny Telephone)

Fever Forms (Peek-A-Boo)

The Sun Dogs (Sub Pop)

05/ Singer-songwriter John Vanderslice took to Kickstarter to fund his latest album; accordingly, Dagger Beach reflects his view of a modern world. His analogue techniques are present—the instrumentation is full of rich, warm sound—but they’re accented by sneaking electronic tones. R ecor d ed aga i n w it h M i n n a C h oi ’s Magik*Magik Orchestra, the material isn’t as lush as 2011’s sweeping White Wilderness, but it’s subtly dense. Overlapping rhythms and twang propel “Gaslight,” while “Sleep It Off” features marimba and distorted percussion. Elsewhere, on “Sonogram,” voice and music fall into a heartbeat before the listener realizes what’s happened. Fittingly, surprises abound in Dagger Beach. [LE]

06/ Over the past decade, Austin’s The Octopus Project has built a portfolio of electronics-infused post- and indie rock, with each of its four multiinstrumentalists (the eight arms of the octopus) contributing in different ways for each song. Following the video-synchronized Hexadecagon ex per ience, Fever Forms is f u l l of dense, da ncea ble rock ja ms with glistening electronics, dirty guitars, and the occasional glockenspiel, music box, or handclap. It’s just as buoyant but more direct—and it rocks harder. Simply put, Fever Forms is a gem of progressive pop rock. [SM]

07/ The Sun Dogs, the debut album from Seattle septet Rose Windows, upends any preconceived notions you might have about a band blurring genre lines. What begins as a deep, deft, and dark album with “Spirit Modules,” centered on slow-moving variances of flute, guitar, organ, and other chambermusic essentials, soon explodes into a raucous and riotous affair on “Native Dreams.” From there on, the album takes turns and occasionally slams on the brakes, shifting with ease between heavy post-rock, indie Americana, and prog folk, as well as bursts of Persian, Indian, and Eastern European music influences. Indeed, Rose Windows is what it sounds like when it all comes together and works. [MD]

Scott Morrow is the music editor at ALARM Press and author of This Week’s Best Albums, an eclectic weekly series presenting exceptional music. Visit alarm-magazine.com for more. [MD] Michael Danaher [LE] Lincoln Eddy [SM] Scott Morrow. Photos courtesy of the artists.

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DESIGN BUREAU

August 2013

FOR HIRE DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

For Hire: Ashley Kuhn FOR HIRE Design We’re a little biased—this graphic designer is Talent our intern! Now she’s Fresh On the Market looking to bring her sexy layouts to a certain design firm... wink wink

FOR HIRE

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

FOR HIRE

FOR HIRE

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

FOR HIRE

FOR HIRE

FOR HIRE

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

Design Talent Fresh On the Market

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

FOR HIRE

FOR HIRE: Laura Allcorn

DESIGNwork TALENT What design doFRESH you most gravitate toward? ON THE MARKET

DESIGN TALENT FRESH ON THE MARKET

I’m a fan of making sexy editorial layouts. My other work definitely has a style to it though, which is rooted in collage. my hands DESIGN TALENT FRESH I want things to look like DESIGN TALENTtouched FRESH them, ON THE MARKET THE MARKET because they are, many times,ON made that way.

FORFORHIRE HIRE

What’s something you’d like to create that you haven’t? It would be a dream to design my own loft space or house. Renting in Chicago is great, but there are only so many grandma kitchens that I can handle. Who are some of your design inspirations? Of course I look up to the greats, like every Swiss designer ever. However, I do come from an art history background, so many fine artists like Duchamp and Magritte still inspire my design. The Chicago design community is full of extremely talented, all-around great people—I look to them frequently. My teachers, classmates, family, and friends are also really inspiring to be around.

from top left: Magazine concept (“inspired by my favorite blog, cabinporn.com,”

says Ashley); handmade paper collage using cut-outs from Vanity Fair; print campaign concept for Rosetta Stone (copywriting, art direction, and design), Best of Quarter winner for best concept at Chicago Portfolio School

What is your ideal post-graduation job? My dream job is with VSA Partners in Chicago (*wink wink*). They’re incredible. I would love to work somewhere with variety, where I can have a real stake in the projects I’m a part of. Why should someone hire you? I’m walking this weird line between advertising and editorial design, and I would love to do both! In every job I’ve had, I wore multiple hats. That’s what I want— I want to try on all of the design hats.

Ashley Likes: Grids, magazines from the ’60s, whiskey, my cat, the Internet, oxfords, Maine, traveling, concerts, sharing a meal with the people I love

Ashley Dislikes: Poor type choices, humidity, terrible drivers, the word “supple,” allergies, lunch singers at Potbelly Sandwich Shop, getting my picture taken

RESUME SNAPSHOT: Ashley Kuhn EDUCATION Chicago Portfolio School Graphic Design Specialization, 2012-2013

Work Experience Design Bureau magazine, 2013 Web development and print design intern

Michigan State University B.A. in History of Art and Visual Cultures, 2009

Freelance designer, 2009-present Various clients for print and web

MSU Museum, 2008-2009 Exhibit Design and Curatorial Assistant

Are you a design student or recent grad? Are you interested in being featured in For Hire? Email us: forhire@wearedesignbureau.com

Wanna hire Ashley? Check out his website: ashleykuhn.com


The waffle concrete Entry Canopy (porte cochere) at the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami received a face lift after nearly 30 years of service. It was jazzed up with centrally controlled LED lighting, covered by a suspended glass ceiling and faรงade.

Atrium Lit Panels in the lobby of the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami. The frames are all aluminum tubular construction with pointsupported laminated tempered glass on both sides.

Two custom designed and engineered portals were installed as part of the renovation at the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami. Both frames are welded stainless steel tubing with point-supported laminated glass cladding.

DeBary, FL 32713 office : 386.668.0474 | cell : 407.492.4523 e-mail : bernd@specialty-structures.com www.specialty-structures.com


gentner furniture showroom

228

w kinzie st 2nd floor chicago il

60654

| t

312 755 0700

gentnerdesign.com


Design Bureau Issue 21  

The Interiors Issue 2013

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