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JOHN HOYLAND Unmistakable Identity

11 March – 9 April 2009

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 22 Mason‟s Yard T: +44 (0)20 7930 1262

Duke Street St. James‟s F: +44 (0)20 7839 8043

London SW1Y 6BU E: contact@alanwheatleyart.com

United Kingdom W: alanwheatleyart.com


Photo by Paul Warner

‘John and I got to know each other forty years ago when we travelled to South America together for the São Paulo Biennial. We have been friends ever since. Beneath his outgoing and fun-loving exterior lies a great honesty and depth of character. These qualities come across in his paintings. I get a lift from seeing them.’ Anthony Caro


The sixties was a time of great optimism, Paris had died as the centre of the art world, Italy and Germany had also stalled, after the brief brilliance of Fontana and Group Uno, New York had taken over. At the beginning of the sixties in England it suddenly seemed that anything was possible. Anthony Caro‟s show at Whitechapel in 1963 was like a beacon light showing us the way, it heralded an escape from the parochialism of British Art. Stephan Munsing was the Cultural Attaché at the American Embassy, New shows of American Art appeared monthly (we didn‟t realise they were political as well as artistic), we drank champagne for the first time, we began to travel and to talk “ART”. Bryan Robertson was the key figure. He was director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery where he put on bold international shows together with British Art. He was a great catalyst, an enormously generous spirit who introduced we young artists to all the artists he was showing. The list included Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and many others. As a result we were able to forge transatlantic links. For me the so-called “swinging sixties” was a parallel universe. I was not interested in the style icons of the day, Carnaby Street, the Kings Road and Pop Art, in much the same way I am not interested in the superficiality of the so-called “Brit Art”. To me this all represented “Little Britain”. I didn‟t want what blacks call “blue eyed soul” with people from the London School of Economics poncing around the stage. I wanted the real blues and jazz, we wanted to fire the “Big Guns”. Once one had glimpsed the sublime, it became impossible to engage with the instant gratification of so-called “Op Art”, or the playful games of “Pop Art”. For me art has always seemed to be a more serious matter, a bigger game. I taught most days, then painted until midnight, sometimes up to 20ft wide, I needed to, and thought that the world needed them also, how wrong I was.

John Hoyland February 2009


Photo by Beverley Heath


JOHN HOYLAND: UNMISTAKABLE IDENTITY

This broad selection of John Hoyland‟s paintings post-dates juvenilia and concentrates on the early and middle years. It therefore more or less encompasses his witty summation of artistic progress: „As I‟ve said before many times, when you‟re young you paint what you see. You paint the garden, you paint your Dad, you paint the dog, you paint your girlfriend. Then when you get a bit older you want to show everybody what a tough guy you are and that you can beat anybody‟s brains out. Then later on you want to show everybody how intelligent you are, that you understand all the polemics. You understand the whole game, of what‟s going on in rival camps and internationally and so on; and you want to play the big game. And then when you get old you don‟t care what the fuck you do! You‟re more free to just dive in and take risks and you can always dip back into your earlier work, different periods of work, and come out. What Picasso called the “unlearning process”.‟ „More or less encompasses‟ because, of course, there is only one John Hoyland; and he brings every aspect of that unique pictorial intelligence, renowned wit and out-spoken-ness to every painting he makes. The earliest painting in the show, 7.10.64 (dates mark completion), is nearly six-feet square. He reckons he used a roller to add as many as ten coats to achieve the right green intensity, saturating the canvas. A similar shot of black down the left-hand side is balanced by two boxed reds of slightly dissimilar widths and one, slightly broader, in orange, hand-painted to hang from the top-edge of the canvas at equal intervals. It looked amazingly bold 45 years ago and has lost none of its vivacity. Robert Motherwell, leading spokesman for the New York School of artists, once wrote to Hoyland thanking him for the present of one of his paintings: „The vitality, the juice and the intense color make a lot of the pictures we have around collapse.‟ Hoyland‟s art, even at its most austere and minimal, always hangs its heart on its sleeve: „I never liked a lot of the hard-edged painters because they were too much to do with design. There was never any natural handling in them, the natural bond between the hand and the mind and the surface.‟ Forty years later anonymous procedures have rendered the artist little more than a contractor, something he deplores. „The problem with a lot of conceptual art, where the actual object is made by other people, is that it completely takes away the process of learning through making the work. If you just give a photograph of an idea and send it to some skilled craftsman to make, it kills the creative process.‟

1964 was a breakthrough year. Bryan Robertson had included Hoyland in the now famous New Generation show of young British artists, at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, and had also secured him a travelling bursary from the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation to visit New York for the first time. There he met some of the big guns of the already legendary New York School – Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko and, of special significance since he was to become a close friend, Robert Motherwell.


„It was when I hit my stride, in a sense. I‟d been mainly concerned with trying to find forms to contain colour and decided to go back to something simpler I suppose. The idea of hanging the rectangles from the top, that was a bit influenced by English sculptors at the time who were all bringing sculpture off the stand onto the ground. I remember Bill Tucker saying to me: “I feel sorry for painters, because everything‟s been done in painting, but in abstract sculpture it‟s all wide open still”; because very little had been done using colour and new materials. But that was also true of painting. I remember thinking “Fuck you, Bill”.‟ Hoyland adopted the faster drying water-based acrylic paint, popular with artists since pouring paint had become the vogue; and masking tape to isolate one colour while applying another next to it, as with the sharply defined reds in 7.10.64. „The reds would have been put in with a brush or palette knife, they‟re more thickly painted. If I used masking-tape I always tried to make it look as if I didn‟t. I didn‟t want those sharp, geometric, edges. It‟s like antiquing a rectangle slightly. In the „sixties I was struggling to find forms.‟ Another big event of 1964/5 was the compilation and publication of Private View, advertised as “the first book ever to tell how London became, with Paris and New York, one of the world‟s three capitals of art”. It grew out of the Sunday Times magazine, first of the colour supplements. Eighty-one artists were included, with the accent on the under-35s, photographed by Snowdon and with extended captions by either Bryan Robertson or The Sunday Times‟s art critic John Russell. Robertson‟s entry for Hoyland‟s remains utterly relevant: „He tends to work on a series of ideas which then flow into a subsequent development: each phase explored to the hilt with great resourcefulness and invention. Hoyland‟s concern is for the ambiguity which can exist between the figure or motif and its enveloping ground: both invariably stated in terms of strong, resonant colour which cuts out tonality. The play between the shapes themselves and the tension between the all-over space and those shapes are dramatic and highly subtle. Hoyland is a true inventor.‟

The last of this opening series in the selection, 23.6.66, acts as a link. If stood vertical it would not look out of place among the tall and narrow rectangular paintings which follow. The colours now are less vernal, more honeyed. 30.11.68 is notably harmonious, the weight of the dark green discord perfectly judged to check but not disrupt the mellow whole. A sense of perspective, of one element standing in front of another, is introduced with 13.2.69, signalling the next development. Referring to his first major retrospective, put on by Bryan Robertson at the Whitechapel in 1967, Hoyland said in 1970: „Everyone went on about the colour… I just happened to like those colours and I still do. But the ways edges met, how colours impinged upon one another, the way that that affected the space, was much more of a problem.‟


13.2.69, with its solid, albeit floating, red rectangle against a fluid, even atmospheric mix of muted hues gives an unavoidable sense of foreground and background, which may owe something to Hans Hoffman, whose work he had seen on that first visit to New York in 1964; but also to the lingering influence of Nicolas de Staël, yet another foreign artist whose work was introduced to an English audience by Bryan Robertson at the Whitechapel, where Hoyland saw it as a student at the Royal Academy Schools in 1956. Hoyland‟s admiration for Hoffman is well known, his debt to de Staël, who also favoured blocks of colour, not so much. „De Staël‟s one of my great heroes. My son is named Nicolas after him, and my father-in-law (my first wife‟s father was Finnish) was furious when I insisted on it being spelt the Russian way. The Americans never mention de Staël because he wasn‟t American. I‟m sure Hoffman must have seen him. De Staël was a fantastic artist. He had this terrible problem which everybody was trying to solve at the time, and he did it better than anyone else, of trying to reconcile figurative and abstract painting. That was the big issue. And they couldn‟t seem to let go of the figurative aspect. After them we were able to do paintings that stand on their own without any obvious external reference. But it was very hard to get out of the parochialism of English landscape-based abstraction.‟ 2.3.70 shows the solid red rectangle melting and fragmenting, the suffused colours surrounding it speckled with what could be spatters from the molten core. In 1969 Hoyland achieved the first goal of any self-respecting British artist, to make enough money to give up teaching. For four years he divided his time between London and New York. He was now an international star, contracted to Waddington Galleries in London and André Emmerich in New York and with exhibitions from Milan to Los Angeles.

Part of the reason he lived so much in America was to mix it with the best painters in his field, but also because he shared his life at the time with the American jazz singer Eloise Laws. The change to unusual colour combinations, pinks and tans, instead of the primaries, notably red and green, used by the artists he first admired - Van Gogh, Matisse and the Fauves in particular owed something to his New York-based painter friend Jules Olitski. „I used to call them the “love-that-mud school of painting” where you raked it around and cropped the best bit. They thought it gave them greater freedom but I always worked on stretchers. I always felt the structure of the painting had to relate to the four given lines of the original canvas. Barnett Newman worked on stretched canvas and dismissed the croppers: “That‟s not painting, that‟s photography”, he told me. To me the result was often formless chaos. Painting is making form out of chaos. You can‟t end with chaos.‟ But he discloses a more personal reason: there was also the effect of the colours he saw on desert drives when he accompanied Eloise to Las Vegas where she was singing at Caesar‟s Palace. „It opened my eyes to other ranges of colour, the colours of rock stratification and also the scrub and silvery plant life.‟ Texture had become an interest, the feel as well as the look of the painting. „Hovering in the background‟ there was the influence of the heaped paintwork of an earlier École de Paris abstractionist, the Frenchman Jean Fautrier (1889-1964), surprisingly also a one-time graduate of the Royal Academy Schools.


The solid rectangle, now centrally located to fill all but the margins of the canvas, reasserts itself, sometimes in the shape of

overlapping rectangles, sometimes, as in the mauve 15.2.75, cropped to form a triangle of one corner, or, in

29.7.75, of four unequal sides. „There are all these influences that go around in your head and I‟d always liked Morandi. I liked the idea of doing paintings with a meaningful dumb centre, that just kind of blanked you, gave nothing away. I liked the blankness, the stillness and yet assertiveness in Morandi‟s still lives.‟ The once spattered paint is poured to create a fringe of dribbles. 3.8.75 shows the previously solid mauve centre riddled with underlying fragments of green, popping in optical opposition to „introduce some sort of movement‟. Calm is restored with the dark cerulean-blue dominated 10.8.76, where Hoyland has painted the blue to let the pink undercoat show through in streaks. „I was beginning to get back to more characteristic colour but I hoped carrying what I‟d learned from the previous excursion. I painted a show out in Los Angeles and I think this is the California sunshine awakening.‟ Five years on 1981, reveals the solid centre re-complicated as a polyhedron of interlocked and painterly triangles. „To find a way out of the rectangle I‟d been introducing the diagonal and eventually that gave me the freedom to make a configuration of triangles. Also it gave me the chance to break up the diamonds with lozenges of colour. I was gradually breaking up the geometry.‟ With the most recent paintings, Zagin 26.1.90 and The Dancers 9.9.97, one witnesses the fall-out from the destruction of the central motif; the centre has not held. Line makes its presence for the first time in this 30-year cross-section of his evolution. „What had happened over the past decade was that I felt more or less at liberty to do anything and to introduce line. The structure is still vital to me. Like I said, you can‟t paint chaos. You must have some structure and then you can be free to paint more or less whatever you want. You paint everything you know and everything you don‟t know.‟‟ Hoyland met his wife, Beverley Heath, in the early 1980s and they soon made it a custom to spend part of the winter in her native Jamaica, where they have an apartment on Montego Bay. With this new chapter in his life an added exoticism enters his art, reflecting his love also of the tropics. The resort to titles and even to explicit figuration in Dancers, demonstrates that Hoyland‟s 1970 „preoccupation with shape‟ has broadened to admit once outlawed references to nature. Already in a statement for the catalogue to his 1980 retrospective at the Serpentine Gallery he wrote that „nature is the source of all inspiration‟, even if his paintings were „an equivalent to nature, not an illustration of it‟. „I came to that conclusion gradually. I tried to turn my back on it. I thought I could invent and invent and invent. And Bob Motherwell gave me this book on Miró. I‟d always thought Miró had the greatest imagination of any artist in the 20th century, and then I found that he went down to the beach every day and picked up bits and pieces, anything that he thought would give him a kick start. And I realized that unless you‟re going to produce sterile geometric painting you‟ve got to have some form of external inspiration. You can‟t live in a vacuum.‟


In so doing he had more than vindicated his early champion Bryan Robertson‟s 1964 verdict that he was „a true inventor‟, always moving on. Robertson wrote to him in 1995: „As an artist, without the shadow of a doubt, you‟ve provided for me the greatest and most acute – and often, very often, the most astonished, really surprised - pleasures. The sheer imaginative force of invention, its rigour, always, and its intelligence – pictorial intelligence – never ceases to delight me.‟ The most recent work, some glass sculptures, were made in Murano in 1994. They are a reminder that Hoyland has always had an interest in the applied arts – it is easy to overlook that he is an outstanding printmaker. Like his prints, his glass and ceramics faithfully reflect the concerns of his painting. One can only hope he makes more three-dimensional work, although he dislikes the necessity of having to be away from his own studio, where he has the opportunity to compare as he composes. This exhibition compiled by Alan Wheatley is further testimony that Hoyland has never been so highly estimated as an artist as he is in his seventies, the demand for his now rarely purchasable early work only matched by the general recognition that „his collaboration with paint as a coloured substance is masterful, inventive and unique in world art‟, in the words of Professor Maurice Cockrill, Keeper of the Royal Academy Schools.

So John Hoyland is wrong. The world has shown that it does need his art, now more than ever.

John McEwen February 2009


1 7.10.64 Acrylic on canvas 174.5 x 174.5 cm / 68 他 x 68 他 inches Signed on the canvas overlap

EXHIBITED 2008, John Hoyland, Early Works, Nevill Keating McIlroy, London, no.6. LITERATURE John Hoyland, Early Works, Exhibition catalogue, Nevill Keating McIlroy, London, 2008, no.6, ill.


2 26 Nov 64 Acrylic and gouache on paper 32 x 52 cm / 12 ½ x 20 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated lower right

LITERATURE Mel GOODING, John Hoyland, Thames & Hudson, London, 2006, p.60, ill.

3 1964 Acrylic and gouache on paper 23.5 x 54 cm / 9 x 21 inches Signed and dated lower right


4 31.1.65 Gouache on paper 30 x 49.5 cm / 12 x 19 ½ inches Signed lower left and dated lower right

5 1965 Acrylic and gouache on paper 33 x 72 cm / 13 x 28 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated lower left

LITERATURE Mel GOODING, John Hoyland, Thames & Hudson, London, 2006, p.63, ill.


6 23.6.66 Acrylic on cotton duck 91.5 x 259 cm / 36 x 102 inches Dated verso on the stretcher

EXHIBITED 2008, John Hoyland, Early Works, Nevill Keating McIlroy, London, no.14. LITERATURE John Hoyland, Early Works, Exhibition catalogue, Nevill Keating McIlroy, London, 2008, no.14, ill.


7 6.10.67 Acrylic on canvas 213.5 x 61 cm / 84 x 24 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

PROVENANCE Waddington Galleries, London. EXHIBITED 1968, Britische Kunst Heute, Kunstverein, Hamburg, Germany, no.21.


8 30.11.68 Acrylic on canvas 213.5 x 122 cm / 84 x 48 inches Dated verso

PROVENANCE Artist‟s studio. Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 2001, John Hoyland, Works from the 1960’s, Nevill Keating Pictures Ltd., London, no.8. 2005, Private View – Forty Years On, Rocket, London. LITERATURE John Hoyland, Works from the 1960’s, Exhibition catalogue, Nevill Keating Pictures Ltd., London, 2001, no.8, ill.


9 13.2.69 Acrylic on canvas 244 x 91 cm / 96 x 36 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

PROVENANCE The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut, USA. Private collection, UK.


10 2.3.70 Acrylic on linen 244 x 101.5 cm / 96 x 40 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap


11 1971 Acrylic on paper 58 x 84 cm / 23 x 33 inches Signed lower right and dated lower left


12 8.11.72 Acrylic on cotton duck 71 x 71 cm / 28 x 28 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

PROVENANCE Waddington Galleries, London.


13 1972 Acrylic on paper 51 x 66 cm / 20 x 26 inches Signed and dated lower right

14 1972 Acrylic on paper 77 x 56 cm / 30 x 22 inches Signed and dated lower right


15 22.4.73 Acrylic on cotton duck 61 x 46 cm / 24 x 18 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

EXHIBITED 1976, Galleria La Bertesca, Genoa, Italy. 1981, Galleria La Polena, Genoa, Italy.


16 22.8.73 Acrylic on canvas 91.5 x 91.5 cm / 36 x 36 inches Signed on the canvas overlap


17 1974 Acrylic on paper 72.5 x 52.5 cm / 28 ½ x 20 ½ inches Signed lower right and dated lower left


18 15.2.75 Acrylic on cotton duck 198 x 153 cm / 78 x 60 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

EXHIBITED 1976, Galleria La Bertesca, Genoa, Italy. 1976, Studio La CittĂ , Verona, Italy. 1981, Galleria La Polena, Genoa, Italy, no. 164.


19 29.7.75 Acrylic on canvas 122 x 91.5 cm / 48 x 36 inches Signed and dated on the canvas overlap

PROVENANCE Waddington Galleries, London. Galerie AndrĂŠ Emmerich, Zurich, Switzerland.


20 3.8.75 Acrylic on cotton duck 122 x 91.5 cm / 48 x 36 inches Dated verso

PROVENANCE Private collection, London. EXHIBITED 1976, Galleria La Bertesca, Verona, Italy. 1976, Studio La CittĂ , Verona, Italy.


21 10.8.76 Acrylic on canvas 91 x 76 cm / 36 x 30 inches Signed and dated verso and again on the canvas overlap

PROVENANCE Waddington Galleries, London.


22 1981 Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm / 30 x 22 inches Signed and dated lower right


23 Zagin 26.1.90 Acrylic on cotton duck 71 x 61 cm / 28 x 24 inches Signed, inscribed and dated verso

PROVENANCE Waddington Galleries, London. Collection of Dr. Lowe. Private collection, UK.


24 The Dancers 9.9.97 Acrylic on canvas 41 x 33 cm / 16 x 13 inches Signed, inscribed and dated verso


BIOGRAPHY

1934

Born in Sheffield

1946-51

Attended Sheffield School of Art (junior art department)

1951-56

Studied at Sheffield College of Art

1956-60

Studied at the Royal Academy Schools, London

1957

Attended Scarborough summer school under Victor Pasmore and Tom Hudson

1958

Attended William Turnbullâ€&#x;s evening classes at Central School of Art, London

1960-62

Taught at Hornsey College of Art, London

1962-69

Taught at Chelsea School of Art, London

1963

Received Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Purchase Award

1964

Visited USA with a Peter Stuyvesant Bursary Prize winner at the John Moores Liverpool Exhibition

1965-69

Principal Lecturer at Chelsea School of Art, London

1966

Prize winner at Open Paintings Exhibition, Belfast

1969-70

Travelled in South America, the Caribbean and throughout the USA

1972

Made Charles A Dana Professor of Fine Arts at Colgate University, New York

1974-77

Taught at St Martinâ€&#x;s School of Art and the Royal Academy Schools

1974-89

Taught at the Slade School of Fine Art, London

1978

Artist in residence at the Studio School, New York

1979

Received an Arts Council purchase award Artist in residence at Melbourne University

1982

First Prize at the John Moores Liverpool Exhibition

1983

Elected ARA (Associate of the Royal Academy)

1986

Joint first prize (with William Scott) in the Korn Ferry International

1987

First Prize at the Athena Art Award

1991

Elected RA (Royal Academician)

1994

Short listed for Jerwood Painting Prize First visit to Murano, Venice to make glass sculptures

1998

Won the Wollaston Award for most distinguished work in the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition

1999

Appointed Professor of Painting at the Royal Academy Schools Second visit to Murano, Venice

2000

Elected Foreign Painter Academician, Academia Nationale di San Luca, Rome

2003

Received a Honorary Doctorate from Sheffield Hallam University


SOLO EXHIBITIONS

1964

Marlborough New London Gallery, London

1965

Chelsea School of Art, London

1967

Whitechapel Art Gallery, London Waddington Galleries, London Galerie Heiner Friedrich, Munich, Germany Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, USA Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, USA Waddington Fine Art, Montreal, Canada

1968

Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, USA Waddington Fine Art, Montreal, Canada

1969

André Emmerich Gallery, New York, USA Waddington Galleries, London Leslie Waddington Prints, London Galleria dell‟Ariete, Milan, Italy

1970

Waddington Galleries, London André Emmerich Gallery, New York, USA Galleria dell‟Ariete, Milan, Italy

1971

Waddington Galleries, London André Emmerich Gallery, New York, USA Waddington Fine Art, Montreal, Canada

1972

André Emmerich Gallery, New York, USA Harcus Krakow Gallery, Boston, USA The Picker Gallery, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, USA

1973

Waddington Galleries, London Galleria L‟Approdo, Turin, Italy

1974

Studio La Citta, Verona, Italy Waddington Galleries, London Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, USA

1975

Kingpitcher Contemporary Art Gallery, Pittsburgh, USA Galleria E. Bolzano, Italy Rubiner Gallery, Detroit, Michigan, USA Waddington Galleries, London Waddington Fine Art, Montreal, Canada

1976

Waddington Galleries, London Modula Gallery, Lisbon, Portugal Galleria La Bertesca, Milan, Genoa and Turin, Italy Studio La Città, Verona, Italy


1976-77

Galeria M贸dulo, Porto Modula, Lisbon, Portugal

1978

Waddington Galleries, Montreal, Canada Waddington and Tooth Galleries, London

1979

Andr茅 Emmerich Gallery, New York, USA Waddington Fine Art, Toronto, Canada Bernard Jacobson Gallery, New York, USA Art Contact, Coconut Grove, Florida, USA Waddington Graphics, London

1979-80

John Hoyland, Painting 1967-1979, Retrospective, Serpentine Gallery, London, touring to Birmingham City Art Gallery and Mappin Art Gallery, Sheffield

1980

University Gallery, University of Melbourne, touring to Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide and Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, Australia Galerie von Braunbehrens, Munich, Germany Kammor Gallery, Hamburg, Germany

1981

Gump's Gallery, San Francisco, USA Waddington Galleries, London

1982

Jacobson/Hochman Gallery, New York, USA Bernard Jacobson Gallery, Los Angeles, USA Compass Gallery, Glasgow

1983

Waddington Galleries, London Waddington Graphics, London

1983-84

Hokin/Kaufman Gallery, Chicago, USA

1984

Castlefield Gallery, Manchester

1985

Waddington Galleries, London

1986

Waddington & Shiell Galleries, Toronto, Canada

1987

Waddington Galleries, London Oxford Gallery, Oxford Lever/Meyerson Gallery, New York, USA

1988

Erika Meyerovich Gallery, San Francisco, USA Edward Thorden Gallery, Gothenburg, Sweden

1990

Austin / Desmond Fine Art, London Waddington Galleries, London

1991

Eva Cohon Gallery, Chicago, USA

1992

Galerie Josine Bokhoven, Amsterdam, Holland Graham Modern Gallery, New York, USA

1994

Annendale Gallery, Sydney, Australia New Ceramics, CCA Gallery, London

1995

Theo Waddington, London

1996

Carlow Fine Arts Festival, Ireland


1997

Annandale Galleries, Sydney, Australia

1999

Galerie Fine, London John Hoyland Retrospective, Royal Academy of Arts, London Advanced Graphics, London

2000

Galerie Josine Bokhoven, Amsterdam, Holland University of Leathbridge, Alberta, Canada

2001

John Hoyland Retrospective, Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield Galleri Christian Dam, Oslo, Norway Mural Design for Metro, Rome, Italy Nevill Keating Pictures Ltd., London Beaux Arts, London

2003

Beaux Arts, London

2004-06

Art in the 1960’s, This was Tomorrow, Tate Britain, touring to Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand

2005

Lemon Street Gallery, Truro, Cornwall

2006

John Hoyland: A Focus on the 1960’s and New Work, Retrospective, Tate St Ives Nevill Keating Pictures Ltd., London Beaux Arts, London Michael Carr Gallery, Sydney, Australia Lemon Street Gallery, Truro, Cornwall

2007

Hillsboro Fine Art, Dublin, Ireland Gallery Aalders, La Garde Freinet, France

2008

Lemon Street Gallery, Truro, Cornwall Nevill Keating McIlroy, London Beaux Arts, London

JOINT EXHIBITIONS

1969

with Anthony Caro, X Biennial de São Paulo, Brazil

1972

with Jules Olitsky, Leslie Waddington Prints, London

1977

with Gordon House, Waddington Graphics, London

1978

with John Walker, Van Straaten Gallery, Chicago, USA

1981

with Joe Tilson, Hokin Gallery, Miami, USA


PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, USA Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia Arts Council of Great Britain Art Museum of the Ateneum, Helsinki Birmingham City Art Gallery British Council, London Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, London Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, USA City Art Gallery, Manchester Contemporary Art Society, London Courtauld Institute, London Frederick R Weisman Art Foundation Collection, Los Angeles, USA Government Art Collection, London Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Leicestershire Education Authority Maclaurin Collection, Rozelle, Ayr Melbourne University Art Gallery Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, R.I., USA Museum of Modern Art, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil National Museum, Finland Neuberger Collection, University of Purchase, New York, USA Perth Art Gallery, Australia Peter Stuyvesant Foundation, London Phoenix Museum, Arizona, USA Picker Gallery, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, USA Power Gallery of Contemporary Art, University of Sydney, Australia Royal Academy of Arts, London Royal College of Physicians, London St채dtisches Museum, Leverkusen, Germany Tate Gallery, London Tehran Museum of Modern Art, Tehran, Iran Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio, USA Ulster Museum, Belfast Victoria and Albert Museum, London Warwick University Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester


INDEX 1. 7.10.64

Acrylic on canvas

174.5 x 174.5 cm

2. 26 Nov 64

Acrylic and gouache on paper

32 x 52 cm

3. 1964

Acrylic and gouache on paper

23.5 x 54 cm

4. 31.1 65

Gouache on paper

30 x 49.5 cm

5. 1965

Acrylic and gouache on paper

33 x 72 cm

6. 23.6.66

Acrylic on cotton duck

91.5 x 259 cm

7. 6.10.67

Acrylic on cotton duck

213.5 x 61 cm

8. 30.11.68

Acrylic on canvas

213.5 x 122 cm

9. 13.2.69

Acrylic on canvas

243.8 x 91.5 cm

10. 2.3.70

Acrylic on linen

244 x 101.5 cm

11. 1971

Acrylic on paper

58 x 84 cm

12. 8.11.72

Acrylic on cotton duck

71 x 71 cm

13. 1972

Acrylic on paper

51 x 66 cm

14. 1972

Acrylic on paper

77 x 56 cm

15. 22.4.73

Acrylic on cotton duck

61 x 46 cm

16. 22.8.73

Acrylic on canvas

91.5 x 91.5 cm

17. 1974

Acrylic on paper

72.5 x 52.5 cm

18. 15.2.75

Acrylic on cotton duck

198 x 153 cm

19. 29.7.75

Acrylic on canvas

122 x 91.5 cm

20. 3.8.75

Acrylic on cotton duck

122 x 91.5 cm

21. 10.8.76

Acrylic on canvas

91.5 x 76 cm

22. 1981

Acrylic on paper

76 x 56 cm

23. Zagin 26.1.90

Acrylic on cotton duck

71 x 61 cm

24. The Dancers 9.9.97

Acrylic on canvas

41 x 33 cm


Front cover: 22.8.73 (cat.16)

Published by Alan Wheatley Art © ALAN WHEATLEY ART, 22 Mason‟s Yard, Duke Street St. James‟s, London SW1Y 6BU All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without first seeking the written permission of the copyright holders and of the publisher.

Images © Paul Tucker Essays © John Hoyland, John McEwen Catalogue design by Iwona Chroscielewska


______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 22 Masonâ€&#x;s Yard T: +44 (0)20 7930 1262

Duke Street St. Jamesâ€&#x;s F: +44 (0)20 7839 8043

London SW1Y 6BU E: contact@alanwheatleyart.com

United Kingdom W: alanwheatleyart.com

JOHN HOYLAND: Unmistakable Identity  

2009 Exhibition at Alan Wheatley Art

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