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MODERN BRITISH SCULPTURE It is largely through the work of one of the most fascinating sculptors of the Twentieth Century, Henry Moore, that Britain took an important place in the international mainstream of art in the early part of the century. His work greatly influenced the course of world sculpture and marked the beginning of the modern tradition in Britain. In 1952 the exhibition New Aspects of British Sculpture in the British Pavilion at the XXVI Venice Biennale brought to the world’s notice the extraordinary fact that Great Britain now had a remarkable number of highly gifted sculptors quite capable of establishing an international ascendancy. Six of the sculptors who participated in that significant Event are represented again here – Kenneth Armitage, Reg Butler, Lynn Chadwick, Bernard Meadows, Eduardo Paolozzi and William Turnbull. And with them, the two sculptors who paved the way for them, Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth.

This catalogue has been published to accompany the exhibition at Alan Wheatley Art Modern British Sculpture. Fanning the Flames 21 June - 20 July 2012


MODERN BRITISH SCULPTURE Fanning the Flames


MODERN BRITISH SCULPTURE Fanning the Flames


MODERN BRITISH SCULPTURE This representative sample of the best of modern British sculpture highlights a post-war flowering when emerging British sculptors recently returned from sometimes harrowing war experiences, established an entirely new idiom. They were blessed at the outset by career-defining international exposure of the 1952 Venice Biennale where the sculptors included in the present survey participated in the New Aspects of British Sculpture exhibition in the British Pavilion. The Venice event automatically cast them as successors to their elders Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, the former having won the International Sculpture Prize at Venice in 1948, the latter exhibiting successfully there in 1950. Though Moore and Hepworth remained seminal figures, particularly in the case of the Norwich-born Bernard Meadows who began his professional life assisting in Moore’s Kent studio during the second half of the 1930s, the likes of Reg Butler, Kenneth Armitage, Lynn Chadwick and William Turnbull consciously reacted against the pre-war surrealistic biomorphs of Moore or the purist geometry of Hepworth. Herbert Read, the Venice catalogue essayist, wrote how the "consistent avoidance of massiveness, of monumentality, is what distinguished these even from their immediate predecessor, Moore."1 What Read termed the "entomological articulations" of Butler and Meadows, the "agonised diaphragms" of Armitage and the "toys, armed, however with vicious teeth and claws" of Chadwick proved strong medicine for a still conservative British press but their early arrival on an international stage ensured individually varied and significant subsequent sculptural developments, the fruit of which is evident here. Indeed Read stipulated they were "not members of an organised group" and at the same time were "not imitators of Moore." They were stark image-makers for a dessimated post-war world in which man’s position in a Godless universe was re-defined through the philosophical tool of existentialism. In France Jean Paul Sartre’s essay on the open and neurotically modelled or constructed sculpture of the Swiss-born Parisian sculptor Alberto Giacometti proved that sculpture was the outcome of what the sculptor made it, without recourse to academic assumptions, props or classical conventions. In this context, Read wrote in 1952 how the Venice eight – nine, if we include Moore at the entrance to the Pavilion – all "express their immediate sensations … Their art is close to the nerves, nervous, wiry."2 The degree to which the Venice eight cohered as a group has been subject to debate, even deconstruction, the art historian Andrew Causey describing Read’s catchphrase ‘geometry of fear’ as "a sobriquet which caught people’s imaginations, though it now seems over-emphatic."3 In similar vein Polly Bielecka’s catalogue for the recent Pangolin exhibition Exorcising the Fear replaced the Readian concept of fear and guilt as the unifying thematic thread with "the euphoria and courage to experiment that came with post-war freedom and the opportunity to explore new materials" as the essential bond. Read’s essay New Aspects of British Sculpture, like critic Lawrence Alloway’s Nine Abstract Artists two years later, is rich in metaphor and stands out today as a summarizing sound-bite containing, as Bielecka puts it, "a good dose of poetic licence.”4 In the same way that Alloway’s nine divided into concretist purists on the one hand and partial abstractionists who "fracture platonic geometry" on the other, so the Venice sculptors formed mini allegiances and sub-groupings within the vaguely cohesive whole.


This nexus of shared or diverging characteristics sees Chadwick and Butler, unlike the others, having had no academic training but benefiting from an adjacent architecture and engineering background. The Slade-trained Turnbull and Paolozzi, on the other hand, lived in Paris after the war and pursued in different ways shared archaeological or anthropomorphic interests. Meadows, Armitage and Butler re-engaged with human or animal forms and in so doing probably come closest to Moore, Read even singling out Butler in 1952 as "nearest to Moore."5 Butler’s wartime training as a blacksmith informed the early post-war forged and welded mode which helped make his name though shortly after he relinquished construction for modelled figures like Manipulator (Cat.3) and gesticulating torsos like Head and Shoulders (Arm Up) (Cat.4) or the perfectly upright though armless Girl (Cat.6). Construction was retained within Chadwick’s developing output alongside ‘filling in’ with stolit or plaster for bronze. The forged skeletal membranes and structural armatures of Chadwick’s Second Maquette for Teddy Boy and Girl (Cat.7) and Rad Lad V (Cat.10) were ostensible radial features of the stolit-filled or bronze cast configurations. Butler’s reference to "knitting in steel" bore out Read’s generic description of the post war generation’s "linear, cursive quality". The continental sculptor welders Picasso, Gonzalez or César were undoubted sources of inspiration who, courtesy of the British conduit of Butler and Chadwick, paved the way for a new construction - based expressionism in the 1960s practised by, among others, Hoskins, Kneale, Wall, King and, of course, Caro. While Chadwick and Armitage from the 1952 Biennale made triumphant returns to Venice later in the decade - Chadwick winning first prize in 1956, Armitage taking the Bright Foundation Award in 1958 - it was Butler who most spectacularly followed the 1952 success by winning the Tate Gallery’s International Sculpture Competition, the Unknown Political Prisoner, the following year. This post-war ‘democratic front’ was re-cast for the new Cold War, and 1950s sculptors in general complied with a fight for freedom through the philosophical guise of existentialism. Armitage, who termed Butler "a kind of puritan at heart", described how his colleague "became more and more figurative... In his Unknown Political Prisoner he had tiny little figures called Watchers and these grew and grew in size."6 The results were works like Manipulator, both from a thematic and technical point of view a highlight. The taut, almost life-size figure contains a radar-like upward gaze shared by the Watchers and is poised like a Gulliverian giant on a low lying scaffolding - a diminished residue of the Unknown Political Prisoner towers. The tyrant-like pose of Manipulator anticipates Frink’s later theme of bullies and persecutors, notwithstanding the latter’s closer ties to the animal sculpture of her Chelsea tutor, Meadows. Armitage’s Linked Figures (Cat.1) and Triarchy (Model) (Cat.2) are conjoined groups. Armitage’s expressed interest in modern architecture, though not as specific as Butler’s or Chadwick’s, yielded ‘architectural’ screens out of which extruded knob-like heads and limbs. Despite Read’s description of "the stretched agony of human relationships" the theme of Armitage’s linked figures is less predatory or threatening than protective, a reading validated by the Leeds-born sculptor’s use of everyday perceptions of family groups walking against powerful winds. By 1957 Armitage had stylised these with the Diarchy and Triarchy sculptures, in small and large variations, made in the sculptor’s Notting Hill studio. Titled by the British Council’s Gerald Forty, these regal and majestic sculptures had unintended kinship with Moore’s King and Queen pieces, works the younger man found grandiose and of little thematic interest. Meadows made animal subject-matter inimitably his own, particularly with his trademark crabs, cocks and fallen birds; the latter category also subjected to running, frightened and shot variations. Chadwick’s greater use of


human subjects - male and female duets developed with increasing gender stylisation into the mid and late periods with Maquette VI Walking Couple (Cat.12) - did not however, preclude a range of birds and beasts emerging during the late 1950s. The thrusting horizontality of Bird III (Cat.9) expresses aerodynamic movement (Chadwick narrowly missed a Heathrow Airport commission) and seamlessly followed a series of first dancing, then, winged figures. For Meadows, too, the animal and human worlds merged, not literally as in the French sculptor Richier’s metamorphic hybrids, but in terms of analogy. Meadows spoke of birds and crabs as "human substitutes, they are vehicles, expressing my feelings about human beings."7 Crucially, the return to human imagery during the 1960s and beyond seen here in the dislodged seated pose of Frightened Torso (Cat.18), the sandwiched anatomic blocks of the iconic Head and Shoulders of Augustus (Cat.20), Pointed Figure (Cat.21) and the spiked hulk Maquette for Large Standing Armed Figure (Cat.19) - reflected what Penelope Curtis has called Meadows’s "perception of our situation in the world as being between threat and defence."8 The re-casting of earlier themes evident in Meadows’s polished bronze Crab (Cat.23) is seen in the later work of Henry Moore who, as well as being Meadows’s mentor, can be seen as the ‘Daddy’ to the entire post war avant-garde sculpture gamut. Half Figure (Cat.24), a 1956 bronze cast from a 1932 carved prototype, belonged to the prolific early 1930s carved phase using multi-various sizes and materials. The flowing biomorphism of Upright Motive: Maquette No.12 (Cat.28) is, by contrast, informed by a more circumspect post-war zeitgeist and by a situation where the great man’s early studies of what he called the "elemental" and "intense vitality" of primitive art in the British Museum had been adapted to the generic formalism of abstracting modern art. This piece is a mid-period harbinger of the small but intricate later bronze ‘œuvre’ of which the stylised bronze Mother and Child (Cat.29) and metamorphic Tree Figure (Cat.30) are examples. Moore’s overriding sense of the monumental aspect of the figure within landscape is complemented by occasional architectural dialogues. The Time-Life Screen: Maquette No.4 (Cat.26) and Wall Relief: Maquette No.6 (Cat.25) see Moore concerned with the architectonics of a free standing screen and an enclosed relief respectively, both of which shun pictorial narrative while making a uniquely sculptural play on disconnected symbols and anthropomorphic imagery. The fourth maquette for the Time-Life Screen, Moore described as ‘better and more varied’9 than its predecessors. Moore’s abstraction of anthropomorphic sources is present in William Turnbull’s bronze forms which, as in Arrowhead Torso (Cat.33) and Blade Venus 2 (Cat.34) merge the semblances of the human figure with the functional morphologies of primitive implements. The simple iconic reductions of these two later bronzes revisit the earlier anthropomorphism after the minimalist and systematic geometry of the mid period 1960s and 1970s hiatus. Informed by such reductive disciplines Turnbull’s later works, as featured here, moved the critic David Sylvester who, Amanda Davidson tells us “argued that these sculptures derive a detached non religious ‘sacred’ quality from their ‘incredible lightness of being’.”10 The polymath Eduardo Paolozzi also shifted ground, in his case between primitive and popular culture sources, his later re engagement with human imagery in the Heads or the bending sequence of Isaac Newton pieces overtly the outcome of synthetic figurative reconstruction. Peter Davies May 2012


1 KENNETH ARMITAGE (1916-2002) Linked Figures Bronze with a green and brown patina Height 99 cm / 39 inches Signed, inscribed with the edition number ‘5/6’ and stamped with the foundry mark ‘H NOACK BERLIN’ Conceived in 1951 and cast in 1960 in an edition of 6 KA13

PROVENANCE Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 1959, Kenneth Armitage, Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (plaster version, no.2). 1961, Sculpture 1961, Welsh Committee of the Arts Council of Great Britain, touring to National Museum of Wales, Cardiff; Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea; National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth and University College, Bagnor, UK (version KA6, no.2). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Kenneth Armitage, Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK, 1959 (plaster version, cat.no.2). Exhibition catalogue, Sculpture 1961, Welsh Committee of the Arts Council of Great Britain, Cardiff, UK, 1961 (version KA6, cat.no.2, ill.). Norbert LYNTON. Kenneth Armitage, Methuen & Co. Ltd., London, UK, 1962 (version KA6, ill.). Tamsyn WOOLLCOMBE (ed.). Kenneth Armitage: Life and Work, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1997, KA13, p.143, ill.p.27. Clare FREESTONE and Karen WRIGHT. Ida Kar. Bohemian Photographer, National Portrait Gallery, London, UK, 2012, (plaster version, ill. pl.8, p.66).

‘In Linked Figures the figures were definitely merged together: instead of having two bodies they were all one, with arms and legs on the outside. And so in a sense that was a very important break with my previous work.’11


2 KENNETH ARMITAGE (1916-2002) Triarchy (Model) Bronze Height 25.5 cm / 10 inches; Length 37 cm / 14 ½ inches Conceived in 1957 and cast by Fiorini in an edition of 6 KA83

EXHIBITED 1961, Sculpture 1961, Welsh Committee of the Arts Council of Great Britain, touring to National Museum of Wales, Cardiff; Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea; National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth and University College, Bagnor, UK, no.5 (another cast). 1964, The Gregory Fellows, Arts Council Gallery, Cambridge and touring to Bolton, Liverpool, Nottingham, Southampton and Cardiff, UK, no.19 (another cast). 1967, In Our View, Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, UK, no.8 (another cast). 1973, Kenneth Armitage, Castle Museum, Norwich and touring to Bolton, Oldham, Kettering, Nottingham, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Llanelli, Leeds and Hull, UK, no.8 (another cast). 1997, Austerity to Affluence: British Art & Design 1945-1962, The Fine Art Society, London, UK, no.18 (another cast). 2001, Kenneth Armitage: 60 Years of Sculpture and Drawing, Jonathan Clarke Fine Art, London, UK, no.11 (another cast). 2012, Exorcising the Fear. British Sculpture from the ‘50s & ‘60s, Pangolin, London, UK. LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Sculpture 1961, Welsh Committee of the Arts Council of Great Britain, Cardiff, UK, 1961, cat.no.5, ill. (another cast). Norbert LYNTON. Kenneth Armitage, Methuen & Co. Ltd., London, UK, 1962 (large version KA86, ill.). Exhibition catalogue, The Gregory Fellows, Arts Council Gallery, Cambridge, UK, 1964, cat.no.19, ill.p.6 (another cast). Exhibition catalogue, In Our View, Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, UK, 1967, cat.no.8, ill. (another cast). Exhibition catalogue, Austerity to Affluence: British Art & Design 1945-1962, The Fine Art Society, London, UK, 1997, cat.no.18, ill.p.118 (another cast). Tamsyn WOOLLCOMBE (ed.). Kenneth Armitage: Life and Work, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1997, KA83, p.144 (large version KA86, ill.p.42). Exhibition catalogue, Kenneth Armitage: 60 Years of Sculpture and Drawing, Jonathan Clarke Fine Art, London, UK, 2011, cat.no.11, ill. (another cast). Exhibition catalogue, Exorcising the Fear. British Sculpture from the ‘50s & ‘60s, Pangolin, London, UK, 2012, ill.pp.14-15, 25 and 92. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS British Council, London, UK. This is the maquette for the large bronze Triarchy (KA86) in the Berlin Opera House, which was exhibited in 1958 at the XXIX Venice Biennale where Armitage received the David E. Bright Foundation Award for the Best Sculptor Under 45.


3 REG BUTLER (1913-1981) Manipulator Shell bronze Height 165 cm / 65 ¾ inches Stamped with monogram, dated ‘56’ and numbered ‘C4’ Conceived in 1954 and cast in 1956 in an edition of 6 RB126

PROVENANCE Collection of Florene May Schoenborn, USA. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA (loaned by the above in 1957 and gifted in 1971). EXHIBITED 1955, Reg Butler, Curt Valentin Gallery, New York, USA, no.42 (another cast). 1958, The Gregory Fellowship Exhibition, ICA, London, UK (plaster version, no.2). 1961, Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, no.464 (another cast). 1963, Reg Butler: A Retrospective Exhibition, J. B. Speed Memorial Museum, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, no.56 (another cast). 1964, Contemporary British Painting and Sculpture, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, USA, no.10, ill. (another cast). 1983, Reg Butler, Tate Gallery, London, UK, no.51 (another cast). 2008, Picasso to Moore: Modern Sculpture from the Weiner Collection, Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, California, USA (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Reg Butler, Curt Valentin Gallery, New York, USA, 1955, cat.no.42, ill. (another cast). Exhibition catalogue, The Gregory Fellowship Exhibition, ICA, London, UK, 1958 (plaster version, cat.no.2). Exhibition catalogue, Reg Butler, Tate Gallery, London, UK, 1983, cat.no.51, ill.p.65 (another cast). Margaret GARLAKE. New Art New World: British Art in Postwar Society, Yale University Press, UK, 1998, no.198 (another cast). Margaret GARLAKE. The Sculpture of Reg Butler, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.149, p.142, ill.fig.5, p.14 and fig.39, p.47 (another cast). PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Charles Clifton Fund, USA (gifted in 1955). Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA (gifted by Josef H. Hirshhorn in 1966). Weiner Collection, Palm Springs, California, USA.


4 REG BUTLER (1913-1981) Head and Shoulders (Arm Up) Bronze Height 34 cm / 13 ½ inches Inscribed with monogram, the edition number ‘3/8’ and the foundry mark ‘Susse Fond Paris’ Conceived in 1956 and cast in an edition of 8 RB150

PROVENANCE Private collection, New York, USA. Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 1957, Reg Butler, Hanover Gallery, London, UK, no.32 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Reg Butler, Hanover Gallery, London, UK, 1957, cat.no.32 (another cast). Margaret GARLAKE. The Sculpture of Reg Butler, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.173, ill.p.149.


5 REG BUTLER (1913-1981) Study for Girl on Back Bronze Length 47 cm / 18 ½ inches Stamped with monogram, inscribed with the edition number ‘5/8’ and stamped with the foundry mark ‘CIRE VALSUANI PERDUE’ Conceived in 1965 and cast in an edition of 8 RB220

PROVENANCE Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, USA. Private collection, USA. EXHIBITED 1986, Reg Butler Musée Imaginaire: Bronze Middle and Later Period, Gimpel Fils, London, UK, no.29 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Reg Butler Musée Imaginaire: Bronze Middle and Later Period, Gimpel Fils, London, UK, 1986, cat.no.29 (another cast). Margaret GARLAKE. The Sculpture of Reg Butler, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.239, p.166, ill.fig.70, p.79.


6 REG BUTLER (1913-1981) Girl Bronze Height 55.2 cm / 21 ¾ inches Stamped with monogram, inscribed with the edition number ‘6/8’ and stamped with the foundry mark ‘CIRE VALSUANI PERDUE’ Conceived in 1965 and cast in an edition of 8 RB226

PROVENANCE Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, USA. Private collection, USA. Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 1983, Reg Butler, Tate Gallery, London, UK, no.67 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Reg Butler, Tate Gallery, London, UK, 1983, cat.no.67, ill.p.69 (another cast). Margaret GARLAKE. The Sculpture of Reg Butler, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.245, ill.p.167.


7 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Second Maquette for Teddy Boy and Girl Bronze Height 39 cm / 15 ½ inches Signed, dated ‘56’, inscribed with number ‘185’ and the edition number ‘0/6’ Conceived in 1956 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast LC185

PROVENANCE The Artist. Joseph Wolpe Fine Art, Cape Town, South Africa. Private collection, USA (purchased from the above in 1960). EXHIBITED 1956, Zeitgenössische Englische Malerei und Plastik, Städtische Galerie, Munich, Germany (another cast). LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS. Lynn Chadwick, Methuen & Co. Ltd., London, UK, 1962. Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick, Sculptor: with a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.185, p.116, ill.p.117.

‘Here we have a rectangle opposed to a triangle, basically, and a slight amount of movement by the girl’s legs being bent a bit... What I was doing was getting some sort of attitude... It was meant to be as exact as I could to express a certain way of speaking, as it were, between two people.’12


8 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Maquette IV Moon of Alabama Bronze Height 33 cm / 13 inches Signed, inscribed with number ‘244/3’ and the foundry mark ‘Susse F. Paris’ Conceived in 1957 and cast in an edition of 4 LC244

PROVENANCE Private collection, Europe. EXHIBITED 1959, Lynn Chadwick, Galerie Charles Lienhard, Zurich, Switzerland. 2009, Lynn Chadwick: Out of the Shadows - Unseen Sculpture of the 1960s, Pangolin, London, UK (another cast). LITERATURE Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.244, p.136, ill.p.137. Exhibition catalogue, Lynn Chadwick: Out of the Shadows - Unseen Sculpture of the 1960s, Pangolin, London, UK, 2009, p.110, ill.pp.7& 50 (another cast).

‘Here I was trying to get away from the rectangles or pyramids or that sort of shape and I was trying to do something in the round but literally in the round, sort of round shapes composed in this case of triangles, and with the legs being part of one of the sides of the triangle and continuing upwards into a sort of spike, rather like the arms of the ‘Teddy Boy and Girl’ really. It was an exercise in trying to be more three-dimensional, spherical.’13


9 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Bird III Bronze with a green patina Length 122 cm / 48 inches Edition 3/4 Conceived in 1958 and cast in an edition of 4 LC252

PROVENANCE Knoedler & Company, New York, USA. Collection of Vera List, USA (purchased from the above in 1961). Beaux Arts, London, UK. Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 1959, 5e Biennale voor Beeldhouwkunst, Middleheim Park, Antwerp, The Netherlands (another cast). LITERATURE Guy PLAIFAIR. Lynn Chadwick, Sculptor in Metal, Motif, 4, Shenval Press, London, UK, March 1960, p.25. Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.252, p.140, ill.p.141. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art, Ursinus College, Collegeville, Philadelphia, USA. British Council, London, UK.


10 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Rad Lad V Iron and stolit cement Height 54 cm / 21 ¼ inches Unique Conceived and cast in 1962 LC368

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA. LITERATURE Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.368, p.186, ill.p.187.


11 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Tower IV Bronze Height 50.5 cm / 19 ⅞ inches Inscribed with number ‘486’ and the edition number ‘1/4’ Conceived in 1965 and cast in an edition of 4 LC486

PROVENANCE Parke-Bennett Galleries, New York, USA. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Gilmore, USA (President of ‘Upjohn’, one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world). The Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA. EXHIBITED 1966, Lynn Chadwick, Marlborough New London Gallery, London, UK (another cast). LITERATURE Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.486, ill.p.228.


12 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Maquette VI Walking Couple Bronze with polished faces Height (excluding base) 31 cm / 12 ¼ inches Stamped with monogram, dated ‘76’, inscribed with number ‘734S’ and the edition number ‘EA1/2’ Conceived in 1976 and cast in an edition of 8 and 2 artist’s casts LC734S

PROVENANCE Collection of Mr. P. Rothman, USA. EXHIBITED 1976, Galerie Farber, Brussels, Belgium (version LC734). 2011, Lynn Chadwick, Osborne Samuel, London, UK (version LC734). LITERATURE Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.734S, p.312 (version LC734, ill.p.313). Exhibition catalogue, Lynn Chadwick, Osborne Samuel, London, UK, 2011, p.53, ill. (version LC734, ill.p.53).


13 LYNN CHADWICK (1914-2003) Maquette I High Wind Bronze with polished face Height 37 cm / 14 ⅝ inches Stamped with monogram, inscribed with number ‘799’ and the edition number ‘2/9’ Conceived in 1980 and cast in an edition of 9 LC799

PROVENANCE Jeanne Frank Fine Art, New York, USA. Private collection, Belgium. EXHIBITED 1983, Mercury Gallery, Edinburgh, UK (another cast). 1984, Chadwick, Recent Sculpture, Marlborough Fine Art, London, UK, no.2 (another cast). 1987, Lynn Chadwick. Recent Sculpture, Erica Meyerovich Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA (version LC799S). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Chadwick, Recent Sculpture, Marlborough Fine Art, London, UK, 1984, cat.no.2, ill.p.6 (another cast). Exhibition catalogue, Lynn Chadwick. Recent Sculpture, Erica Meyerovich Gallery, San Francisco, California, USA, 1987 (version LC799S, ill.). Dennis FARR and Éva CHADWICK. Lynn Chadwick Sculptor: With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2005, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2006, cat.no.799, ill.p.340.


14 BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903-1975) Two Forms (January 1967) Polished bronze Height (including base) 23 cm / 9 inches Signed, dated ‘1967’ and inscribed with the edition number ‘3/9’ Conceived in 1967 and cast in an edition of 9 BH436

PROVENANCE The Artist. Waddington Galleries, London, UK. Emily Golding Gallery, Los Angeles, California, USA. EXHIBITED 1968, Barbara Hepworth: Retrospective, Tate Gallery, London, UK (slate version, no.173). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Barbara Hepworth: Retrospective, Tate Gallery, London, UK, 1968 (slate version, cat.no.173). Alan BOWNESS. The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-1969, Lund Humphries, London, UK, 1971, cat.no.436, pp.44-45 (another cast).


15 BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903-1975) Solitary Stone Silver Height (excluding base) 7.6 cm / 3 inches Edition 2/2 Conceived in 1974 and cast in an edition of 2 BH569A

PROVENANCE The Artist. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Gilbert, UK (gifted by the artist on 25 October 1974 on the occasion of their 25th Wedding Anniversary). Private collection, UK (purchased from the above in 2007). LITERATURE To be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist, being revised by Dr Sophie Bowness, under the catalogue number BH569A.

The Solitary Stone derives from Group of Three Magic Stones, BH569, also silver, conceived in 1973 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast.


16 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Fallen Bird Bronze Length 101 cm / 39 ¾ inches Signed Conceived in 1958 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM54

PROVENANCE Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 1961-1963, Recent British Sculpture, The British Council, London touring to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Auckland City Art Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand and State Galleries of Australia, Australia, no.49 (another cast). 1964, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, Venice, Italy (another cast). 2002, Henry Moore and the Geometry of Fear, James Hyman Gallery, London, UK, no.19 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Recent British Sculpture, The British Council, London, UK, 1961, cat.no.49, ill.(another cast). Exhibition catalogue, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, The British Council, Percy Lund Humphries & Co. Ltd., London, UK, 1964, ill. (another cast). Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM54, ill.p.140. Exhibition catalogue, Henry Moore and the Geometry of Fear, James Hyman Gallery, London, UK, 2002, cat.no.19, ill.p.33 (another cast). PUBLIC COLLECTIONS British Council, London, UK (loaned to Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal).


17 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Fallen Bird Bronze Length 43 cm / 17 inches Signed with initial Conceived in 1961 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM71

PROVENANCE Private collection, UK. EXHIBITED 2002, Henry Moore and the Geometry of Fear, James Hyman Gallery, London, UK, no.19 (another cast). LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM71, p.141. Exhibition catalogue, Henry Moore and the Geometry of Fear, James Hyman Gallery, London, UK, 2002, cat.no.19, p.33, ill. (another cast).


18 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Frightened Torso Bronze Height 37 cm / 14 ½ inches Signed with initial Conceived in 1961 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM75

LITERATURE Abraham Marie HAMMACHER. Modern English Sculpture, Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1967, ill.p.118. Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadow: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM75, p.142.


19 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Maquette for Large Standing Armed Figure Bronze with a black patina Height 56.5 cm / 22 ¼ inches Signed with initial Conceived in 1962 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM85

PROVENANCE Midwest Institution, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Gerhard D. Strauss, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA (gifted by the above in 1967). EXHIBITED 1964, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, Venice, Italy (large version BM86). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, The British Council, Percy Lund, Humphries & Co Ltd., London, UK, 1964, (large version BM86, ill.). Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM85, p.142, ill.p.143. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Oldham Art Galleries and Museum, Oldham, UK (purchased from Gimpel Fils, London, UK in 1963).


20 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Head and Shoulders of Augustus Bronze (in two parts) Length 92 cm / 36 Âź inches Edition 3/3 Conceived in 1962/1964 and cast in an edition of 3 BM89

PROVENANCE The Artist. Gimpel Fils, London, UK. EXHIBITED 1964, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, Venice, Italy. 1995, Bernard Meadows Recent Works, Gimpel Fils, London, UK, no.18. 1999, The Shape of the Century - a Survey of British Sculpture, The Salisbury Festival, Wiltshire, UK. 2011, Modern British Sculpture, Gimpel Fils, London, UK. LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, XXXII Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, The British Council, Percy Lund, Humphries & Co. Ltd., London, UK, 1964, ill (catalogued as an edition of 6). Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM89, p.142, ill.pl.53, p.72. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Arts Council of Great Britain, London, UK.


21 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Pointing Figure Polished bronze on a slate base Length 63.5 cm / 25 inches Signed with initial Conceived in 1966 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM101

PROVENANCE The Artist. Gimpel Fils, London, UK. LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM101, p.144, ill.pl.66, p.84.

‘The Pointing Figures, made from the later 1960s, soon carried what is perhaps the single biggest shift in Meadows’ œuvre. Suddenly his surfaces became smooth and rounded, sometimes bulbous, even seemingly liquid. They remind us of fruits, of bellies, breasts and buttocks. Gone were the craggy surfaces of his earlier pieces; his work was now soft, and even when the softness was brought up against hardness, the hardness was smooth.’14


22 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Pointing Figure Polished bronze Length 68.5 cm / 27 inches Conceived in 1967 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM106

PROVENANCE The Artist. Gimpel Fils, London, UK. LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM106, p.144, ill.pl.67, p.85. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS British Council, London, UK.


23 BERNARD MEADOWS (1915-2005) Crab Bronze Height 24 cm / 9 ½ inches Signed with initial and inscribed with the edition number ‘0/6’ Conceived in 1985 and cast in an edition of 6 and 1 artist’s cast BM128

PROVENANCE Private collection, UK. LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995, BM128, p.145, ill.pl.117, p.130.

‘Meadows spent an extremely formative period on the Cocos Island in the Indian Ocean, when he was stationed there at the end of the war with the RAF. These islands teem with different kinds of crabs, and their behaviour greatly affected daily life. […] Meadows observed ponderous tree-crabs, fast mosquito crabs, slow tank-like crabs living out their cycle beside him; attacking escaping, hiding and disappearing. The crabs became a forceful motif which Meadows took home with him to London.’15


24 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Half Figure Bronze on wooden and marble bases Height (excluding bases) 12 cm / 4 ¾ inches; (including bases) 24 cm / 14 ¼ inches Edition 1/7 Conceived in 1932 and cast in 1956 in an edition of 7 LH116

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA. LITERATURE David SYLVESTER (ed.). Henry Moore: Sculpture and Drawings 1921-48, Volume 1, Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1988, cat.no.116, p.8.


25 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Relief No.2 Bronze 11.8 x 10.3 cm / 4 ¾ x 4 ⅛ inches Conceived in 1952 and cast by 1957 in an edition of 7 LH306

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA. LITERATURE Robert MELVILLE. Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1970, no.442, p. 356, ill.pl.442, p.206. Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1949-54, Volume 2, Lund Humphries Publishers, Aldershot, UK, 1986, cat.no.306, p.39, ill.p.38.


26 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Time-Life Screen: Maquette No.4 Bronze with a green patina Height 18 cm / 7 inches; Length 32 cm / 13 inches Conceived in 1952 and cast in an edition of 9 LH342

PROVENANCE Knoedler & Company, New York, USA. Greenberg Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Private collection, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. EXHIBITED 1960, Henry Moore: An Exhibition of Sculpture from 1950-1960, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, UK, no.17 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Henry Moore: An Exhibition of Sculpture from 1950-1960, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, UK, 1960, cat.no.17, ill. (another cast). Will GROHMANN. The Art of Henry Moore, Readers Union/Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1966, p.183 (large version HM344, ill. pls. 137-139). Robert MELVILLE. Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1970 (large version HM344, ill.pls.455-457). Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1949-54, Volume 2, Lund Humphries Publishers, Aldershot, UK, 1986, cat.no.342, p.46, ill.p.37 and pl.109. Alan G. WILKINSON. Henry Moore Remembered, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada, 1987, p.147 (large version HM344, ill.fig.71, p.145). PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Time & Life Building, New Bond Street, London, UK (public commission in 1952/1953) (large version HM344). Blue Fin Building, Southwark, London, UK. The Renaissance Society, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

The definitive study for the Time-Life Screen (LH344) was based on Time-Life Screen: Maquette No.4 of 1952 of which Henry Moore wrote: 'The fourth maquette I thought was better and more varied and so this became the definitive maquette, although a further working model produced other changes.’16


27 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Wall Relief: Maquette No.6 Bronze with a green patina 34 x 47 cm / 13 ½ x 18 ½ inches Conceived in 1955 and cast by Fiorini in an edition of 7 LH370

PROVENANCE Private collection, Canada. EXHIBITED 1960, Henry Moore: An Exhibition of Sculpture from 1950-1960, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, UK, no.37 (another cast). 1987, Henry Moore Remembered: The Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada, no.102 (another cast). 1988, Henry Moore, Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK, no.131 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Henry Moore: An Exhibition of Sculpture from 1950-1960, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, UK, 1960, cat.no.37, ill. (another cast). John HEDGECOE and Henry MOORE. Henry Moore, New York, USA, 1968, no.9, p.215 (another cast). Robert MELVILLE. Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1970, no.493 p.358, (plaster version, ill. pl.493, p.228, catalogued as an edition of 10). Alan G. WILKINSON. Henry Moore Remembered, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada, 1987, no.102, ill.p.157 (another cast). Susan COMPTON. Henry Moore: Catalogue of the Royal Academy Exhibition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, UK, 1988, ill.pl.131, p.103 (another cast). Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1955-64, Volume 3, Lund Humphries Publishers, Aldershot, UK, 2005, cat.no.370, p.18, ill.p.19. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada (gifted by Henry Moore in 1974).

‘In the random grouping of the forms, Maquette No.6, one of the most interesting and varied of the wall relief maquettes, is reminiscent of Moore's sketchbook sheets with ideas for sculpture. Here the reliefs include a lobster's claw just left of centre; at upper right a fragment from a stringed-figure sculpture almost certainly made in the late 1930s; below this a cast of a work related to the small Maquette for Head of 1937; at lower left, turned upside down, Small Relief: Lower Half of Upright Motive: Maquette No.1.’17


28 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Upright Motive: Maquette No.12 Bronze Height 32 cm / 12 ⅝ inches Signed, inscribed with the edition number ‘7/9’ and stamped with the foundry mark ‘H NOACK BERLIN’ Conceived in 1955 and cast in 1965 in an edition of 9 LH392

PROVENANCE Marlborough Gallery, London, UK. Private collection, Dublin, Ireland. EXHIBITED 1965, Henry Moore, Marlborough Galleries, New York, USA and London, UK, no.8 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, Henry Moore, Marlborough Galleries, New York, USA and London, UK, 1965, cat.no.8 (another cast). John HEDGECOE and Henry MOORE. Henry Moore, Simon & Schuster, New York, USA, 1968, p.243 (another cast). Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore. Complete Sculpture 1955-64, Volume 3, Lund Humphries Publishers, Aldershot, UK, 2005, cat.no.392, p.25, ill.p.24 (plaster version, ill.p.22).

‘In 1954 I was asked to do a sculpture for the courtyard of Olivetti's new office building in Milan. I went out to Milan and met the architect and we looked together at the building then in construction... A lone Lombardy poplar growing behind the building convinced me that a vertical work would act as the correct counterfoil to the horizontal rhythm of the building. This idea grew ultimately into the Upright Motives.’18 Moore produced thirteen upright motives maquettes in 1955, of which five (nos. 1, 2, 5, 7 and 8) were enlarged.


29 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Mother and Child Bronze on a rosewood base Height (excluding base) 17.8 cm / 7 inches; (including base) 25 cm / 9 ⅞ inches Signed and inscribed with the edition number ‘1/6’ Conceived in 1956 and cast in 1965 in an edition of 6 LH409A

PROVENANCE Private collection, Belgium. Private collection, UK. LITERATURE Robert MELVILLE. Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, Thames and Hudson, London, UK, 1970, no.519, p. 35, ill.pl.519, p.236. Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1964-73, Volume 4, Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1977, cat.no.409A, ill.p.31.


30 HENRY MOORE (1898-1986) Tree Figure Bronze Height 18.5 cm / 7 â…› inches Edition 1/9 Conceived in 1979 and cast in an edition of 9 LH771

LITERATURE Alan BOWNESS (ed.). Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1974-80, Volume 5, Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1994, cat.no.771, ill.


31 EDUARDO PAOLOZZI (1924-2005) Lacerated Head Plaster Height 39 cm / 15 ½ inches Unique Signed with initials Conceived in 1990

PROVENANCE The Estate of the Artist.


32 EDUARDO PAOLOZZI (1924-2005) Head (After Josephine Baker) Painted plaster Height 40 cm / 15 ¾ inches Unique Signed and dated ‘1996’ Conceived in 1996

PROVENANCE The Estate of the Artist.


33 WILLIAM TURNBULL (born 1922) Arrowhead Torso Bronze with a green patina Height 23.8 cm / 9 ⅜ inches Stamped with monogram, dated ‘79’ and inscribed with the edition number ‘9/9’ Conceived in 1979 and cast in an edition of 9

PROVENANCE The Artist. Waddington Galleries, London, UK. Private collection, London, UK (purchased from the above in 1987). Thence by family descent. EXHIBITED 1981, William Turnbull, Waddington Galleries, London, UK, cat.no.4. 1983, William Turnbull, Galerie Kutter, Luxembourg, cat.no.4. 1987, William Turnbull, Galerie Folker Skulima, Berlin, Germany. 2005, William Turnbull: Retrospective 1946–2003, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton, Wakefield, UK (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, William Turnbull, Waddington Galleries, London, UK, 1981, cat.no.4 ill. Exhibition catalogue, William Turnbull, Galerie Kutter, Luxembourg, 1983, cat.no.4, ill. Amanda A. DAVIDSON. The Sculpture of William Turnbull, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2005, cat.no.192, p.149, ill. PUBLIC COLLECTIONS University of Lethbridge Art Gallery Collection, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (gifted by anonymous donor as part of the Inuit Gift in 1986).


34 WILLIAM TURNBULL (born 1922) Blade Venus 2 Bronze on York stone base Height (excluding base) 120 cm / 47 ¼ inches; (including base) 136 cm / 53 ½ inches Signed with monogram, inscribed with the edition number ‘1/6’, dated ‘89’ and stamped with the foundry mark ‘Livingstone Art Founders’ Conceived in 1989 and cast in an edition of 6

PROVENANCE The Artist. Waddington Galleries, London. Private collection, USA. EXHIBITED 1998, William Turnbull, Sculpture and Paintings, Waddington Galleries, London, UK, no.2 (another cast). LITERATURE Exhibition catalogue, William Turnbull, Sculpture and Paintings, Waddington Galleries, London, UK, 1998, cat.no.2, ill.p.19 (another cast). Amanda A. DAVIDSON. The Sculpture of William Turnbull, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 2005, cat.no.268, p.177, ill.p.176.

‘The idea of metamorphosis in Turnbull’s work is at its most intense in the Blade Venus series. These large sculptures suggest the shapes of Chinese knives, Japanese Samurai swords, pens, paintbrushes, leaves and goddess figures in one elegant, slightly curved form. Their form and inspiration relate them to the Zen paintings that inspired Turnbull and to the calligraphic paintings, drawings and reliefs that he produced in the 1950s. Like a single gesture, with a wide and a thin section, they combine all of the breadth of the front view with the slenderness of the side view in one perception. Part of their ambiguity and their dynamic presence stems from the spectators’ simultaneous ability to see both the wide element and the narrow section as the handle or the blade or tip of the tool. Although they are absolutely still they are also balanced on their sharpest point, poised to act. ‘19


NOTES 1

Herbert READ. New Aspects of British Sculpture, XXVI Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, exhibition catalogue, The British Council, Westminster Press, London, UK, 1952.

2

Ibid.

3

Andrew CAUSEY. Sculpture Since 1945, Oxford Paperbacks, Oxford, UK, 1998, p.71.

4

Polly BIELECKA. Exorcising the Fear, exhibition catalogue, Pangolin, London, UK, 2012, pp.6&11.

5

Herbert READ.

6

Kenneth Armitage statement in Tamsyn WOOLLCOMBE (ed.). Kenneth Armitage: Life and Work, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1997, p.40.

7

Bernard Meadows quoted in Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 1995.

8

Penelope CURTIS. Bernard Meadows: Art Interior World in Alan BOWNESS. Bernard Meadows: Sculpture and Drawings, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, London, UK, 2005, p.19.

9

Henry Moore: Notes on the Sculptures for the Time-Life Building, London in Alan BOWNESS. Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1949-54, Volume 2, Lund Humphries, Aldershot, UK, 1986, p.15.

10

Amanda A. DAVIDSON. The Sculpture of William Turnbull, The Henry Moore Foundation/Lund Humphries Publishers, Aldershot, UK, 2005, p.63.

11

Kenneth Armitage statement in Tamsyn WOOLLCOMBE (ed.). p.24.

12

Lynn Chadwick quoted in Nico KOSTER and Paul LEVINE. Lynn Chadwick the Sculptor and His World, SMD Informatief Spruyyt, Van Mantgem & De Dos, Leiden, The Netherlands, 1988, p.83.

13

Ibid.

14

Penelope CURTIS. p.20.

15

Ibid. p.19.

16

Henry Moore quoted in Philip JAMES (ed.). Henry Moore on Sculpture: A Collection of the Sculptor’s Writings and Spoken Words, Macdonald, London, UK, 1966, p.235.

17

Alan G. WILKINSON. Henry Moore Remembered, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada, 1987, p.157.

18

Henry Moore quoted in Philip JAMES. p.253.

19

Amanda A. DAVIDSON. pp.72-73.


INDEX 1. KENNETH ARMITAGE

Linked Figures

1951

Bronze

Edition of 6

2. KENNETH ARMITAGE

Triarchy (Model)

1957

Bronze

Edition of 6

3. REG BUTLER

Manipulator

1954

Bronze

Edition of 6

4. REG BUTLER

Head and Shoulders (Arm Up)

1956

Bronze

Edition of 8

5. REG BUTLER

Study for Girl on Back

1965

Bronze

Edition of 8

6. REG BUTLER

Girl

1965

Bronze

Edition of 8

7. LYNN CHADWICK

Second Maquette for Teddy Boy and Girl

1956

Bronze

Edition of 6

8. LYNN CHADWICK

Maquette IV Moon of Alabama

1957

Bronze

Edition of 4

9. LYNN CHADWICK

Bird III

1958

Bronze

Edition of 4

10. LYNN CHADWICK

Rad Lad V

1962

Iron

Unique

11. LYNN CHADWICK

Tower IV

1965

Bronze

Edition of 4

12. LYNN CHADWICK

Maquette VI Walking Couple

1976

Bronze

Edition of 8

13. LYNN CHADWICK

Maquette I High Wind

1980

Bronze

Edition of 9

14. BARBARA HEPWORTH

Two Forms

1967

Bronze

Edition of 9

15. BARBARA HEPWORTH

Solitary Stone

1974

Silver

Edition of 2

16. BERNARD MEADOWS

Fallen Bird

1958

Bronze

Edition of 6

17. BERNARD MEADOWS

Fallen Bird

1961

Bronze

Edition of 6

18. BERNARD MEADOWS

Frightened Torso

1961

Bronze

Edition of 6

19. BERNARD MEADOWS

Maquette for Large Standing Armed Figure

1962

Bronze

Edition of 6

20. BERNARD MEADOWS

Head and Shoulders of Augustus

1962/64

Bronze

Edition of 3

21. BERNARD MEADOWS

Pointing Figure

1966

Bronze

Edition of 6

22. BERNARD MEADOWS

Pointing Figure

1967

Bronze

Edition of 6

23. BERNARD MEADOWS

Crab

1985

Bronze

Edition of 6

24. HENRY MOORE

Half Figure

1932

Bronze

Edition of 6

25. HENRY MOORE

Relief #2

1952

Bronze

Edition of 7

26. HENRY MOORE

Time-Life Screen: Maquette No.4

1952

Bronze

Edition of 9

27. HENRY MOORE

Wall Relief: Maquette No.6

1955

Bronze

Edition of 7

28. HENRY MOORE

Upright Motive: Maquette No.12

1955

Bronze

Edition of 9

29. HENRY MOORE

Mother and Child

1956

Bronze

Edition of 6

30. HENRY MOORE

Tree Figure

1979

Bronze

Edition of 9

31. EDUARDO PAOLOZZI

Lacerated Head

1990

Plaster

Unique

32. EDUARDO PAOLOZZI

Head (After Josephine Baker)

1996

Plaster

Unique

33. WILLIAM TURNBULL

Arrowhead Torso

1979

Bronze

Edition of 9

34. WILLIAM TURNBULL

Blade Venus 2

1989

Bronze

Edition of 6


EDUARDO PAOLOZZI (1924-2005) Newton After Blake, Tate Gallery Plaster 15.3 x 21 cm / 6 x 8 ¼ inches Edition unknown Signed and inscribed ‘December 1993, For John Addey, Newton after Blake, Tate Gallery’ verso Conceived in 1993

Published to accompany the exhibition Modern British Sculpture, Fanning the Flames, 21 June - 20 July 2012 © ALAN WHEATLEY ART, 22 Mason’s Yard, Duke Street St. James’s, London SW1Y 6BU All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without first seeking the written permission of the copyright holders and of the publisher.

Images © The Artists / The Estates of the Artists Photography © Paul Tucker; Julian Jans (7, 19, 32, 33) Essay © Peter Davies Research and catalogue design by Iwona Chrościelewska Print production by Oldacres, London

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 22 Mason’s Yard T: +44 (0)20 7930 1262

Duke Street St. James’s F: +44 (0)20 7839 8043

London SW1Y 6BU E: contact@alanwheatleyart.com

United Kingdom W: alanwheatleyart.com


PETER DAVIES (born 1953) is a well-known art critic and an author of over twenty books on modern British art. He is an obituarist for The Independent and has contributed to numerous art journals and exhibition catalogues. He is also a painter and printmaker with prints in the Permanent collection of Falmouth Art Gallery and Guernsey Museum. He is a member of the Bath Society of Artists. Davies’s previous books on modern British sculpture include: Michael Kenny Sculpture (1997), The Sculpture of John Milne (2000), After Trewyn: St. Ives Sculptors Since Hepworth (2001) and John Huggins Sculptor (2006). His latest book on the sculpture of Robert Clatworthy (co-written with Keith Chapman) will be published in autumn 2012.

Jacket illustration: REG BUTLER, Manipulator (Cat.3)


_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 22 Mason’s Yard T: +44 (0)20 7930 1262

Duke Street St. James’s F: +44 (0)20 7839 8043

London SW1Y 6BU E: contact@alanwheatleyart.com

United Kingdom W: alanwheatleyart.com

MODERN BRITISH SCULPTURE: Fanning the Flames  

Exhibition catalogue

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