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A WORKSHOP OF TRAIL TOWNS & THE ALABAMA TRAILS COMMISSION

Alabama Trails Design Summit AT T E N D E E N A M E

NOVEMBER 21–22, 2013


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Book design, editing & content development by

For ease of collaboration and open source sharing, text is set in Georgia, which is available on all computers and on the web.

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Tab e of Contents Th s book s des gned o be a wo k ng documen we encou age eve yone o w e n ea ange pages and add ma e a s ha w he p ca y he wo k fo wa d Cove

Backg ound on P ocess

We come Table of Contents This book is designed to be a working document. we encourage everyone to write in it,

A WORKSHOP OF TRAIL TOWNS &

rearrange pages, and add materials that will help carry the work forward.

THE ALABAMA TRAILS COMMISSION

Cover

Alabama Trails Design Summit

INTRODUCTION

Background on Process

Welcome

our first thought is of a brilliant inventor and innovator whose creations transformed modern life. We often think of him toiling

Welcome to the Summit

away in a laboratory all by himself.’

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Produced with major support from Alabama Innovation Engine

editing & content development by

Participants

For ease of collaboration and open source sharing,

creative energy and sense of possibility as we focus over the next two days on amplifying the

The Alabama Trails Design Summit is a two-day workshop where attendees will work together, using design thinking, to develop ideas supporting the mission of the Alabama Trails Commission. Attendees will be assigned one of two studios that approach the challenge of trails in Alabama from two different directions. One group is titled “The ATC Strategy” and views the challenge

opportunities to advance trails as a broad community benefit, an affordable form of exercise, and an economic development tool for Alabama.

Alabama Trails Commission’s potential as a compelling and significant resource – force! – in leveraging the outdoor assets of Alabama. You are an important part of this “tactical” investigation. Having the right people – together and engaged – is potent, and we expect an extraordinary two days. We’re confident

resource that fueled the knowledge assets of his sprawling innovation empire.’

Book design,

that the Design Summit’s methodology and facilitated sessions will lead us to some powerful next steps and serve as a catalyst for real action.

through a top-down lens. The other group is named “The Trails Towns Group” and will explore the same issue from a more local perspective. Challenge statements for each group are found later in the book and will serve as a starting point for the workshop. Other background material has been provided in this briefing book to support the exercises. Over the two days, a facilitator will lead each team in discussion, debate, and development of an actionable plan. The groups will craft ways to address their challenge statements and have opportunities to share their process and outcomes with the other group. We have incredible expertise on every team, so the process

So, roll up your sleeves and prepare to make a difference!

should be energetic, challenging, and rewarding. However, during this brief two-day period, we will only be able to do a

With sincere thanks,

portion of the work needed to advance a trail system in Alabama. This Design Summit is part of an ongoing effort of the Alabama Trails Commission to learn from trail users of all types

Thank you

text is set in Georgia, which is available on all computers and on the web.

Sans serif type is Edmond Sans designed by James T. Edmondson.

AT T E N D E E N A M E

Welcome and thank you for the commitment of your time,

In fact, Edison ‘viewed collaboration as the beating heart of his laboratories, a sustaining

Setting Out

Through participatory exercises and conversations with other individuals and organizations, we’ll develop ideas and

‘When we call Thomas Edison to mind,

Schedule

Workshop Material

Creative Commons Copyright 2013

It is available for a price of your choosing on LostType.com. NOVEMBER 21–22, 2013

throughout Alabama and develop into an organization that can

–SARAH MILLER CALDICOTT, GREAT-GRANDNIECE OF THOMAS EDISON IN HER BOOK

Debbie Quinn,

MIDNIGHT LUNCH ABOUT HIS INVENTION PROCESS

Board President

effectively support the grassroots efforts of locals as they continually work to create high-quality trails in Alabama.

The Alabama Trails Commission Thomas Edison’s laboratory. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY PAUL MILES

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY JOEL NEVILLE ANDERSON

BACKGROUND

Design thinking is ‘primarily concerned with the process of visualizing what might be, some desired future state, and creating a blueprint for realizing that intention.

Design Thinking SO CI AL INN OVAT IO N & DESIGN PRO CES S Design thinking is a method of bringing the process of design to both early planning and final rollout stages of solving challenges in systems development, products, and services. Through observation and integration of user insights, design thinking collaborators are able to build prototypes and test

iteration

them before significant amounts of money are spent bringing new outcomes to scale.

Through a process

–JEANNE LIEDTKA IN ROTMAN MAGAZINE

By testing new systems, products, and services with users–

of iteration, we

the ultimate experts–the design thinking process reveals both

will use everyday

typically yield. Playing out experiments in real situations, with actual users reveals contextual clues and environmental cues that lead to breakthroughs in usability and fit with the user’s

again. To test our

possible maps, or

visualization with group members, encouraging everyone to make ideas visible. The designers support the project management process of bringing the ideas through community

summit format

will consume a product or service and the infrastructure that enables it.’

are built on

Align the effort with existing energies

transparent, and rigorous collaboration. This workshop, as part of a much larger project, will produce outcomes

Big vision, modest goals Accept that an event is only a few days, and celebrate that potential of the impact that a few days can have as a point along a much longer continuum.

that will lead to

Design around your assets Communities are filled with light-hearted, hard working people seeking inspiration and ways to contribute to something larger than themselves. Put creativity and energy into assessing the nature, needs and availability of these

physical prototypes

around an issue or challenge in a local community with design

(ie–What could a

and iteration as key methods of defining the problem,

graphic signage

brainstorming next steps, and testing possible solutions.

Let’s make a sign

be underway in the same area, with similar intentions.

significant next

extraordinary people.

W H AT IS A DESIGN SUMMI T ?

to see and share.)

Do the homework in finding other initiatives that might

steps in the overall

Listen to everyone, then let everyone hear it.

A Design Summit is a multi-day gathering of stakeholders

system look like?

Suggested ways of working from the national graphic designers’ group’s Guidebook for Design Summits:

in-person,

–TIM BROWN & JOCELYN WYATT , STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW, WINTER 2010

engagement and user testing into implementation.

Summit workshops

needs and habits.

ideas, we may make conceptual models,

and facilitation are convening partners who frame the process. The designers, embedded in each group, share their skills in

challenges and solutions that laboratory experiments would not

materials like paper to make models, try them, reconsider, and make them

big braintstorms,

DESIGN SUMMI T The summit will take a people-centered approach to design,

‘Design thinking—inherently optimistic, constructive, and experiential—addresses the needs of the people who

All voices should be heard in order to shape the process and scope…and then everyone involved should have as much access to that shared wisdom as possible.

Bruce Mau, a leader in Design Thinking

Definition questions

Words and deeds It’s been said that if you want someone to join you, join them. In this way, trust is

‘often starts by questioning standard practices; then begins an experimental-thinking phase that is described as jumping

built. The DO-ference planning was focused less on

focusing on the needs, hopes, and dreams of users and communities to create solutions that are not only sustainable, but desireable.

Summit Participants

Please bring your full enthusiasm, openness, and best listening skills. We’ll bring the big paper, collaborative process,

Ideation

and design tools to

planning the DO-ference (an active community design

These questions can be used to set a project in motion They can help frame

workshop in Savannah, GA organized by the

the issue and serve as a jumping off point for collaborators.

support your work

Definition

Synthesis

university-level design school), but planning ways in

celebrating failure Failure is what happens

fences; he quickly begins to create sketches, prototypes, and other representations of ideas that can be shared; and at some point, he brings empathic research into the mix.’

which the community’s future could best be served.

H OW A M I GOIN G TO PART ICIPATE IN

when we don’t try at

THE DESIGN SUMMIT?

all or when we don’t

Active participation and an open mind will benefit all

try enough new ideas.

What is the current situation?

Design processes,

Gain insights into the organization by mapping a detailed picture of daily activities

Why does it exist?

DEFINE Stakeholders Workflows Journeys Questions

What has been tried in the past?

collaborators in the Design Summit. Because participants come from different backgrounds and have different

by necessity, require

innovative breakthrough. Instead of stigmatizing

What is the Opportunity?

learn planning terms, designers will learn policy details and of collaboration. At first, they may prove a bit challenging. In the end, the diversity of skill sets, framing tools, and

our discarded ideas, like this butterfly made by

What would be an ideal outcome?

photo

Summit Organizers

Documenting the collaborative process & sharing assets & resources to propel the work

At the Summit?

much more than sit still at the tables. We’ll be standing up, walking around, drawing together, and rearranging our notes. In this very active process, we will be able to

Post Summit?

recombine ideas and push through our first pitches to get to real breakthrough ideas.

and industrial design and with experience in design thinking

briefing book

photo

results, even though its architecture differs from the linear, milestone-based processes typical of other kinds of business activities. TIM BROWN, CO-FOUNDER OF IDEO

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY THE ALABAMA ENGINE

bird-watch scout sight stroll meander wander

FILM: POWERS OF TEN

USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:

By Charles and Ray Eames

“Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell.” Available at www.eamesoffice.com http://youtu.be/0fKBhvDjuy0

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY INDIANA DUNES

pedal navigate tour spin ride

PLACEMAKING CONCEPT: POWER OF TEN By the Project for Public Spaces

“The Power of 10 is a concept Project for Public Spaces uses to start off a Placemaking process. The idea is that it’s not enough to have just one great place in a neighborhood- you need a number of them to create a truly lively city or town. It’s not enough to have only one superior neighborhood in a city- you need to provide people all over town with close-to-home opportunities to take pleasure in public life. And, it’s not enough to have one livable city or town in a regionyou need a collection of interesting communities.

Everywhere we bring up this idea, citizens become more energized to turn their places around. The Power of 10 offers an easy framework that motivates residents and stakeholders to revitalize urban life, and shows that by starting efforts at the smallest scale you can accomplish big things. The concept also provides people something tangible to strive for and helps them visualize what it takes to make their community great.

residents and stakeholders determine -both individually and collectively- where they need to focus their energie

It’s the Placemakers’ role to encourage everyone to think about what’s special in their communities. How many quality places are located nearby, and how are they connected? Are there places that should be more meaningful but aren’t? Answering these questions can help

onn nd ow h ba a a

WHO ARE OUR USER GROUPS? USER GROUPS DEFINED

OT H ER WAYS TO D ES CR I B E

BY M E T H O D O F USI N G

THE GROUP OF USERS

THE TRAILS

Volunteers

Road Bikers

Retirees

Mountain Bikers

Experienced/Inexperienced

Slow Bikers

Family-friendly

Equestrian Riders

Staycation

Hikers

Organizational Opportunities

Trail Runners

Foundations

Off-Highway Vehicle Drivers

Societies

Fisherman

Social Media

Hunters

Paid memberships

Birders

Newsletters (electronic)

Divers – Gulf and Quarry

Professional Organizations

Home Schooled Students

Volunteers

Scouts

Board of County Commissions Citizens Advisory Committee

Hikers Trail Runners Off-Highway Drivers Fisherman & women Hunters Birders Road Bikers Mountain Bikers Slow Bikers Equestrian Riders Divers – Gulf & Quarry Scouts

THE ATC GROUP FOCUS

Benefit of a Trails System Trails and greenways fuel our future by... • Attracting tourists • Increasing property

THE ATC GROUP

Advancing Outdoor Recreation

What if...

• Providing healthy • Improving quality of life • Stimulating business development 

document– jump off, discuss, write,

MISSION STATEMENTS FOR REVIEW AND

NOTE:

Design thinking

Please feel free to jump in and take your own pictures to share

and trails

with your friends and peers.

and to promote outdoor recreational and educational opportunities for all the people of the State.

gallery we can keep building over time.

The following examples are intended to spark

Statewide Greenways and Trails System in order to advance the State’s economy, tourism, health, alternative transportation, recreation, conservation and quality of life. WE DO THE FOLLOWING:

establish priorities and define the role of the GTS in advancing recreation, conservation and quality of life.

units, land trusts, organizations, corporations, individuals) to

2. OVERSEE the priority and opportunity maps that define the

participate in establishing, developing and maintaining quality

GTS, and work in partnership with communities, agencies and organizations to close gaps in the system.

trails.

conversation and provide context for conversation during

2. ENCOURAGING all governmental units to develop land-use

the summit. They are not intended even as draft

The Alabama Trails Commission was created to Establish the

the State’s economy, tourism, health, alternative transportation,

consultation to, the State on:

3. EXPAND the GTS through the acquisition of eligible projects,

statements. Rather, each of the three is intended to

plans that preserve rights-of-way and corridors for existing

and partner with governments and organizations that develop

trails and the establishment of future trails.

and manage greenways and trails.

express a slightly different version of what the role of the

3. RECOMMENDING priorities for trail acquisition and

4. SUPPORT communities by providing technical assistance

Alabama Trails Commission might be. We expect to have

Define a framework for the Alabama Trails Commission that reflects

a spirited conversation about what elements of each feel

a vision of amplifying the efforts and voices of local organizations

right for Alabama, and what might be missing that we

and communities as they develop a high-quality network of trails.

should consider.

• Providing alternative transportation

development with an emphasis on trails that establish

regarding the acquisition, development, designation and

connections between existing trails, and connections between

management of greenways and trails projects that fulfill the GTS

public lands, that are easily accessed by the people of the State.

plan and vision.

4. DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING a trail use ethic for a safe and

5. ADMINISTER the Recreational Trails Program (RTP), a

positive user experience and to ensure a respect for natural

federally funded competitive grant program that provides

resources.

financial assistance to local communities for the development of

• Preserving public

5. RECOMMENDING AND PROMOTING a rational and stable

lands for generations

funding mechanism for trail maintenance and operations.

to come

6. PROMOTING AND ENCOURAGING trails that are designed to meet the diverse interests and abilities of our citizens.

trails. 6. DISSEMINATE information about the many benefits that greenways and trails provide to residents and visitors. Provide information to residents and visitors about greenways and trails recreational opportunities through websites, publications, and e-newsletters.

Sketching with images, words, and ideas helps us generate new ways of seeing what is possible.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT BY TOMOUTSIDE, SEAN DREILINGER, MANNY ROSAS, & STARLEY SHELTON

CREATIVE COMMONS ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE KLEINSCHMIDT

THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

FUNCTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

EX AMPLE 3: GOALS AND OBJECT I VES

AT A GL ANCE ... THE OBJECTIVES OF THE [STATE} RECREATION

IMPLEMENT the Plan for the State Greenways and

TRAILS PROGRAM ARE TO:

Trails System (GTS)

• CREATE a statewide system of designated trails that will

EVALUATE AND PRIORITIZE greenways and trails

showcase state’s outstanding scenic features and significant

corridors in the GTS

regional routes;

PROVIDE statewide coordination of the GTS through

• NURTURE proponent groups that will develop, sustain and

planning and community assistance

advocate for high quality trails and outstanding trails

FACILITATE AND PROVIDE support to GTS priority

experiences

and opportunity projects

• IDENTIFY trails that offer access to a variety of quintessential

FACILITATE the GTS through representation on

local scenery;

various boards, committees and councils

• RECOGNIZE close-to-home trails that make significant

SERVE as staff to the State Greenways and Trails

connections within local areas and between communities;

Council

• COMPLIMENT , support and strengthen other trail and outdoor

ADMINISTER the federal Recreational Trails Program

initiatives developed under private, local, state, regional and

ADMINISTER the Greenways and Trails Designation

federal auspices

Program BENEFITS

ADMINISTER the Greenways and Trails Acquisition

• BRING economic benefits to local communities

Program

• PROVIDE a variety of recreational challenges for trail users;

PUBLICIZE AND PROMOTE greenways and trails and

the GTS

• FOSTER strong grassroots support for State Recreation Trails designation

TRAILS CASE STUDY

Hunters Hunters Birders Birders DiversDivers – Gulf–&Gulf Quarry & Quarry ScoutsScouts Road Road BikersBikers Mountain BikersBikers Mountain Slow Slow BikersBikers Equestrian RidersRiders Equestrian HikersHikers Trail Runners Trail Runners Off-Highway Drivers Off-Highway Drivers Fisherman & women Fisherman & women

CH ALLEN GE STATEMENT

Imagine a community program for Alabama that provides a sustainable model for economic growth by encouraging access to the wealth of outdoor Alabama through the use of trails.

TRAILS CASE STUDY

THE GREAT ALLEGHENY

THE BUCKEYE TRAIL, OHIO

PASSAGE, PENNSYLVANIA

In 1958, American writer and Ohio native Merrill Gilfillan proposed a trail from Cincinnati to Lake Erie to encourage “young people to slow down and learn about their native land.” Several people, including Merrill, met in Columbus in February 1959 to discuss building such a trail. In June, they formed a non-profit organization: The Buckeye Trail Association (BTA).

The 150-mile Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) connects with the 184.5-mile C&O Canal Towpath at Cumberland, Maryland to create a 334.5-mile traffic and motorized vehicle-free route between Pittsburgh and Washington, DC. Built mainly on abandoned rail beds, the GAP has a packed crushed limestone surface for a smooth ride. From Cumberland to Washington, DC, travelers follow the C&O Canal Towpath. Built for mules and not railroads, the towpath is overall much less improved than the GAP.

TRAIL TOWNS GROUP FOCUS

Connecting Places

travel venture cycle reflect exercise relax

Bicycling and hiking are the two most popular activities and sections of the trail system are open to equestrians. Open throughout the year, the trail system is universally accessible between dawn and dusk. Winter snow allows cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Fishermen take the trail to favorite fishing spots. Bird watching is another favorite activity. In the early 2000s, The Allegheny Trail Alliance (ATA), with planning and funding assistance from Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and The Progress Fund, developed the Trail Town Program®. The program is an economic development and community revitalization initiative working in “Trail Towns” along the GAP, ensuring that trail communities and businesses maximize the economic potential of the trail. The program also works to address trail-wide issues and to identify opportunities available through regional cooperation. It works in participating Trail Towns to improve the connections “between trail and town,” addressing issues of signage, safety, marketing, and awareness.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT BY PAUL MILES, BRANDON CRIPPS, COLLEGE OUTDOORS,

A train depot along the The Great Allegheny Passage in Ohiopyle State Park in Pennsylvania.

WISCONSIN DEPT. OF NATURAL RESOURCES

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY JOSEPH

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY MK CAMPBELL

Bicycle tourists sometimes camp in tents or they stay in hotels along the path, supporting local businesses like hotels and restaurants. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY MK CAMPBELL

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY CHRIS PALMER

Bicycle touring on the The Great Allegheny Trail.

A two-year economic impact surveying businesses and trail users determined that:

800,000+ trips Estimated taken each year

$40+ million in direct annual spending is attributable to trail user spending (up from $7.26 million in 2002);

30% of sales attributed to trail user spending on average (percentage is higher for lodging properties and bike shops).

TR A IL TOWN PROGRAM GOALS: –Retain, expand, and increase revenues of existing businesses; –Recruit sustainable new businesses; –Facilitate collective action by the Trail Towns to create a world class recreational destination; –Improve the buildings and infrastructure in each town to create a visitor friendly destination. Currently, the Trail Town Program works extensively in nine communities and offers basic services in other trail towns along the GAP. Program staff work with local and regional partners toward the vision of a corridor of

revitalized trailside communities that reap the economic benefits of trail-based tourism and recreation. Since it’s founding, the Trail Towns Program has developed a series of networks, grant programs and partnership opportunities to help towns and businesses succeed as a Trail Town. The Trail Town Certified Business Network helps improve business practices in sustainability and hospitality through training assessments to become “Certified Sustainable” and/or “Certified Trail Friendly.”

installing custom-made and locally produced signs that refl ect the special nature of each participating business.

Stone stairs on the trail in Hocking Hills.

The first 20 miles of the trail were dedicated in September 1959 in Hocking County and the trail was completed near Deer Lick Cave in the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area in 1980. Although first envisioned by Gilfillan and other BTA members as a trail from the Ohio River to Lake Erie, the Buckeye Trail evolved into a large loop, branching both north and east from Cincinnati. The separate legs rejoin in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park near Cleveland. Today, the Buckeye Trail is nearly 1,444 miles and winds around Ohio, reaching into every corner of the state. The trail is primarily a footpath, however certain portions are designated for bicyclists and equestrians. The BTA, a volunteer organization, maintains and promotes the trail. Though the entire route is marked, the Buckeye Trail continues to change and improve. The BTA looks for ways to move road sections off the roads, and to upgrade those off-road sections to high quality trail.

And, until the end of 2012, the Trail Town Bike Rack Matching Grant Program offered Pennsylvania Trail Town businesses the opportunity to install post and ring style bike racks at a reduced cost through a matching grant program. USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:

Trail Town Business Sign Grant Program offers a matching grant program to assist businesses in

Stone bridges on the trail in Cedar Grove, Ohio.

In addition, the BTA promotes “Buckeye Trail Towns” as destinations users can use plan their outdoor recreation. Promoting them as base camps, the BTA helps towns identify and promote local campgrounds, motels and bed and breakfasts as well as restaurants, shops, and other in-town

Co abo a o L s TRAILS CASE STUDY THE FLORIDA NATIONAL SCENIC TRAIL, FLORIDA The Florida National Scenic Trail, a federally designated trail approximately 1,300-miles long, offers a continuous non-motorized recreation opportunity for hiking and other compatible activities. Over its length, the Trail highlights the diverse scenic, natural, historic and cultural character of the Florida countryside. One of 11 National Scenic Trails, the Florida Trail stretches from the edge of the everglades ecosystem in Big Cypress National Preserve to historic Fort Pickens in Gulf Islands National Seashore.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY B A BOWEN PHOTOGRAPHY

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY CHRIS PALMER

Signing in on the Marjorie Harris Cross Florida Green Way Trail, part of the National Florida Scenic Trail in Ocala, Florida.

Trail walkers on the Buckeye Trail in Cedar Grove, Ohio.

amenities that complement visits to the Buckeye Trail. The Buckeye Trail Town program helps towns identify ways the town and the Trail can work together. By leveraging relationships with the Chamber of Commerce, local businesses and other community organizations, the program helps towns form partnerships that capitalize on the benefits the Buckeye Trails can bring to an area. BTA MISSION: The Buckeye Trail Association is the leader in building, maintaining, protecting

and promoting use of Ohio’s longest scenic hiking trail for our citizens, communities and partners. We provide outdoor recreation, opportunities to volunteer, education, access to the varied resources of Ohio and local economic benefits. BTA VISION: The Buckeye Trail, Ohio’s State Scenic Trail is a sustainable hiking trail that provides a safe and unique experience throughout the state refl ecting the diverse resources, people and stories of Ohio. The trail is a dedicated, recognized and protected route developed and

maintained by the Buckeye Trail Association, an organization refl ective of the diversity of the trail. The Buckeye Trail Association works in close partnership with communities, organizations and agencies around Ohio creating a legacy for present and future generations.

The U.S. Forest Service is designated the administrator of the Trail, however the Florida Trail Association (FTA) helps to develop, maintain, protect and promote the Trail as well as a network of other hiking trails throughout the state. Together with their partners, the FTA provides opportunities for the public to hike, engage in outdoor recreation, participate in environmental education and contribute to meaningful volunteer work. The FTA established the Florida Trail Gateway Community Program which is designed to raise awareness of the Trail by developing partnerships with communities along or near the Trail while helping to support the community by providing tourism, health and economic development tools. The Gateway Program focuses on communities near the trail that provide outdoor recreation opportunities for a day, a weekend or a week-long stay. Working together, the program and the selected communities will be able to encourage the preservation of natural

USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:

and cultural resources and at the same time, boost the economy.

T H E F TA A N D G AT E WAY COMMUNITIES HELP EACH OTHER ACCOMPLISH THE FOLLOW ING: Educate local businesses of the value of the Trail as an economic resources; Promote responsible tourism development within the community and support the Trail; Increase usage of the Trail by attracting more nature based tourists to the local community; Enable both parties to apply for targeted grants to assist in the Gateway Community’s efforts towards nature based tourism development economic development and FTS infrastructure development through the development of promotional products, educational resources or signature events.

Specifically, the FTA assists the Gateway Communities through: Promoting the Gateway Community as a destination through its website and other media outlets; Offering outreach materials to the Gateway Community such as brochures newsletters posters displays and other such items;

Providing detailed information on hiking opportunities near the Gateway Community (which can be reproduced and distributed to visitors); Providing periodic guided or signature hikes that depart from the Gateway Community; Providing support at local festivals or other community events to encourage interest in the Trail when possible; Providing signs with the Florida Trail Gateway Community logo for posting at the entrances of the Gateway Community; Maintaining the sections of the Trail near the Gateway Community so that casual hikers can easily locate and follow it.

DESIGN SUMMIT ATTENDEES

Monitor the number of visitors who are seeking the Gateway Community as a destination for hiking; Make efforts to attract businesses that support nature based tourism and assure the FTA maps and guides will be available from a business or community organization in town for visitors to purchase;

‘Laying out all of our ideas visually helps us pull back to see the trends, the big picture.’

Encourage local business to become a member of FTA and provide discounts for visitors who show their FTA membership card; Install the Florida Trail Gateway Community signs at the entrance of the community. USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:

In return, the Gateway Community is expected to: Include the FTA and the Trail in its promotional materials; Provide Trail information to the local visitors centers and/or chamber of commerce to be available to the public and request space for a FTA display or wall mounted poster; Work with the local FTA contact to promote periodic guided or signature hikes or events; Assist in promoting special designations such as Florida Hiking Trails Month in February and National Trails Day the in June;

–PHOENIX DESIGN SUMMIT PARTICIPANT

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non-profit, and governmental organizations on projects that have the potential to have significant positive impact in a region. REGIONAL PROJECTS

THIS MISSION THROUGH THREE

Engine is continually developing relationships with

COMPLIMENTARY METHODS:

- Organize and host design summits to identify responses to large scale issues - Identify and coordinate regional based, long-term projects with potential to have positive broad social and economic impacts - Facilitate partnerships between professional designers and community non-profits

several community organizations, non-profits, and governmental entities to identify opportunities for design in the context of large-scale regional projects. the state of Alabama that need a catalytic force to

Nisa Miranda (Chairman), Director, University of Alabama Center for Economic Development Otis French, Southeastern Regional Forester, Alabama Forestry Commission

community groups and non-profits need assistance

individuals: government officials, advocacy groups,

engage. It states some basic info, interests,

in developing and refining strategies to continue

non-profits, community groups, universities, and

research, history, context, or whatever else

advancing their missions. Design Summits are

many others. Engine works to build partnerships

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events that bring together community leaders and

between those mission-driven organizations and design firms to create opportunities for design

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traditional conferences. Using design thinking,

projects. Long-term goals for this strategy include

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Design Summits are action-oriented events that

creation and implementation of a communitybuilding event and a web-based connection platform.

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identify partnerships, mission overlaps, and

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potential in a non-traditional environment.

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James K. Lanier, Cherokee Ridge Alpine Trail Association William M. Matthews, Director of Continuing Education, University of North Alabama (retired) Richard Martin, Limestone County Parks and Recreation Board

Debbie Quinn (Chairman)

implementation, but do have the potential for significant positive impact on Alabama.

research, history, context, or whatever else

Alabama Trails Commission Members

Cam Ward, State Senator, 14th District Trip Pittman, State Senator, 32nd District Donnie Chesteen, State Representative, 87th District Terri Collins, State Rep, 8th District

Jim Felder (Vice Chairman) Executive Director, Alabama Scenic River Trail

may not have a well-defined process for

involvement and interest of a variety of groups and

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Auburn University School of Architecture Urban Studio The University of Alabama Center for Economic Development

Alabama Trails Commission Advisory Board

organize and guide their development. Engine acts

The nature of effective community work requires the

ideas around common local issues. They are not

Jim Byard, Jr., Director, Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs N. Gunter Guy Jr., Commissioner, State of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

as that force to continually develop projects that

PARTNERSHIPS

tendency to focus on the solutions and everyday operations of an organization. With limited capacity,

designers to develop new strategies and innovative

Governor Robert Bentley, State of Alabama

There are several of these large-scale projects within

DESIGN SUMMITS A significant challenge of mission-driven work is a

NAME GOESHERE This is a brief bio on this person that is on a few lines and helps us understand how to

Many Thanks to Our Summit Supporters

University of Alabama’s Center for Economic Development, we partner with community,

OUR GOAL IS TO ACCOMPLISH

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Alabama Innovation Engine is a design-based economic development initiative. Began as a partnership between Auburn University’s School of Architecture Urban Studio and the

research, history, context, or whatever else this person sends to us. Lovely copy goes goes here. Lovely copy goes here. Lovely

Hos s & Suppo e s

Alabama Innovation Engine

thinking to have an impact on local social innovation

John Eagerton, Chief Aeronautics Bureau, Alabama Department of Transportation Phillip West (Secretary), Coastal Resources Manager, City of Orange Beach Richard Guthrie, Dean, Auburn University School of Agriculture (retired) Cecil Colson, Special Programs Administrator Transportation Planning/Modal Programs, Alabama Department of Transportation Grey Brennan, Alabama Tourism Marketing and Regional Director, Alabama Department of Tourism Greg Lein, Director, State Parks Division, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Wesley Helton, Aide-de-Camp, Governor’s Office Rob Grant (Staff), Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs

Gordon Stone, Mayor, Town of Pike Road Josh Dyer, Superintendent of Golf, Ross Bridge Golf Resort Joe Nicholson, Recreation Program Manager, National Forests in Alabama Steven H. Newton (Secretary), Planning Team Leader at Gorgas Steam Plant, Alabama Power Company Sara B. Baldwin PhD, Alabama Registered Forester Edward I. Lyon, Site Manager, Alabama River Lakes, US Army Corps of Engineers Rodney Goode, Urban Conservationist, National Resources Conservation Service Printing by Ingenius Design

Let’s connect, tend, grow, stitch, & blaze together.

Space donated by Energen Corporation

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY ROBERT GÖDICKE

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DESIGN REPUBLIC

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CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DESIGN REPUBLIC

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–PHOENIX DESIGN SUMMIT PARTICIPANT

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documentary photographer at the summit will be posted on Flickr with your photos in a

or search Flickr.com for Alabama Trails Design Summit

1. IMPLEMENT the State Greenways and Trails System Plan to

The council shall represent the public and provide advice and

the group by posting to your Flickr feed and sharing with our Flickr group, http://www.flickr.com/groups/2385366@N23/

material for the summit

E X A MPLE 2: MIS SIO N STATEMENT

advice and consultation to the State of Alabama regarding the planning, acquisition, development, and management of state-owned trails, in order to preserve, protect, interpret, and enhance the scenic, natural, and cultural resources of the state;

work this text dialogue about what is possible.

1. ENCOURAGING private/public partnerships (government

CH ALLEN GE STATEMENT

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DAVID JONES

your work to help propel us to the next phase!

photo

A GROWING GALLERY

THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

E X A MPLE 1: MIS SIO N STATEMENT It is the mission of the Alabama Trails Commission to provide

edit, rearrange, and otherwise

CONVERSATION

values recreation

Please consider this a working

to support your

EXAMPLES OF TRAILS COMMISSION

photo

Images taken by professional

am wo

THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

Trail User Experience

photo

VISUALIZING THE WORK

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY RESEARCHING MEDIA

a wd mpa

photo

You can share photos you make with

Wo kshop Ma e a

hike ride bike run photograph walk

your constituency, you can share the experience of the Summit. We’ll send you a follow-up document showing

Summit report photo

PHOTOGRAPHING THE ACTION

umm h du

steps. The spaces demarcate different sorts of related

for the first time. But over the life of a project participants come to see… that the process makes sense and achieves

When you go back to your community, your office,

We’ll be taking pictures of you looking your best, collaborating.

Schedu e Design thinking can feel chaotic to those experiencing it

DOCUMENT Defined challenge Refined concept Implementation strategies Next steps

photo

PROCESS

DESIGN CASE STUDY

‘The design process is best described metaphorically as a

photo

INTRODUCING

development

system of spaces rather than a predetermined series of orderly

photo

maps

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford conducting experiments at Edison’s laboratory in New Jersey.

activities that together form the continuum of innovation.

Craft a compelling case for the project and clearly articulate implementation strategies and next steps

community networks will prove to be our greatest strength.

As we work together to invent new possibilities, we’ll do

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY THE HENRY FORD

Open to outline the process

Documentation

How do you envision the Summit can shift things?

LET’S WEAR COMFY SHOES

designer Nina Miller.

–WARREN BERGER ON BRUCE MAU IN ‘GLIMMER’

DESIGN CASE STUDY

IDEATE Experiences Solutions Tools Processes

SYNTHESIZE Design constraints Models Maps Defined challenge

so on. These translation opportunities are the fertile ground

failure, we can celebrate small failures by making origami of

Designers with backgrounds in communication, architecture,

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY LAURA BELL

Engage in creative exploration, leading to an innovative, well-articulated idea that solves the challenge

Review findings, reach consensus on the most pressing challenge, consider strategic opportunities

DISCOVER Context Pain points Work-arounds Opportunities

how to speak and listen to the languages of other disciplines. Planners will learn some design language, policy experts will

Discovery

Identify opportunity areas, create a shortlist of problems worth solving

What worked / didn’t?

specialties, a particular opportunity exists for us all to learn

a certain amount of failure to get to an

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‘When we call Thomas Edison to mind, our first thought is of a brilliant inventor and innovator whose creations transformed modern life. We often think of him toiling away in a laboratory all by himself.’

In fact, Edison ‘viewed collaboration as the beating heart of his laboratories, a sustaining resource that fueled the knowledge assets of his sprawling innovation empire.’ –SARAH MILLER CALDICOTT, GREAT-GRANDNIECE OF THOMAS EDISON IN HER BOOK MIDNIGHT LUNCH ABOUT HIS INVENTION PROCESS Thomas Edison’s laboratory. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY JOEL NEVILLE ANDERSON


Welcome to the Summit Welcome and thank you for the commitment of your time, creative energy and sense of possibility as we focus over the next two days on amplifying the Alabama Trails Commission’s potential as a compelling and significant resource – force! – in leveraging the outdoor assets of Alabama. You are an important part of this “tactical” investigation. Having the right people – together and engaged – is potent, and we expect an extraordinary two days. We’re confident that the Design Summit’s methodology and facilitated sessions will lead us to some powerful next steps and serve as a catalyst for real action. So, roll up your sleeves and prepare to make a difference! With sincere thanks,

Debbie Quinn, Board President The Alabama Trails Commission


Through participatory exercises and conversations with other individuals and organizations, we’ll develop ideas and opportunities to advance trails as a broad community benefit, an affordable form of exercise, and an economic development tool for Alabama.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY PAUL MILES


INTRODUCTION

Setting Out The Alabama Trails Design Summit is a two-day workshop where attendees will work together, using design thinking, to develop ideas supporting the mission of the Alabama Trails Commission. Attendees will be assigned one of two studios that approach the challenge of trails in Alabama from two different directions. One group is titled “The ATC Strategy” and views the challenge through a top-down lens. The other group is named “The Trails Towns Group” and will explore the same issue from a more local perspective. Challenge statements for each group are found later in the book and will serve as a starting point for the workshop. Other background material has been provided in this briefing book to support the exercises. Over the two days, a facilitator will lead each team in discussion, debate, and development of an actionable plan. The groups will craft ways to address their challenge statements and have opportunities to share their process and outcomes with the other group. We have incredible expertise on every team, so the process should be energetic, challenging, and rewarding. However, during this brief two-day period, we will only be able to do a portion of the work needed to advance a trail system in Alabama. This Design Summit is part of an ongoing effort of the Alabama Trails Commission to learn from trail users of all types throughout Alabama and develop into an organization that can effectively support the grassroots efforts of locals as they continually work to create high-quality trails in Alabama.


Design thinking is ‘primarily concerned with the process of visualizing what might be, some desired future state, and creating a blueprint for realizing that intention. –JEANNE LIEDTKA IN ROTMAN MAGAZINE

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY LAURA BELL


BACKGROUND

Design Thinking SO CI AL INN OVAT IO N & DESIGN PRO CES S Design thinking is a method of bringing the process of design to both early planning and final rollout stages of solving challenges in systems development, products, and services. Through observation and integration of user insights, design thinking collaborators are able to build prototypes and test

iteration Through a process of iteration, we will use everyday

them before significant amounts of money are spent bringing new outcomes to scale. By testing new systems, products, and services with users– the ultimate experts–the design thinking process reveals both

materials like paper

challenges and solutions that laboratory experiments would not

to make models, try

typically yield. Playing out experiments in real situations, with

them, reconsider,

actual users reveals contextual clues and environmental cues

and make them

that lead to breakthroughs in usability and fit with the user’s

again. To test our

needs and habits.

ideas, we may make conceptual models, big braintstorms,

W H AT IS A DESIGN SUMMI T ?

possible maps, or

A Design Summit is a multi-day gathering of stakeholders

physical prototypes

around an issue or challenge in a local community with design

(ie–What could a

and iteration as key methods of defining the problem,

graphic signage

brainstorming next steps, and testing possible solutions.

system look like? Let’s make a sign to see and share.)

Designers with backgrounds in communication, architecture, and industrial design and with experience in design thinking


‘Design thinking—inherently optimistic, constructive, and experiential—addresses the needs of the people who will consume a product or service and the infrastructure that enables it.’ –TIM BROWN & JOCELYN WYATT , STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW, WINTER 2010

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford conducting experiments at Edison’s laboratory in New Jersey. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY THE HENRY FORD


and facilitation are convening partners who frame the process. The designers, embedded in each group, share their skills in visualization with group members, encouraging everyone to make ideas visible. The designers support the project management process of bringing the ideas through community

summit format

engagement and user testing into implementation.

Suggested ways of working from the national graphic

Summit workshops

designers’ group’s Guidebook for Design Summits:

are built on

Align the effort with existing energies

in-person, transparent, and rigorous collaboration. This workshop, as part of a much larger project, will produce outcomes

Do the homework in finding other initiatives that might be underway in the same area, with similar intentions.

Big vision, modest goals Accept that an event is only a few days, and celebrate that potential of the impact that a few days can have as a point along a much longer continuum.

that will lead to

Design around your assets Communities are

significant next

filled with light-hearted, hard working people seeking

steps in the overall

inspiration and ways to contribute to something

arc of the work.

larger than themselves. Put creativity and energy into assessing the nature, needs and availability of these extraordinary people.

Listen to everyone, then let everyone hear it. All voices should be heard in order to shape the process and scope‌and then everyone involved should have as much access to that shared wisdom as possible.


Bruce Mau, a leader in Design Thinking

‘often starts by questioning standard practices; then begins an experimental-thinking phase that is described as jumping fences; he quickly begins to create sketches, prototypes, and other representations of ideas that can be shared; and at some point, he brings empathic research into the mix.’ –WARREN BERGER ON BRUCE MAU IN ‘GLIMMER’


Words and deeds It’s been said that if you want someone to join you, join them. In this way, trust is built. The DO-ference planning was focused less on planning the DO-ference (an active community design workshop in Savannah, GA organized by the university-level design school), but planning ways in

celebrating failure

which the community’s future could best be served.

Failure is what happens

H OW A M I GOIN G TO PART ICIPATE IN

when we don’t try at

THE DESIGN SUMMIT?

all or when we don’t

Active participation and an open mind will benefit all

try enough new ideas. Design processes, by necessity, require a certain amount of failure to get to an innovative breakthrough. Instead of stigmatizing

collaborators in the Design Summit. Because participants come from different backgrounds and have different specialties, a particular opportunity exists for us all to learn how to speak and listen to the languages of other disciplines. Planners will learn some design language, policy experts will learn planning terms, designers will learn policy details and

failure, we can

so on. These translation opportunities are the fertile ground

celebrate small failures

of collaboration. At first, they may prove a bit challenging.

by making origami of

In the end, the diversity of skill sets, framing tools, and

our discarded ideas, like

community networks will prove to be our greatest strength.

this butterfly made by designer Nina Miller.

LET’S WEAR COMFY SHOES As we work together to invent new possibilities, we’ll do much more than sit still at the tables. We’ll be standing up, walking around, drawing together, and rearranging our notes. In this very active process, we will be able to recombine ideas and push through our first pitches to get to real breakthrough ideas.


Definition questions These questions can be used to set a project in motion They can help frame the issue and serve as a jumping off point for collaborators.

What is the current situation?

Why does it exist?

What has been tried in the past?

What worked / didn’t?

What is the Opportunity?

How do you envision the Summit can shift things?

What would be an ideal outcome?

At the Summit?

Post Summit?


DESIGN SUMMI T The summit will take a people-centered approach to design, focusing on the needs, hopes, and dreams of users and communities to create solutions that are not only sustainable, but desireable.

Summit Participants

Please bring your full enthusiasm, openness, and best listening skills. We’ll bring the big paper, collaborative process,

Ideation

and design tools to support your work

Definition

Gain insights into the organization by mapping a detailed picture of daily activities DEFINE Stakeholders Workflows Journeys Questions

Synthesis

Discovery

Review findings, reach consensus on the most pressing challenge, consider strategic opportunities

Identify opportunity areas, create a shortlist of problems worth solving

photo Documenting the collaborative process & sharing assets & resources to propel the work

briefing book

IDEATE Experiences Solutions Tools Processes

SYNTHESIZE Design constraints Models Maps Defined challenge

DISCOVER Context Pain points Work-arounds Opportunities

Summit Organizers

Engage in creative exploration, leading to an innovative, well-articulated idea that solves the challenge

photo

photo

photo

Documentation

Craft a compelling case for the project and clearly articulate implementation strategies and next steps DOCUMENT Defined challenge Refined concept Implementation strategies Next steps

When you go back to your community, your office, your constituency, you can share the experience of the Summit. We’ll send you a follow-up document showing your work to help propel us to the next phase!

photo Summit report

maps photo

photo

photo

photo

photo

INTRODUCING

PHOTOGRAPHING THE ACTION

VISUALIZING THE WORK

A GROWING GALLERY

PROCESS

We’ll be taking pictures of you looking your best, collaborating.

You can share photos you make with

Images taken by professional

Please feel free to jump in and take your own pictures to share

the group by posting to your Flickr feed

documentary photographer at

with your friends and peers.

and sharing with our Flickr group,

the summit will be posted on

development

http://www.flickr.com/groups/2385366@N23/

Flickr with your photos in a

material for

or search Flickr.com

gallery we can keep building

the summit

for Alabama Trails Design Summit

over time.

Design thinking and trails


Open to outline the process


‘The design process is best described metaphorically as a system of spaces rather than a predetermined series of orderly steps. The spaces demarcate different sorts of related activities that together form the continuum of innovation.

Design thinking can feel chaotic to those experiencing it for the first time. But over the life of a project participants come to see‌ that the process makes sense and achieves results, even though its architecture differs from the linear, milestone-based processes typical of other kinds of business activities. TIM BROWN, CO-FOUNDER OF IDEO

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY THE ALABAMA ENGINE


bird-watch scout sight stroll meander wander CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY INDIANA DUNES


DESIGN CASE STUDY

FILM: POWERS OF TEN By Charles and Ray Eames

“Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell.� Available at www.eamesoffice.com http://youtu.be/0fKBhvDjuy0

USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:


pedal navigate tour spin ride CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY RESEARCHING MEDIA


DESIGN CASE STUDY

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY MICHIGAN MUNICIPAL LEAGUE

PLACEMAKING CONCEPT: POWER OF TEN By the Project for Public Spaces

“The Power of 10 is a concept Project for Public Spaces uses to start off a Placemaking process. The idea is that it’s not enough to have just one great place in a neighborhood- you need a number of them to create a truly lively city or town. It’s not enough to have only one superior neighborhood in a city- you need to provide people all over town with close-to-home opportunities to take pleasure in public life. And, it’s not enough to have one livable city or town in a regionyou need a collection of interesting communities.

Everywhere we bring up this idea, citizens become more energized to turn their places around. The Power of 10 offers an easy framework that motivates residents and stakeholders to revitalize urban life, and shows that by starting efforts at the smallest scale you can accomplish big things. The concept also provides people something tangible to strive for and helps them visualize what it takes to make their community great. It’s the Placemakers’ role to encourage everyone to think about what’s special in their communities. How many quality places are located nearby, and how are they connected? Are there places that should be more meaningful but aren’t? Answering these questions can help

residents and stakeholders determine -both individually and collectively- where they need to focus their energies. Whether you’re talking about places in a given neighborhood or great neighborhoods within a city, “10” can also refer to the ultimate goals of variety and choice. When we talk about the “Power of 10,” we are stressing the fact that we should always think of how Placemaking can be accomplished at all scales.” http://www.pps.org/reference/ poweroften/ USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:


connect tend grow stitch blaze caretake CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY C.K. HARTMAN


Summit Schedule Thursday, Nov 21

Friday, Nov 22

8:30 am

Continental Breakfast

8:30 am

Continental Breakfast

9:00 am

Welcome &

9:00 am

Group Check-In

Introductions 9:10 am

Overview of Design Summit

9:30 am

Breakout Into Teams

Goals of the Day 9:15 am

Individual Groups

noon

Lunch (on site)

12:30 pm

Lunch (on site)

1:00 pm

Individual Groups

1:00 pm

Individual Groups

4:15 pm

Shareback

3:00 pm

Shareback

4:00 pm

Individual Groups Next Steps to Advance Solutions

5:00 pm

End of Day 1

5:00 pm

End of Design Summit


OUTDOOR RECREATION STATEWIDE IMPACT

State & Local Tax Revenue Mississippi $165 million less than Alabama Alabama

$494 million

Georgia

$906 million more than Alabama

Florida

$2.0 billion more than Alabama

Wages & Salaries $1.3 billion Mississippi $2.0 billion in Alabama $7.0 billion Georgia $10.7 billion Florida

Data Source: The Outdoor Recreation Economy, a 2012 report from the Outdoor Industry Association


THE OUTDOOR RECREATION ECONOMY

Statewide Impact Direct Jobs in Outdoor Recreation 58,000 people in Mississippi 86,000 people in Alabama 231,000 people in Georgia 329,000 people in Florida

Consumer spending $4.9 billion Mississippi $7.5 billion in Alabama $23.3 billion Georgia $38.3 billion Florida


Topography

L A U DE R DA L E L IME ST ONE

MA DISON

JACKSON

COL BE RT L AW R E N CE F R A NK L IN

DE K A L B

MOR GA N MA R SH A L L

W INST ON

MA R ION

CH E R OK E E

CU L L MA N E T OWA H B L OU NT

WA L K E R L A MA R

CA L H OU N

ST . CL A IR

FAY E T T E

CL E BU R NE

Mt. Cheaha 2,407 ft.

JE F F E R SON

T A L L A DE GA PICK E NS

T U SCA L OOSA

CL AY

SH E L B Y

BIBB

GR E E NE

R A NDOL PH

T A L L A POOSA

COOSA

CH A MBE R S

CH IL T ON

HAL E PE R RY

E L MOR E

L EE

A U T AU GA

SU MT E R

MA CON

MONT GOME R Y

DA L L A S

MA R E NGO

R U SSE L L

L OW N DE S

CHOCT AW

BU L L OCK

W ILCOX BA R B OU R

PIK E

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MON R OE

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COF F E E

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DALE

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COV INGT ON E SCA MBIA

H OU ST ON GE NE VA

MOB IL E

BA L DW IN 1,500 1,000 750 500 250 100 0

Produced by the Dept. of Geography, College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama

Elevation in Feet

2,500


ForestForest TypesTypes

LAUDERDALE

MADISON

LIMESTONE

JACKSON

COLBERT LAWRENCE FRANKLIN

MORGAN

WINS TON

MARION

DE KALB

MARS HALL

CHEROKEE

CULLMAN ETOWAH BLOUNT

WALKER

LAMAR

CALHOUN

S T. CLAIR

FAYET T E

CLEBURNE

JEFFERS ON TALLADEGA T US CALOOSA

PICKENS

CLAY

S HELBY

RANDOLPH

BIBB

TALLAPOOSA

COOSA

GREENE

CHAMBERS

CHILTON HALE PERRY

MARENGO

LEE

ELMORE

AUTAUGA

S UMTER

MACON

DALLAS

MONT GOMERY

CHOCTAW

RUSSELL

LOWNDES

BULLOCK

WILCOX BARBOUR PIKE

BUT LER

CLARKE

CRENS HAW MONROE HENRY

WASHINGTON CONECUH

COFFEE

DALE

COVINGTON ES CAMBIA

GENEVA

HOUSTON

MOBILE

BALDWIN

Longleaf-Slash Pine

Oak-Hickory

Loblolly-Shortleaf Pine

Oak-Gum Cypress

Oak-Pine

Non-typed, less than 10% forest

Produced by Cartographic Research Lab, Department of Geography Produced by the Dept. of Geography The University of Alabama The University of Alabama


River Basins River Basins

T E N N E S S E E

S I P S E Y

/ W A R R I O R C O O S A

/

T A L L A P O O S A

A L A B A M A

T O M B I G B E E /

C H A T T A H O O C H E E

/

C A H A B A

M O B I L E

C H O C T A W C O N E C U H

-

H A T C H E E

E S C A T A W P A Y E L L O W B L A C K W A T E R

C H I POL A

P E R D I D O

P roduced by the Dept. of Geography College of A rts and S ciences T he U niversity of A labama

Produced by the Dept. of Geography, College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama


Major Major RiversRivers Pickwick Lake Wilson Lake

Wheeler Lake Guntersville Lake Weiss Reservoir

Lewis Smith Lake

Neely Henry Lake

Inland Lake Bankhead Lake

Logan Martin Lake

Lake Tuscaloosa

Lake Tallapoosa

Lay Lake

Martin Lake

Lake Mitchell Jordan Lake labam

William B. Dannelly Reservoir Walter F. George Reservoir

Mobile Bay

Produced by the Dept. of Geography, College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama

Produced by the Dept. of Geography, College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama


CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY ANDREA WRIGHT


WHAT IS THE ALABAMA TRAILS COMMISSION?

Framework FROM THE FOUNDING ACT FOR THE ALABAMA TRAILS COMMISSION: The duties of the commission shall include the following:

trail A trail is ‘any form of paved or unpaved trail, including freshwater and saltwater paddling trails.’

Develop and support the Alabama Trails System. Facilitate a statewide system of interconnected landscape linkages, conservation corridors, greenbelts, recreational corridors and trails, scenic corridors, utilitarian corridors, reserves, regional parks and preserves, ecological sites, and cultural/historic/recreational sites using land-based trails that connect urban, suburban, and rural areas of the state and facilitate expansion of the statewide system of freshwater and saltwater paddling trails.

Recommend priorities for critical links in the Alabama Trails System and coordinate local needs goals and leadership to accomplish this mission.

Review designation proposals for inclusion in the Alabama Trails System. Encourage public-private partnerships to develop and manage trails. Review progress toward meeting goals for the establishment and operation of the Alabama Trail System and recommend appropriate action.

Make recommendations for updating and revising the implementation plan for the Alabama Trails System.

Promote trail support organizations. Support the Alabama Trails System through intergovernmental coordination, advocacy, education, alternative funding sources, and any other appropriate way.

Organize and coordinate a non-profit tax deductible corporation that should be expected to aggressively serve Alabama Trails in enterprises normally beyond the reach

of government, such as fund-raising, coordination of local and national

institutions similarly intended, and supporting education and civic outreach.


hike ride bike run photograph walk CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DAVID JONES


Trail User Experience WHO ARE OUR USER GROUPS? USER GROUPS DEFINED

OT H ER WAYS TO D ES CR I B E

BY M E T H O D O F USI N G

THE GROUP OF USERS

THE TRAILS

Volunteers

Road Bikers

Retirees

Mountain Bikers

Experienced/Inexperienced

Slow Bikers

Family-friendly

Equestrian Riders

Staycation

Hikers

Organizational Opportunities

Trail Runners

Foundations

Off-Highway Vehicle Drivers

Societies

Fisherman

Social Media

Hunters

Paid memberships

Birders

Newsletters (electronic)

Divers – Gulf and Quarry

Professional Organizations

Home Schooled Students

Volunteers

Scouts

Board of County Commissions Citizens Advisory Committee


Hikers Trail Runners Off-Highway Drivers Fisherman & women Hunters Birders Road Bikers Mountain Bikers Slow Bikers Equestrian Riders Divers – Gulf & Quarry Scouts CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT BY TOMOUTSIDE, SEAN DREILINGER, MANNY ROSAS, & STARLEY SHELTON


THE ATC GROUP FOCUS

Benefit of a Trails System Trails and greenways fuel our future by... • Attracting tourists • Increasing property

Advancing Outdoor Recreation

values • Providing healthy recreation

CH ALLEN GE STATEMENT

• Improving quality of

Define a framework for the Alabama Trails Commission that reflects

life

a vision of amplifying the efforts and voices of local organizations

• Stimulating business development • Providing alternative transportation  • Preserving public lands for generations to come

and communities as they develop a high-quality network of trails.


Sketching with images, words, and ideas helps us generate new ways of seeing what is possible. CREATIVE COMMONS ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE KLEINSCHMIDT


THE ATC GROUP

What if... EXAMPLES OF TRAILS COMMISSION MISSION STATEMENTS FOR REVIEW AND CONVERSATION

NOTE:

The following examples are intended to spark

conversation and provide context for conversation during the summit. They are not intended even as draft statements. Rather, each of the three is intended to express a slightly different version of what the role of the Alabama Trails Commission might be. We expect to have a spirited conversation about what elements of each feel right for Alabama, and what might be missing that we should consider.


THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

Please consider this a working document– jump off, discuss, write,

E X A MPLE 1: MIS SIO N STATEMENT It is the mission of the Alabama Trails Commission to provide advice and consultation to the State of Alabama regarding the planning, acquisition, development, and management of

edit, rearrange,

state-owned trails, in order to preserve, protect, interpret, and

and otherwise

enhance the scenic, natural, and cultural resources of the state;

work this text

and to promote outdoor recreational and educational

to support your

opportunities for all the people of the State.

dialogue about what is possible.

The council shall represent the public and provide advice and consultation to, the State on: 1. ENCOURAGING private/public partnerships (government units, land trusts, organizations, corporations, individuals) to participate in establishing, developing and maintaining quality trails. 2. ENCOURAGING all governmental units to develop land-use plans that preserve rights-of-way and corridors for existing trails and the establishment of future trails. 3. RECOMMENDING priorities for trail acquisition and development with an emphasis on trails that establish connections between existing trails, and connections between public lands, that are easily accessed by the people of the State. 4. DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING a trail use ethic for a safe and positive user experience and to ensure a respect for natural resources. 5. RECOMMENDING AND PROMOTING a rational and stable funding mechanism for trail maintenance and operations. 6. PROMOTING AND ENCOURAGING trails that are designed to meet the diverse interests and abilities of our citizens.


THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

E X A MPLE 2: MIS SIO N STATEMENT The Alabama Trails Commission was created to Establish the Statewide Greenways and Trails System in order to advance the State’s economy, tourism, health, alternative transportation, recreation, conservation and quality of life. WE DO THE FOLLOWING:

1. IMPLEMENT the State Greenways and Trails System Plan to establish priorities and define the role of the GTS in advancing the State’s economy, tourism, health, alternative transportation, recreation, conservation and quality of life. 2. OVERSEE the priority and opportunity maps that define the GTS, and work in partnership with communities, agencies and organizations to close gaps in the system. 3. EXPAND the GTS through the acquisition of eligible projects, and partner with governments and organizations that develop and manage greenways and trails. 4. SUPPORT communities by providing technical assistance regarding the acquisition, development, designation and management of greenways and trails projects that fulfill the GTS plan and vision. 5. ADMINISTER the Recreational Trails Program (RTP), a federally funded competitive grant program that provides financial assistance to local communities for the development of trails. 6. DISSEMINATE information about the many benefits that greenways and trails provide to residents and visitors. Provide information to residents and visitors about greenways and trails recreational opportunities through websites, publications, and e-newsletters.


THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

FUNCTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES AT A GL ANCE ... IMPLEMENT the Plan for the State Greenways and

Trails System (GTS) EVALUATE AND PRIORITIZE greenways and trails

corridors in the GTS PROVIDE statewide coordination of the GTS through

planning and community assistance FACILITATE AND PROVIDE support to GTS priority

and opportunity projects FACILITATE the GTS through representation on

various boards, committees and councils SERVE as staff to the State Greenways and Trails

Council ADMINISTER the federal Recreational Trails Program ADMINISTER the Greenways and Trails Designation

Program ADMINISTER the Greenways and Trails Acquisition

Program PUBLICIZE AND PROMOTE greenways and trails and

the GTS


THE ATC GROUP: WHAT IF WORKING STATEMENTS

EX AMPLE 3: GOALS AND OBJECT I VES THE OBJECTIVES OF THE [STATE} RECREATION TRAILS PROGRAM ARE TO:

• CREATE a statewide system of designated trails that will showcase state’s outstanding scenic features and significant regional routes; • NURTURE proponent groups that will develop, sustain and advocate for high quality trails and outstanding trails experiences • IDENTIFY trails that offer access to a variety of quintessential local scenery; • RECOGNIZE close-to-home trails that make significant connections within local areas and between communities; • COMPLIMENT , support and strengthen other trail and outdoor initiatives developed under private, local, state, regional and federal auspices BENEFITS

• BRING economic benefits to local communities • PROVIDE a variety of recreational challenges for trail users; • FOSTER strong grassroots support for State Recreation Trails designation


Hunters Birders Divers – Gulf & Quarry Scouts Road Bikers Mountain Bikers Slow Bikers Equestrian Riders Hikers Trail Runners Off-Highway Drivers Fisherman & women CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT BY PAUL MILES, BRANDON CRIPPS, COLLEGE OUTDOORS, WISCONSIN DEPT. OF NATURAL RESOURCES


TRAIL TOWNS GROUP FOCUS

Connecting Places CH ALLEN GE STATEMENT

Imagine a community program for Alabama that provides a sustainable model for economic growth by encouraging access to the wealth of outdoor Alabama through the use of trails.


travel venture cycle reflect exercise relax

A train depot along the The Great Allegheny Passage in Ohiopyle State Park in Pennsylvania. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY JOSEPH


TRAILS CASE STUDY THE GREAT ALLEGHENY PASSAGE, PENNSYLVANIA The 150-mile Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) connects with the 184.5-mile C&O Canal Towpath at Cumberland, Maryland to create a 334.5-mile traffic and motorized vehicle-free route between Pittsburgh and Washington, DC. Built mainly on abandoned rail beds, the GAP has a packed crushed limestone surface for a smooth ride. From Cumberland to Washington, DC, travelers follow the C&O Canal Towpath. Built for mules and not railroads, the towpath is overall much less improved than the GAP. Bicycling and hiking are the two most popular activities and sections of the trail system are open to equestrians. Open throughout the year, the trail system is universally accessible between dawn and dusk. Winter snow allows cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Fishermen take the trail to favorite fishing spots. Bird watching is another favorite activity. In the early 2000s, The Allegheny Trail Alliance (ATA), with planning and funding assistance from Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and The Progress Fund, developed the Trail Town Program®. The program is an economic development and community revitalization initiative working in “Trail Towns” along the GAP, ensuring that trail communities and businesses maximize the economic potential of the trail. The program also works to address trail-wide issues and to identify opportunities available through regional cooperation. It works in participating Trail Towns to improve the connections “between trail and town,” addressing issues of signage, safety, marketing, and awareness.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY MK CAMPBELL

Bicycle touring on the The Great Allegheny Trail.

A two-year economic impact surveying businesses and trail users determined that:

800,000+ trips Estimated taken each year

$40+ million in direct annual spending is attributable to trail user spending (up from $7.26 million in 2002);

30% of sales attributed to trail user spending on average (percentage is higher for lodging properties and bike shops).


CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY MK CAMPBELL

Bicycle tourists sometimes camp in tents or they stay in hotels along the path, supporting local businesses like hotels and restaurants.

TR A IL TOWN PROGRAM GOALS: –Retain, expand, and increase revenues of existing businesses; –Recruit sustainable new businesses; –Facilitate collective action by the Trail Towns to create a world class recreational destination; –Improve the buildings and infrastructure in each town to create a visitor friendly destination. Currently, the Trail Town Program works extensively in nine communities and offers basic services in other trail towns along the GAP. Program staff work with local and regional partners toward the vision of a corridor of

revitalized trailside communities that reap the economic benefits of trail-based tourism and recreation. Since it’s founding, the Trail Towns Program has developed a series of networks, grant programs and partnership opportunities to help towns and businesses succeed as a Trail Town. The Trail Town Certified Business Network helps improve business practices in sustainability and hospitality through training assessments to become “Certified Sustainable” and/or “Certified Trail Friendly.” Trail Town Business Sign Grant Program offers a matching grant program to assist businesses in

installing custom-made and locally produced signs that refl ect the special nature of each participating business. And, until the end of 2012, the Trail Town Bike Rack Matching Grant Program offered Pennsylvania Trail Town businesses the opportunity to install post and ring style bike racks at a reduced cost through a matching grant program. USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:


TRAILS CASE STUDY THE BUCKEYE TRAIL, OHIO In 1958, American writer and Ohio native Merrill Gilfillan proposed a trail from Cincinnati to Lake Erie to encourage “young people to slow down and learn about their native land.” Several people, including Merrill, met in Columbus in February 1959 to discuss building such a trail. In June, they formed a non-profit organization: The Buckeye Trail Association (BTA).

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY CHRIS PALMER

Stone stairs on the trail in Hocking Hills.

The first 20 miles of the trail were dedicated in September 1959 in Hocking County and the trail was completed near Deer Lick Cave in the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area in 1980. Although first envisioned by Gilfillan and other BTA members as a trail from the Ohio River to Lake Erie, the Buckeye Trail evolved into a large loop, branching both north and east from Cincinnati. The separate legs rejoin in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park near Cleveland. Today, the Buckeye Trail is nearly 1,444 miles and winds around Ohio, reaching into every corner of the state. The trail is primarily a footpath, however certain portions are designated for bicyclists and equestrians. The BTA, a volunteer organization, maintains and promotes the trail. Though the entire route is marked, the Buckeye Trail continues to change and improve. The BTA looks for ways to move road sections off the roads, and to upgrade those off-road sections to high quality trail.

Stone bridges on the trail in Cedar Grove, Ohio.

In addition, the BTA promotes “Buckeye Trail Towns” as destinations users can use plan their outdoor recreation. Promoting them as base camps, the BTA helps towns identify and promote local campgrounds, motels and bed and breakfasts as well as restaurants, shops, and other in-town


CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY CHRIS PALMER

Trail walkers on the Buckeye Trail in Cedar Grove, Ohio.

amenities that complement visits to the Buckeye Trail. The Buckeye Trail Town program helps towns identify ways the town and the Trail can work together. By leveraging relationships with the Chamber of Commerce, local businesses and other community organizations, the program helps towns form partnerships that capitalize on the benefits the Buckeye Trails can bring to an area. BTA MISSION: The Buckeye Trail Association is the leader in building, maintaining, protecting

and promoting use of Ohio’s longest scenic hiking trail for our citizens, communities and partners. We provide outdoor recreation, opportunities to volunteer, education, access to the varied resources of Ohio and local economic benefits. BTA VISION: The Buckeye Trail, Ohio’s State Scenic Trail is a sustainable hiking trail that provides a safe and unique experience throughout the state refl ecting the diverse resources, people and stories of Ohio. The trail is a dedicated, recognized and protected route developed and

maintained by the Buckeye Trail Association, an organization refl ective of the diversity of the trail. The Buckeye Trail Association works in close partnership with communities, organizations and agencies around Ohio creating a legacy for present and future generations. USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:


TRAILS CASE STUDY THE FLORIDA NATIONAL SCENIC TRAIL, FLORIDA The Florida National Scenic Trail, a federally designated trail approximately 1,300-miles long, offers a continuous non-motorized recreation opportunity for hiking and other compatible activities. Over its length, the Trail highlights the diverse scenic, natural, historic and cultural character of the Florida countryside. One of 11 National Scenic Trails, the Florida Trail stretches from the edge of the everglades ecosystem in Big Cypress National Preserve to historic Fort Pickens in Gulf Islands National Seashore.

CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS BY B A BOWEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Signing in on the Marjorie Harris Cross Florida Green Way Trail, part of the National Florida Scenic Trail in Ocala, Florida.

The U.S. Forest Service is designated the administrator of the Trail, however the Florida Trail Association (FTA) helps to develop, maintain, protect and promote the Trail as well as a network of other hiking trails throughout the state. Together with their partners, the FTA provides opportunities for the public to hike, engage in outdoor recreation, participate in environmental education and contribute to meaningful volunteer work. The FTA established the Florida Trail Gateway Community Program which is designed to raise awareness of the Trail by developing partnerships with communities along or near the Trail while helping to support the community by providing tourism, health and economic development tools. The Gateway Program focuses on communities near the trail that provide outdoor recreation opportunities for a day, a weekend or a week-long stay. Working together, the program and the selected communities will be able to encourage the preservation of natural


and cultural resources and at the same time, boost the economy.

T H E F TA A N D G AT E WAY COMMUNITIES HELP EACH OTHER ACCOMPLISH THE FOLLOW ING: Educate local businesses of the value of the Trail as an economic resources; Promote responsible tourism development within the community and support the Trail; Increase usage of the Trail by attracting more nature based tourists to the local community; Enable both parties to apply for targeted grants to assist in the Gateway Community’s efforts towards nature based tourism development economic development and FTS infrastructure development through the development of promotional products, educational resources or signature events.

Specifically, the FTA assists the Gateway Communities through: Promoting the Gateway Community as a destination through its website and other media outlets; Offering outreach materials to the Gateway Community such as brochures newsletters posters displays and other such items;

Providing detailed information on hiking opportunities near the Gateway Community (which can be reproduced and distributed to visitors); Providing periodic guided or signature hikes that depart from the Gateway Community; Providing support at local festivals or other community events to encourage interest in the Trail when possible; Providing signs with the Florida Trail Gateway Community logo for posting at the entrances of the Gateway Community; Maintaining the sections of the Trail near the Gateway Community so that casual hikers can easily locate and follow it.

In return, the Gateway Community is expected to: Include the FTA and the Trail in its promotional materials; Provide Trail information to the local visitors centers and/or chamber of commerce to be available to the public and request space for a FTA display or wall mounted poster; Work with the local FTA contact to promote periodic guided or signature hikes or events; Assist in promoting special designations such as Florida Hiking Trails Month in February and National Trails Day the in June;

Monitor the number of visitors who are seeking the Gateway Community as a destination for hiking; Make efforts to attract businesses that support nature based tourism and assure the FTA maps and guides will be available from a business or community organization in town for visitors to purchase; Encourage local business to become a member of FTA and provide discounts for visitors who show their FTA membership card; Install the Florida Trail Gateway Community signs at the entrance of the community. USEFUL TO OUR WORK AS WE CONSIDER:


align coordinate navigate adjust CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DARK DWARF


‘Laying out all of our ideas visually helps us pull back to see the trends, the big picture.’ –PHOENIX DESIGN SUMMIT PARTICIPANT CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DESIGN REPUBLIC

Standing up, walking around, and physically being in the middle of our ideas helped us feel free to move ideas around, to change, to stay flexible. –PHOENIX DESIGN SUMMIT PARTICIPANT CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY DESIGN REPUBLIC


DESIGN SUMMIT ATTENDEES

Participants FORREST BAILEY

thinking and will rely more on leveraging

Alabama Department of Conservation and

grant monies in the future.

Natural Resources: State Parks Division

When a person leaves the Park having

Chief of Natural Resources forrest.bailey@dcnr.alabama.gov

seen the start and ending of a project either in a picture format or comparing

Mr. Bailey is a 61 year old native of

lands that have not been manipulated by

Alabama who is married with one daughter

man or nature to lands that have, then

and a stepson. He graduated from Auburn

you are making progress in education.

University in 1976/ B.S. Degree in Parks/ Recreation Administration with Double Minor in Zoology and Wildlife Management. As Chief of Natural Resources, Mr. Bailey’s responsibilities include the management of 50,000 acres of Park lands and water to include forest management, aquatic management, wildlife problems, trails, Interpretation- Nature Centers, prescribed fire and planning, some Grant work and land acquisition. Mr. Bailey considers: The greatest challenge facing resource managers today is doing more with less in the public sector. The ability of a manager to plan and implement a proactive program of land manipulation within a Park setting and successfully communicate to the Park visitor by showing them what happened here and why, is a great achievement today. Having budgets that will allow for the short range project of 2-5 years is quite challenging. Having the budget that will allow for long range projects of 10-15 years is simply wishful

GREY BRENNAN Marketing Manager/Regional Director Alabama Department of Tourism Grey.Brennan@tourism.alabama.gov SALLY BROWN University of Alabama Center for Economic Development Administrative Coordinator Sally Brown joined the staff of The University of Alabama Center for Economic Development (UACED) as Administrative Coordinator in October 2012. In this position, Sally is responsible for overseeing UACED’s administrative activities, managing student assistants and providing support for the Center staff to make their jobs possible by providing general management and organization to enable the expansion of Alabama’s economic growth. Sally’s previous employment with the UA System - Office of International Programs and Outreach afforded her the skills and opportunity to provide support to the Board of Trustees and assist the Assistant to the Chancellor as needed.


Sally is a native of Tuscaloosa; and studied at The

means that she never takes a project brief at face

University of Alabama majoring in Retail Merchandising

value—she always challenges assumptions to lay the

and Marketing.

groundwork for new insights and ideas.

DWIGHT COOLEY

Nathalie applies this same fervor to engagements

Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge Complex

beyond her client work. She is the co-author of The

USFW Project Manager

Living Principles for Design, the first integrated

dwight_cooley@fws.gov

sustainability framework for the creative industry, which

Mr. Cooley has worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the past 33 years at locations throughout the southeast including Merritt Island NWR in Florida, Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR in Mississippi, and Alligator River NWR on the North Carolina Outer Banks.

has been adopted by professional design associations around the world. She also serves on the board of trustees of Ecole Bilingue de Berkeley. Nathalie was born and raised in France before setting sail for the Bay Area in the mid-1980s.

Since 2001, He has served as the Project Leader at Wheeler NWR Complex, a group of seven national wildlife refuges spread over 12,500 square miles of northern Alabama. His professional interests revolve around migratory bird management, habitat management and restoration, endangered species management and connecting people with nature. He holds a B.S. in Biology from Athens State University and a M.S. in Zoology and Wildlife from Mississippi State University. He spends way too much time birding and enjoy reading and fishing. Dwight’s wife Deb and he are both native Alabamians. VALERY DE LANEY Baldwin County Trailblazers President ValeryDelaney@gmail.com NATHALIE DESTANDAU Partner: Strategy

DAVE DIONNE Red Mountain Park Executive Director ddionne@redmountainpark.org David Dionne is the Executive Director to Red Mountain Park. Prior to joining Red Mountain Park David served as Chief of Trails and Natural Areas for Anne Arundel County, Maryland. David was selected to be the first Park Superintendent of the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail Park in 1987. In 2011 David was named one of 25 Rails Trail Champions in America by the Rails to Trails Conservancy as they celebrated their 25 year history of trail advocacy and projects in communities around the nation. David has been appointed to serve on a number of national committees and panels. In 1997 David was asked to be a member of the White House Millennium Council’s Green Ribbon Panel on trails, where he helped set up the Millennium Trails Program. In 1999

Tomorrow Partners

he became a member of the National Endowment for

ndestandau@tomorrowpartners.com

the Arts’ Committee for Art on Millennium Trails. From

Nathalie Destandau is Tomorrow’s lead strategist,

2001 until 2005 David was the Chairman of the

resident sustainability buff and Co-Founder of Sparkwise. Her engagements run the gamut from ethnographic research to sustainable business strategy, naming, positioning and development of communication platforms for Tomorrow’s wide range of clients. Nathalie’s background in academia and her MBA in Sustainable Management from the Presidio Graduate School give her a particular knack for translating complicated propositions into messages that are clear and engaging. Her deeply rooted intellectual curiosity

National Board of Trustees for the East Coast Greenway Alliance, a non-profit corporation linking local trail projects between Maine and Florida into a continuous 2900-mile route. In 2005 David was appointed by Governor Robert Ehrlich, Jr. to be the Chairman of the Maryland Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee where he served until 2007. In addition to his years spent with the Department of Recreation and Parks, David has served for a total of 31 years in leadership for non-profits entities such as the East Coast Greenway Alliance, Severn River Lions Club, and the Friends of Anne Arundel County Trails.


ERIK DOUGLAS

landscape architects and industrial designers to

Gulf Coast Chapter, Alabama Hiking Trails Society

promote, discuss, and celebrate great design and its

MISSPELLING (t)

relevance to everyday life. He is also co-founder of

Vice President of Trails

Plenty Design Coop where he makes furniture that is

jedbear@yahoo.com

resourceful and minimal. Jared has a Masters in Architecture from the Harvard

JIM FELDER Alabama Scenic River Trail Executive Director jim.felder@gmail.com Jim’s professional career began as an illustrator and graphic designer in the early 1970s. He gained Fortune 500-level management and communications experience throughout his career with a variety of technology clients in the US and Europe. Felder Communications served international clientele from its north Alabama office with brand management and exhibit design through the 1990s before Jim became the marketing vice president of an Internet

Graduate School of Design, a Bachelor of Architecture from Auburn University. While at Auburn he attended the Rural Studio where he built and designed the Antioch Baptist Church. Prior to William Blackstock Architects, Jared has worked at Rick Joy Architects, Kyu Sung Woo Architects, and Slaughter Group, and was co-owner of BOX Architects in Birmingham. In 2003, Jared completed a six month thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail, a 2,100 mile continuous hiking trail between Georgia to Maine. JAMES HERSICK Rocketfuel Design

entertainment company.

james@rocketdc.com

His love of the outdoors has recently led him to focus

James Hersick is a multi-discipline designer, illustrator

his writing, illustration and design skills to help foster the development recreational tourism in Alabama, including the creation of several books on recreation in the state. He was selected as a Governor’s appointee to the Alabama Trails Commission soon after it was enacted as law in 2010 and serves as the commission’s vice-chair and has recently been invited to sit on the National Geographic Gulf Coast Geotourism Committee. MIKE FRANKLIN Town of Hodges franklin.mike40@yahoo.com

and photographer. He is president and creative director of RocketFuel Design Company & president and strategist at Equalibrium – a social profit strategy firm. He has worked with companies, communities and organizations large and small to design positive changes for people and the places they live. He believes that creativity and design can make the world an awesome place. When not working, he is usually found on two wheels, traveling, hiking or doing all of them at once. WENDY JACKSON Freshwater Land Trust Executive Director wendy.jackson@freshwaterlandtrust.org

JARED FULTON

Wendy Jackson has over 18 years of experience in the

William Blackstock Architects

field of real estate with most of those years spent in

Project Manager and Designer

conservation. Since joining the Freshwater Land Trust in

jaredf@wba-architects.com

2001, Wendy’s passion for river and land conservation

Jared Fulton is a project manager and designer at

has fueled her work to establish preserves and projects

William Blackstock Architects, an architecture firm

such as the Turkey Creek Nature Preserve, the Five

based in Birmingham, AL that has established a

Mile Creek Greenways project, and Red Mountain Park.

reputation for working with clients as team members.

During her tenure as Executive Director, the Land Trust

He is co-founder of the first annual Design Week Birmingham, a multi-faceted event that unites architects, graphic designers, interior designers,

has helped to protect over 10,000 acres of land in north-central Alabama. Wendy has been recognized across the state for her businesslike approach to


conservation and her unique ability to bring diverse

Alabama Innovation Engine sprang. He has continued

partners together for the benefit of conservation. She is

to advise the Engine team and lead design summits in

the 2005 recipient of the James Dockery

Alabama in support of Engine initiatives.

Environmental Leadership Award that is presented to individuals who have played a leadership role in preserving the South’s environment. She is celebrating her twelfth anniversary at the Freshwater Land Trust this year. In 2013, Wendy was named Friend of Planning by the American Planning Association due to her efforts to coordinate the Red Rock Ridge and Valley Trail System. STEVE JONES Alabama Power sajones@southernco.com

LINDSAY KINKADE Design RePublic Principal & Creative Director lindsay@designrepublic.us Lindsay Kinkade is a community-based design strategist, graphic designer, public artist, and lecturer. She is the Founder and the Creative Director of Design RePublic, a design firm that builds tools for dialogue on public issues. A former visual journalist at The Boston Globe, Lindsay brings an ethical framework and research rigor to every project. From recent years working with corporate, academic, and social sector partners, she brings a love of collaboration, a deep commitment to

JEREMY KAYE

the highest levels of design, and a passion for

Tomorrow Partners

engagement to her work.

Partner: Innovation

In Phoenix, Lindsay is focused in particular on

jkaye@tomorrowpartners.com

placemaking in downtown Phoenix and transportation

Jeremy’s professional experience lies at the intersection

issues. She is employing the studio’s [Design Territory]

of business and design. His expertise is heading multi-disciplinary teams charged with disruptive innovation that responds to the evolving needs of under-served audiences, and setting new standards for consumer adoption of products and services. Jeremy

pop-up framework to engage broad public audiences, emerging leaders, and established stakeholders. Her work with Roosevelt Row, the Phoenix Center for the Arts, Artlink, Epic Decade, and CEOs for Cities demonstrate her visioning, strategy, visualization,

spent the first portion of his career at J. Crew,

content development, tool-making, and facilitation skills.

Patagonia, the GAP and Nike, leading business-driven

Lindsay has been an adjunct faculty member at the

brand design and marketing efforts. After many years

Rhode Island School of Design where she started a

leading global brand strategy programs for clients in

public policy+design course that recently tackled the

consumer products, healthcare, finance, education,

challenge of communicating details of the Affordable

hospitality, and retail at Ziba in Portland, OR, Jeremy

Care Act. She is currently teaching in the graduate

has committed himself to evolve a model of purpose-

program The Design School at Arizona State University.

driven engagements that operate at the intersection of strategy, experience design, and emerging technologies to address some of the most pressing problems facing our planet and people. Jeremy holds degrees in Psychology, and in Product Development and Marketing. He is a periodic guest lecturer at Parsons the New School for Design, a presenter at AIGA and DMI conferences, and is a contributor to Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Jeremy has won numerous design and business awards, and has been featured in Fast Company as well as The Wall Street Journal. Jeremy was part of the original team at the Aspen Institute Design Summit from which the idea for the

MATTHEW LEAVELL Alabama Innovation Engine Project Director matt.leavell@ua.edu Matthew Leavell is the Director of the Alabama Innovation Engine. Matt is an architect, an urban planner, and educator currently working to develop ways to connect design resources with communities throughout Alabama. His work with Engine is focused on using design to develop economic development strategies for regional projects with multiple partners. In addition to Engine, Matt periodically teaches various courses including the History of Urban Planning and


Introduction to Community Planning. Prior to his work with Engine, Matt worked on several architecture and

OFIE MCCOY

urban design projects around the world including the

Autauga Creek Improvement Committee

redevelopment of an old power plant site on the East

Vice President and Special Events Director

Side of Manhattan and the design of a new island

ofiehardin@juno.com

community off the coast of Bahrain.

Retired businesswoman Ofie McCoy was born in a

An Alabama native, Matt has a Master’s of Science in

village in Zacatecas, Mexico, raised in San Jose

Urban Planning from Columbia University and

California, and is today VP and Special Events Director

Bachelors’ of Architecture and Interior Architecture from

of the Autauga Creek Trails in Prattville, Alabama.

Auburn University. He is a licensed architect and a LEED accredited professional.

Always interested on improving quality of life the community, she seeks opportunities to serve, especially children. She has sought opportunities to be a role

GREGORY M. LEIN Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources State Parks Director Greg.Lein@dcnr.alabama.gov Gregory M. Lein was raised in Huntsville, AL, and attended Auburn University, where he received natural resource management degrees in 1991 and 1995. During his career, Greg has worked as a field biologist in the southwest and southeastern U.S., and as a natural resource manager within the Conservation Department since 1996. Within the Conservation Department he served in an administrative role for the

model. Serving as a Child Support Officer in Santa Clara County, California, provided opportunities to assist children and their families. She has served as Human Rights Commissioner in Santa Clara County and Housing Authority Commissioner in Wasco, California. She was elected to the Wasco City Council and served as Mayor. Upon becoming widowed, she opened “The Zoo,” a game room/coffee house directed to teenagers. At the heart of her efforts on Autauga Creek is a desire to provide safe, free, healthy, recreation opportunities for the community, especially children and youth while promoting economic development opportunities.

Forever Wild Land Trust, evaluating and purchasing new lands for public recreation and the conservation of

TIM MCCOY

unique wildlife habitats. Personal and professional

Autauga Creek Improvement Committee

achievements have included being a husband and

Mr. McCoy is a retired heavy equipment mechanic and

father, thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, developing the Bartram Canoe Trail and Wehle Land Conservation Center, as well supporting trail projects and land stewardship at Indian Mtn., Monte Sano State Park, Shoal Creek, the Walls of Jericho, Coldwater Mtn., and numerous other Forever Wild properties. Greg currently serves as the Conservation Department’s State Parks Director.

has worked and played in the outdoors all of his life. He has an associate’s degree in business management. Managed and primitive trails have been used for recreation and work. The trails have been along the Pacific Ocean to the wild back country of the West. The trails enjoyed were built by crews in the national parks to primitive trails made by deer and elk along a mountain face. Mr. McCoy has helped build and maintain trails. His trail experience has been on foot,

RICHARD MARTIN Limestone County Parks and Recreation Board richardwilkesmartin@gmail.com CHRIS MEAD Geneva State Forest Supervisor Geneva.StateForest@forestry.alabama.gov

horseback and motorized (both trail bike and jeep). Short hikes of a few hours to hikes that take several days with varied terrain including camping have been accomplished. He is learning about water trails now. He never thought of a river or lake as a trail until now, and he is still a trail user and a trail dreamer. NISA MIRANDA The University of Alabama Center for Economic


Development

writing for clients, Dan is a poet, a storyteller, an

Director

aficionado of single malt scotches, and a firm believer

nisa.miranda@ua.edu

that the Great American Novel is trapped inside his pen

Nisa Miranda has held the position of Director of The

and simply hasn’t found a way out. Yet. He finds

University of Alabama Center for Economic Development (UACED) since 1995. UACED is the focal point to leverage University resources and partners with

inspiration in the great big world out there, in his wife, Pam, his son, Sam, and trusty dog, Jack. His cat allows him to live in the house because he feeds her.

a specific focus on the community development process and capacity building at the local level. The focus and mission of the Center’s work is critical to improve sustainable economic growth in Alabama’s rural communities. As Director, Miranda assists the Center in administering technical assistance in economic development by developing and structuring programs that build local capacity; increase the elected and civic leadership base; increase tourism/recreation and entertainment; and provide a well-educated and prepared workforce. UACED’s work addresses all aspects of community preparedness to allow communities, organizations, and private firms to compete in today’s global economy. Prior to this appointment, Miranda served for ten years as the Director of the William R. Bennett Alabama International Trade Center, a premier research and trade development program in the State. Miranda has successfully developed nationally recognized demonstration projects at the Center for such agencies as the U.S. Small Business Administration, the Tennessee Valley Authority and several foreign organizations. She is a founding member of two non-profits that support

CHERYL MORGAN Auburn University School of Architecture Urban Studio Director morgace@auburn.edu Cheryl is a licensed architect and a Professor of Architecture in the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture of Auburn University. In over twenty-nine years of teaching she has worked with architectural programs at Georgia Institute of Technology, Oklahoma State and California College of Arts and Crafts. She is currently the Director of Auburn’s Urban Studio in Birmingham, AL. Professor Morgan’s professional practice now focuses on urban design, community planning and graphic design. She is also an experienced facilitator. Cheryl holds two degrees from Auburn University: a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Arts (Sociology). Her Master of Architecture degree is from the University of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana. She is certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards and is a member of the City of

economic development in rural and distressed areas,

Birmingham’s Design Review Board.

and is on the Board of many other state and national

She has worked with the Railroad Reservation Park

organizations.

project in downtown Birmingham; the Red Mountain

A native of Brazil, Ms. Miranda holds an M.B.A. from The University of Alabama. DAN MONROE Cayenne Creative Group Designer dmonroe@cayennecreative.com Dan Monroe, is part owner and chief wordsmith of Cayenne Creative Group - a brand-development agency in Birmingham that offers up national and international brand experience in the form of an agile creative firm. Cayenne helps clients tell their stories strategically in ways that are interruptive and authentic, using whatever medium best talks their talk. When not

State Park; and is a founding board member of the citizen leadership program – YourTownAlabama. She sits on the boards of Space One Eleven. The Urban Studio’s Small Town Design Initiative Program – a significant component of Auburn’s outreach agenda – has worked with over 70 small towns and neighborhoods in Alabama under Professor Morgan’s direction. This work has resulted in assets-based illustrative mater plans that position a community to leverage their distinctive opportunities. CHRIS OBERHOLSTER The Nature Conservancy, Alabama Chapter State Director


coberholster@TNC.org

Past President of Alabama Urban Forestry Association;

Chris Oberholster was born and raised in South Africa,

Past State Director of Alabama ISA Southern, ISA Board

and has lived in Alabama for almost 25 years after coming to the state to obtain his Masters degree in Agronomy and Soils at Auburn University. He is the State Director of the Alabama Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, an international, non-profit conservation organization with offices throughout the US and the world. He has worked for The Nature Conservancy for

of Directors, Southern Chapter; Region 20/20 Committee Chair, Vestavia Hills, Design Review; Created Trees for Alabama; Past Board Member of Texas ISA Chapter; Past Board Member of Trees for Houston; Created Birmingham Make a Difference Program, Created Houston Releaf, Past President of Trees for Alabama, Board Member of Birmingham

more than 20 years in a variety of positions, including

Bicycle Club.

Botanist/Ecologist for the Alabama Natural Heritage

Cycling was a natural outgrowth for urban living and

Program in Montgomery, the Director of the Heritage

became his greatest passion. He has been riding

Program, the Director of Science & Stewardship at the

actively for over 25 years. Mr. Palla’s bikes are his

Alabama headquarters office in Birmingham, then as

constant companions thru the many states he travels.

the Director of Conservation Programs, and now State

It has been his commitment to encourage people to

Director. He serves on several boards and advisory committees

join in the ranks of cyclist for transportation, exercise and for the joy of it. He is a constant advocate to

including the Alabama Forest Stewardship Advisory

institutionalize the needs of cyclists into the roadways

Committee, the Board of the Alabama Forest Resource

just as street lights, utilities, and sidewalks have been.

Center, the Forestry and Natural Resources Advisory

Mr. Palla’s mission in life is to leave the planet better

Council for Tuskegee University, and the Auburn University School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences Advisory Council. He was a member of class XVIII of Leadership Alabama and the 2012 Class of Leadership Birmingham. In 2010 he served on the Environmental Committee of Governor Bob Riley’s Coastal Recovery

than he found it. With your help we can do it together. RYAN PARKER Freshwater Land Trust Red Rock Trail Coordinator

Commission. Chris was in recent efforts by a broad

www.freshwaterlandtrust.org

coalition of business, environmental and recreational

Ryan Parker joined the Freshwater Land Trust as Red

groups to renew Alabama’s Forever Wild Program, the

Rock Trail Coordinator in 2013. He is working to

state program which acquires public lands from willing

implement the 750-mile Red Rock Ridge and Valley Trail

sellers for outdoor recreation, wildlife conservation and

System that will connect communities throughout

other public benefits.

Jefferson County. Ryan works with municipalities to apply for funding, facilitates public-private partnerships

STAN PALLA Alabama Bicycle Coalition Executive Director urbanreleaf@gmail.com Mr. Palla received his BS in Urban Forestry to improve the environment and the quality of life in the communities he lives. His work in the Cities of Houston and Birmingham as the City Forester was a training ground in understanding the importance of political, public, and corporate partnerships. His knowledge and understanding of the need for grass root support by the community was grounded in this experience. It led to him to serving, leading and creating non-profits. This includes:

to support building of trails, and works with community organizations to promote use of trail facilities. Ryan holds undergraduate degrees in political science and journalism from the University of Alabama and a master of public administration with a concentration in city planning from the University of AlabamaBirmingham.   He previously worked for the United Way of Central Alabama where he helped manage a Health and Human Services grant aimed at improving obesity rates in the region through increased physical activity.  He serves on the MPO Active Transportation Committee. 


CYNTHIA SWANN POTTS

Past Chairman of Advisory Board; 5 years on the

Land Trust of North Alabama

Nominating Committee; Past member of New Director

Executive Director

Search Committee

Cynthia@landtrustnal.org

Past Member Senate Committee on Historic Cemetery’s

Currently working as the Executive Director of the

Past Chairman of Design Alabama

Land Trust of North Alabama with primary responsibilities of land acquisition and preservation, fundraising, and business administration; served in the

Past President of Eastern Shore Junior Auxiliary Pat Chairman of Thomas Hospital Foundation

position over 7 years. The Land Trust celebrated 25

Ms. Quinn is married to Michael Quinn and has two

years of land preservation in North Alabama during

children: oldest a Helicopter Pilot with USMC, married

2012 and continues to enjoy significant growth in lands

with 2 children; youngest an Artillery Officer with the

preserved, membership, and funds raised.

US Army, married. She lives in Fairhope where both she

Prior to this position, Ms. Potts worked with the

and Michael grew up.

Huntsville Symphony Orchestra as a fund raiser; volunteered fulltime with Jr. League and Big Spring Jam

CINDY RAGLAND

for 5 years; prior to that, worked as the Business

USDA Forest Service, Oakmulgee District of the

Manager for Trinity United Methodist Church, 10 years;

Talladega National Forest

also 8 years in Advertising/PR field.

District Ranger

Huntsville native:

cragland@fs.fed.us

Graduate of Grissom High School

Cindy Ragland has worked with the Forest Service for

Graduate of Auburn University with degree in Public

30 years and has served as the District Ranger of the

Relations

Oakmulgee District of the Talladega National Forest

Past volunteer involvement: Leadership Huntsville, Class

since 2003. The Oakmulgee District of the Talladega

13

National Forest consists of 157,000 acres of National

Junior League of Huntsville, Board of Directors

Forest located in 6 counties (Bibb, Chilton, Dallas, Hale,

2002-06, member, 1997-present

Perry, & Tuscaloosa) and requires 15 employees with

Big Spring Jam, Board of Directors, 6 years, Chair,

backgrounds in prescribed fire, wildlife, timber, and

2006-07

planning. Its recreational assets include:

Ms. Potts is married to John Potts and has two children:

Payne Lake Recreational Area

Lauren, 19, and Cole, 14.

2 Shooting Ranges – South Sandy and Vick Horse routes, mountain bikes, bird watching, hunting

DEBBIE QUINN Alabama Trails Commission Chairman debbiewq@gmail.com

Prior positions held: 1993-2003 – Forest Service liaison with Ducks Unlimited, Inc. located in Memphis TN. Worked nationally and internationally to build partnerships

Debbie Quinn is the Chairman for the Alabama Trails

between Forest Service, Ducks Unlimited, and other

Commission and a member of the Alabama

organizations to restore wetlands and waterfowl

Recreational Trail Advisory Board. She has also served

habitat.

for 16 years as a City Council member for the City of Fairhope. Ms. Quinn’s past positions include:

1989-1992 – Conecuh National Forest, Andalusia, Alabama. Assistant Ranger with programs in Wildlife,

Member of Al Recreational Trail Advisory Board

Timber sales.

Past Chairman of the Alabama League of Municipalities

1984 – 1989 – Talladega National Forest, Oakmulgee

Energy-Environment Committee; Past Chairman of

Division, District Wildlife Biologist

Finance Committee; Past Chairman of Legislative Committee Past Chairman of the National League of Cities Energy-Environment Committee; Past Board Member;

Ms. Ragland received a B.S. Wildlife Sciences from Auburn University in 1980 and is also a Certified Wildlife Biologist.


AMY RAUWORTH

National Register, provide training to local preservation

Lakeshore Foundation

commission members, and other preservation activities. A

Director of Policy and Public Affairs

member of the State Scenic Byways Council, Alabama

amyr@lakeshore.org

Communities of Excellence Board, and Your Town Alabama

In April of 2012, Ms. Rauworth joined Lakeshore

Board, she provides historic preservation expertise to these

Foundation as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs. She also works within the University of Alabama Birmingham/Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative

community development programs. She has participated in Small Town Design Initiatives with the Auburn Urban Studio in Uniontown, Chickasaw, Jacksonville and

where she is the Associate Director of the National Center

Monroeville.

on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD).   She

After receiving her bachelor’s degree in history from

is a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist with the

Auburn University, she attended the master’s program in

American College of Sports Medicine. Ms. Rauworth

historic preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.

conducts Inclusive Fitness trainings nationally on behalf of

In 1988, she was hired to work with the National Register

the NCHPAD and specializes in accessible fitness center

of Historic Places program at the Alabama Historical

design. She serves on several national committees

Commission. In 1989, she relocated to Salem, Oregon, to

including the Paralympic Research and Sport Science

work with the state historic preservation agency until

Consortium, American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM)

moving back to Alabama in 1991.

F08.30 Fitness Products: WK19803 Inclusive Fitness Equipment Design Task Group, the NSF International Joint Committee on Health/Fitness Facility Standards and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Health and Disability Workgroup. Ms. Rauworth has received funding to address the inclusion of children with disabilities in Safe Routes to School and has a strong interest in the design of healthy communities that are inclusive of people with disabilities. TOM SAURET IMBA/SORBA Regional Director

SAM SHELTON Kinetik Principal, Creative Director, and Founding Partner sam@kinetikcom.com Sam Shelton is the principal, creative director and founding partner of Kinetik, a design firm based in Washington D.C. Since 1988, Shelton has applied his belief that design can be a powerful strategic force for good to guiding Kinetik’s path in a changing world. His passion is evident in the projects he directs as well as his commitment to design education and AIGA. He is a past AIGA National Board member as well as a past Board member and President of

imbasorba@gmail.com

the Washington, D.C. Chapter. Shelton is also an adjunct

MARY MASON SHELL

where he leads the College’s Design Ignites Change

faculty member at the Corcoran College of Art and Design, Alabama Historical Commission Preservation Planner Mary.Shell@preserveala.org Mary Mason Shell is preservation planner for the Alabama Historical Commission. She assists communities with utilizing historic preservation programs to identify and protect historic buildings and districts.  As manager of the Certified Local Government program, she assists towns with establishing local historic preservation commissions and identifying and designating local historic districts and landmarks for regulation and protection.  Since 2000 when she began working with the CLG program, 22 communities have entered the program.  She also manages the CLG grant program used to list properties on the

initiative, and has served in various strategic and educator capacities for multiple design programs in the D.C. area. In 2006, Shelton received the AIGA Fellow award in recognition of his significant contributions to the design community. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Communication Arts and Design from Virginia Commonwealth University. Sam was part of the original team at the Aspen Institute Design Summit from which the idea for the Alabama Innovation Engine sprang. He has continued to advise the Engine team, engage students in local projects, and participate in local design summits.


GRAHAM SISSON

emphasis in mathematics education from The University

Governors Office on Disability

of Alabama, one year of additional graduate study in

Executive Director

mathematics at Emory University, Summer Institute in

graham.sisson@good.alabama.gov

Mathematics and Computer Science at The University

Mr. Sisson was injured in a 1982 motor vehicle collision

of Missouri at Rolla.

with a drunk driver that left him paralyzed at the T-6

Certifications and Licenses: State of Alabama real

level and a full time wheelchair user. Having lost his

estate broker license, Certified Municipal Official,

1982 appointment to the United States Military

Advanced Certified Municipal Official

Academy due to his subsequent paralysis, he attended and was graduated summa cum laude from the University of North Alabama in 1987 with a BS in

Professional Experience: Retired from JSU as Professor of Mathematics after having taught mathematics there for 34 years; taught mathematics at the University of

accounting and minors in history and English.

West Georgia for 5 years. Member of Jacksonville,

Mr. Sisson is a 1990 graduate of Vanderbilt Law School.

Alabama City Council for 12 years (Mayor Pro Tempore

He was in private practice specializing in disability law

for 6 years). Served City of Jacksonville as Mayor for

before being appointed Deputy Attorney General/

the past 9 years.

Assistant Attorney General in 1998 with the Alabama

Organizations: Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at

Department of Rehabilitation Services. He also serves as the ADA Coordinator for the State of Alabama and is an adjunct professor of law with the Birmingham School of Law, where he taught disability law. In January 2006, he began teaching a doctoral course in disability law and history as a visiting professor at Auburn University. He has given over 500 speeches/ lectures on the Americans with Disabilities Act and related laws. He is working on a doctorate in rehabilitation at Auburn University. Mr. Sisson has served as Director of the Governor’s Office on Disability since October 2007 and was reappointed by Governor Robert Bentley. He retains his positions as State ADA Coordinator and Assistant Attorney General, serving as Deputy General Counsel to the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services and General Counsel to the Governor’s Office on Disability. He is married to Victoria, who is also an attorney. They have been married for over 21 years. His hobbies are scuba diving, gardening and woodworking.

JSU; Member: First Baptist Church of Jacksonville, AI. Jacksonville Exchange Club, Alabama League of Municipalities, East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission; Chairman: Board of Directors of The East Alabama Planning and Development Commission, East Alabama Metropolitan Planning Organization, East Alabama Co-Operative Purchasing Association. Family: Married to Sarah Lewis Smith; three children and four grandchildren. BOBBY WHALEY Outback Trail Riders Club Past President Mr. Whaley served previously for 9 years as the President of the Outback Trail Riders Club. Located in Central Alabama, the group exists to bring together equestrian trail users for group rides, help maintain the trails, and develop a state-wide trail map. The club’s 340 members span from Murfreesboro, TN to Fairhope, AL and over to Philadelphia, MS, all contributing to an equestrian industry that has a $2.4 billion impact on the State of Alabama (based on 2005 Auburn

DR. JOHNNY L. SMITH City of Jacksonville, AL Mayor Born & Raised: Collinsville, Alabama Education: BS degree in mathematics from Jacksonville State University, Master of Mathematic degree from The University of South Carolina, Ed.D. Degree with

University survey).


Alabama Innovation Engine Alabama Innovation Engine is a design-based economic development initiative. Began as a partnership between Auburn University’s School of Architecture Urban Studio and the University of Alabama’s Center for Economic Development, we partner with community, non-profit, and governmental organizations on projects that have the potential to have significant positive impact in a region. OUR GOAL IS TO ACCOMPLISH

REGIONAL PROJECTS

THIS MISSION THROUGH THREE

Engine is continually developing relationships with

COMPLIMENTARY METHODS:

- Organize and host design summits to identify responses to large scale issues - Identify and coordinate regional based, long-term projects with potential to have positive broad social and economic impacts - Facilitate partnerships between professional designers and community non-profits

several community organizations, non-profits, and governmental entities to identify opportunities for design in the context of large-scale regional projects. There are several of these large-scale projects within the state of Alabama that need a catalytic force to organize and guide their development. Engine acts as that force to continually develop projects that may not have a well-defined process for implementation, but do have the potential for significant positive impact on Alabama.

DESIGN SUMMITS A significant challenge of mission-driven work is a

PARTNERSHIPS

tendency to focus on the solutions and everyday

The nature of effective community work requires the

operations of an organization. With limited capacity,

involvement and interest of a variety of groups and

community groups and non-profits need assistance

individuals: government officials, advocacy groups,

in developing and refining strategies to continue

non-profits, community groups, universities, and

advancing their missions. Design Summits are

many others. Engine works to build partnerships

events that bring together community leaders and

between those mission-driven organizations and

designers to develop new strategies and innovative

design firms to create opportunities for design

ideas around common local issues. They are not

thinking to have an impact on local social innovation

traditional conferences. Using design thinking,

projects. Long-term goals for this strategy include

Design Summits are action-oriented events that

creation and implementation of a community-

identify partnerships, mission overlaps, and

building event and a web-based connection platform.

potential in a non-traditional environment.


Many Thanks to Our Summit Supporters Governor Robert Bentley, State of Alabama

Alabama Trails Commission Advisory Board

Jim Byard, Jr., Director, Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs

Cam Ward, State Senator, 14th District

N. Gunter Guy Jr., Commissioner, State of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Donnie Chesteen, State Representative, 87th District

Auburn University School of Architecture Urban Studio The University of Alabama Center for Economic Development

Alabama Trails Commission Members

Trip Pittman, State Senator, 32nd District Terri Collins, State Rep, 8th District James K. Lanier, Cherokee Ridge Alpine Trail Association William M. Matthews, Director of Continuing Education, University of North Alabama (retired) Richard Martin, Limestone County Parks and Recreation Board

Debbie Quinn (Chairman)

Nisa Miranda (Chairman), Director, University of Alabama Center for Economic Development

Jim Felder (Vice Chairman) Executive Director, Alabama Scenic River Trail

Otis French, Southeastern Regional Forester, Alabama Forestry Commission

John Eagerton, Chief Aeronautics Bureau, Alabama Department of Transportation

Gordon Stone, Mayor, Town of Pike Road

Phillip West (Secretary), Coastal Resources Manager, City of Orange Beach Richard Guthrie, Dean, Auburn University School of Agriculture (retired) Cecil Colson, Special Programs Administrator Transportation Planning/Modal Programs, Alabama Department of Transportation Grey Brennan, Alabama Tourism Marketing and Regional Director, Alabama Department of Tourism Greg Lein, Director, State Parks Division, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Wesley Helton, Aide-de-Camp, Governor’s Office Rob Grant (Staff), Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs

Josh Dyer, Superintendent of Golf, Ross Bridge Golf Resort Joe Nicholson, Recreation Program Manager, National Forests in Alabama Steven H. Newton (Secretary), Planning Team Leader at Gorgas Steam Plant, Alabama Power Company Sara B. Baldwin PhD, Alabama Registered Forester Edward I. Lyon, Site Manager, Alabama River Lakes, US Army Corps of Engineers Rodney Goode, Urban Conservationist, National Resources Conservation Service Printing by Ingenius Design Space donated by Energen Corporation


Let’s connect, tend, grow, stitch, & blaze together. CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO BY ROBERT GÖDICKE


Alabama Trails Design Summit Briefing Book  

This two day workshop explored the potential of an Alabama Trails network and the ability of the Alabama Trails Commission to assist in crea...