Page 6

6

Foreword

of the papers examine literature and film from a more general perspective (Hans-Christian Trepte and Anja Golebiowski: Polish literature; Jan Čulík and Petr Bednařík: Czech film and television production). Others focus on the specific literary genre (Šárka Vlasáková: diaries narrated by girls). And some only explore the works of one author (Elisa-Maria Hiemer: the poems of Ida Henefeld-Ron; Štěpán Balík: the poems of Aleksander Rozenfeld; Jiří Holý: Ján Johanides’s prose). Other papers deal with significant individual literary and film works (Reinhard Ibler: Fischl’s Dvorní šašci; Marija Sruk: Hilsenrath’s Der Nazi & der Friseur; Valentina Kaptayn: Lustig’s Nemilovaná; Aleksandra Bąk-Zawalski: Edvardson’s Gebranntes Kind sucht das Feuer; Markus Roth: Lanzmann’s Shoa; Katharina Bauer: Grynberg’s Kadisz; Anja Nousch: Grynberg’s Dzieci Syjonu). All these papers also inquire into broader literary issues and associations. By no means can the representation of the Shoah in literature and film be investigated outside of its cultural and historical context. That is why this subject encourages broader interdisciplinary cooperation. Polish colleagues from Łódż were unable to take part in the Prague symposium, but we believe that international cooperation should continue and this research into various representations of Jews and the Shoah in the literature and cultures of Central Europe will prove beneficial. So a followup meeting of our international team will be held again in Gießen in November 2012 (for the period after 1989). In June 2009, during the Czech presidency of the EU, representatives of 46 countries adopted the Terezin Declaration, which, inter alia, undertakes to care for the study and preservation of Jewish culture. It is the belief of this publication that this aim will be served by contributing to the recovery of historical memory and the maintenance of tolerance and respect for cultural pluralism. At a time of “forgetting” or soulless presentism, which dominates parts of Central European societies, it is intensely relevant and timely. Prague, October 2012 Jiří Holý

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The Representation of the Shoah in Literature and Film in Central Europe: 1970s and 1980s  

The Representation of the Shoah in Literature and Film in Central Europe: 1970s and 1980s

The Representation of the Shoah in Literature and Film in Central Europe: 1970s and 1980s  

The Representation of the Shoah in Literature and Film in Central Europe: 1970s and 1980s

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