Page 1

   

EVENT PLANNING AND DESIGN CONTENTS ANALYSIS 

RELATION WITH THE MEDIA - LEARNING UNIT 7

Learning Contents  SUBUNIT 1:  Media Types and Media  Instruments  SUBUNIT 2:  Specifics and Principles  of How Media Works in a Country  SUBUNIT 3: Dissemination  Strategies   

Learning hours:  

Workload:  

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 

8 25 


Unit Objectives  Actions / Achievements  Establish a plan for the relation with Media  Create the materials for the dissemination of a specific event    Knowledge 

Skills

Competencies

Act independently with  Identify media main  production technologies of  characteristics and select the  solutions suited to different  Comprehensive on Media  most suitable one for a specific  objectives and supports (print,  structure, its main formats, and  event according to its  audio, video, digital)  operation dynamics models     characteristics        Autonomously select a model  Fundamental on media  Establish the necessary steps  to be applied in the relationship  regulations, legislation, codes  required for developing a  with the media  and standards  communication plan        Check for solutions for a  Fundamental on Media tools  Respond to media according to  successful cooperation with  and instruments  circumstances (press  Media    conferences, telephone      interviews, discussions)  Create and shape a powerful    recognisability and image of an  event 


SUMMARY The  unit  aims  to  provide  an  understanding  on  how  the  relationship  with  media  can  be  established  and  sustained,  what  media  tools  and  channels  can  be  used  in  order  to  be  featured  on  a  media  tool  for  the  upcoming  event.  Since  this  type  of  communication  is  mostly attributable to the field of public relations, most theory for this module comes from  this sphere.     The  first  subunit  takes  a  look  at  media  types,  they  are  also  called  as  communication  channels,  (television,  radio,  writing  media)  and  instruments  (press  release,  press  conference,  e‐newsletter)  with  which  relations  with  journalists  can  be  established  and  possible coverage may be settled.     The  second  subunit  covers  topics  of  media  regulations  and  the  selection  process  of  the  most suitable media channels according to its target auditory.     The third subunit provides an understanding of possible activities to be implemented that  have to be thought of when creating a communication plan, including the timetable.    KEYWORDS  Media  relations,  public  relations,  communication,  press  release,  press  conference,  news,  interview, target audience, journalists, press kit, communication channels       

  This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


SUBUNIT 1: MEDIA TYPES AND MEDIA INSTRUMENTS  Media communication has always been one of the most valuable tools for event organizers  when  trying  to  promote  awareness  about  an  event  by  using  minimal  financial  recourses.  (Parry & Shone, 2001) These types of activities are most often associated with the field of  public  relations,  although,  nowadays,  promoting  an  event  is  referred  to  integrated  marketing communication which is an approach to achieving the objectives of a marketing  campaign,  through  a  well‐coordinated  use  of  different  promotional  methods  that  are  intended to reinforce each other that is most likely to be used, since all the campaigns for  making awareness most often are created as a whole entity, merging together advertising,  marketing, and public relations, in order to create a single image. (Dictionary, 2017)    The work of a public relations specialist is based on the implementation of clearly planned  communication programs, whether they are planned to create an image for a company or  to introduce public to a new event. (Breckenridge, 2008)    For  the  last  decades,  thanks  to  the  advanced  opportunities  provided  by  the  internet  and  social  media,  communication  programs  have  changed  a  great  deal  –  although  traditional  mass  media  (television,  radio,  press)  are  still  very  relevant,  direct  communication  tools  (social  networks,  blogs  etc.)  with  possible  visitors  to  the  event  acquires  much  greater  importance.  The  positive  aspect  in  using  new  media  is  the  opportunity  of  a  two‐way  communication  –  event  organizers  no longer  have  to  try to  guess  questions  raised  by  the  undecided attendees e.g. prices of tickets, where to park, how to get there etc. as they can  easily  be  answered  if  they  pop  up  online.  Although  internet  also  complicates  the  task  of  maintaining  a  single  image  for  the  event,  everybody  can  take  part  in  the  communication  process. (Breckenridge, 2008)    The Internet is a good tool to create sustainable communication with journalists whose job  requires mobility and speed as much as ever. It means that it is very important to know with  which media to speak about what themes not to waste time. It is also important to create  an  online  platform  where  journalists  can  easily  find  information  about  the  event  and  its  organizers – most likely it could be a web page or a facebook page. (Breckenridge, 2008)    

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


When thinking  about  messages  meant  to  be  delivered  to  the  media,  it  is  important  to  remember to create them as compact and precise as possible. The fact that a great stress  should be put to for example correctly write press releases writing principles of which will  be able shown at the end of this unit. It is very well shown in a research carried out in the  United  Kingdom  where  thirty‐six  press  releases  about  Cheltenham  Festivals  of  Music  and  Literature published. The study took into account the way they were written and the way  they appeared in the media – all of the 36 releases were published up to 99% in the same  form as they were sent out, looking at the amount of the published words and deleted or  corrected text. (Connell & Page, 2015)    Considering  today's  saturated  information  space,  one  of  the  key  elements  of  a  successful  public relations campaign is to reach your audience, avoiding mass communication. That’s  why it is important to conduct research before communication is launched – it would help  to  find  out  which  media  channels  to  use.  (Breckenridge,  2008)  For  example,  nowadays  in  Latvia lots of young people do not watch and do not even own a TV, so if the target group  of  your  event  is  young  people,  it  would  probably  be  useless  to  try  to  arrange  a  television  interview, nevertheless that it is the medium with which it is possible to reach the biggest  audience  –  if  it  is  not  your  target  audience,  it  does  not  matter.  The  event  organizer  may  conduct their own research. For example, assume that the event is carried out annually, and  it is not organized for the first time and the organizer owns a database of the people who  have  visited  in  previous  years.  Therefore,  the  researched  can  be  conducted  by  asking  the  previous‐years  visitors  through  which  information  channels  they  first  learned  about  the  event.    WRITING MEDIA  It is very common to divide journalism in general into four different genres: news, reportage  (long and analytical news article), comment and interview.     The most important genre for most media and public relations specialists is news as it is the  most common one. News refer to everything that is new, unusual, special and topical, and  this topicality is the first criteria for journalists for choosing whether to publish something  or not. (Dimants, 2009)   

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


The structure  of  the  news  (also  valid  for  press  releases)  is  created  after  the  upside‐down  pyramid principle. First comes the “W” questions (What, Who, When, Where, Why), then it  is  followed  by  the  most  important  details,  who  are  backed  up  by  the  background  information  leaving  the  less  important  details  at  the  end.  News  is  carried  out  short  and  precise language, without making any personal comments.   

  The bolded paragraph, also known as the lead, consists of the most important information  and  answers  to  five  “W”  questions,  mentioned  above.  In  this  sentence  (or  two)  the  same  thought that is already in the title must be repeated, but if possible using different words.  (Dimants, 2009)    If the event is a kind of performance like theatre, film or music the review that includes the  critic  of  the  performance  can  be  evaluated  as  reportage  or  comment  according  to  its  content.  (Dimants, 2009) In Latvia information about events in the writing  media usually  appears in the form of news (many newspapers/internet portals even have a section which  consists  of  upcoming  events,  like  a  calendar  for  the  week/month),  or  in  reviews  after  the  event. Sometimes it can also appear in a form of an interview with some of the organizers  or lead figures who will take part in the event.    TELEVISION  Although it often seems that nowadays every news can be captured online and the internet  is  the  most  popular  media,  in  most  countries  television,  is  still  considered  to  be  the  mass  media number one, meant for the widest audience.   This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


Of course, when speaking about television, it has to be taken into account, that it is above  all a visual media. (Dimants, 2009) More than 55% up to 85% impression of the appearance  in  television  results  from  the  body  language,  picture  setting,  and  drama,  so  it  is  always  important  to  consider  how  much  visual  material  the  event  can  offer  so  that  it  is  seen  as  attractive and interesting to the viewers. Also, when participating in a television interview,  it  is  very  important  for  the  guest  to  control  their  behaviour  in  front  of  the  camera  –  gestures, mimics, a way of speaking. (Singleton, 2014)    Prerequisites that should be taken into account, when doing a television interview. Unless it  is a telephone/Skype video interview and the reporter is right beside the guest– the guest  should always look at the reporter and  not to look at the camera, which must be ignored  because the cameraman will do their job. By looking at the camera the interview will simply  look very unnatural.     When being one on one with the camera on the other case, one should always try to look in  the camera, and should not look at the other screen, where they can see their face, to try to  check how they look, because these eye movements are easily noticeable and make them  look uncertain. (Singleton, 2014) It is also worth trying to lean closer to the camera, or at  least not getting back from it – it will show that they are deep into the conversation. It is  also  good  to  smile  a  little  because  it  will  not  only  make  a  positive  impression  but  also  improve  the  sound  of  their  voice.  Also,  as  mentioned  above,  it  is  a  visual  media  and  one  should always try to keep in mind that gesture language is very important – so they should  not only reply to the interviewer with words but also with gestures – a head nod, a smile or  whatever seems appropriate in the concrete moment. (Singleton, 2014)    Information about events in television usually appears as a story in the news (in Latvia, for  example, they most often appear on the evening news or cultural news) or in the form of an  interview  in  breakfast  shows  or  talk  shows.  Most  popular  (though  very  large  scale)  examples  are  “Tonight  Show  with  Jimmy  Fallon”,  “Conan”  etc.  For  some  very  big  scale  events,  there  are  sometimes  also  other  custom  solutions,  like  for  example  live  stream  translations from festivals (BBC television coverage on Glastonbury 2017 music festival).    RADIO 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


An audio  text  is  much  harder  to  perceive  than  written  text  because  the  characters  presented in it are less effective than spatial ones: it is easier to read text than listen to it.  (Kruks, 2005) That is why it is very important to speak directly and specifically using more  nouns  and  verbs,  moderately  using  adjectives  and  conditional  words,  avoiding  long,  decorative descriptions. Intonation is also a matter of great importance in a radio interview,  especially if it is a telephone interview. (Kruks, 2005) The length of the interview depends  on  the  length  of  the  broadcast,  but  approximately  news  reporters  interview  their  guests  from 5 to 8 minutes for a 30 to 90 seconds interview excerpt. (Kruks, 2005)    But taking part into a radio interview should be relatively easier since it is possible to take a  notepaper with the main speaking points (although quite many radio stations also provide  video live streaming which can be seen on their webpage). But on the other hand, radio as a  communication channel also requires additional preparation, since the conversation can be  quite  long  depending  on  the  type  of  the  broadcast.  Furthermore,  if  it  was  a  telephone  interview,  one  should  think  about  the  place,  where  to  carry  it  out,  for  the  radio  that  of  making the environment quiet and ensuring nobody can walk in and interrupt is enough.    MEDIA INSTRUMENTS     PRESS RELEASES  A  press  release  is  a  formal,  official  statement  to  the  press  about  something  new  or  significant. (Dictionary, 2017) In order for the press release to reach its target audience e.g.  get published, it must follow a specific standard in its construction. As mentioned, it must  contain information that is new and topical, as well as it must be given to the right person at  the right time. There are two ways how to try to get journalists to publish the release – send  it to all in a row and make it as general as possible or to create it for specific publications,  which possibly gives a greater guarantee that it will be published. (Nolte & Wilcox, 1990)    Structure of the release must be made based on the overturned pyramid principle – in the  title  and  the  first  paragraph  the  most  important  information  is  mentioned  (What?  Who?  Where?  When?  Why?),  then  comes  the  background  information  and  at  the  end  comes  information about the organization.    Three most important elements of the press release are:  

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


Title ‐  sometimes it is considered the most important feature of the press release because  if  the  title  won’t  be  attractive,  nobody  will  open  the  e‐mail  or  the  press  release.  The  title  should include information what the release is about, why this event is important and why it  is important exactly now. The headline can be thought of as a tweet, where with a limited  number of characters, the message has to be delivered in a binding manner, including the  important  facts.  (Wynne,  2016)  But  the  title  should  not  be  confusing,  because  journalists  get a lot of press releases every day, and if they won’t be able to quickly figure out, what it  is about, they probably will not open the e‐mail and the release (titles for the e‐mail and the  release should be the same). (Murray, 2014)   

Figure 1 (Technologies, 2017) 

The first paragraph or the lead is a summary of the most important information, answering  5 «W» questions.  This is the next most important part of the title. Well written – it is the  instrument  with  which  you  can  get  journalists  to  read  the  release  till  the  end.  The  lead  shouldn’t be longer than 15 – 20 words. (Murray, 2014) There are two types of leads – one is  the «summary» type, which includes the basic information, the other one is a creative pitch  type,  wherein  the  lead  appears  the  most  interesting  and  topical  information  about  the  event, but it also has to include all the basic information. (Nolte & Wilcox, 1990) 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


The text  (background  information)  part  –  the  ideal  length  of  a  press  release  is  approximately one A4 sheet (300 – 400 words). It should be 3 – 4 short paragraphs in the  text  part  including  background  information,  statistics,  if  there  is  any,  quotations  etc.,  it  should  be  delivered  in  a  simple  language,  that  is  easy  to  read.  At  the  end  of  the  press  release, there should be informed about the organization, that is responsible for the event,  as well as the contact information of the person, who prepared the release, so in case of any  questions, the receiver of  the release could contact the person by whom it was prepared.  (Armenia, 2017)    Moreover, when preparing a release, it should be taken into account, that a standard color  choice and fonts (Times New  Roman, Arial 12) will make it look more professional. In the  header (upper side of the paper – in the right or left corner) logo can be placed, which will  immediately  show  the  address  where  the  release  is  from.  The  contact  information  of  the  organization  and  the  date  on  which  the  release  was  prepared.  The  publishing  date  of  the  release may be added, but in most cases, releases are sent out on the same day when they  are meant to be published. The release can be made easier to view by using bullet points  and subheadings, in particular, if it includes numbers. (Murray, 2014)    If  the  release  is  sent  by  e‐mail  (which  is  most  likely),  many  organisations  may  practice  copying  the  whole  release  or  the  lead  in  the  message  of  the  e‐mail,  considering  that  the  journalists would like to gather more information and check if there is anything interesting  for  them.  It  is  very  important  to  double‐check  the  release  before  sending  because  typing  errors look very unprofessional.     If any photos are added to the press release, it is important that they are qualitative (ones  that  can  be  shown  on  the  news).  Photos  must  illustrate  or  add  something  extra  to  the  release.  Also,  if  they  are  very  qualitative,  they  are  also  often  quite  heavy,  so  it  is  a  good  practice to upload them to the webpage and add a link where they can be downloaded in  the e‐mail. (Singleton, 2014)    PRESS CONFERENCE   A press conference is a media event organized in order to make a public statement, after  which  journalists  will  be  able  to  ask  questions.  (Dictionary,  2017)  Press  conferences  are 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


organized only if there is something really important and topical to be announced because  journalists  have  to  make  time  to  physically  get  there.  The  purpose  could  be  a  chance  to  interview a person they otherwise couldn’t get to, see a place that has been closed to other  people or something else interesting. Anyhow, there has to be something that is extra and  cannot be given through a press release. (Singleton, 2014)    Few days before the conference journalists are informed about the theme, place and time  of the conference by a press release or an invitation (still, a «save the date» e‐mail may be  sent earlier). It is also important to create a «press kit», which includes names and positions  of the speakers who will attend the conference, also it should include a press release, where  is the main information discussed in the conference, also photos (or a link to them) can be  included.     The best time to organize a press conference  is from Tuesday to Thursday, from 11:00 to  16:00,  because on Mondays journalists work more  passively and in order to  gather all the  information that has emerged on the weekend, they probably would not like to leave the  office.  On  the  contrary  on  Friday,  all  the  materials  for  the  weekend  are  prepared,  which  means a lot of work, so the journalists would not be happy to leave the office. The middle of  the  day  is  the  best  time  for  the  conference  because  the  representatives  of  the  electronic  media  will  be  able  to  make  references  to  the  event  a  few  times  till  the  evening  and  the  representatives of the printed media will be able to prepare the message for the next day’s  edition.     The  length  of  a  press  conference  should  not  exceed  an  hour.  At  the  entrance  of  the  conference,  journalists  should  be  asked  to  register  (at  a  previously  made  form),  so  afterward  the  conference  holder  can  track  who  made  it  join  the  conference  out  of  all  the  invited journalists.  After the press conference, it is a positive practice to send a post‐press  conference  release,  which  is  replenished  with  photos  from  the  conference  and  the  event  organizer  can  also  send  it  to  the  media  to  let  them  know  whose  representatives  did  not  attend the conference.    E‐NEWSLETTER  This  media  instrument  is  intended  to  educate  knowing  how  much  spam  mail  people  get  every  day,  that’s  why  it  is  important  to  include  only  the  most  essential  and  important 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


information. The  easiest  way  to  create  a  newsletter  is  to  create  a  template,  but  it  is  important to take into account that the communication will be held on regular basis. There  are various systems (e.g. MailChimp) templates of which can be used to send newsletters,  but it is also possible to create them manually without the help of these template‐provider  sites. The newsletter is a good way to inform both the target audience and the media about  what is new and important. (Breckenridge, 2008)   

Media communications are usually related to the field of public relations. It is important to  think  about  the  type  of  the  event,  the  media  channels,  and  journalists  that  could  be  interested  in  it  and  what  media  the  target  audience  use  before  starting  to  build  a  way  to  communicate.    Although  lots  of  different  media  are  present  these  days,  the  most  popular  mass  media  channel  is  still  television.  Despite  the  radio  and  writing  press  are  still  evaluated  as  quite  popular, channels such e‐newsletter promise much more growth than that of the traditional  ones.                                      

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


SUBUNIT 2: SPECIFICS AND PRINCIPLES OF HOW MEDIA WORKS IN A COUNTRY  Media  is  not  an  easily  definable  concept,  so  it  is  possible  to  view  it  from  various  angles.  However,  thinking  about  mass  media,  the  closest  is  the  technical  understanding  of  this  concept. According to it, the matter of technical multiplication is very important, because  only after it is possible to transmit the message to the biggest possible audience. It can be  done in various formats – textual, audio, visual or audio‐visual.     Moreover,  when  one  mentions  mass  media  s/he  probably  refers  to  newspapers,  journals,  TV,  radio,  web  pages  or  other  large‐scale  interactive  platforms  intended  for  public  communication.  (Anon.,  2016‐2020)  Mass  communication  is  defined  as  a  form  of  communication by which a message is communicated to receivers through media. (Anon.,  2016‐2020)    Likewise,  media  convergence  is  becoming  increasingly  popular  nowadays,  meaning  the  gradual merging of traditional media and the internet. This aspect is important because it  changes the behaviour of consumers, causing the media to look for new ways to attract and  keep audience’s attention. (Anon., 2016‐2020)    In  Latvia,  mass  media  field  is  regulated  by  the  law  “on  the  press  and  other  mass  media”,  which state that mass media are newspapers, journals, newsletters and other periodicals (if  they  are  published  in  a  frequency  of  not  less  than  one  every  three  months  with  the  limitation  that  one‐time  circulation  exceeds  100  copies.  Furthermore,  electronic  mass  media,  cinema  chronologies,  announcements  by  information  agencies  and  audio‐visual  recordings for public dissemination are also regulated by the electronic mass media law. In  general,  mass  media  activities  in  Latvia  are  governed  by  the  above‐mentioned  national  laws, as well as international and EU laws.     In Latvia, electronic media is divided in public media which are state capital companies and  commercial media. Public media in Latvia are television channels LTV1 and LTV7, as well as  the radio: Latvian Radio 1; 2; 3; 4; 5 and 6. For the July‐2017 month, the most watched TV  channel in Latvia has been LTV1 (TNS), which for a long time competes with popular media  channel  TV3,  which  mostly  provides  entertainment  shows.  This  most  likely  points  to  the  improvement of the quality of the LTV1.    

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


The most listened radio stations in the spring period in Latvia have been “Latvian Radio 2”,  “Radio  Skonto”,  “Latvian  Radio  1”,  “Radio  SWH”,  “European  Hit  Radio”  and  “Star  FM”  (TNS).  As  it  has  been  mentioned  previously,  it  is  not  most  important  to  get  publicity  in  a  media  which  is  the  most  popular,  it  is  important  to  get  publicity  in  a  media  which  is  the  most popular amongst your target audience. That is why, before sending out press releases  or  trying  to  contact  the  media  in  other  ways,  it  is  important  to  try  to  answer  a  few  questions:  ‐ What are the media habits of your target audience, what kind of media they use the most?   ‐ How to deliver the message if they do not use any media?   ‐ What are the opinion leaders they follow and trust (journalists, bloggers etc.)?    One  more  important  aspect  is  to  understand  the  difference  between  public  relations  and  advertising,  any  statement  distributed  for  payment  or  other  consideration,  as  well  as  any  promotional  program  of  any  person  related  to  commerce,  business,  profession  or  profession,  designed  to  promote  the  offer  of  goods,  including  immovable  property  or  services, for payment or other consideration. For example, if a journalist offers to create a  publication for money – it is not an ethical practice, and it is illegal.                                    

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


SUBUNIT 3: DISSEMINATION STRATEGIES  Regardless of whether public relations are considered to be a part of a marketing campaign  or as a separate, independent set of activities, all actions regarding communication should  be  carried  out  in  a  way  to  further  create  a  single  image.  (Parry  &  Shone,  2001)  The  communication plan will help to define the communication goals and use the right media to  achieve them and it is worth to remember that timing is very important. That is why, when  a  communication  or  a  marketing  plan  for  the  event  is  built,  in  most  cases  there  is  also  a  public relation component, bear in mind that different media requires a different amount of  time  for  planning  relevant  activities.  For  example,  news  broadcast  or  an  interview  on  television is planned approximately one week in advance, but an article in a newspaper that  is published once in a month is planned one to two months before. (Parry & Shone, 2001)  There are seven aspects that should be allowed for shaping a communication plan:  1. The goal of the communication (in this case, most likely to promote the event)  2. Your target audience   3. Human, financial resources, technological expertise and technological means available to  carry out communication activities  4. Key messages you want to include in your communication  5. Determining communication channels  6. Budget  7. Evaluation (impact assessment) ‐ each communication activity should be measurable    Briefly outlining a timetable for the communication plan of an average event (say festival,  international concert etc.), it may be worth remembering that  5 – 6 months before the event a date and a place for a press conference should be booked.  Up to this time, a possible media list also should be clear.   5 – 6 months before the event preparation for the press kit should be started  4 ‐5 months before the event the first press release in which you announce the event is sent  out  3 – 4 months before the event it is possible to start to arrange first interviews with media  (most likely using written media published once a month)  2 – 3 months before the event – sending out invitations for registration (if a registration is  planned)   Month of the event – hold a press conference 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


Week of the event – send out a press release  After the event – last media publications – photos and press  release about the success of  the event are sent out, as well as if the event is annual – you can announce the date of the  next event. (Parry & Shone, 2001)    Sometimes  called  dissemination  plan,  sometimes  communication  plan,  other  times  –  a  marketing  plan,  its  purpose  is  the  strategic  promotion  of  the  event.  Before  starting  any  communication  activities,  including  the  ones  related  to  the  media,  the  goal  of  the  communication,  target  audience,  resources,  key  messages,  communication  channels  and  evaluation mechanisms, as well as the timetable of the activities, should be clear.                                                 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


EXERCISE 1  Write  a  press  release  for  an  imaginary  or  an  upcoming  event  organized  by  you/your  organization.by taking positive practices mentioned in this subunit into account.    EXERCISE 2  Taking into consideration questions about target audience mentioned in this sub‐unit, go to  the  respective  website  in  your  country  and  try  to  identify  your  main  media  channels  according to their and your event`s target audience and specificity.    EXERCISE 3  Considering  above‐mentioned  aspects  while  shaping  a  communication  plan,  create  a  timetable for the media activities including the media that you choose as the most proper  mediator for your message.                                         

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


EXERCISE 4  1.Which sphere media relations most often are associated with?   •Project management  •Marketing  •Public relations    2.What is integrated marketing communication?  •Approach to achieving the objectives of a marketing campaign, through well‐coordinated  use of different promotional methods   •Alternative term for guerrilla marketing  •New definition of public relations    3.The positive aspect of using new media is the opportunity of a two‐way communication   True / False    4.Messages for the media should be…  •As broad as possible, going deep into the subject  •Compact and precise  •Abstract and unclear, so they raise interest    5.It is very common to divide journalism in general in how many (4) different genres:  News,  Reportage, Comment, Interview 

                                             

6.First criteria for a message to be published is its…  •Length   •Title  •Topicality     7.Which mass media is supposed to be the most popular in Latvia?   •Television  •Radio  •Digital news portals   

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


8.When participating in a television interview and the journalist is right beside You, You  should always look straight into the camera.   True / False    9.If participating in a radio interview, it is very important to…  •Use more nouns and verbs, moderately using adjectives and conditional words, avoiding  long, decorative descriptions.  •Use more adjectives and conditional words, moderately using nouns and verbs, involving  long, decorative descriptions.    10.What is a press release?   •Formal, official statement to the press about something new or significant  •Informal message to journalists that can be given in a written or spoken form about the  upcoming event  •Weekly updates on what’s new and important    11.Structure of the release must be made based on the overturned pyramid principle    12.The first paragraph or the lead must answer to 5 “W” questions, giving the most  important information about the event.   True / False    13.When is the best time to organize a press conference?   •Monday or Friday in the middle of the day  •From Tuesday to Thursday in the middle of the day  •From Tuesday to Thursday in the morning    14.Every journalist, who comes to the press conference should receive a pre‐prepared  package press kit which includes names and positions of the speakers who will attend the  conference and a press release that summarizes all the main information that will be  discussed in the conference.     15.Media field in the country is regulated only by national laws.  True / False 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


16.Which of the following statements is more recognized by the public relations scholars?  •It is more important to reach your target audience than the widest possible mass audience   •It is more important to reach the widest possible mass audience than your target audience    17.One of the most important questions, that you have to answer in order to define the  preferable media channels, is “What are the media habits of my target audience – what  kind of media they use the most?”   True / False    18.If a journalist offers to create a publication for money – it is a positive practice and you  should agree.   True / False    19.There are 7 aspects that should be thought about when shaping a communication plan:  goal, target audience, resources, key message, communication channels, budget,  evaluation  True / False    20.When the first press release, announcing the event, should be sent out?    •7 months before the event  •4 ‐5 months before the event  •2 months before the event                   

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 


FURTHER READING AND BIBLIOGRAPHY    Anon., 2016‐2020. Mass Media Policy Guidelines of Latvia , Riga: s.n.  Armenia, N. S. S. R. o., 2017. How to write a press release. [Online]   Available at: http://www.armstat.am/file/doc/99487128.pdf  [Accessed 1 12 2017].  Breckenridge, D., 2008. PR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences. Upper  Saddle River, N.J.: FT Press.  Connell, J. & Page, S., 2015. The Routledge Handbook of Events.. New York: s.n.  Craig, B., 2016. Media writing: a practical introduction. London: Palgrave  Macmillan.  Dictionary, B., 2017. Business Dictionary. [Online]   Available at: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/media.html  [Accessed 1 12 2017].  Dictionary, C., 2017. Cambridge Dictionary. [Online]   Available at: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/  [Accessed 1 12 2017].  Dimants, A., 2009. Žurnālistika: Mācību un Rokasgrāmata. Rīga: s.n.  Eldridge, S. A. F. A., 2017. The Routledge companion to digital journalism studies.  London: Routledge.  Kruks, S., 2005. Radiožurnālistika. Rīga: Valters un Rapa.  Murray, J., 2014. How to write an effective press release (The Guardian). [Online]   Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/small‐business‐ network/2014/jul/14/how‐to‐write‐press‐release  [Accessed 1 12 2017].  Nolte, L. & Wilcox, D., 1990. Public relations writing and media techniques. New  York: HarperCollins.  Oğuz, A. & B., Ş. E., 2017. Research methods and techniques in public relations and  advertising. New York: Peter Lang.  Parry, B. & Shone, A., 2001. Successful Event Management: A Practical Handbook.  London: Continiuum.  Roberts, J., 2016. Writing for Strategic Communication Industries, s.l.: The Ohio  State University (https://osu.pb.unizin.org/stratcommwriting).  Singleton, A., 2014. The PR masterclass : how to develop a public relations  strategy that works!. Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley & Sons Ltd..  Technologies, L., 2017. How to Create a Great Press Release. [Online]   Available at: https://www.lianatech.com/news/liana‐technologies‐hints‐and‐ tips/tip/how‐to‐create‐a‐great‐press‐release.html)  [Accessed 1 12 2017].  Tutorial, P. R., 2011. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UGjujm9BKw, s.l.:  WFDMacedonia.  Weintraub, A., 2015. Strategic public relations management: planning and  managing effective communication programs. New York: Routledge.  Wynne, R., 2016. How To Write A Press Release (Forbes). [Online]   Available at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwynne/2016/06/13/how‐to‐ write‐a‐press‐release/#6d0fdec3b932  [Accessed 1 12 2017].     

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the  authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 

ENG - Learning Unit 7 - AR  
ENG - Learning Unit 7 - AR  
Advertisement