Page 1

THE MEN’S ISSUE

Men share the stories of their businesses, enjoy being in the kitchen, and always have fishing tales!

IN S ID E !

FE ATURIN G

to the

The unsung heroes of the local utility companies are often first on the scene but seldom receive recognition.

BUSINESS MEN OF STYLE

Meet the men who put Lake & Sumter counties businesses on the map.

GANGSTERS, CARS, AND GUNS

Highlighting an era of fast cars, gun molls, and notorious gangsters, antique cars and period costumes created quite an attraction. AL SO

COOKING FAMILY

Ralph Rao knows food always brings the family together, especially if you’re all in the kitchen preparing a great Italian meal.


Life can feel like a holein-one when your heart’s in the right place

V I S I T U S O N L I N E TO L E A R N M O R E A B O U T O U R P H YS I C I A N S A N D M E D I C A L P RO F E S S I O N A L S

The Right Place is Village Heart & Vein Center Our physicians and medical professionals have been treating Central Floridians for years with a level of exemplary cardiac and vascular care that comes straight from the heart. The Oaks Professional Center, 8575 NE 138th Lane | 352.674.2080 | villageheartandvein.com


C O M M E R C I A L

R E S I D E N T I A L

0C% ING 1I0 A N N BLE F ILA AVA

HOME & BUSINESS BACKUP GENERATORS Electrical Works installs both residential and commercial generators. The best part is generators on the market are much more affordable because Electrical Works offers 100 percent financing.

307 East Main St, Leesburg FL 34748 352.460.0810 electricalworksflorida.com LICENSE EC13005476


When your Health is an urgent matter. AFTER 20 YEARS OF CARE, we understand health issues can happen at any time. To serve those urgent needs, we are proud to introduce our new urgent care center.

27637 US Hwy 27, Leesburg 352.326.6001 / 9-7 Mon-Fri 8-5 Sat & Sun 201 LaGrande Blvd, Lady Lake 352.326.6012 / 9-7 Sun, Mon, & Fri

fhvhealth.com CHAIRMAN, DAVID C. LEW, MD, FACC, FSCAI VICE CHAIRMAN, JOSÉ R. ROSADO, MD, FACC PREVIOUSLY KNOWN AS FLORIDA HEART & VASCULAR MULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP


C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


NOW OPEN IN THE VILL AGES® COMMUN IT Y!

SHOWN: Custom Dining by

Your Life. Well Furnished. babettesonline.com | (352) 728-5600 8345 US HIGHWAY 441, LEESBURG, FL MON – SAT 10 AM – 6 PM, SUN 12 – 5 PM NEW

3691 MEGGISON RD., THE VILLAGES, FL MON – SAT 10 AM – 9 PM, SUN 12 – 5 PM


OPTIONS? DO YOU KNOW YOUR BEST

FACELIFT, TEMPORARY FILLERS, OR PERMANENT FACIAL FILLERS

Liz had ImageLift, Laser, and filler treatments. Results are typical and do vary.

Kathy had a Laser ImageLift. Results are typical and do vary.


Free ImageLift seminars are being held at the following locations in June and July. Meet the doctor and enjoy free food, books, *drawings and door prizes.

YOU’RE INVITED TO FIND OUT! Double Board-Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon

Raffle drawings for free filler, a $995-$1200 value

UPCOMING FACIAL BEAUTY SOCIAL MIXER JUNE 5 CITRUS HILLS COUNTRY CLUB SEMINAR, HERNANDO JUNE 18 HILTON HOTEL SEMINAR, OCALA JUNE 25 WATERFRONT INN SEMINAR, THE VILLAGES JULY 23 WATERFRONT INN SEMINAR, THE VILLAGES JULY 30 COUNTRY CLUB OF MOUNT DORA SEMINAR CALL NOW TO RSVP - LIMITED SEATING

MEET THE TEAM!

WSJ

Bestseller!

FREE IMAGELIFT BOOK for first

DR. RICH CASTELLANO

20 callers! Limited quantities (Retail $14.95)

is a Double Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon as seen on:

*Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hrs of responding to ad for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment.

8630 East CR 466, The Villages 877.346.2435 // www.IMAGELIFT.com


JUN'19 V.15

≈ N.8

CONTENTS 1 of 2

FEATURES

068

Linemen with good defense These men have the power, and they work hard to keep it turned on. The linemen you see atop power poles take their job seriously, and when hurricanes or accidents knock out power, you’ll see their big trucks lining the roadways to help restore electricity.

034

Style 2019 Business Man of the Year Ted Waterman of Waterman Construction loves the work he does. It’s a family business for residential and commercial construction and pools.

STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

076

Gangster style Their names have gone down in infamy, but the type of cars they drove are still around. Classic sedans from the 1920s and ’30s, accompanied by owners dressed in gangster garb, were a big hit at Leesburg Bikefest. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

010 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL


re .W e Educate.

a C We Listen. We

B T F IN

L A I C AN

U O R G

P

I NC.

1 6 1 1 . .350 p.com

352ancialGrou7, Suite F-2,

2 n TBFi Highway 441F/L 34731

ark, U.S. 3261 ruitland P F

ANNUITIES 101 WORKSHOPS FOR JUNE CALL TO REGISTER!

June 11th | 9:30 a.m.

June 20th | 9:00 a.m.

MISSION INN, HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS

THE WATERFRONT INN, THE VILLAGES

Seating is very limited and by RSVP only. TB Financial Group Inc. is a licensed insurance agency for life, health, and annuities. We are not securities licensed. We are not tax advisors. Our seminars are very general in nature and not meant to replace the advice of your CPA, Tax Preparer, Investment Advisor or Attorney. We will not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax or legal professional for these matters.

Liz Cornell, CAS®

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


JUN'19 V.15

≈ N.8

CONTENTS 2 of 2

DEPARTMENTS

first

021

agenda

THE HIT LIST 022 PERSON OF INTEREST 024 OUTSTANDING STUDENT 026 MY FIRST TIME 028 THIS 'N' THAT 030

081

menu

THE TO-DO LIST 082 LOCAL TALENT 086 SOCIAL SPOTLIGHT 088 HI, SOCIETY! 090 NEAR & FAR 102

107

columns

IN THE KITCHEN 108 FORK ON THE ROAD 110 SALUTÉ 112 DINING GUIDE 114

FROM THE PUBLISHER 014 FINAL THOUGHT 116

116

108 023

082 E ON TH S R C OV E

028

086

030 012 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

102 112

110

Lake and Sumter Style Ted Waterman of Waterman Construction Corp Photo: Anthony Rao

Village Edition Style Photo Illustration: Jason Fugate


BUILDING UNIQUE POOLS We know that every single customer is unique— Building Unique Pools is our company motto—and so every project we undertake is delivered to a client’s signature set of personal tastes and, where necessary, solves any challenges their property may present.

And we deliver.

352-431-3766

1517 W Main St., Leesburg www.WisemanPools.com CPC1457504

‘‘

This was our first experience with a pool, and that’s why I’m so grateful we went with Wiseman Pools because the company has an extremely friendly and talented staff. They were readily available throughout the project and enthusiastically answered our questions or addressed our concerns. I would highly recommend the company to anyone who wants a pool.

‘‘

Wiseman Pools is a family-ownedand-operated, licensed residential and commercial swimming pool builder with an extensive portfolio of projects. From the small—fountains and in-ground spas. To the large— million dollar installations with multiple pools and spas. Our customers, large and small, demand a quality swimming pool for a fair price.

—VALERIE RHOADES, THE VILLAGES


FROM THE PUBLISHER

The Men of Style This month we focused on the Business Men of Style and the men who work to keep our communities powerful. ere’s another exciting issue of Style magazine as we feature the 2019 Business Men of Style. They look cool, have a dangerous air, and could be gangsters, but none of these gentlemen ever worked for Al Capone or Bugsy Siegel. They work hard every day, not only to bring more business to the area but also to help the community, provide opportunities for growth, and create a legacy for Lake and Sumter counties. Ted Waterman is 2019 Business Man of the Year. In business in Lake

County for more than 20 years, Waterman Construction builds custom homes, does remodeling, commercial construction, and pools. We’re also highlighting another group of extraordinary men: the line workers who provide the power behind everything we do. These first responders are on the scene after every damaging storm or hurricane. They enjoy what they do and are happy to help wherever they are needed. I always feel pride when I see a convoy of those big trucks filled with workers headed north after a blizzard or ice storm. They leave without hesitation and regret only the time away from their families. We offer you an opportunity to get to know them, to understand exactly what they do, and to learn how the next generation is preparing for the job. Speaking of gangsters, if you’re a fan of antique cars, the recent Leesburg

Bikefest was a sight to behold. Classic cars shown at the festival may not have belonged to gangsters, but they’ve been lovingly restored and no doubt each one has a story. With the costumed drivers holding wooden Tommy guns, there definitely was a realistic air to the display. It was 75 years ago this month when D-Day occurred, and we take you to the place where many of the plans and strategies for this historic event were created. Today, St. Ermin’s Hotel in London is a wonderful place to enjoy a fabulous vacation stay, but during World War II, it was a “House of Spies.” Until next month,

We love to hear from readers! Whether it’s a comment or a story idea, send a note to kendra@akersmediagroup.com

014 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


Kendra Akers Doug Akers

OWNER/PUBLISHER kendra@akersmediagroup.com

DESIGN

/

PRESIDENT doug@akersmediagroup.com

PHOTOGRAPHY

/

AT YOUR SERVICE

EDITORIAL

Jason Fugate Leigh Neely

CREATIVE DIRECTOR jason@akersmediagroup.com

MANAGING EDITOR leigh@akersmediagroup.com

Michael Gaulin James Combs

SENIOR DESIGNER michael@akersmediagroup.com

STAFF WRITER james@akersmediagroup.com

Volkan Ulgen Theresa Campbell

ART DIRECTOR volkan@akersmediagroup.com

STAFF WRITER theresa@akersmediagroup.com

THE MEN’S ISSUE

Men share the stories of their businesses, enjoy being in the kitchen, and always have fishing tales!

THE MEN’S ISSUE

Men share the stories of their businesses, enjoy being in the kitchen, and always have fishing tales!

MOVING TO THE DARK SIDE A new addiction is rising

THE KEY IS SAFETY

Knowing safe places for kids to play

SIMULATION AND EDUCATION

SPONSORED BY

The man who never leaves the hospital

JUN '19

L AKE & SUMTER

JUN '19 INSIDE!

Douglas Tyler Chris Gerbasi

WEB DESIGNER/ PHOTOGRAPHER douglas@akersmediagroup.com

STAFF WRITER chris@akersmediagroup.com

Megan Mericle CON TRIBUTIN G GRAPHIC DESIGNER WRITER S megan@akersmediagroup.com

TO LA KE COUNTY

2 0 1 9

B U S I N E S S

M A N

O F

T H E

FE ATURIN G

LAKE COUNTY IS HOPPIN’

to the

WATERMAN

His company began with one house in Umatilla and grew to a reliable and reputable construction company.

FE ATURIN G

POWER TO THE PEOPLE

The unsung heroes of the local utility companies are often first on the scene but seldom receive recognition.

The unsung heroes of the local utility companies are often first on the scene but seldom receive recognition.

BUSINESS MEN OF STYLE

Meet the men who put Lake & Sumter counties businesses on the map.

GANGSTERS, CARS, AND GUNS

Highlighting an era of fast cars, gun molls, and notorious gangsters, antique cars and period costumes created quite an attraction.

GANGSTERS, CARS, AND GUNS

Highlighting an era of fast cars, gun molls, and notorious gangsters, antique cars and period costumes created quite an attraction.

AL SO

COOKING FAMILY

Ralph Rao knows food always brings the family together, especially if you’re all in the kitchen preparing a great Italian meal.

AL SO

COOKING FAMILY

Anthony Rao Joe Angione STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Mary Ann DeSantis anthony@akersmediagroup.com Paula F Howard Nicole Hamel STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Parker Martin

Y E A R

Endless possibilities with fitness, faith, and family

Ralph Rao knows food always brings the family together, especially if you’re all in the kitchen preparing a great Italian meal.

Local beer that’s truly local. Fresh hops, fruit and other ingredients grown in Lake County.

DANIEL CHIMENTO

+

FRESH TODAY!

WHERE THE LOCALS GO

BIRDWATCHERS UNITE

Enjoy food picked fresh at a farm café, pick your own fruit, or take a hayride to relish agritourism.

Find the best places for outdoor fun, downtown adventure, and lazy life on the water.

Lake County is home to hundreds of bird species, including the native scrub-jay.

Hot off the press! The latest editions of Lake & Sumter Style, Village Edition Style, Healthy Living, and Welcome to Lake County.

nicole@akersmediagroup.com

SA LES

/

M A RK ETIN G

Tim McRae

VICE PRESIDENT, SALES tim@akersmediagroup.com

Melanie Melvin Brianna Lemerise

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Melanie@akersmediagroup.com

ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE brianna@akersmediagroup.com

Shaena Long Dillon True

SALES ASSISTANT shaena@akersmediagroup.com

ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE dillon@akersmediagroup.com

A D M IN IS TRATION Deb Matlock Aubrey Akers Simmons

DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SERVICES deb@akersmediagroup.com

Get yours Subscriptions: Order a subscription of your favorite magazine to be delivered directly

to your home for just $84. Each subscription includes 12 consecutive issues of Lake & Sumter Style, Village Edition Style, or Healthy Living. Choose 2 or more magazines for $108 per year. To order, call 352.787.4112 or mail us at: Subscriptions at Akers Media, P.O. Box 490088, Leesburg, FL 34749. Change of Address: If you are a seasonal resident or have moved, send your address change request to general@akersmediagroup.com or mail us at: Subscriptions at Akers Media, P.O. Box 490088, Leesburg, FL 34749. Back Issues: Order a single issue by mail for $7, or 2 or more single issues for $9. To pick up a back issue from our office, please call 24 hours in advance.

OFFICE MANAGER aubrey@akersmediagroup.com

D ISTRIBUTION Scott Hegg

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER scott.hegg@akersmediagroup.com

Digitize your life Visit the Apple or Android app store today and download the Lake & Sumter Style or Healthy Living online magazine app for your mobile device.

Lake & Sumter Style is a proud member of

Find us on social media

Winner of 200+ Awards for Excellence

Lake & Sumter Style. Published monthly by Akers Media, 108 South Fifth Street, Leesburg, FL 34748. All editorial contents copyright 2019 by Akers Media. All rights reserved. Lake & Sumter Style is a registered trademark of Akers Media. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or billing information, call 352.787.4112. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Paid Promotional Feature” denotes a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims or contents of advertisements. The ideas and opinions contained in this publication do not necessarily reflect the thoughts or opinions of Akers Media.

FULL-SERVICE ADVERTISING AGENCY • VIDEO PRODUCTION • CUSTOM PUBLISHING AKERSMEDIAGROUP.COM • 352.787.4112

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 015


Y A S Y E H T Y H W F EL S R U O Y R O F E E S COME S I , E C I R P R U O N A TH R E T T E B E K I L L L YOU’

G N I H T Y L N O E H T

G N I Y U B E TH ERIENCE P X E ! F L E S IT

n ever bee n s a h e e rienc My expe ss than awesom le anything ordinary. This is or extra e dealership it my favor hevy. for C

aseball ssional b hts a fe ro p a 0 nig “I am pends 12 re, I have s o h w t scou herefo e road. T om Vann year on th ut 15 vehicles fr m over d abo n the purchase evrolet, and I tur ales staff, h C le y p ,s nd Gannawa The service peo p notch a . to k ll ic a u q re y a tt ent pre name.” departm ows my e n c k n y a d n o fi b and ng. Every mmodati o c c a y r hols ve Steve Nic

ASK ABOUT OUR MONTHLY DISCOUNTS!

Facebook 4.8 out of 5 stars based on 125 reviews

ck y 1st tru m t h g u Bo r the here afte n of my endatio recomm I was not brother. inted. disappo Jordan M

SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR EXCLUSIVE OFFERS!

OF THE BEST

HOTLIST2018

Gabby F

OF THE BEST

WINNER

HOTLIST

Google

OF THE BEST 4.7 out of 5 stars based HOTLIST FINALIST on 308 reviews


a ar in for c r u o k o To . It the hood e n o ir a p re Th ed early. ey h is n fi s h wa cellent. T rned x e is ir a tu rep ar and re ever. c e h t d e wash ape than h s r e t t e it in b Paula Q friendly y r e v s y Alwa service. Charles H

g to writin d e m o t s ot accu estly We are n eviews, but hon ut a lot of r ay enough abo s evrolet h cannot C y a w nna Vann Ga taff working at s and the lership. this dea Jenny F

Every

ike ou feel l y s e k a one m Mary H

family.

ushy, had p t ’ n s a W ur wer to o d s n a y r e e ev and help . s n o i t s e qu g part in c n a n fi with the more money to had . Wish we er car from them h buy anot enjamin H B

in there e m d a h They tes. Had u in m 5 s. within 0 minute 3 in h it w r me out custome e l u f r e d r Won ys go the d. a lw a I e ice servic son serv c u T y m and get yB

HWY 441, Eustis FL 32726 / VGChevy.com / 352.343.2400

Cind


JUNE

PAID

P R OM OTION AL

2019

EDI T I O N

F E ATUR E

Dealing With the Fear Factor

O

ne of the most common worries is that cancer will return once treatment is over. The American Society of Clinical Oncology lists six coping strategies. 1. Accept your fears, don't push them away. These fears tend to weaken over time, but certain events (like follow-up tests) can trigger them. 2. Express your emotions. You can do this through keeping a journal and/or participating in a support group. 3. Stay informed. Random aches and pains can trigger worries about

recurrence, but knowing how likely that is and what to look for can help you avoid panic. Talk to your oncologist. 4. Be proactive about follow-up care. It can help you feel more in control, and regular checkups and tests can catch a recurrence early if it occurs.

6. Seek professional help if your fears feel overwhelming. Remember that some amount of fear is normal. There are ways to cope with it so that it is less intrusive.

5. Lead a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating a well-balanced diet, exercising, and getting enough sleep. It also includes reducing stress and avoiding unhealthy habits like smoking and drinking too much alcohol.

Did You Know?

June is Cancer Immunotherapy Awareness Month. Immunotherapy (also called biologic therapy) boosts the body's natural defenses to fight cancer. It has revolutionized approaches to some cancers that are difficult to treat, like melanoma or lung cancer. Although this type of treatment does not work for all cancers, researchers are learning that immunotherapy might also help treat some early-stage disease.

When Treatment Continues

Cancer survivorship includes the treatment of metastatic disease. Cancer becomes metastatic when it spreads to a different part of the body from where it started. It is chronic and cannot be cured, but metastatic patients are living longer than before and can be treated for an extended period of time.


Navigating a “New Normal”

“Many say that they felt they had lots of support during their treatment, but once it ended it was hard to make a transition to a new way of life,” says the National Cancer Institute. “It was like entering a whole new world where they had to adjust to new feelings, new problems, and different ways of looking at the world.” “New normal” can include continuing side effects from treatment, worry about cancer returning, changes in home and work life, and financial difficulties from past and ongoing medical care. In addition to medical follow-up, survivorship care includes free wellness programs, like Healthy Living and LiveSTRONG classes and smoking cessation programs from Tobacco Free Florida. Individual counseling, family counseling, and support groups can also help you cope with new challenges and uncertainties. Speak with your doctor or call RBOI to learn more.

quick quote

“It was like entering a whole new world where they had to adjust to new feelings, new problems, and different ways of looking at the world.”

by the numbers

16.9 million

Cancer survivors in the US as of January 2019

Keep Breathing Stress reduction is part of cancer survivorship care. Some ways to reduce stress include: 1. Spending time with loved ones, including family, friends, and pets. 2. Enjoying hobbies. 3. Taking a walk.

5%

4. Taking a hot bath. 5. Meditating.

Percentage of the US population who are cancer survivors

6. Laughing by reading funny books or watching comedies. 7. Reducing commitments and simplifying your life.

67%

Cancer patients who have survived five or more years after diagnosis

Almost $50 billion Spending on cancer drugs in 2017

Patient-centered radiation oncology close to home The Villages 352.259.2200 Ocala 352.732.0277 Timber Ridge 352.861.2400 Inverness 352.726.3400 Lecanto 352.527.0106 RBOI.com

Like us on Facebook

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 019


www.AmericanFamilyHomesInc.com

CUSTOM HOMES ON YOUR LOT FROM THE $200s. MOUNT DORA / EUSTIS / TAVARES / CLERMONT / LEESBURG / UMATILLA / ALTOONA / OCALA / DELAND / DEBARY / SANFORD

Schedule an appontment with Mike Neace Owner, Home Designer, Licensed Contractor

and Now, Builder of The Year / 352-589-6004

1st Mike Neace

Award Winning Builder Home Designer and Licensed Contractor

FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

Call Mike: 352-589-6004

mike@AmericanFamilyHomesInc.com State License Number - CBC058306 Broker friendly. Call Mike regarding co-broke commission policies.

“I can honestly say that by far, working with American Family Homes has been the best experience I have had with a builder.” Homeowner - Clermont

“Committed to Quality & Satisfaction” OFFICE / DESIGN STUDIO 312 South Bay St., Eustis FL 32726 www.AmericanFamilyHomesInc.com Phone: 352-589-6004 “We love our American Family Home! We recommend Mike Neace to anyone looking for that personalized design and home building experience.” Homeowner - Tavares


021

p.

first

BE IN THE KNOW ABOUT LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES | PEOPLE. COMMENTARY. NEWS.

022

024

026

028

030

THE HIT LIST News and notes from Lake and Sumter counties.

PERSON OF INTEREST Brendon Rogers talks Indie films.

OUTSTANDING STUDENT Austin McGrath comes in first driving a tractor.

MY FIRST TIME A fishing tale, an out-ofplace older brother, and the lakes of Lake County.

THIS N' THAT For the love of cheese!


THE HIT LIST

MORE THAN BOOKS! The library is a place where you can take a toddler for story time; let a teen share the fun of a video game with friends and other teens who enjoy the same game; go to a cooking class; learn how to print a 3-D object; do yoga; enjoy Spanish Story Time; or see a film of one of the Great Courses. There are 15 public libraries in Lake County and five in Sumter County. See what you can find to do…and read a book, too!

3

COMMUNAL MEALS: Rodello’s Italian Restaurant in Leesburg offers 10 percent discounts to diners on specified days for their communities: Monday, Legacy; Tuesday, Plantation; Wednesday, Hawthorne; Thursday, Royal Highlands; Friday, Highland Lakes/Trilogy; Saturday, Windsong/Ridgecrest; and Sunday, Arlington Ridge. Rodello’s also added a new entrance, more accessible parking, and new lunch and dinner options. 26736 U.S. Highway 27. 352.319.8093.

022 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

John Bell

TOP CHEF: As an instructor of culinary arts at Leesburg High School, chef John Bell has been a mentor and taught many students about running a commercial kitchen and preparing gourmet food. He recently received the Cutting Edge Chefs Award for the Southeast Region of the American Culinary Federation. The award is presented to chefs who dedicate themselves to excelling in their craft and sharing their knowledge with others.

TIME FOR A MAKEOVER: Lake County’s Office of Communications recently created a new county logo featuring a picturesque sunset, a blue heron, and the county’s trademark slogan, “Real Florida. Real Close.” The new logo will appear on the county’s uniforms, street signs, vehicles, website, stationery, and gateway signs. “This logo would serve as more than just a graphic representation designed for fast recognition,” Communications Director Elisha Pappacoda says in a press release. “It is an important part of our branding efforts, representing the public image we wish to present to our citizens and visitors.”


8

5

WANTED: LOCAL VETERANS: All Lake, Sumter, and Marion counties veterans—living or deceased—can have their names engraved on the memorial walls of Veterans Memorial at Fountain Park, 411 W. Meadow St., Leesburg. Residents or former residents who have served in the military for at least 90 days are eligible if they have an honorable, medical, or, in some cases, a general discharge. There is a $35 engraving fee. To be listed on the wall, proof of military service is needed. A copy of the DD214, DD215, AGO, or WED form is required, along with proof of living in the tricounty area, such as a copy of voter’s registration. Documents and a $35 check may be mailed to Veterans Memorial at Fountain Park, c/o Southern Monument Services, 404 B. Blvd. E (U.S. Highway 441), Leesburg, FL 34748.

FATHER’S DAY TRIVIA

• The first Father’s Day was celebrated June 19, 1910, in Spokane, Washington. It was started by Sonora Louise Smart Dodd in honor of her father, William Smart, a widowed Civil War veteran.

Source: lakeveterans.com

COMING CLEAN: CleanUp Eustis is hosting its next group event at 9am June 8 at Ferran Park, 250 Ferran Park Drive. Volunteers consisting of land and water crews will clean the shoreline from Ferran Park to the end of the boardwalk by the community center. While most volunteers walk the shoreline, kayaks and other small watercraft also are needed. Call 352.217.7370 for more information.

WHERE’S MY GAME? As sports fans turn their attention to baseball, it’s not always easy for Northern transplants to find their hometown teams on the tube. Graffiti Junktion has it covered. Clermont’s funky sports bar carries the Major League Baseball package on multiple hi-def TVs, and it’s open till 2am every day so fans can catch West Coast games. 2400 S. Highway 27. 352.432.9331.

• In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson approved observing Father’s Day annually, and in 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day. • Roses are the official flower for the day. A red rose is worn in the lapel if your father is living; a white rose if he is deceased. • There are 66.3 million fathers in America. • The necktie is the No. 1 Father’s Day gift. Hammers and golf clubs are popular, too. • Father’s Day is the fifth-largest cardsending holiday. Source: theholidayspot.com

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 023


PERSON OF INTEREST

PEO PLE

• Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Brendon Rogers

• Attended American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York.

Executive director, Central Florida Film Festival. INTERVIEWER: CHRIS GERBASI

≈ PHOTO: ANTHONY RAO

L V I TA AT S ST

• His ‘leading lady,’ Jennifer Fink, is film festival operations director. • 14th annual CENFLO Film Festival is Sept. 6-8, Epic Theatres, Mount Dora.

What’s it like guiding the festival? There are challenges, for sure, but I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to offer local audiences the chance to see very entertaining independent films that they otherwise wouldn’t be able to enjoy on the big screen. On the flip side, it’s been a great honor helping up-and-coming filmmakers have an outlet for their work and to help them network with other filmmakers and make valuable industry connections. First film you remember? “Star Wars,” no doubt. I was very young when my father took me to see it, but that film completely opened my imagination to what was possible in movies, even if I didn’t know it at the time. Another film I was taken to was “Caveman” with Ringo Starr (though trying to ascertain an impression made on me at such a tender age by seeing Ringo toss Barbara Bach into dinosaur plop could possibly negate my ability to talk about films with any perceived intelligence).

Favorite film? On a gut level, I’d have to say “The Departed,” although it’s a photo finish with “Goodfellas” and “Casablanca.” On the comedy side, it’s hard to dispute “Ghostbusters” (1984), if not the greatest comedy of all time, then definitely in the top three.

Best popcorn? Well, I have to say Epic Theatres’— their popcorn pairs quite well with just about any wine! Movie theater pet peeve? Anything distracting that pulls me out of the picture; people who can’t stop talking, a phone going off, even people sitting in front of you playing on their phones. I mean, if one can’t disconnect from the world for a couple hours and just escape, maybe a dark theater isn’t the place for them.

Keep reading!

024 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

For more with Brendon Rogers, visit lakeandsumterstyle.com.


l e e P A h it W n a M r u o Y r Pampe Great skincare isn’t just for women. Men who want to maintain a youthful, healthy look should start with a skin peel. With several options to choose from, a peel provides visible results with little downtime. Peels treat brown age spots, fine lines, wrinkles, ingrown hairs and large pores. Peels also improve skin texture, leading to a closer shave, as well as brighter, healthier looking skin. Gift Certificates available for Father’s Day.

352.259.5126 Face2FaceFL.com THE VILLAGES LEESBURG TAVARES

FACIAL COSMETIC SURGERY

|

BOTOX

|

LASER TREATMENTS

|

PEELS

|

SKIN CARE PRODUCTS


OUTSTANDING STUDENT

PEO PLE

Austin McGrath He won first place in the Tractor Operations Contest at Marion Technical Institute and moved to the state-level competition.

VITAL STATS

INTERVIEWER: LEIGH NEELY

• • • •

Age: 18; Parents: Tami Mosier and Joe McGrath. Graduating from Tavares High School; GPA: 3.2. Born in Leesburg. Plans to attend Lake Tech to become a certified welder.

One word that describes me: Spontaneous, because I never know how something is going to go and just make the best of it.

How did you become interested in agrisciences? One of my

What is your favorite thing to do related to the tractor contests? To actually drive the course. I think that it is fun to drive the tractor period, but put in a little bit of a challenge and it makes it 10 times better.

good friends, Abi Lawson, was in it, and she told me about it and what all they do. It seemed interesting to me.

Other interests: I enjoy working on anything that has a motor or see what I can engineer myself.

Which tractor brand do you prefer? If it gets the

Have you ever watched the classic TV show, “Green Acres”? No.

job done then it is great, but if I had to choose, it would be John Deere.

Know an outstanding student? Fill us in!

026 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

≈ PHOTO: NICOLE HAMEL Any farm animals as pets? I do not, but I have

Favorite sport: I am really not a sports kid. I would rather be outside or be with friends.

raised a pig to show in the Lake County Fair for the past four years.

Guilty pleasure:

Favorite food: A nice steak

Procrastinate; leave everything to the last minute.

dinner with mashed potatoes.

Your hero: Both of my parents for teaching me the values of life and making me the person I am today.

Dream place to live: Somewhere away from the city limits on a piece of property where I can have my own shop full of tools and toys where no one can bother me.

What I want to be doing 10 years from now: I hope to have my own house with a good-paying job and possibly starting a family.

Email your outstanding student recommendations to leigh@akersmediagroup.com


Dr. Dave and Dr. Chris will see you now! Why your child should get an orthodontic checkup by no later than age 7. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

W Wollenschlaeger Orthodontics 33050 Professional Drive, Leesburg, FL 34788 352.787.6800 drdaveortho.com

hen many people think of orthodontics, they think their teenage years. However there are many good reasons for your child to receive an orthodontic evaluation much sooner. Dr. Dave and Dr. Chris Wollenschlaeger, a father-son duo practicing in Leesburg, recommend receiving a complimentary check up with our orthodontic specialist no later than the age of 7. Dr. Dave and Dr. Chris are devoted to the highest standards of care for patients of all ages. The doctors, along with a team of highly trained and skilled clinicians, utilize state-of-the-art procedures and comprehensive treatment planning to achieve optimal dental health while enhancing and maintaining the natural beauty of their patients’ smiles.

Here are the reasons why an early orthodontic checkup with Dr. Dave or Dr. Chris at Wollenschlaeger Orthodontics may be important for your child: • Orthodontists can spot subtle problems with jaw growth and emerging teeth while some baby teeth are still present. • While your child’s teeth may appear to be straight, there could be problems that only an orthodontist can detect. • The check-up may reveal that your child’s bite is fine. Or, the orthodontist may identify a developing problem but recommend monitoring the child’s growth and development, and then if indicated, begin treatment at the appropriate time for the child. • Early treatment may prevent more serious problems from developing and may make treatment at a later age shorter and less complicated.

• In some cases, the orthodontist will be able to achieve results that may not be possible once the face and jaws have finished growing. • Early treatment may give them the chance to: guide jaw growth; lower the risk of trauma to protruded front teeth; correct harmful oral habits; improve appearance; guide permanent teeth into a more favorable position; and improve the way the lips meet. Because patients differ in both physiological development and treatment needs, Dr. Dave and Dr. Chris’ goals are to provide each patient with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time. Through a complimentary orthodontic evaluation at Wollenschlaeger Orthodontics, you’ll be giving your child the best opportunity for a healthy beautiful smile.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 027


MY FIRST TIME

PEO PLE

Larry Martin A fish out of water becomes a convert on a fishing trip. INTERVIEWER: LEIGH NEELY

arry Martin had always enjoyed water activities though he never went fishing. He just had no interest in it. Soon after moving to Florida, however, his brother, Bernie, an avid fisherman, came to visit from Colorado and wanted Larry to go fishing. “He told me in that haughty younger brother way that I needed the experience,” says Larry, of The Villages. “He even hired a guide for us and made all the arrangements from Colorado.” They met their professional guide, Grady Maynard, at 6:30am in Venetian Gardens in Leesburg.

≈ PHOTO: ANTHONY RAO

Larry was amazed at the technology on Grady’s boat. “Every inch of it is designed to catch bass in shallow freshwater lakes,” Larry says. “Bernie bought some squirming Florida ‘shiners,’ which are about 4 inches long, because we needed live bait.” The shiners didn’t work so well, and Bernie wondered if they’d gotten a bad batch, but when he pulled out a banana for a snack, the guide was shocked. He said that explained the bad luck: you never take bananas on a bass boat. “Bernie ate both of them and threw the peels over the side,” Larry says. “Just then—I’m not making this up—I had a sharp tug on my line.” Larry was encouraged to reel it in, and on the end of the line was a gar, not a bass.

“It has a more interesting profile than a bass, with its long snout, but it wasn’t for us,” Larry says. While Bernie was taking a picture, it jumped back into the water without any help. After a few hours, Grady discovered the dam had just opened and quickly headed to the Palatlakaha River. “With Grady’s help, I actually caught two bass,” Larry says. “Bernie, who paid for the excursion, caught none.” Larry’s wife said, “Do not bring any fish home,” so, of course, the fish went back into the water. “I get it now. I really do. It’s a challenge that attracts many people,” Larry says. “You could say you get ‘hooked.’”

Want to share your story of the first time you experienced something?

028 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

Email leigh@akersmediagroup.com


Impotence isn’t important; getting help is PATIENT Alpha Medical Group uses an exclusive, all natural ED treatment.

REVIEW

We are the experts in the newest and most innovative ED treatment on the market today. Acoustic Pressure Wave Therapy (APWT).

How APWT Works & What to Expect When you come to our clinic, a doctor performs a Doppler Ultrasound test. This determines whether there is a blockage in the veins or arteries supplying blood to the penis and to what extent the blockage is restricting blood flow. If a blockage is present and the doctor clears you for treatment, the technician uses a hand-held device to focus the acoustic waves on the veins and arteries with obstructed blood flow. Veins regenerate, nerves grow and narrow, shriveled-up blood vessels become big and plump again. Girth increases, sensitivity increases and intimacy feels better than ever.

The acoustic waves move through tissue and… 1) Gently dissolve plaque that restricts blood flow. 2) Activate stem cells that cause veins to regenerate and new blood

vessels to grow. 3) Promote nerve growth that gives you greater sensitivity, more

enjoyment and makes it easy to get and maintain an erection. No more headaches, distorted vision or other nasty side effects. Plus, you'll never hide pills again to keep your ED a secret and never fall asleep waiting for them to work. The non-invasive treatment, which takes about twenty minutes has no known side effects and requires no recovery time. Regardless of the number of treatments you need, we are here to help you achieve your desired results.

“It has been nine years since I could get and maintain an erection. I couldn’t take Viagra because I couldn’t stand the side effects. I heard about APWT and decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did. The staff never made me feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. Thank you for giving me my life back.” — J.K. (age 62)

352.816.1901 / AlphaWaveHealth.com *Individual results may vary. © All rights reserved

heaven SOME SLICES OF

ARE CREATED BY ARCHITECTS.

Everything about Lake Port Square was designed to enhance the lives of our residents: the spacious apartments, the 78 acres of breathtaking grounds, the excellent dining. But all this doesn’t come with a big price tag. So you can live large without spending large.

Call (352) 221-9134 today to schedule your personal visit.

A Life Care* Community 600 Lake Port Boulevard Leesburg, Florida 34748 brookdalelifecare.com *Life Care plan/guarantee is subject to the terms of the Residency Contract. 225703 SR

©2019 Brookdale Senior Living Inc. All rights reserved. BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING and BRINGING NEW LIFE TO SENIOR LIVING are the registered trademarks of Brookdale Senior Living Inc.

Bringing New Life to Senior Living® J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 029


THIS 'N' THAT

CO MMENTARY

Stop and smell the cheese Every day and with every meal, I’m living the dream. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

030 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

≈ ILLUSTRATION: MEGAN MERICLE


t’s a perfect day for a dip in the cheese. The creamy golden-yellow waves of nacho cheese wash over me as I do the butterfly stroke from one end of the pool to the other. After I jump out, I towel off with cheesecloth, recline in the cheese chaise lounge, sip a piña cheeselada, and enjoy the view of the young women in their string-cheese bikinis. Oh, a light sprinkling of Parmesan is coming down. I better get back inside my cheese cube house. I’m so glad I moved out of Cottage Cheese. Look, here’s the mailman, Mr. Limburger, with a delivery. It’s probably my “Merry Mozzarella” basket from the Cheese of the Month Club. I’ll put it in my cheese cellar, where I can cool off, too. It’s hot today, almost hot enough to melt the town. Another gooey day in paradise. This is Cheeseland. And I’m the mayor. (I unseated Mayor McCheese.) Then I woke up. It was all just a Homer Simpson-esque fantasy. D’oh! From time to time, I attempt to give up certain foods that are supposed to be “bad.” I heard somebody say recently that THINK ABOUT IT: HAS CHEESE “dairy is the devil” or EVER LET YOU DOWN? HAS something ridiculous CHEESE EVER STOLEN YOUR like that. But if cheese is wrong, IDENTITY? DOES CHEESE I don’t want to be EVER CHEAT ON YOU? HAS right. I can never CHEESE RUN A GOVERNMENT stop eating cheese. INTO THE GROUND? NO. The weird thing is, I don’t remember liking cheese that much as a kid, well, except for grilled cheese sandwiches. I didn’t even care much for pizza. What was I thinking? It’s a giant circle of cheese! Now, I can’t get enough of it: Cap’n Cheese with Cheeseberries for breakfast, cheese stacked high between two slices of cheese for lunch, cheeseloaf with cheese tots and cheese on the cob for dinner, and cheese chips with cheese pop for a snack. The mind reels. Imagine the perfectly melted slice of cheese on top of a burger.

Gooey, sloppy cheese mixed with every type of pasta. Chicken parm, veal parm. Mozzarella sticks, perhaps the greatest invention ever. Potatoes au gratin—the French get what I’m saying. Cheddar and Swiss and provolone and Monterey Jack. Orange and blue and yellow and white. Slices and chunks and crumbles and sauces. Cheese, glorious cheese! Cheese is everywhere—just like God. It’s a good time to count our cheesy blessings. This sounds cheesy but cheese is our friend. Think about it: has cheese ever let you down? Has cheese ever stolen your identity? Does cheese ever cheat on you? Has cheese run a government into the ground? No. In fact, in times of trouble, the nation turns to cheese. When people are in need, the government issues surplus cheese. “Surplus cheese.” The phrase alone is enough to make me salivate. (It’s also a good band name. “Ladies and gentlemen, from Kenosha, Wisconsin, please welcome Surplus Cheese!) But for the love of cheese, don’t call me a “cheesehead.” I wouldn’t be caught in a mousetrap with those types. Who would put cheese on their head? Swim in it, yes. On my head, no. And I’m not what you call a connoisseur. I don’t know all the “great fromage regions” or the breeding habits of the goats that produce the best cheese-making milk. Leave that to the foodies over in the Menu section. So, why do we consume so much cheese and why does cheese consume so many of us? I almost did some research and came up with these completely undocumented alternative facts about cheese’s mysterious qualities: • The consumption of cheese produces a warm, fuzzy feeling—a comforting drowsiness really— that encircles the brain and makes the cheese eater feel safe, as if they’re back in the womb. • A love of cheese is linked to intelligence, attractiveness, and the ability to make a sandwich. • In mass quantities, cheese is the greatest known aphrodisiac. • The moon controls the tides, and the moon is made of cheese. • Theologians and scientists agree that cheese will one day save the planet.

There you have it. No insightful conclusion here. This column has made me hungry. I’m going out to buy some cheese.

Do you wish Earth was made of cheese, just like the moon? Comment on this article or share ideas for new stories by emailing chris@akersmediagroup.com.

CHRIS GERBASI

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 031


With three advanced powertrains, a revolutionary design and Honda Sensing® standard on all trims, the Accord is the most impressive Honda yet.

At Jenkins Honda we are committed to providing a world-class customer experience with just one goal. Get it right, the first time. Car buying is pretty big deal. You can count on us to guide you through the process for all of your automotive needs. If it has the Jenkins name on it, we stand behind it. I personally guarantee it.

Jason Kirkland

Welcome to the Family Civic

Clarity

Fit

HR-V

Insight

Odyssey

Jason Kirkland General Manager

Ridgeline

8865 South U.S. HWY 441 • Leesburg • 1-885-984-5363

www.JenkinsHondaOfLeesburg.com

CR-V

Pilot


Our smallest SUV. The industry’s biggest award. 2019 North American Utility Vehicle of the YearTM

2019 Hyundai Kona Our goal is to provide our customer with a world class buying and servicing experience. We know you have a choice where you spend your money. I have empowered my staff to make sure that your experience at Jenkins Hyundai of Leesburg is the best of the best. When you do business with us, you can be assured you made the best decision for your automotive needs. I personally guarantee it.

Steve Tagliente

Welcome to the Family

Steve Tagliente General Manager

Accent

Veloster

Elantra

Sonata

Ioniq

Kona

9145 South U.S. HWY 441 • Leesburg • 352-326-3585

www.JenkinsHyundaiOfLeesburg.com

Tucson

Santa Fe


034 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


FOR CONSTRUCTION Builder Ted Waterman Style’s 2019 Business Man of the Year

Photo: Anthony Rao

STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

ed Waterman admits he loves being in the spotlight, so of course he thinks it’s pretty cool to be gracing this month’s magazine cover as Style’s 2019 Business Man of the Year and he relishes talking about the things he loves—his wife, sons, his passion for the construction field, an industry he has been in since 1982, and being the top man behind Waterman Construction Corp., based in Umatilla. “I was really shocked; I didn’t think I was going to win,” says Ted, 54, who was chosen in a drawing at Style’s annual gala that honors Lake and Sumter County men and their professions. Growing up in Tampa, he began working in general labor for a large Heathrow construction company at age 17, honing skills and expertise that

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 035


have helped him work his way up the ladder in the building field. He passed the state exam to become a certified general contractor in 1993. “I have enjoyed every bit of it,” he says. Whatever clients need, Ted does all phases of construction from start to finish, including site work to turn key projects. His commercial builds have been veterinary clinics, nail salons, retail stores, gift shops, and eateries. He also builds custom homes, along with doing residential remodels, additions, and renovations. Ted is licensed as a certified pool contractor, too, and has been in demand

to install new commercial and residential swimming pools in fiberglass or concrete. Have a pool that needs remodeled? Waterman Construction can do it. The company also is available to provide weekly pool maintenance. The majority of Waterman’s latest projects have been swimming pool work, which has left Ted questioning if customers associate him with pools because of his “Waterman” name? “Most people think we’re a pool contractor,” says Ted, who strives to make the public aware Waterman does much more. His company is currently

involved working on a half-million-dollar housing project in Longwood. “I would love to build more houses— ranch, contemporary, stucco, brick, stucco and rock—I like it all,” Ted says. His family-owned business has eight employees, and Ted proudly notes Gina, his wife of 24 years, serves as the company president while he’s vice-president. The couple started their business in 1995 in Astatula before relocating to Umatilla in 1999. “Gina does an extremely good job of taking care of the office and I take care of everything outside the front door, and

Samantha Provost

Billy Brett and Seth Green

Ted, Gina, and Jimmy Waterman

036 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


it works,” Ted says. “I don’t tell her what to do, and she doesn’t tell me what to do. She’s actually the reason why Waterman Construction exists.” Ted’s former job involved being on the road and away from home overseeing commercial construction builds of Winn Dixie, Albertson’s, Office Depot, and other turn key projects throughout Florida. “We had three kids and I traveled an awful lot,” Ted recalls. “Gina said it was time for me to be home because the kids missed me.” Ted agreed it would be better to be more involved in their three sons lives when Kyle,

“I admire his passion for construction,” Gina adds. “It’s definitely in his blood. He’s the hardest working man I have ever met in my life.” The pair met while Ted was working at a job site in Poinciana. “It was summertime, hot and muddy, and I said, ‘look at this chick walking through the mud in high heels. She thinks we’re a bunch construction workers who are going to whistle and holler at her,”’ Ted told his peers before he walked over to Gina and told her: “We’re not going to whistle, we’re not going to holler. You can walk by us; we’re not a bunch of pigs.”

“WHEN THINKING OF MAKING THE DECISION OF CREATING A CUSTOM COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT, LET’S DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.”

Photos: Nicole Hamel

—T E D WAT E R M A N

24, and twins Tom and Jimmy, 29, were growing up. Tom now serves in the U.S. Army, Jimmy works for the company, and Kyle is in college to become a veterinarian. Ted and Gina believe being married and working side-by-side works for them. “We enjoy being with each other. Even as the kids grew up, we always did things as a family together and I think we are both geared that way,” says Gina, who marvels over her husband’s devotion to faith, family, and his work.

Ted escorted Gina back to her office, which was by the construction work site, and he made certain she could walk on concrete rather than in the mud in her heels. During his years of commercial construction experience, Ted says the development of commercial facilities built with the idea of selling or leasing to an organization post construction, often doesn’t bode well. He has found there’s a tendency for large commercial areas to be left vacant, especially after a business

evaluates its true needs and then contracts to have a commercial building made to their specifications. “When thinking of making the decision of creating a custom commercial construction project, let’s do it right the first time,” Ted says on Waterman Construction’s website. “Our customers have been pleased with our commercial construction projects. Unlike being forced to move into a space that is not specifically designed with the commercial endeavor in mind, all of our commercial construction projects are developed from the ground up in cooperation with the client, so that the space is best utilized for their needs.” Waterman Construction’s primary area for commercial construction jobs are in Central Florida, and besides doing builds in Astatula, Eustis, Howey-inthe-Hills, Leesburg, Minneola, Mount Dora, Tavares, Clermont, and Umatilla, the company also does builds in Sumter, Seminole, Orange, and Marion counties. Those interested in having a custom home built by Waterman, the company offers a wide selection of choices for the customer to consider at their Umatilla office. Gina notes many homebuilding shows on TV are unrealistic as far as prices of quoted materials, yet she admits the shows can be fun to watch. “You can get great ideas off of them,” she says. “We may not use the most expensive product in our houses, but it’s definitely not the cheapest. We strive for quality,” Ted says. “We want to build a home that will last and that our customers will be proud to call home.” The Watermans are thankful for their customers’ support over the years. “We have made a lot of wonderful friends,” says Gina, noting many of them they first met as customers before they’ve become longtime friends. “God has blessed us,” adds Style’s 2019 Business Man of the Year.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 037


Shockingly great ED treatment The next “wave” in ED treatment. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

rectile dysfunction, or ED, is bothersome and distressing. It affects mood. It affects ego. It affects relationships with your sexual partner. Unfortunately, ED becomes more common as men age. The primary cause of ED is restricted blood flow to the penis. Restoring normal healthy blood flow is vital to restoring healthy function. Thanks to Alpha Wave Health Centers, an Alpha Medical Group company, which has offices in Leesburg, Jacksonville, Palm Coast and Farmington Connecticut, men can now have their ED treated without surgery, drugs, or side effects. The practice offers an innovative treatment called Acoustic Pressure Wave Therapy, or APWT. With the use of a small, hand-held device, energy from acoustic waves moves through tissue, gently dissolving plaque that restricts blood flow, activating stem cells that cause veins to regenerate and new blood vessels to grow, and promoting nerve growth

that gives men greater sensitivity and more enjoyment. “There’s no needles, no bruising, no surgry, and no side effects,” says Dr. Scott Hollington, MD, of Alpha Medical Group. “Patients may feel tingling immediately after the procedure, but that goes away in 30 minutes. We also encourage patients to have sex the same day of the treatment.” When veins regenerate, nerves grow, and shriveled-up blood vessels become big and plump, men enjoy similar sexual experiences to what they enjoyed in their prime. In essence, it’s like turning back the clock and returning to their youth. Girth increases, Sensitivity increases and intimacy feels better than ever. During shockwave therapy, clinicians coat a probe using a special gel and apply the probe to the penis. They use the probe to target different areas of the penis. The procedure is completely non-invasive, non-surgical, requires no down time, and is conveniently performed at Alpha Wave Health Centers in just under 20 minutes or so. Dr. Hollington says the device is like a vibrator, but much more powerful. The device produces acoustic pressure waves that penetrate beneath the skin, breaking up plaque and rejuvenating tissue cells.

“The success rate is over 80 percent,” Dr. Hollington says. “Success is defined as any improvement at all, with most men being able to perform again for their partner”. Most importantly, APWT restores confidence and significantly improves relationships that have been strained by this disorder. Just ask Collin M., who is one of Alpha Wave Health Centers’ satisfied patients. “I don’t usually discuss my personal life. But this treatment is so amazing, I’m going to tell all my friends about it. Visiting your clinic is the best choice I’ve ever made. I only wish I had known about it years ago.” The treatment also worked wonders for 70-year-old Gerald F. “It has been nine years since I could get and maintain an erection. I couldn’t take Viagra because I couldn’t stand the side effects. I heard about APWT and decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did. The staff never made me feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. Thank you for giving me my life back.” Another patient, 62-year-old J.K, got back in the game in no time. “One treatment and sex with the wife four times! This is better than I expected.”

AN ALPHA MEDICAL GROUP COMPANY

4120 Corley Island Road, Leesburg, FL 34748 / 352.816.1901 / AlphaWaveHealth.com DR. SCOTT HOLLINGTON

DR. JOHN LIGEON


M E

S

BU

SS ME E N IN

OF STY

L

You see them every day. You may do business with them. They’re your neighbors and friends—the 2019 Business Men of Style. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 039


S

ESS ME

N

M

West Construction Services, Inc.

E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

1004 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora 352.483.9378 / westconstructionfl.com

Award-winning and experienced building contractors Joseph West and his father, Dale West, recently relocated their 31-year construction business to downtown Mount Dora. “We are very excited to be a part of a thriving business community,” says Joe, who understands building a custom home can be a large commitment for people to make. “They are trusting us with their dreams, their ideas, and their resources,” says Joe, adding the entire West Construction team values the trust and friendship they forge with customers in the building process. “We try to walk away from every project having built a house, a home, and a relationship.”

Dale Joseph West West BUILDING CONTRACTOR

BUILDING CONTRACTOR

040 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

Larry Blevins, PA ASLMS FELLOW & NATIONAL TRAINER

Village Institute of Plastic Surgery

607 CR 466A, Fruitland Park / 352.259.8599 / plasticsurgeryvip.com The awards just keep coming for the popular plastic surgery duo of Dr. Danny Soares and Larry Blevins, PA. Located just outside The Villages, their brand-new practice location, aptly named Village Institute of Plastic Surgery, or VIP for short, is already generating waves of excitement. This state-of-the-art facility offers the best of each treatment modality in aesthetic medicine. Dr. Danny Soares is a nationally recognized and published facelift specialist, facility medical director, and associate professor of Head & Neck surgery at the UCF College of Medicine. Larry Blevins, PA is an awardwinning cosmetic injector and national clinical instructor specializing in all forms of non-surgical and laser-based treatment services. Capping off the talent of this team of super-specialists is Dr. Roberto Mendez, a board certified plastic surgeon with extensive expertise in body contouring. Schedule your complimentary consultation and discover what it means to have a VIP experience in cosmetic surgery.

L

Danny Soares, MD DOUBLE BOARD-CERTIFIED FACIAL PLASTIC SURGEON

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 041


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

Carlos Colon FINANCIAL SERVICES MANAGING ADVISOR

The Villages Insurance 352.751.6622 / TheVillagesInsurance.com

“Only a life lived for others is a life worthwhile,” this famous Albert Einstein quote is the guiding light for Carlos Colon personally and professionally. “I always give more in value than I take in payment,” he says. Though he’s new to The Villages Insurance, he’s already learning why the community is called Florida’s Friendliest Hometown. “The potential here is great and the people are amazing,” he says. “This is a place where the old guard is still the culture. People aren’t on their phones in restaurants; they’re interacting with one another.” Carlos believes it’s his duty to do what’s best for his clients not himself, which is why he’s pleased to be with The Villages Insurance.

042 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

JoeJamieson LOAN ORIGINATOR

Success Mortgage Partners 16903 Lakeside Dr., Unit #1, Ste. 150, Montverde 352.242.1535

Joe Jamieson is proud that he and his wife’s’ company is a local business, able to help people he knows and sees every day. Joe believes its great idea to call him first before looking for your new home. If you have your loan preapproval in place, you know what you can afford and have a payment number that won’t strain your budget. “We are the best at doing mortgages, and we have the No. 1 Lake County mortgage loan consultant with Kristin, my wife, in our office. We’re dedicated to your financial success, and we mean that.” Joe’s future includes getting deeper into local politics because he says, “We have a crisis for affordable housing that must be addressed.”

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 043


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

IsaacDeas LICENSED MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELOR

Deas Consulting, LLC 385 W. Alfred St., Tavares 352.406.1264

For fathers, being a positive role model is a 24-hour job. That’s the message Isaac Deas, a licensed mental health counselor and owner of Deas Consulting LLC in Tavares, conveys when counseling fathers. “Manhood is not about power or control; it’s about understanding and compassion,” says Isaac, who is also a certified substance abuse counselor and certified sexual abuse counselor. “Unfortunately, there are men who are not accepting the responsibility being placed on them. Very few are mentoring their sons or other peoples’ sons. As a result, we’re losing the next generation of men.” Isaac, who opened his company in 2000, provides Christian counseling only. He counsels toubled youth, as well as people dealing with anger management, substance abuse, sexual abuse, and marital issues.

044 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

Dr. John Dr. Paul

Chiaramonti Collins OPTOMETRIST

OPTOMETRIST

EyeSite of The Villages

®

2909 Traverse Trail, The Villages Conveniently located adjacent to Brownwood® in The Villages® 352.674.3937 / eyesite-thevillages.com When EyeSite of The Villages® opened five years ago, Drs. Paul Collins and John Chiaramonti had a clear vision for their practice: bedside manner would never take a backseat. At this small, independent practice, the overall patient experience is personalized. Imagine walking into a practice where your doctor greets you with a handshake, spends ample time examining and talking with you, and even shares a cup of coffee or tea with you. That’s what happens daily at EyeSite of The Villages®, where high-quality, compassionate, and comprehensive eye care are a priority.

OF THE VILLAGES®

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 045


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

JoeCiceri OWNER

Electrical Works

352.460.0810 / electricalworksflorida.com In preparation for hurricane season, Lake County residents have two options. They can do nothing and then complain when their power is out, their food spoils, and their home reaches sauna-like temperatures. Or, they can purchase a generator and enjoy a better quality of life during the aftermath of a hurricane. Fortunately, Joe Ciceri, owner of Leesburg-based Electrical Works, offers generators for both residential homes and commercial buildings. Here’s the best part: You no longer have to break the bank to purchase a generator. Electrical Works provides 100 percent financing that is easy and affordable, allowing customers to keep their current cash and credit lines intact. It also means, in the event of a power outage, that lights will be on in their home, edible food will be available in the refrigerator, and cool air will continue blowing through the home. “It is definitely a smart investment that makes all the difference in the world when your power is off due to a hurricane or storm,” Joe says. Electrical Works has gained an outstanding reputation, and that comes from Joe’s trustworthy team of awesome managers. They include Jason Paynter, Joe Macaluso, John Thomas, Mark Pait, and Chris Etheridge. “I’m blessed to have this wonderful team,” Joe says. “They go above and beyond for the company and its loyal customers.”

046 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


Mack Macaluso

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

John Thomas NEW CONSTRUCTION

Mark Pait PROJECT MANAGER

Jason Paynter Chris Ethridge

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

LEAD ESTIMATOR

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 047


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

Wade Boyette Heath Nailos J.D., LLM.

J.D.

BCN Law Firm

1635 E. Hwy 50, Ste 300, Clermont 8564 CR 466, Ste 306, The Villages 352.394.2103 / 855.LAW.2020 bcnlawfirm.com Know Your Attorney…Know Your Options.™ BCN Law Firm partners Heath Nailos and Wade Boyette are community leaders their clients can trust. Along with their team of attorneys, they are committed to being involved in the communities they serve and support a number of non-profit organizations including Cornerstone Hospice and Project Scholars/Pig on the Pond. Recently, Heath was appointed to the Board of the Leesburg Regional Medical Center Foundation. BCN Law Firm is a full-service firm, with practice areas including Auto Accidents, Bankruptcy, Civil Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Homeowner’s Insurance Law, Insurance Law, Probate Law, and Real Estate Law. Heath and Wade are joined by attorneys Michelle Bottex, Kenneth Costello, Norman Cummins, Kristin Nailos and Travis Stulz.

048 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

Erik Zimmermann PODIATRIST

Zimmermann Podiatry

1208 W. Dixie Ave., Leesburg 352.435.7849 / drzpodiatry.com Much like businesses of a century ago, Zimmermann Podiatry is kicking up its heels heading into the ’20s. “We’re roaring into a new office and into a new phase of our practice,” Dr. Erik Zimmermann says. “It’s booming with new patients and new services.” He’s the kingpin of a 20-year-old practice and a friendly staff of four flapper girls. He graduated from Barry University Podiatry School and completed his residency at Cedars Medical Center, both in Miami. Dr. Zimmermann goes Al Capone on foot pain, and no ailment is untouchable. He packs heat with laser technology for neuropathy treatment, skin surgeries, toenail fungus, and warts—setting ’em up and shooting ’em down. After treatment at Zimmermann Podiatry, patients are back on their feet and swinging their gams to the Charleston in no time.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 049


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

ThomasClark BROKER EXECUTIVE/PRESIDENT CEO

Realty Executives Lifestyle Group 1635 E. Highway 50, Suite 102, Clermont / 352.874.3430

Thomas has been in real estate for 22 years, doing what he is the most passionate about, Real Estate. Realty Executives Lifestyle Group has built a trusted brand, where progress and leadership in today’s real estate market puts the consumer experience first, providing vast experience on residential, investment or commercial properties. We focus on agents; providing broker/mentorship training, and are entrepreneurial driven. Offering a team concept as well, we have seasoned, established agents who are valuable mentors to new or younger people in the business. Realty Executives Lifestyle Group is an advocate of building community relationships, we’re proud to sponsor community events.

050 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

TedWaterman VICE PRESIDENT

Waterman Construction

21025 Wiygul Road, Umatilla 352.669.1033 waterman-construction.com Ted Waterman and the staff of Waterman Construction believe customer service is the most important aspect of their business. The family-owned company does custom home building, small commercial projects, and swimming pools. “I don’t feel like I’ve worked a day in my life,” Ted says. “We definitely enjoy what we do.” Gina, Ted’s wife, manages the office, and one of their twin sons, James works with the family business. His brother, Thomas, is in the Army, and the youngest Waterman, Kyle, is studying to be a veterinarian. Waterman Construction works with all phases of construction, and their goal is your complete satisfaction.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 051


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

052 /

L

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


JeffreyGlover CHIROPRACTOR

Glover Chiropractic 312 N. 14th St., Leesburg 352.787.9995 / gloverchiro.com

Back pain can be debilitating. To effectively treat back pain, Dr. Jeffrey Glover, owner of Glover Chiropractic in Leesburg, goes on a “fact-finding mission” to discover the root cause. That means conducting chiropractic, orthopedic, and neurological exams, as well as x-rays if needed. “Then we can let patients know up front how many treatments they’ll need and how much it will cost,” Dr. Glover says. “If its soft tissue related, it may take only one or two treatments. If it’s a disc problem, then aggressive treatment could take a month or two.” Dr. Glover utilizes treatments such as chiropractic adjustment, spinal decompression and laser therapy. Stay tuned, because in the coming months he hopes to unveil a new treatment that can help treat and heal a wide range of medical conditions.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 053


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

BobTucker OWNER

Events by Miss Daisy

1024 W. Main St., Leesburg 352.787.6806 / missdaisysflowers.com “I love it, just love it,” says Bob, a talented, award-winning florist and event planner who enjoys decorating for special events and weddings. He’s been in business 15 years. “Every day my audience is at a different location. Some days it’s decorating an office building, a community center, and sometimes it’s the beach!” Bob’s favorite event is the annual Leesburg Chamber of Commerce Gala, which he loves having the freedom to be creative. “Last year the event was sold out before the invitations were printed,” Bob says. “It’s become the event of the year that people look forward to and that just touches my heart.”

054 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

MichaelSparks OWNER

Central Florida Roof Rescue 407.484.1185 centralflroofrescue.com

A veteran-owned business, Central Florida Roof Rescue is ready whenever you need their services. Owner, Mike Sparks has served more than 18 years in the U.S. Army and is still in the Army reserves. Mike is a certified Roofing contractor and a part time Firefighter/EMT. “We are a family business, our goal is to serve the community with our services, and help people along the way,” he says. “I decided to take what I’ve learned through the years and make a better company.” Central FL Roof Rescue does all types of roofing projects including repairs, commercial, residential and insurance. We are here to assist any and all needs. Customer satisfaction is the ultimate goal.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 055


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

Dr.

Birendra Bhattarai INTERNAL MEDICINE

Aegis Medical Group Lakeview Healthcare System

8135 Centralia Court, #101, Leesburg 34748 / 352.394.8060 18540 U.S. Hwy. 441, Mount Dora 32757 / 352.383.1667 aegismedicalgroup.com Dr. Birendra Bhattarai never turns away someone in need, whether it’s treating patients who lack insurance or raising $20,000 for earthquake victims in his native Nepal. After graduating from medical school in Nepal, Dr. Bhattarai completed his residency at Nassau Medical Center in Long Island, New York. He has practiced internal medicine and geriatrics in Florida since 2007. “My philosophy for patients is, ‘I’m your doctor, but you know best how you’re feeling,’” Dr. Bhattarai says. “It’s a trust relationship where we can help each other. I tell them, ‘Help me to help you.’” His top priority is providing access to health care, and he hopes to establish a local institution to help people in need. “I tell patients to call, click, or come—either call or click on our website or come to our office so we can provide the service that is needed,” Dr. Bhattarai says. “Just because you can’t afford to come see me, do not stop coming to see me, because your health is more important than anything else.” He works with his wife, Rashmee Pokharel, a nurse practitioner and leader in telehealth medicine, and they have a son, Nishchay, 11, and a daughter, Shreya, 7. When he’s not spending time with his family, Dr. Bhattarai is pursuing his other passion in life: golf.

056 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 057


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

L

MichaelFrymier CEO

Computer Corner

205 W. North Blvd., Leesburg 352.460.1155 / computercornerfl.com Tradition dictated that Michael Frymier would own a business—so have his uncles, cousins, and inspirational late grandfather, Don Martin. With a gift for technology, he started working professionally with computers at 15 and opened Computer Corner straight out of high school. “I’m completely self-taught. I learned everything from trial and error, and it really is the best way to learn, from real, practical experience,” he says. Michael works with his wife, Samantha, and manager Alex Flick to provide computer repair, networking, IT services for small businesses, and superior customer service. “I go above and beyond to make sure our customers are happy,” Michael says. “I will lose money before losing a customer, and not many business owners will take that stance.” He must be doing something right: “I got the greatest compliment the other day, someone saying, ‘Your grandfather would be proud.’”

058 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


S

ESS ME

N

M E

BU

IN

OF STY

Chris Kessler John Theeck

L

Aaron Perry ORIENTAL MEDICINE

CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN

CLINICAL DIRECTOR

Legacy Clinic

1950 Laurel Manor Dr., The Villages 352.259.0024 / legacyclinicofchiropractic.com Legacy Clinic is an award-winning practice located in the heart of The Villages, which offers extremely successful alternative health treatments. Dr. Theeck who started the clinic in 2010, oversees a dedicated staff that includes chiropractic physicians, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Dr. Kessler is a Titleist Performance Institute Certified Chiropractor, specializing in how the human body functions in relation to the golf swing. With the recent addition of Dr. Perry, who is a certified homeopathic injection doctor, Legacy Clinic now offers acupuncture and class 4 laser therapy treatments, along with all-natural injections for pain. The injections are a great alternative to more conventional pain shots without the side effects.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 059


S S ME E N N I

M E

US

THANK YOU TO THE SPONSORS OF THE 2019

OF ST

L Y

decor

Events by Miss Daisy

stylist

Renew Day Spa

props

Good Ol’ Times Cigars & Lounge, Leesburg 060 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


MEDICARE

A D VA N TA G E

BlueMedicare means more savings Florida’s Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plan

0 $0 $0 $

Our Florida Blue HMO plans received Medicare’s highest rating of 5 out of 5 stars for 2019

monthly premiums on most BlueMedicareSM Advantage plans primary care doctor copays

preventive and wellness care

Get dental, vision and hearing benefits at

NO EXTRA COST

Switch to one of our 5-star HMO plans now! No need to wait for Open Enrollment. Enjoy benefits * that include: • Predictable out-of-pocket costs • Medicare-approved Part D prescription drug coverage • Dental, hearing and vision coverage at no additional cost • Free SilverSneakers® Fitness membership

A Florida Blue agent can help you find the right plan and enroll.

Call today! (352) 259-0666 Mid Florida Agencies LOCAL office in Lake, Sumter & Marion Counties!! *Not all benefits are available in all BlueMedicare plans. Florida Blue HMO is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Florida Blue HMO depends on contract renewal. HMO coverage is offered by Health Options, Inc., DBA Florida Blue HMO, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Tivity Health, SilverSneakers and SilverSneakers FLEX are registered trademarks or trademarks of Tivity Health, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or other countries. Every year, Medicare evaluates plans based on a 5-star rating system. Applicable to 2019 BlueMedicare HMO plans on contract H1035. We comply with applicable Federal civil rights laws and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or gender. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-800-352-2583 (TTY: 1-877-955-8773). ATANSYON: Si w pale Kreyòl Ayisyen, gen sèvis èd pou lang ki disponib gratis pou ou. Rele 1-800-352-2583 (TTY: 1-800-955-8770). © 2019 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., DBA Florida Blue. All rights reserved. Y0011_95238_M 0219 CMS Accepted


WE’RE GROWING! Great People. Great Bank. 12 Convenient Locations. USB Wildwood Branch Opening Summer 2019 1017 S. Main Street, Wildwood

www.unitedsouthernbank.com

More women die each year from complications following hip fractures than from breast cancer At UNOVA Health, we are focused on the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, with the goal of reducing fractures and preventing patients from dying from a fracture. Call (352) 561-3683 to schedule an appointment for osteoporosis evaluation.

TM

Follow Unova Health Clinic on Facebook for more information. 062 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

U

H E

OV

SM

L T H

539 Rolling Acres Road | Lady Lake UnovaHealth.com


Your Solution to Social Media

Social Media Management Over 700 billion minutes are being spent monthly on Facebook alone, making social media the most powerful venue for engagement. Allow Akers Media to evaluate your business, discover where your key customers are and develop and plan to grow your business through social media management.

Call us today for a free consultation

352.787.4112

akersmediagroup.com


Your health. Your time.

Our priority. • Minor Medical Emergencies • Comprehensive Primary Care • Disease Management • Osteopathic Screenings & Treatment • Annual Wellness Exams • Health & Wellness Seminars

WE CREATE THE

BLUEPRINT FOR YOUR COMPANY’S

SUCCESS T O E L E VAT E Y O U R B U S I N E S S,

VISIT THEFLB.COM

• Same Day Appointments

John Joseph Im, D.O. Graduate of Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine Internship at Weill Medical College of Cornell University Residency at Seton Hall University

847.340.9487 Kathleen M. Bogolin, CPA

352.391.5200 ExceptionalUrgentCare.com

064 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

Profitability Coach


M E E T T H E D O C S AT

ET H ERED GE CH I ROP RACT IC I M P R O V I N G PAT I E N T Q UA L I T Y O F L I F E S I N C E 1 9 8 9 W W W. E C D O C T O R S . C O M

Dr. Etheredge

A lifelong L eesburg native who has dedicated more than 30-years to specializing in the personaliz ed treatment of back and neck pain, and joint disorders. “O ur goal is to get patients out of pain as quickl y as possible and return them to the dail y activities they love.”

Dr. Paul

A long-time F loridian and avid golfer who loves seeing the positive impact chiropractic care has on her patients. “ We specializ e in effectivel y assessing, diagnosing and treating your musculoskeletal conditions to get you bac k in the game quickl y.”

CHIROPRACTIC CARE WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH The most trusted chiropractic technique and expertise based on 30-years of experience. Our patients receive the highest standards of chiropractic care within a safe, effective and preventative manner. We treat with improved function as our goal. SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

THE VILLAGES

910 Old Camp Rd. Bldg 110 // 352.750.1200 FRUITLAND PARK

3261 US HWY 441/27 // 352.365.1191

ecdoctors.com


Celebrating 20 years 1998-2018 Specializing in: • Mini Face and Neck Lift with Smartlipo of Neck and Jowls • Xeomin/Botox/Belotero/Radiesse Facial Enhancements • Direct Neck Lift • Torn Earlobe Repair • Smartlipo (Laser Assisted Liposuction) • Abdominoplasty (Tummy Tuck) • Arm Lift • Thigh Lift • Body Contouring After Weight Loss • Breast Augmentation • Breast Reduction and Lift • Skin Cancer Removal and Reconstruction


FEATURING

QUIET STORM

Motown moved from Detroit around the world. GOING HOME Being discharged from a hospital needs more than paperwork. PLUS

A LOVE OF TREES Dan Kincaid loved his years as a forester.

AI AND HOSPITALS Apple isn’t always a fruit.


MEET A VILLAGER

Second nature Former ranger Dan Kincaid sees the forest and the trees. STORY: PAULA F. HOWARD

≈ PHOTO: NICOLE HAMEL

he forests are peaceful for me,” says Villager Dan Kincaid, a professional forester for 31 years with the U.S. Forest Service. Born in West Virginia, where he grew up loving the outdoors, Dan followed in the footsteps of his grandfather, father, and uncle, all of whom were outdoorsmen. He and his wife, Vicki, met in high school and moved to the Village of Dunedin five years ago after Dan retired. Dan earned a Bachelor Of Science

degree in forest management from West Virginia University, and a master’s degree in forestry and environmental management from Duke University in North Carolina. “Becoming a forester requires a four-year degree and lots of science, botany, chemistry, and other environmental studies,” he says. “Many don’t realize how much a forester must know about the environment, soil conservation, and nature. It’s more than a job, it’s a calling.” Beginning by fighting forest fires, Dan served in his home state, then worked in Minnesota, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Ohio before retirement in Florida, where he’s been writing books. Two of his most recent releases are aimed at educating young people about protecting and managing the natural resources of this country’s national forests through his story of “Kade Holley, Forest Ranger: Volumes I and II.” Dan and his wife love The Villages because of the warm winters and all the activities. He plays a lot of softball while she’s into a variety of crafts. But there’s life outside The Villages, too. “Vicki and I travel north to the mountains to ‘detox’ from Florida life,” Dan says. After three decades as a forester, Dan has some advice about the environment. “Nature is your friend and national forests are true gems,” he says. “Enjoy them as much as you can!”

To learn about hiking trails in local preserves the Lake County Water Authority’s website at lcwa.org.

2 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19

Visit


Medical, Cosmetic, and Surgical Dermatology

Pamper yourself with our anti-aging treatments customized to meet all your skin’s needs. •

PRP for Hair Loss

Derma-Planing

Mirco-Needling with PRP

Non-Surgical Face Lift

Facials

Micro-Needling

Chemical Peels

Micro-Dermabrasion

Botox & Fillers

Lightwave Therapy

Accepting new patients Call to make an appoinment today OF THE BEST

352.350.5230 | macinnisdermatology.com HOTLIST2018 The Villages | Leesburg | Mount Dora

OF THE BEST

OF THE BEST

WINNER

HOTLIST FINALIST

HOTLIST

Events by Miss Daisy Let us plan your event!

Weddings

Birthdays

Luncheons

Anniversaries

Corporate Parties

Miss Daisy’s Flowers & Gifts

“Whatever Your Occasion, Let Miss Daisy’s Make It Special!”

1024 W. Main Street Leesburg, FL

352.787.6806

www.MissDaisysFlowers.c om

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 3


IN THE VILLAGES

Eight words that can save your life! Safety with car services is all in the name. STORY: JOE ANGIONE

t’s obvious that words matter. Words have great power. The right combination of words even can save your life; or, if left unsaid, could end your life. A couple of months ago, a University of South Carolina coed was waiting for an Uber ride after a late-night party. A car came for her, but it wasn’t sent by Uber. Without thinking, the girl got in and, a short time later, the driver murdered her for reasons unknown. She made a terrible mistake. The use of ride services like Uber and Lyft are so common now that after placing an order for a ride, most people think that when

4 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19

a car shows up, it’s the Uber or Lyft service they ordered. What happened to this young woman should help you realize such an assumption can be fatal. According to one security expert, when a ride comes to pick you up, you should first ask the driver for two vital pieces of information; a total of eight short words that can save your life: “Tell me my name.” “Tell me your name.” Orders for car services are made on an app you load into your smartphone. The apps used by both Uber and Lyft give you immediate information about the car being sent for you, including its make, model, color, license plate number, and the driver’s name. Lyft even sends you a photo of the driver. The driver will know your first name, as it appears on your

ride-service account, your pickup location, and where you want to be driven. That’s plenty of information to make you feel confident the person picking you up is a bona fide car service driver. Depending on the time of day, the weather and other conditions, you might not be able to verify all of these details. But the most important thing to remember is asking those two quick questions: Tell me my name. Tell me your name. Eight words that can save your life. Car services that began in the nation’s big cities have now spread to The Villages, where residents are among the most trusting in the world. Remember, when ordering a ride, you must suspend your trust until you say the eight words that tell you it’s safe to trust. Don’t rush and put your life in jeopardy.


The ultimate ED treatment Alpha Wave Health Centers is changing men’s lives. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

rectile dysfunction, or ED, is likely to strike all men at one time or another during their lives. Though ED can occur at all ages, it becomes more common as men age. The primary cause of ED is restricted blood flow to the penis. Restoring normal, healthy blood flow is vital to restoring healthy function. Men now can have their ED treated without surgery, drugs, or side effects at Alpha Wave Health Centers, an Alpha Medical Group company with offices in Leesburg, Jacksonville, Palm Coast, and Farmington, Connecticut. The practice offers an innovative treatment called Acoustic Pressure Wave Therapy, or APWT. With the use of a small handheld device, energy from acoustic waves moves through tissue, gently dissolving plaque that restricts blood flow, activating stem cells that cause veins to regenerate and new blood vessels to grow, and promoting nerve growth that gives men greater sensitivity and more enjoyment.

“The acoustic waves trigger or stimulate cell growth and tissue growth in the penis,” says Dr. John Ligeon, an internal medicine specialist at Alpha Wave Health Centers in Leesburg. “Because it’s acoustic waves, it doesn’t involve prescription medications or surgical interaction. Most people who have done this procedure see this lack of invasiveness as the big difference between other methods of treating erection difficulty.” During therapy, clinicians use an ultrasound probe to target different areas of the penis and near the groin and send acoustic wave pulsations, Dr. Ligeon says. The procedure is completely non-invasive and non-surgical. Each treatment generally lasts about 20 minutes. There are no needles, no bruising and no side effects. The procedure also requires no down time—patients are encouraged to have sex the same day of the treatment. Success is defined as any improvement at all, and APWT has a success rate of more than 80 percent. “The results are very favorable,” Dr. Ligeon says. “The majority of the patients have positive results even if they have risk factors.”

Dr. John Ligeon

An Alpha Medical Group Company

352.816.1901 / 4120 Corley Island Road, Leesburg / AlphaWaveHealth.com

Some of the risk factors for ED include cardiovascular and heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure or cholesterol, and kidney disease. Dr. Ligeon joined Alpha Wave Health Centers in 2018 after hearing about APWT. Other treatments he had used on patients included pills or injections that come with inherent risks of side effects or complications from drug interactions. “I was looking for ways to fix the problem but take away many or all of the risks or side effects,” he says. “When I heard about Acoustic Pressure Wave Therapy essentially being risk-free, it intrigued me.” Patients such as Collin M. also were intrigued by the treatment: “I don’t usually discuss my personal life. But this treatment is so amazing, I’m going to tell all my friends about it. Visiting your clinic is the best choice I’ve ever made. I only wish I had known about it years ago.” Gerald F., 70, also enjoyed amazing results: “It has been nine years since I could get and maintain an erection. I heard about APWT and decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did. Thank you for giving me my life back.”

Dr. Scott Hollington


money . st me , shop whe

The distinct musical sound created in Detroit has been heard around the world. STORY: PAULA F. HOWARD


top in the name of love p around , please mr. po ere did our love go , my

T

he phone rang and I answered as I usually did, “Hello.” “Hi, this is Smokey Robinson, Jayne Kennedy asked me to call,” said a deep and friendly voice. It was 1972 and I was a radio DJ for WHOA Radio Capital in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Smokey, a star songwriter and performer for Motown Records, was in town for a gig at one of the luxury hotels. It was easy to connect with celebrity talent then, before the world went crazy with security needs. We talked for about 15 minutes, and I think now, if I’d had a three-way connection on a cellphone, I could have connected to my radio station with the on-air personality. But, in 1972, the mobile phone was a year away from being invented and three-way calling was still a dream, while I had a legend on my phone. Smokey was leader of the Miracles, the first act under contract (originally signed as the Matadors) to Motown Records. The company was the dream of songwriter Berry Gordy, and it changed the course of musical history. Robinson was its vice president. This year, Motown Records is celebrating its 60th anniversary and a history of a phenomenal cultural exchange that helped heal a racially divided country and whose influence is still felt today. Berry introduced such artists as the Supremes with Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, and Marvin Gaye while becoming one of the most successful moguls in the world of pop and rock ’n’ roll. He also found the Temptations, the Jackson 5 featuring Michael Jackson, Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, Gladys Knight & the Pips, Lionel Richie & the Commodores, and many more. Together, they had well over 180 No. 1 songs worldwide, according to motownmuseum.org. In The Villages, residents have fond memories of the music that many of them listened to as youngsters. “Loved Motown music,” says Claire Rahn, of the Village of Gilchrist. “It has survived the test of time. ‘Stop in the Name of Love’ is a classic favorite.”

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 7


oney . stop in the name round , please mr. post irl, money . stop in the n Villagers can enjoy a musical trip down memory lane with “Forever Motown,” coming June 10 to the Savannah Center, 1545 Buena Vista Blvd. Shows are at 5pm and 8pm. Straight from Las Vegas, the high-energy production features eight vocalists and a live band performing nearly 30 songs from the Motown era. Tickets are available at Villages box offices and thevillagesentertainment.com. “Forever” started with a humble moment in time. With an $800 family loan, Berry established Tamla Records on Jan. 12, 1959, and bought a house at 2648 W. Grand Blvd. in Detroit, making it his Hitsville, U.S.A., office, according to billboard.com. He and his wife lived on the second floor, and the garage became a small recording studio with the first-floor kitchen a control room for the real work. Falling back on his experiences on the assembly line at Detroit’s Lincoln-Mercury auto plant, Berry wanted to “create a place where a kid

8 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19

off the street could walk in one door, an unknown, go through the process, and come out another door, a star,” according to motownmuseum.org. The first record released by the company was Marv Johnson’s “Come to Me” on Jan. 21, 1959. However, a song co-written by Berry, “Money (That’s What I Want),” was the first major hit. A year later, Smokey and the Miracles put the company on the map with its first million-record seller, “Shop Around,” the museum website states. Between 1960 and 1970, Smokey put out 26 top-40 hits with the Miracles as lead singer, chief songwriter, and producer. Meanwhile, the creative Gordy knew Detroit as “Motor City” but changed “city” to “town” to give the name a friendly, homegrown flavor. The convergence of Motor Town became Motown and on April 14, 1960, he incorporated his business as Motown Record Corporation and history was made. In 1961, Motown released the Marvelettes’ No. 1 pop song, “Please Mr. Postman.” That same year, two other groups, the Supremes and the Temptations, signed to Motown. The company blossomed under a string of consecutive No. 1 hits beginning with the Supremes’ “Where Did

Our Love Go” to the Temptations’ classic “My Girl.” Within seven years, Motown expanded to seven neighboring houses. By the end of 1966, Motown had 450 employees and was grossing $20 million. “My wife and I danced to Motown at our senior prom in 1967,” says Dan Kincaid, of the Village of Dunedin. “I have a jukebox of it in my house right now!” Berry’s dream was to make music for everyone in the world, so he set his sights on television and movies. He booked his artists on “American Bandstand” and “The Ed Sullivan Show.” The Supremes were the first R&B act to play New York’s Copacabana club, which opened doors to venues around the world, motownmuseum.org states. The 1960s are remembered for many historic events, but Motown brought rhythm and blues and soul music to the forefront with its distinctive sound. Much of the African-American music of the time had roots in gospel and blues, but Berry pulled artists away from that trend with catchy pop lyrics, giving the music its own style. Under his influence, singers and songwriters brought African-American popular


e of love , come to me , tman , where did our lo name of love , come to music to a new level where it would not be dismissed as minority taste. “That music energized me,” says Phyllis Walters, of the Village of Summerhill. “It was a reprieve from the duress of college classes.” Today, Motown is synonymous with African-American capitalism, pride, and self-expression, and recognized as having produced some of the greatest talent under one company name anywhere. In the late 1980s and ’90s, all of Motown’s major artists were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Berry was inducted in 1988. A man of vision, talent, drive and determination, he created a world of love for everyone and the “Motown Sound” is loved by millions around the world. Berry moved Motown headquarters in 1972 to Los Angeles. Today, the label is part of the Universal Music Group with its classic recorded music catalog managed by Universal Music Enterprises. Motown songs from 1959 to 1985 are represented, according to motownmuseum.org. In April, CBS aired “Motown 60: A Grammy Celebration,” a

concert co-hosted by Smokey and featuring Motown legends such as Diana Ross and Stevie Wonder. During the show, Berry said he wanted his label to bring people together from all walks of life through “a legacy of love.” “My dream came true,” he told the capacity crowd. So, what about Jayne Kennedy, my friend who connected me to Smokey? While in high school in 1970, she was the first African-American woman to win the Miss Ohio beauty pageant. She married the following year, and Smokey was best man at her wedding. She went on to become a model, actress, and one of the first female sportscasters on “The NFL Today.” But when we met in Puerto Rico, she was touring as one of the Dinga-Ling Sisters on “The Dean Martin Show.” Being thoughtful, she asked Smokey to call me when he was in town, and he did. My conversation is only a memory for me, but it happened. Just small talk; he was doing his friend Jayne a favor because she asked. Nice people.

MUSICAL NOTES ABOUT MOTOWN The singers from Motown were also known for their unique choreography. Outside the United States, the company was known as Tamla Motown. Berry Gordy has written or co-written many well-known songs, including “Do You Love Me?” by the Contours, and “Jump” by Kris Kross. Martha Reeves worked as a secretary at the record company before breaking out with Martha and the Vandellas. Motown was the first commercial record company in the U.S. owned by an African-American. Smokey Robinson named his children Tamla and Berry after the record label and its founder. 110 top-10 hits came from Motown between 1961 and 1971. Source: flyingmusic.com

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 9


AFTERCARE

Success Better post-discharge follow-up creates a win-win for providers and patients alike. STORY: JOY STEPHENSON-LAWS

10 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19


recent study by Boston University School of Medicine reinforces how discharge planning can reduce readmission rates while increasing patient health and satisfaction. It also clearly demonstrates the importance of ongoing physician involvement in aftercare in ensuring the success of discharge plans. In the usual process, a physician develops the discharge plans but doesn’t make a home visit or continue to actively monitor a patient after discharge. But in this particular study, researchers found when resident physicians visit the homes of former hospital patients, they can better assess patient needs and understand the role community services and agencies play in keeping patients out of the hospital. A key element of the follow-up is a review of the original discharge plan to determine how effective it is. The major takeaway from this study was improved assessment of patient needs and development of more personalized discharge plans, including medication reconciliation and caregiver communications, which are keys to successful transitions. While this study focused on older adults, the approach could be used to improve services for younger patients. Another study, reported by the National Institutes of Health, suggested better discharge-planning quality is associated with lower rates of hospital readmissions for patients treated for heart failure, pneumonia, and partial or total hip replacement. There are two key challenges for enhancing discharge planning follow-up. One is operational and the other, as expected, is financial. Many providers cannot devote staff time to data collection, training, and other logistical management required to ensure a successful discharge. On the financial side, there is still some uncertainty about

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 11


the exact return-on-investment of more comprehensive follow-up on discharge plans. Anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that they do result in a net cost saving. Another important element to consider is that discharge planning should be viewed as a key element of the continuum of care. This type of approach tends to be more interdisciplinary with an integrated team of primary care physicians, hospitalists, pharmacists, physical therapists, community-based organizations, and the patient’s personal caregivers. Remember, there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all approach to post-discharge planning. Providers can, and should, develop approaches for the most effective—both in terms of cost and outcome—plans for their unique needs and patient population. Here are some steps providers can take to enhance postdischarge planning:

Get creative. Tailor the discharge instructions to fit the needs of individual patients and limit “medical speak.” One provider in West Virginia, for example, realized some older patients couldn’t read scales, which is important for heart-failure patients to monitor fluid retention. The solution? Patients were told to try on their best shoes every morning. If the shoes fit, they were doing well. If they didn’t, patients likely were retaining fluid and needed to call their doctor.

Involve caregivers. The Caregiver Advise, Record and Enable Act, enacted in a majority of states, requires providers to involve caregivers and family members in discharge planning. Complying with this law pays dividends as evidenced by some providers reporting up to a 25 percent reduction in the risk of older patients being readmitted. Make medication a focus and not an adjunct. More than half of medication errors affecting more than 1.5 million people occur during care transition. Reports say almost half of all patients have a clinically significant medication error within a month of discharge. Clearly, patients and caregivers must be properly educated about medications given upon discharge.

Tap volunteer and community support. Most providers have a community volunteer corps that helps with operational tasks. Consider expanding that network to conducting follow-up with patients after discharge or creating a post-discharge call center.

Pilot a variety of approaches. Academic institutions and health-care organizations offer a wide variety of discharge planning tools and models. Study these resources to identify what might work. Once identified, initiate a pilot program to customize the plan. Look beyond medical issues. Other issues include transportation to a doctor or pharmacy, safe housing, and community resources for social and other needs.

Adequately account for the cost of proper discharge services in the chargemaster. Include the added costs associated with enhanced discharge planning in the total price charged for medical services. The chargemaster is generally where the official rates for the various procedures and services from the hospital is located. It is also the basis for receiving payment from governmental and commercial payors.

To be successful, post-discharge planning and patient education must go beyond a routine, cursory meeting at discharge. By taking a more wholistic, integrated, and transitional approach to this critical element of hospital care, providers create a true victory for themselves, patients, and their communities.

About the writer

Joy Stephenson-Laws is founding and managing partner of Stephenson, Acquisto, and Colman, a leader in health-care reimbursement law.

12 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19


BOOK CLUB

‘News of the World’ By Paulette Jiles. This book featuring Captain Kidd soon may be a film starring Tom Hanks. STORY: DIANE DEAN

ews of the World” begins in 1870 in a northern Texas town. Captain Kidd travels from town to town to read newspapers to crowds who pay their dime to hear stories from far-off places. Author Paulette Jiles’ book traverses the journey of the captain and Johanna, the young girl he is charged with transporting 400 miles across Texas. After being kidnapped as a child, she became so immersed in the Indian culture she had great difficulty in re-assimilating to the white man’s world. The girl and the old man encounter outlaws, cowboys, soldiers, and more Indians, all on a mission to hinder their journey. When Johanna is delivered to distant relatives in a town near San Antonio,

she is treated horribly. Kep-dun, as Johanna calls Captain Kidd, rescues her from this slavery. Lisa French, formerly of Texas, ably facilitated the Bookworm Book Club discussion with her knowledge of Texas history and her homegrown accent. We learned of the economy, politics, geography, German heritage, and life on the range. All of these were factors in the storyline of the book. This popular book club selection is fictional yet accurate in the descriptions of the late 1800s in Texas. The book is in development to become a movie through Fox 2000. It is easy to picture the authenticity actor Tom Hanks will bring to life in his role as the captain. An important message of the book is evident as Captain Kidd reflects on his purpose: “Maybe life is just carrying news. Surviving to carry the news. Maybe we have just one message…but it must be carried by hand through a life, all the way, and at the end handed over, sealed.”

Ready to delve into this book?

A 2016 National Book Award finalist, this highly acclaimed book can be found at amazon.com and goodreads.com

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 13


LIVING HEALTHY

Apple, PC, HD, DM No, we are talking about health care. STORY: DR. JOSHUA MANSOUR

14 /

VSTYLE • JUN '19

was in the hospital when I heard the word apple. Without hesitating, I reached into my pocket to see if I had my phone. By the way, they were talking about the fruit, not the product. This got me thinking, has technology and our products now become more important than our health? Technology surrounds us and has become a large part of how we live on a daily basis. I’m not saying that technology and its progression and evolution is all bad, but certain aspects may pose a health risk. I mean, I am writing this article on my laptop right now to try to reach out and help others. Technology has served many positive aspects and revolutionized how we take care of patients today. The old adage is “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This still may remain true but in a different light. People have become so preoccupied with their gadgets that they are not taking the time to take care of themselves, let alone visit a doctor. If I was to write the word apple on a piece of paper then ask someone about the word, I bet many people would think I was talking about the company. You wouldn’t think I was talking about the fruit that boasts antioxidants and fiber and may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure, stroke, cholesterol, and diabetes. Oh, diabetes you say?  If I was to do the same thing with the letters DM, a person would be quicker to think I was talking about direct messaging someone on Instagram than diabetes mellitus. This disease, caused by an elevated level of glucose in your body, can lead to kidney disease, nerve damage, high blood pressure, eye problems, strokes, sexual health issues, and even HD. That’s HD, as in heart disease, not the high-definition screen that many people spend hours a day watching. Ironically, sitting for hours in front of an HD screen eventually may lead to the other type of HD. There actually is an increase in risk with sedentary behavior, such as sitting for prolonged hours in front of your HD television, and heart disease. Though the screen is now high definition, your eyesight is not. Increased screen time can lead to a multitude of visual defects including, myopia (near-sidedness), retinal damage, eye strain, and blurred vision—the opposite of high definition—not to mention the headaches, neck, shoulder, and back strain associated with sitting and staring in the same position for hours at a time. While technology in many ways has given us greater access to information and improved communication,


our obsession with it may have detrimental effects on our health. Many of us use a personal computer (PC) every day, but when was the last time that we saw a PC (primary care) doctor? The World Health Organization posted an article over a decade ago warning people that a sedentary lifestyle can be one of the top 10 leading causes of death and disability in the world. Physical inactivity as a whole not only increases mortality

EXTRA! EXTRA! just 20 minutes of brisk walking each day improves circulation and lowers blood pressure according to Johns Hopkins Medicine.

but can severely increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Physical inactivity can lead to poor diet and nutrition as well. It’s a slippery slope with a downward spiral that studies show can even increase your risk of cancer. The America Cancer Society indicates that about one-fifth of all cancer deaths in the United States annually are linked to excess body weight, poor diet, excessive alcohol intake, and decreased physical

For other exercise ideas and health tips

activity. Although there are genetic factors as well as cellular factors that continue to be discovered as playing a role, there is no denying that a healthy diet and physical activity contribute to cancer prevention. Instead of being outdoors, while indoors locked to our computer screens, we risk vitamin D deficiency, which was recently linked to an increase in cancer as well as, again, an inactive and sedentary lifestyle. While sitting indoors, many of us eat processed food or snack on food with high levels of nitrates or sodium, which are linked to several deleterious health effects, including cancer. At the same time, we bingeeat while multitasking on our devices and lose sight of portion control. As I said, it’s a slippery slope. So, the next time you find yourself spending too much time in front of a screen, think about your health and what you may be doing to your body. After all, we each get only one.

Visit hopkinsmedicine.org

JUN'19 • VSTYLE

/ 15


A Lasting Memory It is our goal to help you say goodbye to your special friend in the most caring and understanding way.

“A way to provide the respect and loyalty after death that your pet freely gave in life�

Central Florida Pet Crematory has been serving Lake and Marion Counties since 2002.

Lisa Elliott

Crematory Director

352.307.2256 // 10725 SE 36th Ave www.cflpetcrematory.com


Ignore What You’ve Heard

Contrary to what many believe, insurance may cover your hearing aids.

If you’re covered by: • BCBS Federal Employee • Empire Plan • UAW • Freedom Health • United Healthcare you may have benefits to take advantage of this year.

Call Today For Your FREE Hearing Screening & Consultation.* *Excludes diagnostic hearing test

352.728.2404 LakeENTHearing.com T H E V I L L AG E S • L E E S B U R G • TAVA R E S


U N N OT I C E D

068 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


Linemen head into danger to ensure public safety, and some believe they deserve recognition as first responders. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 069


torms, hurricanes, vehicle crashes, and fires are life-threatening events, and linemen often are the first to respond in adverse conditions to deenergize power lines and make an accident scene safe for firefighters, police, and paramedics to do their jobs. Linemen are first responders’ heroes. They are part of an elite group—less than 1 percent of the population are line installers and repairers—who climb poles and work with thousands of volts of electricity high atop power lines, often in extreme outdoor conditions, in an effort to keep electricity flowing to homes, businesses, hospitals, traffic lights, and other facilities. Many people give little thought to the work linemen do or the hazards they face. It’s not until there’s a loss of electricity, internet service, cable television, and video games for the kids that people start thinking about their power company. “Their work is highly complex and dangerous,” says Al Minner, city manager for Leesburg, which operates its own electric department. “They are highly trained and very technical people, and for the most part, their work generally goes unnoticed. But, when the storms come, they are the last ones to take shelter and the first ones out after an event to make sure energy is restored. I cannot brag enough on our linemen and what a great job they do for our community.”

LINEMEN ON THE JOB Born and raised in Eustis, Cody Ellis, 30, lives in Mount Plymouth and has worked as a lineman for Duke Energy in Apopka for the past seven years. He spoke to more than 120 Lake and Sumter counties high school students about his profession during the recent National Line Workers Appreciation Day hosted at the Sumterville campus of Lake-Sumter State College.

Cody Ellis and two coworkers advance to the 2019 International Linemen’s Rodeo after winning first place statewide.

That’s the site of the Energy Utility Institute, where an overhead pole line and underground electrical power systems operations and maintenance are available for LSSC students to gain a wide range of knowledge and functional skills to work in the electric utility industry. Duke Energy, SECO Energy, and the city of Leesburg are partners in the training program. “When I came through the program, I didn’t know a whole lot about the industry. It opened my eyes. I had to learn how to climb and to troubleshoot,” Cody says, calling his profession “a lifestyle” and an opportunity to make a six-figure income without a four-year degree.


Cody Ellis

“THERE’S A HARD WORK ETHIC IN THIS FIELD AND IT TEACHES YOU TO TAKE PRIDE IN THE TRADE AND TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR WORK.”

Photos: Anthony Rao

— C O DY E L L I S

“We are out there making it safe so the cops and firemen can get through the roads and make sure the wires are dead. Cars hit poles almost every day, and the first responders won’t help you until we make sure it’s safe for them to go in,” he says, adding linemen can average 500 to 1,000 hours in overtime a year, depending on how many service calls they answer. “We have to maintain 40 percent of the calls. Four out of 10 calls we have to answer per contract,” adds Cody, who grew up hunting and fishing, and relishes being able to work outdoors. He will be making his fourth trip to the International Lineman’s Rodeo Oct. 18-19 in Bonner Springs, Kansas, with

Chase Rich and Tim West as part of the three-member Duke Energy linemen team representing the Sunshine State. Cody missed attending two other rodeos because of hurricanes. “Our team won this year for Florida, so we are headed back to Kansas again. It’s a good time, fun, and a big family event,” Cody says. The rodeo will feature 300 apprentices and 200 linemen teams from all over the world performing traditional lineman tasks and skills as they compete in the “hurt man rescue,” a pole climb based on speed, and two mystery events. “In the speed climb, there is a little bucket with an egg in it, and you climb a 40-foot pole,

hang the bucket, put the egg in your mouth, and climb back down as fast as you can without cracking the egg,” Cody says. “We don’t know the mystery events until we show up.” While winning competitions is a thrill, taking pride in the job is his first priority. “There’s a hard work ethic in this field and it teaches you to take pride in the trade and take pride in your work,” he says. “I try to pass that on to the guys I train.” Cody is appreciative of public support during hurricanes and power outages. “Sometimes kids run up and give us water, soda, and little things that they make and sign, and that really means a lot to us,” he says.

Lineman Brant Duke, 22, of Leesburg, works for the city of Leesburg Utilities. He was taking a math class at Lake-Sumter State College and was unsure what he wanted to do with his life. “I saw this program, and I knew I liked to work outside Brant Duke

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 071


Tim Sullivan

and work with my hands. I decided to give it a shot, and I fell in love with it,” says Brant, who was praised by his instructors for his work ethic, willingness to learn, and his quick ability to climb poles. “The city of Leesburg Utilities is one of the best utilities out there,” he says. “They give you good balance of plenty of work and also give you time to enjoy what your money can buy you. It’s an excellent place to work.” Brant was working for Leesburg during Hurricane Irma in September 2017 and repaired downed poles. He also went to South Carolina to restore power after Hurricane Florence in September 2018 and found residents were appreciative. “When we were riding through town, we had a convoy of utility trucks, and we were getting a lot of waves,” he says. A lineman for 20 years, Chad Duncan, 47, of Ocklawaha, works for Duke Energy, covering Highway 40 in Ocala down to Highway 50 in Clermont, “from one side of the state to the other.” Being a lineman is in his blood. “My whole family is in the electrical business; my brother also works for Duke, and my father works for Sumter Electric,” he says. “The time that really stands out is the 2004 hurricanes for how long we worked, and everything was a stumbling block. We worked 16-hour days for what seemed like a month straight.” Restoring power after consecutive hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne was tedious. “It can be a real time-consuming job with a lot of time away from your family,” Chad says of the drawbacks, along with working in the hot summer heat. However, Chad is quick to say he enjoys his work. “Everything is always changing so you’re learning something new all the time,” he says. “It’s a good career and a pretty lucrative living. You’re not going to get rich, but you’re not going to be broke, either.”

The median annual wage for electrical power-line installers and repairers in May 2018 was $70,910, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “I tell the students if you are a journeyman lineman in this world today and if you’re not making six figures then you don’t want to,” says Tim Sullivan, a Villages resident and lead instructor of the LSSC energy programs at the Sumterville campus. “One of the ways you get there is answering the phone when it rings.” Tim was an upstate New York lineman for 25 years and traveled around the country restoring power, often after ice storms. He later became the boss and had 130 linemen under his command in Syracuse, New York, before retiring from National Grid. “Once you get the job in your bloodstream, it’s not just a job, it’s a life,” he says.

Tim is pleased to have seen 120 students gain jobs with utilities after going through the LSSC program to learn about transformers, overhead construction, underground systems, troubleshooting, climbing poles, and a heavy course on safety. The college hopes to add a commercial driver’s license program by fall to complement the line program. “The industry is so in need of workers,” Tim says of replacing an aging workforce. He believes athletic young men in good shape are ideal candidates, even though a 46-year-old is currently going through the LSSC program, and a 42-year-old was hired a few years ago. “It’s not age as much as ability,” Tim adds of students hired by city- or governmentowned utilities, cooperatives, and investor-owned utilities. “Companies do a skills test. Most people who come through our program pass the skills test easily. We train them well,” Tim says.

Area high school students tour the Energy Utility Institute at the Sumterville campus of Lake-Sumter State College during National Line Workers Appreciation Day.

Photo: Nicole Hamel

Chad Duncan

A LINEMAN’S P AY


Photos: Anthony Rao

Leo Taylor

“A properly trained lineman can control hazards, which doesn’t make it dangerous, in my opinion. If you follow the rules and do what you are trained to do, it’s quite a safe profession.” Bob Seigworth, of Summerfield, director and program manager of energy technology programs at LSSC, saw 17 students graduate May 3 from his engineering technology substation/relay program. Twelve had jobs and the others were sending out résumés. “Working for utilities is a good deal. It’s not an easy life, but it’s a good life and a brotherhood,” Bob says. “The beauty of our programs is they are less than $10,000. So, a two-year degree in either line or substation relay is less than $10,000 for tuition, books, lab, and fees, and they can come out and get an entry-level job at $40,000 to $50,000, and I’ve had some students go to work for $62,000 right out of school.”

Bob Seigworth

The overall employment of line installers and repairers is projected to grow

8

percent through 2026. Job opportunities are best for those with good technical and mechanical skills. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

LSSC counsels students on which energy-related career is best for them. “Typically, if you are an outdoorsy person and enjoy being outside, working with your hands, working with heavy equipment, working in a team environment, then the line program would be fantastic for you,” Bob says. “The engineering technology substation/relay program is a completely different discipline. If you’re good with math, good with computers, and you enjoy new technology, then that program would be good for you.” Bob worked for Duke Energy for 37 years before he retired in October 2014 and began teaching at LSSC. “One thing that gives me great joy is when my student gets that dream job with a utility and goes to work and has the opportunities that I had,” he says. “We are in our third cohort of students in engineering, and that is a good feeling knowing they have jobs to go to, and that’s really what our program is based on—students getting jobs.” The LSSC instructors say electrical utilities provide opportunities and job security. “It’s a lifestyle, and once you start doing it, it’s all you want to do,” says Leo Taylor, of Ocoee, who is a part-time instructor at LSSC.

Leo retired from the Orlando Utilities Commission after 30 years, and he remembers two unforgettable times in his career. The first was working in Homestead after Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and the second was saving a girl’s prom. “Hurricane Andrew was the biggest and most devastation I have seen anywhere. The big challenge was trying to get power back on for people,” Leo says. “And I did have one time when a transformer just went out, and there wasn’t a storm or anything, but we went out to fix it. It was prom night for the local high school, and a lady was trying to get her daughter ready for the prom and needed to run a hair dryer.” The mother and daughter were distraught to learn the power outage would last a couple more hours. “I broke one of the rules of the company and cranked up a generator and ran an extension cord so she could run that dryer and get her daughter’s hair fixed for prom,” Leo says, grinning. “He saved the day,” Bob adds. Just like any first responder would do.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 073


Villager Tom Moore: ‘Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gave me new life!’ The Villages® Regional Hospital Wound Care & Hyperbaric Center offers safe, noninvasive, evidence-based treatments. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

arl Thomas “Tom” Moore, 81, says his health drastically improved when he began treatments at The Villages® Regional Hospital Wound Care & Hyperbaric Center. “I feel great,” said The Villages® resident, flashing a wide smile. “The hyperbaric chamber gave me new energy to go forward in life. It helped heal my wounds, contributed

to the elimination of my cancer, and made me feel like a normal person again, and that is a wonderful feeling!” Tom became ill two years ago with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in his right ear lobe, the bottom of his right eye, and SCC was also found in his left ear. He underwent two surgeries, radiation treatment, and then the SCC came back six months later on his nose. During another surgery in Ocala, half of Tom’s nose was removed, and seven teeth were pulled. Months of chemotherapy

and radiation followed, which left Tom feeling drained. He developed thrush in his mouth, a common side effect from cancer, and he lost 25 pounds from not being able to eat. He ended up with a feeding tube. “I told my wife we need to prepare for my death,” he says. Those thoughts changed when Tom was a patient in The Villages® Regional Hospital and Panthipa Laowansiri, MD, a board-certified internist and infectious disease specialist who serves as medical director at the hospital’s Wound Care & Hyperbaric Center, visited him for a close look at his wound where half of his nose was gone. After consulting with Tom’s surgeon and primary wound care provider, Manuel Alvarado, MD, Dr. Laowansiri recommended that Tom receive wound care and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Tom’s grandson, Bryan Soth, a pre-medical student at Kent State University in Ohio, felt it would help. “He said, ‘Cancer hates oxygen. If you get oxygen in the hyperbaric chamber, it

could help you cure the cancer,’ which in fact, I think it did!” Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe, noninvasive, evidencebased treatment proven to speed the healing process in certain types of wounds. The clear chambers are equipped with televisions and comfortable bedding, so patients are free to watch a movie or take a nap during treatment. The pressurized chamber allows the patient to breathe 100 percent oxygen, which increases the concentration of oxygen in the bloodstream and helps heal the wound from the inside out. “I felt good and had energy,” Tom recalls after his treatments. He completed 120 hours in the hyperbaric chamber over a few weeks. A recent PET scan showed Tom is now free from cancer. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gave me new life,” says Tom, who now has a prosthetic nose and is enjoying golf and activities in The Villages® with his wife, Charlotte. “She was my biggest supporter through it all.”

1451 El Camino Real, The Villages, FL 32159 / 352.751.8820 / thevillagesregionalhospital.org THE VILLAGES® is a federally registered trademark of Holding Company of The Villages, Inc. and is used under license. The Villages® Regional Hospital is part of

074 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


__________ Countywide school supply and non-perishable food drive benefiting the Lake County Public School District. The event is organized by the Educational Foundation, participating Chambers and THAT! Company.

How Can Your Business or Organization Participate? __________ BE A COLLECTION SITE OR SUPPORTER IN THE MONTH OF JULY Just call our office to sign up (352) - 326 - 1265 We will deliver signage, box and buttons

Lake County has 1,538 homeless students? Every year the Education Foundation of Lake County gives out literally tons of school supplies to students in need.

What Do We Need? __________ Pencils, pens, rulers, hand sanitizer, tissue, erasers, glue sticks, bottles of glue, notebook paper, folders, graph paper, scissors, calculators,

What Happens to Donations? Donations will be distributed by the foundation in Apple-Mart stores where teachers shop for free. Food collections will stock district and individual school pantries.

construction paper,markers, dry erase markers, crayons, dry erasers, highlighters,staples, paper clips, tape, index cards, binders, colored pencils,non-perishable food items & backpacks.

*Traveling awards will be given to the biggest donor based on business size!

If you would like to become a collection site or a volunteer for the program please contact 352-326-1265 or edfoundation@lake.k12.fl.us. The foundation has the ability to purchase supplies at deeply discounted rates and will be accepting cash donations on-line at www.edfoundationlake.com or checks can be mailed to: Educational Foundation of Lake County 2045 Pruitt Street Leesburg, FL 34748 edfoundation@lake.k12.fl.us

Follow us on facebook https://www.facebook.com/RedForEd http://edfoundationlake.com/red-for-ed

JOIN US Bring your collections to an old fashioned SUPPLY WEIGH IN Mon., August 5th, 3-6 pm WOOTON PARK, TAVARE S


076 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


‘Gangster era’ classic cars were a popular attraction at Leesburg Bikefest. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

≈ PHOTOS: DOUGLAS TYLER

he movie industry has always been fascinated with gangsters, and the 1930s were the “golden age” for actors playing bad guys: Jimmy Cagney in “The Public Enemy,” Edward G. Robinson in “Little Caesar,” Paul Muni in “Scarface,” and so many more. That era may be gone, but the fascination continues. Owners of “gangster era” cars from the 1920s and ’30s drove in from around the state in late April for the Ma Barker Gangster Car Run staged at Leesburg Bikefest. The collection included 15 classic cars, such as a 1921 Ford convertible, a 1931 LaSalle, and a variety of antique sedans. To complete the theme, car owners dressed in gangster costumes and “armed” themselves

with wooden Tommy guns provided as gifts by organizer Kent Thall, and the Paul De Ritter Quintet played music of the era. Gangster lore added local flavor. “Public enemies” Ma Barker and her son Fred were shot and killed by FBI agents in January 1935 at a house overlooking Lake Weir in Ocklawaha in nearby Marion County, according to mabarkerhouse.org. The shootout reportedly lasted four hours and is considered the FBI’s longest-ever gun battle. The Barker-Karpis gang was notorious for a string of bank robberies and murders during the 1930s, though historians dispute whether Ma had a criminal role other than caretaker of the gang. But there’s no disputing that the gang drove in style in cars similar to those at the festival. “It just fits what Ma Barker drove and what her gang drove,” says Kent, of Fruitland Park. “The cars that they had, generally speaking, were four-door sedans that gangsters with

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 077


Tommy guns would ride in (and) rob banks in.” Kent says his goal was to create, rather than a routine car show, an attraction that would stop Bikefest fans dead in their tracks and make them want to take photos of the cars and the “gangsters.” “The gangster costumes really are what makes it,” he says. “When you look at them holding a Tommy gun, you really believe that they are from the ’20s and that they are bad people.” The car owners provided their own costumes because they typically know what to expect from one of Kent’s concepts. He sets up attractions at various shows, including Bikefest the past several years, and creates a different theme each time. One year, for example, his wife dressed like Mae West and posed in front of the late actress’ 1931 Auburn 8-98-A

“They’re

078 /

coupe along with current owner Nick Bauer, who was dressed as a gangster. “They have found that Kent Thrall is crazy and he does this all the time; have people dress up and the music and everything,” Kent says. “Everything has to take a theme and make it an attraction.” He travels around the state looking for cars and owners that fit the themes of his events. With just 15 cars at Bikefest, it was a select group of well-restored, good-looking antique vehicles. The owners volunteered their time, which was considerable as they posed with their cars for an entire day at the festival.

“I call them crazy people,” Kent says. “They’re crazy like me: they like the old days, they like to celebrate what happened in the past and

crazy like me: they like the old days, they like to celebrate

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


be revisiting that time, that era.” Kent also organized two other car displays at Bikefest. The Rats Around the Bugs

what happened in the past and be

included 11 “rat rods” circling four Volkswagen vehicles. Rat rods are like jalopy hot rods built by the owners. The VWs included a 1960s flowered bus and one designed like the No. 53 VW from “The Love Bug” movie. The other display, Drop-Tops Through the Years, showed how convertibles evolved with a large collection ranging from a 1912 Ford Model T to 2005 vehicles. As for the appeal of “bad guys,” festival fans may love ’em or hate ’em, but pop culture, films, and books certainly help their legends live on. “We give notoriety to some pretty bad people in movies and attractions,” Kent says. “(Like) Bonnie and Clyde. That’s part of that

same type of story where bad people doing bad things are famous. Everybody knows who Bonnie and Clyde was.” Ma Barker may be a little less known than some of her contemporaries, but she will always hold a place in local history. The house where she was killed, now known as the Bradford-Ma Barker House, was relocated in 2016 to Carney Island Recreation and Conservation Area in Marion County. Guided tours are available; see mabarkerhouse.org. Kent says her story and the Gangster Car Run were an ideal fit for Bikefest, billed as the world’s largest threeday motorcycle and music festival. Motorcycle fans are often car fans and vice versa. “It’s historical, and if you like old cars and just the memories that come from old cars, it’s a trip back in another era,” he says.

revisiting that time, that era.”

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 079


Home improvements are easier with the right tools.

Open a Home Equity Line of Credit with Insight, for up to $50,000, and your appraisal is on us*! Get the tools you need for your home improvements. Call us today at 407.426.6000 or TollFree 888.843.8328, or visit one of our convenient locations to speak with a Representative for more information, or to apply for a HELOC today! INSIGHTCREDITUNION.COM *Insight Credit Union will pay the appraisal fee for Home Equity Lines of Credit, up to $50,000, funded starting April 1, 2019, for a limited time. $5,000 minimum to open a Home Equity Line of Credit; up to a maximum of $100,000. Standard appraisal fee will apply to Home Equity Lines of Credit $50,001 to $100,000. Eligible collateral includes primary single-family detached residence only. Offer valid in the State of Florida only. Loans subject to normal underwriting guidelines. Interest accrues from the date of disbursement. Offer subject to change at any time. Other restrictions and fees may apply. Equal Housing Lender. Federally insured by NCUA.

Limited time only.


081

p.

agenda

MARK YOUR CALENDAR! PLAN YOUR TRIP! BE SEEN IN LAKE AND SUMTER! | EVENTS. TRAVEL. PEOPLE.

082

086

088

090

102

THE TO-DO LIST What’s happening this month.

LOCAL TALENT Florida Plus Realty offers local artists a place to shine.

SOCIAL SPOTLIGHT Stepping Out for Education means dancing with local stars!

HI, SOCIETY! Bras and boxers, brews and blues in Leesburg, and more.

NEAR & FAR St. Ermin’s Hotel in London has lots of luxury and secrets.


THE TO-DO LIST

jun. 2019

JUN

8

FESTIVAL S

Summer Grape Stomp 2019 Do the “purple foot two-step”: Get your feet moving to stomp the grapes to make the wine! Test your grape-stomping skills and win prizes. This family event includes live music on the outdoor stage (The Smokin’ Torpedoes, Ronnie Duncan Band, Shawline, Buddy Blues Band) and the popular wine and cheese bar inside. Grape stomping is for all ages, and a portion of the proceeds goes to the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation. Adults: $10; children 12 and younger, free. June 8 @ 10am-5pm & June 9 @ 11am-5pm Lakeridge Winery & Vineyards 19239 U.S. Highway 27 N., Clermont lakeridgewinery.com


EVENTS

Fore! It’s that time of year for women who play golf and women who don’t: the Ladies Fore Education Golf Tournament. Start the morning at 10am with a mimosa and a silent auction, enjoy lunch, and then it’s time to play. The day ends with an awards ceremony and a reception. Proceeds benefit the Educational Foundation of Lake County.

JUN

7

June 7 @ 10:30am / Continental Country Club 50 Continental Blvd., Wildwood edfoundationlake.com

jun.

ON STAGE Enjoy quality entertainment on the many stages of Lake and Sumter counties.

6/1-16 @ various times “RIPCORD” Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora

JUN

2

6/1-23 @ various times “SISTER ACT” Bay Street Players, Eustis

6/7-16 @ various times “THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR” Moonlight Players Theatre, Clermont

EVENTS

WE CAN BE HEROES JUST FOR ONE DAY

6/14 @ 6pm PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY SHOWCASE The Sharon, The Villages

The eighth annual Comics, Toys, and Hollywood Collectibles Comic Con is coming to Lake Square Mall. Along with more than 40 vendors, there will be a Cosplay Contest, Character Parade, Pop Culture Trivia Contest, Super Hero Scavenger Hunt, Godzilla Lounge, and Comics in Classroom Q&A presentation. “Godzilla” will be playing at AMC Theatres, which will also offer a raffle and spin-wheel prizes. Go to the south end of the mall and follow the yellow signs.

6/17-22 @ 9am-3pm CAMP: “PEAS & HARMONY” The Sharon, The Villages

6/24 @ 9am-3pm CAMP: “CINDERELLA SAVES THE WORLD” The Sharon, The Villages

June 2 @ noon-6pm / Lake Square Mall / 10401 U.S. Highway 441, Leesburg / lakecollectacon.com

ONGOING EV E NTS Events are subject to change and cancellation.

EVERY MON

EVERY TUE

EVERY SAT

1ST MON

3RD WED

Webster’s Farmer’s Market 6am2pm, 524 North Market Blvd., Webster

Lady Lake Farmer’s Market 9am1pm, Lady Lake Log Cabin, 106 S. U.S. Hwy. 441/27

Brownwood Farmer’s Market 9am-1pm, 2726 Brownwood Blvd., Wildwood

Senior Shakedown 1-3pm, Tavares Civic Center, 100 E. Caroline St.

PAWS Reading Dogs W.T. Bland Library, Mount Dora.

3RD THU

Mount Dora Food Trucks downtown Mount Dora.

1ST FRI

Street Party Downtown Eustis, 6-10pm

Night Market 5th and Magnolia Streets, Leesburg, 5-8pm

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 083


THE TO-DO LIST

jun.JAMS Move to the beat of one of your favorite performers at one of these great concerts or local venues!

6/6 @ 7pm

6/13 @ 7:30pm

6/21 @ 7pm

GREG PANDO The Mojo Grill and Catering, Belleview

JOE VAN Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/6 @ 7:30pm

LONIE CARTER Lake Veterans Club, Tavares

MAIDEN VOYAGE BAND American Legion, Mount Dora

6/14 @ 6pm

DANGEROUS DAVE MERRILL Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/7 @ 7:30pm PRIME COUNTRY Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale JUN

6/7 @ 9pm

19

LONIE CARTER JJ’s Lounge and Package, Sorrento

EVENTS

For moms and moms to be

6/7 @ 9pm

SAIL ON Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

6/15 @ 9pm

6/21 @ 8pm BLUE STONE CIRCLE Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/22 @ 7:30pm THE DRIFTERS Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

6/16 @ 1pm

6/23 @ 6pm

GFM Gator Harley-Davidson, Leesburg

MAIDEN VOYAGE BAND Lake Harris Hideaway, Tavares

CHEYENNE ROSE First Baptist Church of Belleview, Belleview

6/8 @ 9pm

6/16 @ 7:30pm

LONIE CARTER JJ’s Lounge and Package, Sorrento

DEFENDERS OF DAISIES Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

JEFF WHITFIELD Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/9 @ 1:30pm

6/19 @ 7:30pm

DANGEROUS DAVE MERRILL Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

JEFF WHITFIELD Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/9 @ 7:30pm

JIMMY HUNTER DRUMS Lake Harris Hideaway, Tavares

6/8 @ Noon

DEFENDERS OF DAISIES Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/21 @ 1pm

DA BOYS Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

6/26 @ 7:30pm 6/30 @ 1:30pm ADAM GRAYFORD Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

7/3 @ 7:30pm JEFF WHITFIELD Ruby Street Grille, Tavares

Let us help you get the word out! To have an event considered for the calendar, send a short text description along with a color photo (if available) 45 days in advance of event to: calendar@akersmediagroup.com or Lake & Sumter Style Calendar, P.O. Box 490088, Leesburg, FL 34749

2ND FRI

084 /

6/15 @ 7:30pm

LONIE CARTER Crossroads 44, Eustis

6/22 @ 8pm

June 19 @ 2-4pm / Leesburg Regional Medical Center 600 E. Dixie Ave., Leesburg Call 352.323.777 to register.

Art in the Alley Features artists and performers on the sidewalks of downtown Mount Dora, 6-8pm

MAD HADDER BAND Magical Meat Boutique, Mount Dora

MAD HADDER BAND Crossroads 44, Eustis

MAD HADDER BAND Frank’s Place, Leesburg

If you’re pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, the Tavares Chamber of Commerce invites you to a free Mom-toBe Expo. Learn about becoming pregnant, taking care of yourself and your baby during pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and more.

6/14 @ 7pm

6/21 @ 8pm

Acoustic Music Hear local musicians free from 7-9pm at Leesburg Center for the Arts, 429 W. Magnolia St.

Open House 6-8pm Mount Dora History Museum, 450 Royellou Lane

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

1ST SAT

Movie in the Park Free family movie starts at dusk in Donnelly Park, downtown Mount Dora.

Wine Tasting Stroll 6-8pm, Starts at Maggie’s Attic on Alexander Street and 4th Avenue.

2ND SAT

Food Truck N Flick Night Entertainment, Leesburg Towne Square.

4TH SAT

Classic Car Cruise-In downtown Eustis.


MADE FOR THE WAY YOU MOVE

NO BARS. NO SPRINGS. PURE COMFORT.

R

E

T A

I

L

E

R

E X T E N D E D R E TA I L E R I N F O R M AT I O N

ALL AMERICAN LEATHER MOTION PRODUCTS ON SALE JUNE 7-24


LOCAL TALENT

PEO PLE

Artwork in the workplace A Leesburg business gives local artists a unique venue. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

t many offices, employees are herded into gray, dreary cubicles where they dust off plastic plants and stare at drab walls. At Florida Plus Realty, however, the office is a vibrant palette. The staff works amid a colorful gallery of artwork that fills the walls of every room of this office at 26736 U.S. Highway 27, Suite 103. The gallery displays paintings in watercolors, oils, and acrylics, fused glass, ceramics, sculptures, photography, and more. Sisters Lesley Greenslade and Nicky Martz co-own the company, and Lesley also is a “weekend artist.” Last year, they had the novel idea for an office gallery to promote local artists, particularly residents of the 55-plus communities served by their company. The goal is “cultivating relationships with likeminded people,” Lesley says. “This has given me an opportunity to combine my personal passion with my business,” she says. “Talking to artists and being able to look at the beautiful work that’s on the walls and then inviting our customers to participate, too, has been really rewarding for everybody.” Art lovers can drop in during business hours to browse or get a tour. The company periodically hosts exhibitions in combination with events such as the Neighbors Meeting Neighbors happy hour, where guests can dine and drink next door at Rodello’s Italian Restaurant, which also displays paintings. Lesley Greenslade and Nicky Martz


Photos by Nicole Hamel, Steve Gordon photo by Fred Lopez

Art patrons buy directly from the artists, and the realty company does not receive a commission. Vonnie Wills, an art club member at the Plantation at Leesburg retirement community, admits the idea of an art gallery in an office seemed unusual. “I thought there was still enough opportunity there for people, especially people that were coming down from Northern states to buy houses, that may have wanted to update some of their artwork and encompass more of a Florida feel,” she says. Vonnie specializes in acrylic, oil, and pastel paintings that have a “Florida feel,” such as “Later Gator,” a sunset over a swamp, displayed at the gallery. She usually creates scenes from her imagination but also likes to paint plein air, or outside on location. “In my estimation, it’s the purest form of artwork that you can get because you’re right there, you’re putting down your images, your colors, what you’re seeing, right on paper,” she says. “This is totally you and nature.” Steve Gordon, a Sorrento potter, said, “Why not?” when he was approached to display his work. Steve is one of only 20 or so artists in the world who creates crystalline porcelain vases, a difficult process requiring about 18 exacting techniques, he says. “People are going to come in to the office, so why not expose them to art?” he says. Margi Geiger, of Plantation, has a variety of work on display but her true love is photography. She starts with a photo, enlarges it through photo shop and puts the print on canvas, giving it the appearance of a painting. She also combines photography with the medium of alcohol ink. She pours the ink on a small ceramic tile, takes a

photo of it and again blows it up to create a larger image that looks like a painting, often with psychedelic colors and shapes. “It’s a fascinating medium because you somewhat have control, but on the other hand, it has sort of a mind of its own, too,” Margi says. “You might start out with an idea and before you know it, it’s morphed into something else.” Margi has sold a few pieces at Florida Plus Realty and says she enjoys having her art on display. “What a clever idea,” she says of the gallery. “Those women have their act together. They definitely thought outside the box in coming up with this idea.”

Steve Gordon

If you want to check out the local talent Florida Plus Realty is located at 26736 U.S. Highway 27, Suite 103


SOCIAL SPOTLIGHT

EVENTS

Dance to the music It’s that time of year again when some of Lake County’s familiar faces hit the dance floor for Stepping Out for Education. STORY: LEIGH NEELY

088 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

ocally, it’s more popular than “Dancing with the Stars” because the contestants are familiar. Stepping Out for Education is the Educational Foundation of Lake County’s version of the popular TV show. This year’s lineup features Nan Cobb, owner of Cobb’s Tractor; Chief Charles Broadway, of the Clermont Police Department; Diane Kornegay, Lake County Schools superintendent; Jim Miller, Grizzard Commercial Real Estate Group; Alise Morris, Ernie Morris Enterprises; and State Rep. Anthony Sabatini. In its 14th year, Stepping Out for Education is modeled after ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars.” It will be a two-night event, July 26-27, at Mission Inn Resort & Club in Howey-in-the-Hills. “The dancers are selected by previous dancers who meet in January to select next year’s stars,” says Carman CullenBatt, executive director of the Educational Foundation of Lake County. “Each participant has 20 hours of instruction with a professional ballroom dancer. It takes work to learn the choreography.” Learning the dances is very physical, according to Carman. She says people always lose weight, and one contestant lost 60 pounds one year. The celebrities dance a fox trot, rumba, cha cha, swing, and tango with the professional dancers. Audience voting determines the winner of Stepping Out for Education. The voting is certified by Alan Hays, supervisor of elections for Lake County. Last year’s performance netted $100,000, and all the proceeds from this event benefit teachers and students in Lake County schools. Some of the money is used for students in the ACT prep program the foundation has offered for three years. “It’s for students who are not going to graduate because they haven’t passed 10thgrade reading assessment,” Carman says. “However, if they score 19 or higher on the ACT, they can graduate.” Of the 478 students who have participated in the program, 388 graduated. The professional dancers come from a dance studio in Orlando and Anastasia Ballroom in Leesburg, and Carman is especially proud

Last year’s performance netted

$100K and all the proceeds from this event benefit teachers and students in Lake County schools.


“I’M HONORED TO BE CHOSEN WITH SUCH A WONDERFUL GROUP OF PEOPLE. I KNOW IT’S GOING TO BE EXCITING, AND I’M NERVOUS, BUT I CAN’T WAIT TO BE THERE.” —NAN COBB

to have Laura Constantini participate. Laura is a teacher from Orange County and has served as one of the professional dancers for nine years. Nan says she was surprised to receive the invitation to be a celebrity dancer. “I’m honored to be chosen with such a wonderful group of people,” she says. “I know it’s going to be exciting, and I’m nervous, but I can’t wait to be there.” The youngest of the local celebrities is Alise, 25, and the oldest is Jim, who is 70. Jim was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s leukemic lymphoma (NHLL) in 2006. After chemotherapy treatment, he was declared in remission. Later tests

indicated a less aggressive strain of NHLL could come back, and he was told a bone marrow transplant was the answer, providing hope he would live for five more years. When he saw signs the cancer was coming back, he decided to go to the Hippocrates Health Institute in West Palm Beach. There, he learned about eating the right foods and focusing on mind, body, and spirit. A longtime board member of the Educational Foundation, he always joked with Carman, saying, “By the time I’m 70, I’ll be young enough to dance.” “Changing my lifestyle reversed my aging process,” Jim says. “So now it’s time to put up or shut up. I feel

like I’m 35, and I’m doing yoga to become more flexible and spry. I’m really looking forward to it. I think I’m going to surprise people being 70.” He admits he’s facing some tough competition from the younger men. “Broadway is tall and good looking, and Sabatini is younger. We practice two times a week for 10 weeks,” Jim says. “It’ll be the first time I’m totally making a fool of myself.” Carman says it’s a fun event that gives the Educational Foundation a large audience to share the foundation’s story. Dr. Wade Winker is this year’s master of ceremonies for the two-night event. Tickets for Stepping Out for Education are $150, but

S AV E THE D AT E

STEPPING OUT FOR EDUCATION

July 26 & 27 Mission Inn Resort & Club, 10400 County Road 48, Howeyin-the-Hills. Use the code 101805 and book a room for the night for $132.

that includes arriving at 5:30pm for cocktails and then enjoying a seven-course meal, wine and beer bar, and the opportunity to vote for the winner.

Want to see your event in Social Spotlight? Contact us at least three months in advance and provide all the details to leigh@akersmediagroup.com.

LEIGH NEELY

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 089


HI, SOCIETY!

Jordan Klinschmidt and Joshua DiLena

Linda Beebe, Michele and Brian Artman

Raymond York and Mary Ann Sawyer

Amanda Tominovich and Jonathan Fagan

Lauren Smith

Danielle Hall and Laura Hunt

Michelle and Hailey Bladek

S H OW I N G I T O F F F O R A CAU S E @ CLERMONT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. The 12th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers, too, presented by the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation, was themed “Puttin’ on the Glitz.” It was held at the Clermont Performing Arts Center and featured a fun-filled fashion show with bras and boxers designed, decorated, and modeled by local residents. GCCF is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization that provides financial assistance, scholarships, and other free services to cancer patients, their families, and caregivers in the community.

090 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Gina Clutter

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


Robin Gump Agency Owner

Navigating a complicated health care system can be frustrating and time-consuming. Fortunately, Robin Gump of Mid-Florida Agencies has spent 30 years helping individuals, families, and business owners choose the right health insurance plan. Mid Florida Agencies is your LOCAL Florida Blue, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida office. Robin and her team specialize in health insurance, Medicare Advantage, and the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) and they pride themselves on educating clients so they can make informed decisions. For Robin, the company’s focus on quality and professionalism as well as listening carefully and effectively while communicating with clients has resulted in many trusting, long-term relationships.

Call today! 352.259.0666 Our agents are available and ready to help with all of your health insurance needs!

Mid Florida Agencies Local offices in Lake, Sumter & Marion Counties!


HI, SOCIETY!

Penny Dixon

Gabriella Rivera

Tiffany and Sarah

Eric Daigneau and Jason Shenefield

J-Matt Restaurant

Lauren and Ronni

Jennifer and Meghan Boliek

Mr. and Mrs. Cooper

Fred and Michelle

T H I S E V E N T WA S S M O K I N ’ ! @ LEESBURG TOWN SQUARE ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. The Downtown Leesburg Business Association and the Leesburg Partnership had great success with the annual BBQ, Brews, and Blues event in Towne Square. Plenty of cooks in the outdoor kitchens prepared many pounds of great pork, brisket, and chicken for everyone to enjoy. Those who walked around sampled barbecue and also voted for first-, second-, and third- places for trophies and cash prizes. Blues master David Julia provided the music for the popular event.

092 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

The Johnston Family

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


Live entertainment!

SATURDAy

June 8th • 5:00pm

MAGAZINE

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 093


HI, SOCIETY!

Jack Meyer, Linda Czarnecki, Lori Weber, Bob Stewart, and Mark Weber

Richard Beatty

Nicole Hamel

Jed Wolcott

Douglas Goddia

Mark Cravens

Ryan Blair

A R OA R F R O M T H E PA S T @ WOOTEN PARK ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. Vintage and classic race boats were displayed at Wooton Park for the 10th annual Tavares Spring Thunder Regatta. Since Tavares is a major stop on the Florida Vintage Race Boat Circuit, there were 75 lovingly restored vintage and classic race boats doing demonstration laps on Lake Dora. Visitors were also able to view the boats up close in the pit area. The daylong event was free and featured large heats of all the APBA vintage classes, including outboards, classic glass, small hydros, flatbottoms, skiffs, speedsters, gold cuppers, and fire-breathing grand prix hydros.

094 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Mark Weber

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


HI, SOCIETY!

Geannie Rutlidge, Melanie Melvin, and Deb Matlock

Jessica Nielsen and Robert Larson

Bryan Abbott, Jamie Abbott, Alan Reisman, Jinnie Palinski, and Brittney Lucas

Beatrix Isaac, Tomi-lyn Seager, Brooke Tucker, Bob Lewis, and Sandy Lewis

Alan Daugherty, Danielle Daugherty, Tony Hill, Kelly Hill, David Ayris, and Julie Ayris Christy Kitt, Casey Hendrix, Christie Casey, and Becky Frazier

Bob Tindall and Jan Tindall

TA S T Y DAT E ≈

@ LEESBURG NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY PHOTOS: DOUGLAS TYLER. Though rain forced the event inside

Jack Ross, Donna Ross, and Bert Johnson

096 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

the armory, it didn’t ruin the taste of any of the great offerings from Taste of Lake & Business Expo. Featured food included everything from seafood to barbecue, appetizers to desserts, and sangria to beer. Entertainment for the evening included Kelly Jarrard’s sultry tones and the antics of the Blues Brothers. The rain didn’t dampen anything as hundreds of guests enjoyed an evening of food, drink, and music.

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Cliff Barrineau and Dustin Levine

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


14TH ANNUAL

Stepping Out For

Education

LOCAL CELEBRITIES COMPETE ON THE BALLROOM FLOOR

Nan Cobb

Chief Charles Broadway

Owner, Cobb’s Tractor

Clermont Police Dept.

$150red r e f e r P atingeal, Se course m r and es a 7 Includne & beer boate for wi nce to v a cha he winner. t

Diane Kornegay

Jim Miller

Lake County Schools Superintendent

Grizzard Commercial RE Group

Alise Morris

Representative Anthony Sabatini

Business Development Florida House Manager, Ernie Morris Enterprises

TWO FULL PERFORMANCES!

Friday, July 26, 2019 or Saturday, July 27, 2019 Mission Inn • Howey-in-the-Hills, Florida For tickets: www.edfoundationlake.com or 352-326-1265

Hosted by

Jim Miller

OF FLORIDA

Hosted by The Educational Foundation of Lake County. Benefiting the teachers and students in Lake County Schools


HI, SOCIETY!

Jim Croson

Cathy Hoechst

Erika Greene and Ray Villegas

Dennis Zander and Cas Waddell

Cheryl Jarvis

Irene O’Malley and Cathy Hoechst

Amanda and Jacob Baumann

Clara Schneider

Yashoda Yehudit and Sharon Rowlett

A DIA MON D FU N DRAISER ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. Lake Cares Gala & Silent Auction actually was a yearlong event. Eleven women wore a diamond necklace valued at more than $20,000 for a month each. The necklace, titled Bella Diamante, was part of the fundraiser for the 10th anniversary of Lake Cares. Carol Lynn Nelson was the winner of the necklace, and her name was drawn by Cheryl Jarvis, author of “The Necklace,” the novel that spurred the idea. Irene O’Malley, the pantry’s executive director, surprised everyone by announcing Maribella is the necklace to be raffled next year as the saga of “The Necklace” continues.

@ LAKE RECEPTIONS

098 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Leslie Campione and Diane Culpepper

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


June 1 - August 31

Where would you go… if you could earn 3x the points? Use your CAMPUS Visa Platinum Rewards Card June 1 - August 31 on lodging, travel, dining, and entertainment and TRIPLE your earning power! 1

Apply today at campuscu.com Call 237-9060 and press 5 Visit any CAMPUS Service Center Summerfield 17950 S. US Hwy. 441 Grand Traverse 2945 Traverse Trail Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Marion, Lake, and Sumter counties! 2 There are costs associated with the use of this card. Credit approval required. For specific information call 800-367-6440 or write us at P.O. Box 147029, Gainesville, FL 32614. The annual percentage rate may vary with the market based on the Prime Rate as published in the Wall Street Journal “Money Rates” table on the last day of each calendar month. The APR is determined by adding together the index and the margin applicable to the card type and the consumer’s credit. The APR could change without notice. APR not to exceed 17.99%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 1. Bonus CURewards points are eligible for Lodging, Travel, Dining, and Entertainment purchases from June 1, 2019 through August 31, 2019. Points on all other purchases and balance transfers will continue to accrue at one point for every dollar spent. CAMPUS shall determine which purchases qualify and will not be responsible for merchant misclassifications. Points will be posted to your account at the close of each billing cycle. Cash advances and finance charges do not earn points. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Federally insured by the NCUA.


HI, SOCIETY!

Shawnda and Hannan Davis

Brittany Hansen and Jason Fugate

Brooke Malloy, Terrance Manner, Lauren Morgan, Melissa Morgan, Alona Siemons, Robert Siemons, and Wendy Hoag

Irene O’Malley

Kassandra, Cameron, and Jessica

Star Schneider

J.R. Rodriguez, Robert Smith, Ben Jackson, and Jason R. Labayne

Joel Orr

IT’S STILL A M AZING! @ FERRAN PARK ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. The sixth annual Amazing Race for Charity was another challenging feat this year. Featuring more than 20 challenges along a five-mile route, the race is for teams of two. The challenges can be as simple as solving a puzzle or reciting the Miranda rights or as difficult as rappelling off a tower. Participants don’t know what to expect until they arrive for the race. By the end of the day, racers have learned a great deal about the host city, worked together as a team, enjoyed (or endured) a great workout, and benefited local charities..

100 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Phil C. Stokes

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


NEAR & FAR

TR AVEL

STYLE,

suites, and

SECRETS

Not only is St. Ermin’s a unique London hotel, it also has an intriguing history. STORY: LEIGH NEELY

102 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

≈ PHOTOS: COURTESY OF TIM FORDHAM-MOSS


14

NOTES ABOUT ST. ERMINS

riving under the beautiful arch in front of St. Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster in London is like stepping back in time. However, when you walk inside the luxurious historic hotel, you’ll find a staff that is ready to make it your comfortable home during your visit at the Autograph Collection Hotel.

1

The third-floor terrace beehives are home to 300,000 Buckfast bees and London’s only Bee & Bee hotel.

2

Urban beekeeping workshops are available at the hotel at various times during the year. Check online at sterminshotel.co.uk for dates as they sell out early.

3

Children receive “Budding Bond” spy kits and “A Bedtime Story” book along with the afternoon tea.

4

The ballrooms and event spaces showcase the wonderful architecture, including dazzling chandeliers and beautiful plasterwork.

5

In winter, St. Ermin’s terrace becomes a cozy getaway with candles, lights, and blankets for those who might need them.

6

St. Ermin’s Hotel was voted a “Top London Hotel” in Condé Nast Traveller Reader’s Choice Awards.

7

Ian Fleming, the author who created MI6 agent James Bond, worked in the Secret Intelligence Service (now MI6) during World War II at St. Ermin’s. He also is the author of the children’s book, “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car.”

A GRAND HOTEL

Staying at an Autograph Collection Hotel means you have a unique experience. These hotels are branded by Marriott International for their architecture, design, and the surprising stories in their histories. Each of these hotels is curated to provide a unique experience for visitors. The hotel originally was an elegant mansion block (containing apartments) built in the 1800s. Now, it’s a gorgeous hotel that’s just five minutes from St. James Park and Buckingham Palace, the Houses of Parliament, and other famous London landmarks. St. Ermin’s Caxton Bar is one of the local establishments that has a “division bell,” which is used to notify members of Parliament of upcoming votes. Members have eight minutes to get to their designated place to vote for or against a

More notes on the following page

Below: St. Ermin’s deluxe king suite lounge. Left: The grand staircase from the theatrical balcony goes down to the lobby. Opposite: The oppulent entrance to St. Ermin’s.

resolution. These bells have been in place in areas of the United Kingdom for more than 150 years. The lobby is a fabulous mix of architecture with art nouveau styling and rococo plasterwork, and the breathtaking theatrical balcony in the lobby makes you want to don your elegant gown and descend the steps to the carriage that awaits. Of the hotel’s 331 spacious rooms, there are 41 uniquely designed suites, and 18 family rooms. St. Ermin’s welcomes families and children. Among its many attractions for the younger set is the St. Ermin’s Secret Agent Package, which not only allows the children

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 103


to roam the hotel but also to participate in a “top secret” scavenger hunt.

8

According to Peter Matthews in his book, “House of Spies: St. Ermin’s Hotel, The London Base of British Intelligence,” people in the intelligence service refer to themselves as “friends.” Apparently, they don’t like being called spies or spooks.

9

The Cambridge Five became Soviet agents after being recruited at the University of Cambridge and stole top-secret information from the early 1930s to the 1950s. They were Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Kim Philby, Anthony Blunt, and John Cairncross. It is said the KGB referred to them as the Magnificent Five.

HOUSE OF SECRETS

St. Ermin’s Hotel is an especially significant place on this 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, or D-Day, as it’s most often called. Members of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) used it and 2 Caxton St. as headquarters beginning in 1938. Throughout World War II, not only were whole floors of the hotel occupied by intelligence crews, but the buildings surrounding the hotel also were part of the secret agencies. Of all the buildings used for intelligence services, St. Ermin’s is the only one in London closely associated with espionage that is accessible to the public. According to “House of Spies,” a book by Peter Matthews, a former intelligence officer, strategic plans for the D-Day landings were first formulated and overseen by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s staff at Norfolk House in St. James Square, less than a mile from St. Ermin’s. The hotel became a second home not only for the SIS but also for the MI5 (military intelligence) and the Naval Intelligence Division. Among the famous and infamous people working in this war effort were Noel Coward, Ian Fleming, and the Cambridge Five spy ring. These five men were recruited by Russia during their years at Cambridge and worked as double agents against Great Britain during the war. Kim Philby is perhaps the most famous, as he passed information along to two other agencies, making him a triple agent. The famous Caxton Bar, which has been beautifully restored, was the site of many secret meetings. Guy Burgess, who eventually defected to Russia, often met his Russian counterpart at the bar to pass papers and top-secret government files. At Sir Winston Churchill’s request, the group that later became Special Operations Executive was organized to explicitly work in espionage, sabotage, and reconnaissance in

The staircase at the main endtrance to St. Ermin’s

104 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

10

Kim Philby, a senior officer in Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service, passed more than 900 documents to the KGB.

11

St. Ermin’s Hotel is built on the site of a 15th-century chapel dedicated to St. Ermin. It became St. Ermin’s Mansions in the late 19th century.

12

St. Ermin of Lobbes was a Benedictine monk and disciple of St. Ursmar. He died in 737.

13

Westminster Abbey, which was founded in 960, is near St. Ermin’s and has been the venue for coronations since 1066.

14

Not far from St. Ermin’s, you can see the Tower of London and the iconic Tower Bridge along with St. Paul’s Cathedral, and catch a ride on the London Eye. Since the hotel is in London’s city center, it has easy access to any location in London.

Inside the famous Caxton Bar

occupied Europe. Few people knew of this organization though it occupied an entire floor of St. Ermin’s. Among insiders, members were called “Baker Street Irregulars” and “Churchill’s Secret Army.” SOE was officially dissolved in 1946. A MODERN EXPERIENCE

Even with its storied history, this elegant hotel offers a wonderful opportunity to make your London stay exciting. As much as the children will enjoy uncovering secrets in their hotel adventure, they’ll be equally excited when they get to see the hotel’s resident bees. Due to the close proximity to so many parks, the honey created by these bees is especially great tasting. St. Ermin’s London honey is served in all the hotel’s dining spots. The bees are on the third floor, and guests can watch


GUY BURGESS, WHO EVENTUALLY DEFECTED TO RUSSIA, OFTEN MET HIS RUSSIAN COUNTERPART AT THE BAR TO PASS PAPERS AND TOP-SECRET GOVERNMENT FILES.

Steak and lobster prepared on the Josper Grill

CAXTON GRILL • BAR • TERRACE

them through protective glass as they buzz in and out of their hives. For those who prefer not to live in hives, there are hexagonal suites for their shelter. The hotel also has a Roof Kitchen Garden for sustainability and local produce for daily and seasonal menu items. The garden includes popular produce such as tomatoes, squash, pumpkin, spring onion, French beans, potatoes, and olives. Among the fruit selection is clemetines, apples, plums, raspberries, and blackberries. TEA FOR TWO OR MORE

Afternoon tea at St. Ermin’s is not just a meal, it’s a culinary experience. During my tour, my son’s family and I were fortunate to enjoy this daily event. The hotel accommodates guests with allergies and people who need gluten-free foods. The menu for afternoon tea is extensive, beautifully prepared, and served with a glass of champagne or English sparkling wine if you wish. Freshly baked scones with clotted cream and jams are always a wonderful start. Among the other delights on the layered tray were cucumber with mint and chive cream cheese and other sandwiches, coffee-and-hazelnut shortbread, peach and apricot mousse, cinnamon sponge, or passion fruit and coconut éclair. While the adult menu is an elegant display of sweet and savory delights, the children were delighted with their “Mini Gardener” tea. Their food was displayed as though growing in a garden and served in a small wooden crate on a bed of grass. My grandchildren thoroughly enjoyed this. They were able to decorate their shortbread and loved the treats in their mini gardens. St. Ermin’s is definitely a family-oriented hotel, and your children will always remember their experiences there. For grownups, there’s afternoon tea with unlimited rosé wine. You can enjoy your tea in the relaxing Tea Lounge or, in nice weather, on the outdoor terrace.

Want to share stories of your travels?

Executive head chef Alexander Boyd oversees the preparation of all foods in the hotel, ensuring an creative array of seasonal dishes and fresh ingredients from the rooftop garden. In addition to the lovely Tea Lounge, you can enjoy drinks and light dining in the famous Caxton Bar. The Bowler Hat—Sipsmith gin, St. Ermin’s honey, and lemon juice—is the bar’s signature drink. When you’re sitting in the bar with its décor that hints at the past but shines with contemporary art, it’s easy to imagine the secret meetings and whispered conversations that occurred here during World War II. If you listen closely, you may even hear the muted conversations and clinks of ice in glasses. Whether it’s wine or whiskey, you won’t have a problem indulging in your favorite drink. Caxton Grill has reintroduced the signature Josper Grill, an indoor charcoal oven, where the British beef steaks are prepared to perfection along with fresh, responsibly caught fish. Because it cooks at such high temperatures, the grill produces meat that retains its moisture and the delicate smokiness. The Josper is a hybrid—a grill that’s also an oven with a front door. Only top-quality charcoal is used to give the meat, chicken, and fish their unique flavor. A fascinating history partnered with every modern convenience make St. Ermin’s Hotel one of the highlights for a getaway in London.

Email Leigh at leigh@akersmediagroup.com

LEIGH NEELY

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 105


The best wings around. Owner “Cousin” Vinnie Vittoria and his family have created a unique atmosphere by combining a “Sports Bar” with a “Family Restaurant”. As soon as you walk in, you will immediately notice why they are famous for outstanding comfort food and service! Their 30+ wing sauces have awarded them BEST WINGS in Lake & Sumter County every year since opening in 2008. In 2017 & 2018, Vinnie’s was also voted BEST SPORTS BAR! There is no better place on the weekends to see who hoists the trophy or takes home the checkered flag. A few menu items offered are (never frozen – 80/20) 1/2 lb. burgers, personal pan pizzas, amazing rib-eye Philly cheese steaks, healthy wheat wraps, fresh homemade chicken salad and 15 awesome appetizers, including Cousin Vinnie’s Signature Secret Shrimp! Families simply can’t get enough of their deep-fried Ice Cream! Cousin Vinnie’s also offers a small arcade for the kids, free Wi-Fi, great music, and an enthusiastic staff ready to exceed your expectations. “I absolutely look forward to serving you and your family very soon!” says owner Cousin Vinnie. Tuesday Family Night: 5pm–8pm Kids 12-and-under eat free. Wednesday Trivia Night: The fun starts at 6:30p.m. with prizes given to the top 3 teams. Food, Spirits, Music, Sports 10700 U.S. Hwy. 441, Leesburg | 352.253.2442 | CVinnies.com | Open daily 11am-9pm

106 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9


p.

107

menu

DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW FOR YOUR KITCHEN, GET THE SCOOP ON EATING OUT, AND TOAST THE WINE! | FOOD. DRINKS. REVIEWS.

108

110

112

114

IN THE KITCHEN Ralph Rao mans the spatula.

FORK ON THE ROAD Legacy Restaurant has a new look and vibrant flavors.

SALUTÉ A legendary village and wine from France with a unique bottle.

DINING GUIDE Restaurants to engage any appetite.


IN THE KITCHEN

RECIPE

A man who knows his place Lady Lake butcher Ralph Rao continues his family’s tradition of men doing the cooking. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL PHOTOS: ANTHONY RAO

108 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

rowing up with Italian and Irish roots in Long Island, New York, Ralph Rao had several male relatives who were butchers that cooked family meals and enjoyed gathering with extended relatives for big feasts. Ralph, 58, is proud to continue the tradition. “We take advantage of family time every time we can,” he says. “Why wait for a certain day or holiday to be together?” Ralph has been a butcher for 38 years, the past 21 years at Publix supermarket in Lady Lake, the town where he lives with his wife of 36 years, Theresa. The couple and their two sons, Anthony and Joey, moved to Florida in 1998 to be near relatives in The Villages. They were followed by 14 other family members who also made the move to the Sunshine State. “Four houses on our street is our family and two other homes in

“ T H IS E A IS L IK D IS H RMET U TO P O G S ON K O D CO E, AN T H AT S T OV IT E H T OF OY IN G E E N J O U R ,” H YO U ’R AN IN H . S W IT H S AY RALP

the community are our family,” Ralph says of his Oakland Hills neighborhood. When they’re all together, they enjoy good times and good food. “My boys’ wives like to cook, so sometimes we’ll all cook together,” says Ralph, who’s called “Peepaw,” by his 4-year-old grandson and now jokingly by his relatives “because they think it’s funny.” The oldest of three brothers, Ralph has early childhood memories of watching his grandfather cook in the kitchen. “In a lot of Italian households, a lot of the men do the majority of cooking,” Ralph says. “And I do all the cooking in my house because my work hours allow me to be home earlier than my wife. Her friends get jealous when I go to her business and ask, ‘What do you want me to make for dinner tonight?’” Many nights, dinner may be pan-frying


GARLIC BUTTER S AU C E F O R S T E A K

shrimp with garlic butter, salt, and pepper, and serving it over rice. One of Ralph’s favorite dishes to whip up is stove-top chicken marsala, and he agreed to share his recipe with Style. As a butcher, he’s often asked, “What’s the best steak to grill?” “Filet mignon is the most tender, and next would be your ribeye, New York strip, Porterhouse, T-bone, and sirloin. Any one of those is great because they don’t need any help to tenderize. They are great non-muscle meats, they are tender, and they’re your better grilling meats,” Ralph says. All that’s needed for flavor is salt, pepper, and a little olive oil before grilling or broiling steaks. Ten minutes on each side is ideal for a medium, 1-inch-thick steak. The butcher encourages home cooks not to be intimidated by cooking meats. “For any pork, chicken, or beef, Publix has pamphlets with cooking instructions, how-to tips, and recipes,” Ralph says. “That’s one thing I like about the company; it’s nice to have a little guide to go by.”

INGREDIENTS

1

stick butter

1

teaspoon garlic powder

1

tablespoon minced garlic

12

/

teaspoon salt and pepper

1

teaspoon parsley

DIRECTIONS

Melt butter and other ingredients. Pour over cooked steaks.

ST EA K M A R I NA DE INGREDIENTS 13

/

cup soy sauce

3

tablespoons honey

1

tablespoon minced garlic

2

tablespoons olive oil

RALPH’S TIPS • Steaks should be 1-inch thick or more for grilling. • For a steak cooked medium, go about 10 minutes on each side. • Meats like London broil or chuck roast can be grilled, but they need to be marinated first to break down the muscle tissue. They can be marinated in Italian dressing or something with acidity in it.

DIRECTIONS

Marinade steaks in this mixture for one hour or overnight before grilling or broiling.

S T OV E -T O P C H I C K E N M A R S A L A INGREDIENTS

Boneless chicken breast cut in bite-size pieces 1

2

/

cup chicken broth

14

/

cup almond flour (or cornstarch as substitute)

Salt and pepper to taste

2

tablespoons parsley

teaspoons minced garlic

2

tablespoons butter

tablespoon olive oil

/ - 1 cup Marsala wine

12

DIRECTIONS

12

8-16 oz. sliced mushrooms

Heat a deep pan to medium heat. Add oil, butter, garlic, chicken, salt, and pepper. Cook until chicken is almost done. Add rest of ingredients. Toss often on low heat 45 minutes. Add more Marsala wine if desired. Serve over your favorite pasta or rice.

Hey, readers! Do you have a favorite dish or funny cooking story? Tell me about it! Email me at theresa@akersmediagroup.com

THERESA CAMPBELL

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 109


FORK ON THE ROAD

REVIEWS

Nancy’s place gets a makeover The restaurant has a new look, a great chef, and excellent service. STORY: LEIGH NEELY

≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL

hen you step into the newly remodeled Legacy Restaurant at the Nancy Lopez Country Club in The Villages, you feel like you’re a world away from life’s stresses. The casual elegance is welcoming and comfortable. The restaurant was purchased last year by the Suleiman family, which owns several restaurants in the area. They temporarily closed Legacy, and the stunning makeover makes you want to take a walking tour before you sit down to eat. “We closed in September last year and the work was completed in five months,”

says Michael Roberts, manager of the restaurant. Brothers David, Nate, George, Jack, and Joe Suleiman have made it their passion to take struggling restaurants and turn them into popular successes. The Greek-style Amerikanos Grille in Spanish Springs Town Square and Havana Country Club are both flourishing after the family bought them. However, it’s Legacy that shows off best what they can do. From the beauty of the hand-blown imported sconces to the uniqueness of the garden wall, they’ve created a restaurant that is definitely an oasis. We were seated in the Garden Room, which has a live garden on one wall that is one of only perhaps a dozen in the United


States. Though it’s tempting to touch to see if it’s real, signs ask that you don’t so the garden isn’t adversely affected. The beauty and lush greenness, along with the row of windows adding natural light, make it a delightful place for lunch. Other rooms include the Florida, the Domingo, and the Sydney. My friend and I had lunch and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves and our meals. Though we skipped appetizers (which include a shrimp cocktail of jumbo prawns, signature crab cakes, a charcuterie board, and escargot), we knew we wouldn’t go home hungry. Entrées include chef specialties like filets, ribeyes, pork shank, and duck, but we opted for the Tuesday & Thursday three-course menu. You get a salad, entrée, and dessert for one price. Other specials include Martini Mondays, Wednesday Lobster Night, and Fresh from the Sea Friday. Prime Rib Sunday features slow-roasted, hand-cut prime rib starting at $22.95. Prices for the three-course meals range from $19.99-$25.99 and offer a significant variety of foods. I chose pear and ricotta stuffed sacchettini while my friend enjoyed chicken piccata. Our house salads were a fresh mix of spring greens and other vegetables with housemade croutons and fresh-made dressing. We also enjoyed warm oatmeal bread with herbed butter.

EXTRA! EXTRA! Just outside Legacy Restaurant is the Legacy Bar and Grill, which is poolside. Designed for good times and good food, it features a menu of American classics and fresh salads. It’s open from 11am-8pm Sunday-Tuesday and from 11am-9pm Wednesday-Saturday.

“The emphasis is on health here,” says Brooke Warnken, who was our server. “Chef Ivan makes sure all meals are fresh and paired for the best flavor.” The entrées were generous and absolutely delicious. The sacchettini pasta with the crunch of the pear and creamy ricotta rested in a pulled short-rib marsala wine cream sauce. It was perfect for a sweet and savory lover like me. My friend’s chicken piccata was tender and juicy and paired well with creamy whipped potatoes. Desserts were small but the perfect ending after the rich entrées. I had a passion fruit cream shot, which was tart but delicious, and my companion enjoyed a key lime tart that was equally good. While enjoying a tour after our meal, we ran into David and Jack Suleiman, two of the owners, who were excited to share with us the details of the restaurant. Hostess Laila Osorio told us the granite bar is filled with crushed red glass from New York City, and the ladies’ room boasts a concrete sink with pink glitter highlights. (We heard there’s blue glitter in the men’s room, though we did not visit.) Jack says they’ve heard from many customers that the noise level can take away from enjoying a meal. “So, we’re working on being acoustic-friendly. With the help of a sound engineer and designer, we’re hoping to control the noise to make dining here more pleasant,” he says.

Legacy Restaurant at the Nancy Lopez Country Club

17135 Buena Vista Blvd. in The Villages. Lunch is served from 11am-3pm and dinner is from 3:30-9pm. Rooms for private parties are available; contact the event coordinator at 352.753.1475.

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 111


SALUTÉ

D RINKS

A toast to French history The legends surrounding Châteauneuf-du-Pape—the village and the wine—make this popular French blend a real conversation starter. STORY: MARY ANN DESANTIS

112 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

une marks the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landing when Allied troops liberated France from Adolf Hitler’s grip. Among those happiest to see the Germans leave were French winemakers, particularly those who produced Châteauneuf-du Pape, which seemed to be a popular wine among soldiers who raided cellars. And if pilfering fine wine wasn’t bad enough, the Germans almost succeeded in completely demolishing the village’s famous castle. Châteauneuf-du-Pape, the village and the wine, is steeped in history and legend. Often the conversations around a glass of the wine make it even more fun to drink. Many people do not know that the Catholic papacy moved to France in 1305 when the French-born Archbishop of Bordeaux became Pope Clement V. The new pope refused to move to Rome and transferred the papal administration to Avignon in southeastern France. Seven French popes presided in France until 1378, when Pope Gregory XI returned the papacy to Rome. It was the second French pope, John XXII, who vowed to improve the wines around Avignon. His regional wines became known as “vin de pape” or “wine of the pope.” Pope John XXII also directed the construction of a castle in the rustic village of Châteauneuf Calcernier. After the papacy returned to Rome, the castle fell into disrepair. Much of it was


THE E GRAP

TAST I NG NOTES DEFINED

Complex/ Complexity

GRENACHE

Photo of Châteauneuf-du Pape provided by Tony DeSantis

While Châteauneuf-du-Pape wines usually are blends of several grapes, the predominant grape must be a grenache. Châteauneuf-du-Pape often is composed of about 80 percent grenache. One of the most widely planted varieties in the world, dark-skin grenache grapes need hot, dry conditions because they ripen late.

dismantled for the stones during the French Revolution, but in 1892, the property was deeded back to the state and immediately classified as a historic monument. The Germans used it as an arms depot and an antiaircraft observation post during World War II, and their parting shot was purposely blowing up the structure as they departed in August 1944. Today, only a portion of the façade remains. Vineyards and wine contributed to the area’s popularity and growth. In 1344, nearly half of the commune around the village was devoted to growing grapes for wine. By the late 1700s, the area was famous for the quality of its Châteauneuf du Pape wines, and in 1893, the village of Châteauneuf Calcernier was officially named Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Enough of the history lesson; let’s discuss the wine by the same name. Châteauneuf-du-Pape is so delicious that it often overshadows other wines from the southern Rhone Valley. The red wine is traditionally a blend of grenache, syrah, and mourvèdre grapes though other grape varieties can be added.

Châteauneuf-du-Pape AOC permits 13 different grape varieties, but the blend must be predominantly grenache. While some bottles can sell for more than $600, many delicious and less expensive labels are available locally. Costco even offers an exclusive Kirkland Signature Châteauneuf-du-Pape from Domaine de Nalys for about $20. Surprisingly tasty, the Kirkland vintages I sampled (2012-2016) were medium bodied and smooth. The flavors became more intense after they were decanted awhile. These are definitely “drink now” wines, though, because they didn’t seem as complex as more expensive Châteauneuf-du-Papes. One of my favorites, La Fiole du Pape Grand Vin de Reserve, even has its own legend. You can’t miss the gritty, distorted bottle in local wine shops, including Two Old Hags Wine Shoppe in Leesburg. Usually wrapped in delicate paper, some people think the bottles pay homage to a great fire in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, where only a cellar and a few melted bottles survived the raging heat. Pioneer bottler and independent winemaker

M. Charles Brotte actually “created” the bottle for a competition of Provence ceramists. Brotte won the competition with a bottle shaped to illustrate “the wild movement of the grenache vine twisted in the strong mistral wind.” The unique bottle remains popular almost 70 years later with more than 2.6 million produced annually. Brotte was a marketing genius because he also was the first to create a nonvintage red cru. Inspired by Champagne producers who make non-vintage wines to ensure consistency of style year after year, he applied the same process using his house reserve wines (some aged five years) in his Châteauneuf-du-Pape blend. The smooth, already mature La Fiole du Pape Grand Vin de Reserve pairs well with blue cheese, meats, and especially chocolate desserts. It sells for about $35 locally. Although the bottle looks like it’s been aged awhile, La Fiole is another “drink now” wine. Other popular and affordable Châteauneufdu-Pape producers include Le Fiacre du Pape, Barton & Guestier, and Roger Sabon Prestige.

Mary Ann has written for Lake & Sumter Style since 2006. She is a member of the Society of American Travel Writers and a fellow of the Symposium for Professional Wine Writers, Napa Valley. Her travel and wine articles have won several first-place awards from the Florida Press Club.

Complexity is the way that flavors and aromas interact with each other, often creating entirely new flavors. Intense flavors and longer finishes (how long the flavor stays on your palate) are traits of higher-quality wines. One popular wine retailer shares this analogy: some wines are one-note melodies, others jazz renditions, and some can be a complex symphony. Tickets to the symphony usually cost more.

MARY ANN DESANTIS

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 113


DINING GUIDE

dine

OUT Whatever your favorite dish, you can find a great place that serves it in this area. Check out what's nearby or take a little drive to a new place! Denotes locations where you can find Lake & Sumter Style

A S TAT U L A Race Car Diner 25641 Monroe St. 352.253.6940 ASTOR Blackwater Inn Williams Landing 55716 Front St. 352.759.3802 Castaways Restaurant 23525 US SR 40 352.759.2213 Sparky’s Place Restaurant 24646 SR 40 352.759.3551 William’s Landing 55716 Front St. 352.759.2802 BUSHNELL Chuck’s Odd Cuples Café 117 W Belt Ave 352.568.0408 Hong Kong Restaurant 2229 W CR 48 (352) 568-8888 Howie’s Family Restaurant 840 N. Main St. 352.793.8582

114 /

TJ’s Family Restaurant 412 W. Belt Ave 352.793.8877

Friar Tuck 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd. 352.404.6818

CLERMONT

G’s NY Pizza 12346 Roper Blvd. 352.243.8900

801 City Grille 801 Montrose St. 352.394.6911 Akina Sushi Bar & Asian Fusion Bistro 4300 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.243.8988 Calabria Ristorante 13900 CR 455 407.656.5144 Cheeser’s Palace Café 707 W. Montrose St. 352.404.9431 Corelli Italian Restaurant 1042 E. Hwy. 50 352.989.5924 Devenney’s Irish Pub 16909 High Grove Blvd. 352.432.3925 El Cerro Restaurant 811 W. Hwy. 50 352.241.9884 Flippers Pizzeria 2523 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.242.2214

Green Garden 1790 E. Hwy. 50 352.243.2077 Guru Restaurant 2400 S. Hwy. 27 352.241.9884 Legends Grille & Tavern 1700 Legendary Blvd. 352.243.1118 Lilly’s on the Lake 846 W. Osceola St. 352.708.6565 Napolis Pizzeria 556 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.243.7500 Robata Japanese Steak House & Sushi Bar 1500 Oakley Seaver Dr. 352.404.9688 Root and Branch Bistro and Bar 1200 Seaver Dr. 352.708.4529 Sanctuary Ridge Bar & Grille 2601 Diamond Club Road 352.243.0411

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

Sarah’s Greek Cuisine & More 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd., Ste. 305 352.404.8031 The Crooked Spoon Gastropub 200 Citrus Tower Blvd. 352.404.4808 Troy’s Cuban & Deli 1200 Oakley Seaver Dr. 352.241.4295 Uncle Kenny’s BBQ 157 Hwy. 27 352.394.1225 EUSTIS 1884 Restaurant & Bar 12 East Magnolia Ave. 1.800.856.1884 Combat Café 1602 N. Hwy. 19 352.483.0250 Haystax Restaurant 15439 Hwy. 441 352.489.0510 Jeannie’s Place 209 E. Gottsche Ave. 352.359.0027 Kiku Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar 15211 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.483.8288

King’s Taste Bar-B-Que 503 Palmetto St. 352.589.0404 LaCabana Mexican Bar and Grill 2060 S. Bay St. 352.357.4600 Nalan Sultan Mediterranean Grill 1 N. Eustis St. 352.357.4444 NightOwl Caribbean Restaurant 929 S. Bay St. 352.589.0256 Stavro’s & Sons of Eustis 2100 W. CR 44 352.589.9100

G R OV E L A N D Coyote Rojo 214 W. Broad St. 352.557.8999 Ikaho Sushi Japanese 7965 SR 50, #900 352.557.8988 James Barbeque 262 W. Orange St. 352.557.4050 Lil Anthony’s Pizza 7965 SR 50 352.429.7499

God Café 300 W. Main St. 352.801.7447

La Hacienda Restaurant 10400 CR 48 352.324.3910

The Crazy Gator 402 N. Bay St. 352.589.5885

Nicker’s Clubhouse Restaurant 10400 CR 48 352.324.2718 L A DY L A K E

The Oyster Troff 936 N. Bay St. 352.357.9939

Bamboo Bistro 700 Hwy. 441 352.750.9998

Tillie’s Tavern & Grill 31 E. Magnolia Ave. 352.602.7929

El Ranchito 1 Lagrande Blvd.

Tony’s Pizza & Subs 2760 E. Orange Ave. 352.589.9001

Lady Lake Harbor Hills Country Club 6538 Lake Griffin Rd. 352.753.7000

F RU I T L A N D PA R K

Mom & Dad’s Italian Restaurant 504 S. U.S. Hwy. 441/27 352.753.2722

Legends Cafe 2468 U.S. Hwy. 441/27 352.728.0006 Rae Rae’s Restaurant 2468 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.323.1595 The Rose Plantation 200 Rose Ave., Fruitland Park 352.805.4340

Frank’s Place 201 N. 1st St. 352.323.1989

H OW EY- I N THE -HILLS

Thai Sushi America 925 N. Bay St. 352.357.1949

ibar-be-que Express 3170 Hwy. 27 352.315.4227

Dance’s BBQ 1707 South Street 352.801.8885

Gator Bay Bar & Grill 10320 CR 44 352.365.2177

JB Boondocks Bar & Grill 704 S. Lakeshore Blvd. 352.324.3600

Fruitland Park Café 3180 US Hwy. 441/27 352.435.4575

Cousin Vinnie’s Family Sports Restaurant 10700 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.253.2442

Red Wing Restaurant 12500 S. SR 33 352.429.2997

Taki’s Pizza House 2824 S. Bay St. 352.357.0022

The Great Pizza Company 23 E. Magnolia Ave. 352.357.7377

Chesapeake Bay Grill 4467 Arlington Ridge Blvd. 352.315.0066

352.750.3335

The Original Brooklyn Water Bagel Co. 514 Hwy. 441 352.614.9000 LEESBURG Cafe Ola 400 N. 14th St. 352.365.0089 Cedar River Seafood 8609 S. U.S. Hwy. 441 352.728.3377

Great Chicago Fire Brewery & Tap Room 311 W. Magnolia St. 352.474.2739 HP Grill 1403 S. 14th St. 352.314.0006 Ichiban Buffet 10301 Hwy. 441 352.728.6669 Johnson’s Pizza Place 4120 Corley Island Rd., Ste. 300 352.801.7250 Kountry Kitchen 1008 W. Dixie Ave. 352.323.0852 La Palma Mexican Grill 1690 Citrus Blvd. 352.323.1444 Lilly’s Super Subs 2339 CR 473 352.343.4663 Magnolia’s Oyster Bar 201 W. Magnolia St. 352.323.0093 Mrs. T’s Place, Southern Restaurant 305 Pine St. 352.431.3217 Naples Italian Restaurant 1107 W. North Blvd. 352.323.1616 Osaka 1401 Citrus Blvd. 352.728.0788 Pine Street Bar-B-Que 408 Pine St. 352.728.1293


Plantation Oaks Restaurant 4720 Plantation Blvd. 352.530.2680

Wrapsody 712 W. Main St. 352.801.7239

Highland Street Café 185 S. Highland St. 352.383.1446

Ramshackle Café 1317 N. 14th St. 352.365.6565

MASCOTTE

Jeremiah’s 500 N. Highland St. 352.383.7444

Rodello’s Italian Restaurant 26736 US Hwy. 27 352.319.8093 San Jose Mexican 1337 S. 14th St. 352.805.4174

Rainbow Restaurant 704 E. Myers Blvd. 352.429.2093 MINNEOLA Jack’s Barbecue 100 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.394.2673

Sip Restaurant and Wine Bar 707 W. Main St. 352.435.7840

Lil Anthony’s Pizza 205 N. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.394.1516

Southern Gourmet 314 W. Main St. 352.409.7512

Minneola Grill 117 W. Washington St. 352.394.2555

Stavro's Pizza 755 N. 14th St. 352.326.4202 Stokes Seafood Market and More 719 W. Main St. 352.787.3474 Sully’s Smokehouse 10820 CR 44 352.483.7427 Takis Pizza Restaurant 1205 N. 14th St. 352.787.2344 Mammoth Oak Brewing Company 1107 W. North Blvd. 352.315.0198 The Florida Porch Café 706 W. Main St. 352.365.1717 The Mojo Grill & Catering Co. 9925 US-441 352.787.0494 The Old Time Diner 1350 W. North Blvd. 352.805.4250 Turners 114 S. 5th St. 352.530.2274 Two 09 West Main 209 W. Main St. 352.801.7966 Two Old Hags Wine Shoppe 410 W Main St 352.435.9107 Vic’s Catering 352.728.8989 Wolfy’s 918 N. 14th St. 352.787.6777

Napoli’s Pizzeria 556 Hwy. 27 352.243.7500 The Surf Bar and Grill 650 N. Hwy. 27 202.527.0100 Tiki Bar & Grill 508 S. Main Ave. 352.394.2232 MOUNT DORA 1921 Mount Dora 142 E. Fourth Ave. 352.385.1921 Anthony’s Pizza 17195 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.357.6668 Barnwood Country Kitchen and Smokehouse 3725 W. Old US Hwy 441 352.630.4903 Beauclaire Restaurant at Lakeside Inn 100 N. Alexander St. 352.383.4101 Bocce Pizzeria 925 E. First Ave. 352.385.0067 Café Gianni 425 N. Alexander St. 352.735.3327 Cody’s on 4th Cafe 111 E. 4th Ave. 352.735.8426 Copacabana Cuban Cafe 320 Dora Drawdy Way 352.385.9000 Frog & Monkey English Pub 411 N. Donnelly St. 352. 383.1936

J.K. Thai & Sushi 116 E. 5th Ave. 352.385.5470 Let’s Do Lunch 426 N. Donnelly St. 352.735.4577 Magical Meat Boutique 112 W. Third Ave. 352.729.6911 Mount Dora Pizza & Subs 2718 W. Old U.S. Hwy. 441 352.383.5303 Olive Branch MediterraneanItalian Grille 115 W. 3rd St. 352.729.6734 One Flight Up Coffee, Dessert & Wine Bar 440 N. Donnelly St., Ste. 100 352.758.9818 Pisces Rising 239 W. 4th Ave. 352.385.2669 PizzAmore’ 722 E. 5th Ave. 352.383.0092 Shiva Indian Restaurant 140A W. 5th Ave. 352.735.4555 Sidelines Sport Eatery 315 N. Highland St. 352.735.7433 Sugarboo’s Bar-B-Que 1305 N. Grandview St. 352.735.7675 The Bavarian Haus 433 N. Alexander St. 352.735.8387 The Country Club 1900 Country Club Blvd. 352.735.2263 The Goblin Market 331-B Donnely St. 352.735.0059

SORRENTO

T H E V I L L AG E S

Del Franco Pizza Place 31436 CR 437 352.383.8882

Amerikano’s Grill 998 Del Mar Dr. 352.633.8027

Lisa’s Kountry Cafe 23911 CR 46 352.735.3380 TAVA R E S Angelo’s Italian Restaurant 2270 Vindale Rd. 352.343.2757 Fish Camp Lake Eustis 901 Lake Shore Blvd. 352.742.4400 Hurricane Dockside Grill 3351 W. Burleigh Blvd. 352.508.5137 Kalua Hale Sand Bar 111 W. Ruby St. 352.609.5910 Lake Dora Sushi & Sake 227 E. Main St. 352.343.6313 Mary’s Kountry Kitchen 15945 CR 448 352.343.6823 O’Keefe’s Irish Pub and Restaurant 115 S Rockingham Ave. 352.343.2157 Palm Gardens Restaurant 1661 Palm Garden St. 352.431.3217 Ruby Street Grille 221 E. Ruby St. 352.742.7829 Sunrise Grill 462 E. Burleigh Blvd. 352.343.7744 The Hideaway 11912 Lane Park Rd. 352.343.3585

Belle Glade Country Club 446 Moyer Loop 352.205.8208 Bravo Pizza 1080 Lake Sumter Landing 352.430.2394

Margarita Republic 1102 Main St. 352.753.4600 Mezza Luna Italian Restaurant and Bar 320 Colony Blvd. 352.753.3824 NYPD Pizzeria 4046 Wedgwood Ln 352.750.1994

Cane Garden Country Club 1726 Bailey Trail 352.750.0627 Chengs Chinese and Sushi Restaurant 4050 Wedgewood Ln. 352.391.9678 China Gourmet III 343 Colony Blvd 352.750.4965 City Fire Brownwood & Paddock Square 352.561.2078 Evans Prairie Country Club 1825 Evan’s Prairie Trail 352.750.2225 Fiesta Grande Mexican Grill 297 Colony Blvd 352.751.0400

Orange Blossom Country Club 1542 Water Tower Circle 352.751.4501 Palmer Legends Country Club 1635 Palmer Way 352.750.4499 RedSauce 1000 Canal St. 352.750.2930 Ricciardi’s Italian Table 3660 Kiessel Rd. 352.391.9939 Sakura 265 Colony Blvd 352.205.7393 Takis Greek and Italian Restaurant 13761 U.S. Hwy. 441 N. 352.430.3630

Giovanni’s 3439 Wedgewood Lane 352.751.6674

The Lighthouse Point Bar and Grille 925 Lakeshore Dr. 352.753.7800

Glenview County Club 3914 Glenview Rd. 352.753.0077

Tierra Del Sol Country Club 806 San Marino Dr. 352.753.8005

Hemingway’s at Havana Country Club 2484 Odell Circle 352.430.3200

VKI Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar 1004 Old Mill Run 352.259.9887

Legacy Restaurant Nancy Lopez Country Club 17135 Buena Vista Blvd. 352.753.1475

U M AT I L L A

Gator’s 9 N. Central Ave. 352.669.6969 Greg’s Haystax 526 Umatilla Blvd. 352.669.1555 Old Crow Real Pit Bar-B-Q 41100 SR 19 352.669.3922 Shanghai 531 N. Central Ave. 352.669.2004 The Mason Jar 37534 State Rd. 19 352.589.2535 W I L DWO O D China Jade 420 W. CR 44 352.330.5913 Continental Country Club 50 Continental Blvd. 352.748.3293 Cotillion Southern Café 101 N. Main St. 352.748.1223 Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 346 Shopping Center Dr. 352.461.0577 O’Shucks! Oyster Bar and Grill 1016 S Main St. 352.399.2200 Traditions Café 3107 Hwy. 44 352.748.1077 Woody’s Bar-B-Q 1220 S. Main St. 352.748.1109 YA L A H A Yalaha Bakery 8210 CR 48 352.324.3366

Fish & Chix 100 N. Central Ave. 352.669.7145 GOOD GRUB

The Rose Plantation

Whale’s Tale Fish House 2720 W. Old U.S. Hwy 441 352.385.1500

A distinctive dining experience with eclectic china, fine silverware, stemware and linen tablecloths that enhance the setting for the Americana-style food and wine. The historical house creates a unique atmosphere and the view of the lake enhances the dining experience.

Zellie’s Pub 4025 N. U.S. Hwy. 19A 352.483.3855

200 Rose Avenue, Fruitland Park 352.805.4340 / theroseplantation.com

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

THIS MONTH'S EDITOR'S PICK

/ 115


FINAL THOUGHT

Another milestone A family milestone—the first grandchild graduates from high school. STORY: LEIGH NEELY

his month, my grandson graduates 50 years to the day after I did. He’s leaving for college on July 7 because he has a football scholarship. I don’t pinch his cheeks or offer him a quarter to rub my feet (“Christmas Vacation” fans will know this). After all, he’s 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighs 285 pounds, and I’m 5-foot-2. You know what’s coming now: you’re going down memory lane with me. The night he was born, we lived in Dalton, Georgia, and his parents lived in Florence, Alabama. There’s just no easy way to make that trip. My son Dale called around 11pm and said Stacie was in labor. He told me they suspected it would be a long one. I said, “Do you want me to come now?” He said, “You don’t have to.” There was a pause and then he said, “I’d like you to come now.” I was packed and ready in 15 minutes. My husband was traveling with work and was in St. Louis. I’d never driven such a long distance by myself, but my son wanted me there and I was going. What made this a problem is I can get lost in a paper sack and this was pre-GPS days. However, I made the drive just fine. I even stopped at a Waffle House for coffee and when I told the server I was on my way to see my first grandson born, she gave me the coffee free.

It turned out the doctors were right, and they finally took Stacie in for a C-section around 8:30am. His other grandmother and I couldn’t wait to see the little guy. Because it was a small hospital, they not only let us see him as soon as he was born, they let us go to the nursery to watch them bath him and get him ready to see his mom, who’d had anesthesia. I have so many wonderful memories. I used to work at a newspaper where I wrote a weekly column and he was often the subject. I called him Perfect Grandson Sam. At age 3, he looked up at me one day and said, “Wet’s go det a tattoo.” Fortunately, he was talking about temporary tattoos at the toy store. However, he now has two special tattoos. On his right wrist are the initials of his late maternal grandfather and on his left wrist is my late husband’s ham radio call sign—K4SON—which makes me love Sam more. Both men would be so proud of the young man he is now. I have to admit, I’m kind of proud, too.

Leigh has been writing with newspapers and magazines for almost 40 years. If you’d like to contact her, you can reach her at leigh@akersmediagroup.com

116 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • J U N ' 1 9

LEIGH NEELY


STARTING AT

$29* INSTALLED *per/sq.ft.

Over 300 colors in stock!

BUILDING STONE :: COUNTERTOPS :: FURNITURE :: LANDSCAPING STONE :: MISCELLANEOUS www.southeasternstoneandtile.com :: 352.629.7518 :: 1208 S.E. 3RD AVE, OCALA, FL 34478

J U N ' 1 9 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 117


Every day deserves more adventure. Capable Performance Underneath RAV4’s rugged good looks are capabilities that reveal the potential of where you can go, on- or off-road. Let’s Go Places.

The all-new 2019

RAV4

DELUCA TOYOTA SR 200 • Ocala, FL 352-732-0770 DELUCATOYOTA.COM Prototype shown with options. ©2018 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

Frank DeLuca

Owner/President DeLuca Toyota


Your Solution to Social Media

Social Media Management Over 700 billion minutes are being spent monthly on Facebook alone, making social media the most powerful venue for engagement. Allow Akers Media to evaluate your business, discover where your key customers are and develop and plan to grow your business through social media management.

Call us today for a free consultation

352.787.4112

akersmediagroup.com


GALDER M A

2018

PR EFER R ED EXECUTIVE

VILLAGE INSTITUTE OF PLASTIC SURGERY

MER Z

2018

TOP INJECTOR S

W E’ V E RE V E A LED A N E W US, N OW LE T ’ S

REVEAL A NEW YOU

FAC E / B O DY / B R E A S T / SK I N & L A SER S / M ED SPA DANNY SOARES, MD

LARRY BLEVINS, PA, ASLMS

ROBERTO MENDEZ, MD, FACS

DOUBLE BOARD-CERTIFIED FACIAL PLASTIC SURGEON

FELLOW & MASTER INJECTOR TRAINER

BOARD-CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON

MESOS PLASTIC SURGERY & LASER CENTER IS NOW

3 52 . 2 59. 8 59 9 | W W W. P L A S T I C S U R G E RY V I P.CO M

Profile for Akers Media Group

Style Magazine, Village Edition, Jun'19  

Every month. Everywhere.

Style Magazine, Village Edition, Jun'19  

Every month. Everywhere.