a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

0324-25

WHAT REALLY HAPPENS AFTER A TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY?


welcome to

after effects! Each year throughout the world, an average of 10 million traumatic brain injuries occur. Concussions are just one small subfield of traumatic brain injuries and happen when the brain suddenly impacts the skull. The location of the impact determines how the concussion is treated. Despite the various kinds of concussion based on what part of the brain is affected, the effects that surface after the time of the injury are similar. Length of post-concussion effects vary by location and severity of the injury and there is no specific timetable for these head injuries. One can recover from the physical effects of a concussion, but the mental side effects last a lifetime. The suicide rate is much higher in people, but specifically athletes who suffer from postconcussion syndrome and depression as a result of the effects to the neurotransmitters.

In the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research by Barbara Graves, nearly nine percent of high school athletes and six percent of collegiate athletes sustained at least one concussion. Graves also stated that males ages 10-19 involved in football or bicycling are more likely to suffer from a traumatic brain injury. Science Direct by Dameon Gruson, explains what concussions are, how they happen, and educating athletes on the dangers of concussions. The article mentions that it is tough for doctors to accurately diagnose a concussion and it is up to the patient to be honest about their symptoms if they want to recover the correct way and avoid the dangers of post-concussion syndrome. The downside of this is that players can easily lie about how they feel in order to get back sooner but again, this is strongly ill-advised as the risk of reinjury and worsening the initial injury is extremely high.


“ One can recover from

the physical effects of a concussion, but the

mental side effects last a lifetime.�


schedule 03.24 10:00

11:00

Join the rest of the conference attendees for a brunch to kick off the two day conference about the after effects of traumatic brain injuries.

Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University whose research focuses on understanding and preventing traumatic brain injuries.

WELCOME BRUNCH

DAVID CAMARILLO

12:00

12:30

Discuss with attendees from your region about the first speakers talk. Short Q&A with speaker when they come to your room.

Take a break for lunch and converse with other attendees about the morning sessions.

REGIONAL SEMINAR DISCUSSION

LUNCH BREAK

1:30

2:30

Kinesiology Professor and Director of Athletic Training Educations Program at Michigan State University.

Discuss with attendees from your region about the first speakers talk. Short Q&A with speaker when they come to your room.

TRACY COVASSIN, PH.D

3:00

CLOSING REMARKS FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Listen to the final statements from the Chairman of the After Effects Conference about Day One, and what to look forward to at tomorrow’s sessions.

REGIONAL SEMINAR DISCUSSION


03.25 9:00

10:00

BREAKFAST

Join the rest of the conference attendees for a breakfast to kick off day two of the conference about the after effects of traumatic brain injuries.

DR. CHRIS NOWINSKI Founder of Concussion Legacy Foundation and leading a global conversation on concussions, CTE and the future of sports.

11:00

1:30

Take either a guided tour with a group of attendees or a self-guided tour of the Professional Hockey Hall of Fame.

Take a break for lunch and converse with other attendees about the morning sessions.

TOUR HOCKEY HALL OF FAME

2:30

CLOSING REMARKS FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Listen to the final statements from the Chairman of the After Effects Conference, giving an overview of the events from the past two days.

LUNCH BREAK

3:00

PICTURE WITH THE STANLEY CUP Have your photo taken with the Stanley’s Cup as you depart this years After Effects Conference!


speakers David camarillo preventing concussions 3/24 11:00am Dr. David Camarillo, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2001), a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (2008) and completed his postdoctoral research fellowship in Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco in 2011.

tracey covassin affects of multiple concussions 3/24 1:30pm Dr. Covassin is a professor and licensed athletic trainer at Michigan State University in the Department of Kinesiology. Her research in sport-related concussion includes sex differences in concussion outcomes, epidemiology and risk factors associated with sports-related concussion. Dr. Covassin currently directs a multi-site high school and college sport-concussion outreach program in the Mid-Michigan area.

chris nowinski can i have your brain? 3/25 10:00am Nowinski wrote the investigative expose Head Games: Football’s Concussion Crisis in 2006 and soon after founded the non-profit Concussion Legacy Foundation, where he serves as CEO. He co-founded the world-famous Boston University CTE Center, where he serves as the outreach, recruitment, education, and public policy leader, as well as the VA-BU-CLF Brain Bank, where he led recruitment for the 2017 study that found 110 of 111 deceased NFL players had CTE.


notes


Profile for akcadle

VISC 302 After Effects Conference Brochure  

VISC 302 After Effects Conference Brochure  

Profile for akcadle
Advertisement