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S T. L O U I S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T PA R T N E R S H I P

GATEWAY TO THE BEST

A LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOODS ACROSS THE REGION

ENTERPRISE 50 PARKS RENT-A-CAR TO HIKE, BIKE, A Welcome Guide to St. Louis

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101 THINGS EVERY ST. LOUISAN MUST DO

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SHOPPING LOCALLY

ESSENTIAL SCHOOL STATS, KINDERGARTEN THROUGH COLLEGE

200+ GREAT RESTAURANTS, FROM CASUAL TO FINE DINING

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Tomiyah, Age 21 Cahokia, IL

cancer SHOULD NEVER INTERRUPT a promising future That’s why we have proton beam therapy on our side. At Siteman Kids at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, we believe cancer shouldn’t interrupt childhood, or derail the dreams kids make during this precious time. That’s why we use the very latest technology, like proton beam therapy, when treating patients with cancer like Tomiyah. Two years ago, this aspiring makeup artist was diagnosed with a tumor on the optic nerve behind her eye. Today, Tomiyah is cancer free, attending college and well on her way to fulfilling her childhood dreams. Because we’re not just experts in our field, we’re Guardians of Childhood.

© St. Louis Children’s Hospital 2018

Meet Tomiyah at StLouisChildrens.org/Tomiyah

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F R OM TH E C E O

St. Louis is experiencing a renaissance. We have one of the highest concentrations of Fortune 1000 companies per capita, affordable homes, excellent schools, and world-class cultural institutions. Inside our region’s thriving innovation districts, daring founders are commercializing groundbreaking scientific discoveries. All of this exciting activity is attracting new workers and companies, who are discovering the outstanding quality of life that our region has to offer. If you are new to St. Louis, we welcome you. If you are one of the partners growing this region every day, we thank you. I also want to thank our extraordinary local leaders, including Mayor Lyda Krewson and County Executive Steve Stenger, who are working tirelessly to build an environment where businesses and families can thrive and grow. Whether someone is a lifelong St. Louisan or a newcomer, every individual has a reason to be invested in this community. That’s why we’re excited to bring you Gateway to the Best, an informative guide to St. Louis. Produced by SLM Media Group, publishers of St. Louis Magazine, the publication will help you navigate our region’s rich history and neighborhoods, parks and cultural attractions, restaurants and shops, schools and hospitals. It’s our hope that Gateway to the Best encourages you to embrace all of the elements that make St. Louis a great place to live, work, and play. Sincerely, Sheila Sweeney Chief Executive Officer St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

Photography courtesy of St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

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C ON TE N TS

P G. 6

Welcome to the Gateway City An introduction to St. Louis P G. 8

Where We Live A look at life across the region

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101 Things Every St. Louisan Must Do A guide to some of the region’s most memorable experiences

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Park Place Whether you’re looking for art, history, or family fun, St. Louis has a green space for you.

Missouri Botanical Garden

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School Stats The Ultimate Guide to Shopping Locally

Resource Guide

A neighborhood-by-neighborhood look at St. Louis clothing boutiques

A Monumental Idea

A comprehensive guide to the region’s educational options, from kindergarten through college

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Dining Guide A sampling of some of St. Louis’ finest restaurants, from everyday cuisine to special-occasion fare.

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2018

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Partners in Business Working alongside local leaders, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership strives to spur stronger companies and communities.

Helpful organizations and institutions across the region

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Did Eero Saarinen draw his inspiration from the stars?

O

S

yo Photography courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden

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CAP OFF A GOOD MEETING WITH A GREAT NIGHT Of course we have the Gateway Arch, but that’s not the only place to get an aerial view. St. Louis provides plenty of venues for out-of-the-box thinking, like 360’s rooftop bar, where you can enjoy a cocktail and a bite to eat while checking out the city from above. Turn your good meeting into a great adventure at explorestlouis.com/meet.

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GAT E WAY TO T H E B E ST 2 0 1 8

THE ST. LOUIS REGION: “Top 10 Affordable Cities” – FORBES “Top 7 U.S. Innovation Districts” – BROOKINGS INSTITUTE

P R E S E N T E D BY

St. Louis Economic Development Partnership 7733 Forsyth, Ste. 2200 St. Louis, MO 63105 stlpartnership.com

“Best Startup City in America” – POPULAR MECHANICS “Fastest Growing Cities for Tech Jobs” – FORTUNE “#1 City Park” – USA TODAY

SLM | Media Group E D I TO R- I N - C H I E F

Jarrett Medlin D E S I G N D I R E CTO R

Tom White DESIGNER

Elizabeth Sawey

Contributors E D I TO R S & W R I T E R S

Eric Berger, Jeannette Cooperman, Nancy Curtis, Pat Eby, Brian Heffernan, Sarah Kloepple, Dave Lowry, George Mahe, Christy Marshall, Melissa Meinzer, Chris Naffziger, Kae M. Petrin, William Powell, Katy Przybylski, Tony Rehagen, Stefene Russell, Mary Tomlinson, and Sandra Zak P H OTO G R A P H E R

Kevin A. Roberts While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for informational purposes only. The views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher, editor, or the Partnership. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited.

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St. Louis has been home to Enterprise since the beginning. And the city has only gotten better. The culture, accessibility and spirit of our town make it a great place to operate our business, and one of the best places to live, play, succeed and raise a family.

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Welcome to the Gateway City We hope you’ll soon discover all that we’ve come to love about our fair city. As with any great love, the obvious qualities draw you in first: baseball, Forest Park, price tags cheaper than Chicago’s… Your appreciation grows over time, as you come to discover more. But what hooks you are the subtle nuances: the Delmar Loop on a Saturday afternoon, a fresh batch at Donut Drive-In, a game of bocce on The Hill, the smell of hops in Soulard, the sound of laughter at Faust Park... Here are just five reasons to love St. Louis. A PERFECT PACE OF LIFE You know the feeling: Standing in line at the grocery store, tapping your foot, while the person in front of you chats with the clerk. Yes, it’s frustrating. But it’s also kinda reassuring to know that when someone asks, “How’s it going?” she can still make time to listen. We have the South’s hospitality, the North’s social concern, the East’s intellectualism, the West’s self-reliance. We eat black-eyed peas and chipotle barbecue; summer in Michigan and winter in Naples; read Emersonian transcendentalism and mutter, “Show me!” We’re smack in the middle, and extremes don’t throw us off course. Maybe it’s that Southern hospitality, mixed with big-city briskness, that makes our pace of life seem just right. AFFORDABILITY Why do so many St. Louisans go away for college and Part One of their careers, only to return to “settle down”? A big reason: That first “nice apartment” or “modest little house” might be realized a decade earlier than if they’d stayed in Chicago or D.C. (and three times that for San Fran or New York). Then there’s the parking. We’re spoiled. New Yorkers park in our no-parking zones because a ticket’s cheaper than an NYC parking spot. Granted, we’ve lost the old penny meters, but name 10 favorite destinations, and we’ll wager there’s free parking a stone’s throw from most of them. As a result, we’re all a bit less frazzled.

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GREEN SPACE There’s something to be said about driving 15 minutes and being surrounded by rolling hills and towering maples. St. Louis somehow balances urban amenities—major-league teams and fine eateries—with the serenity of the great outdoors. State parks like Castlewood and Pere Marquette are among nature’s sprawling retreats, but gems like Powder Valley Nature Center and Meramec Highlands Quarry also abound. Then there are our other parks; the city alone has more than 100 parks, including the granddaddy of ’em all, Forest Park. HISTORY Live here, and you can see and feel the centuries, because St. Louis is a city of brick. Italian immigrants shaped the slick, heavy layer of clay beneath The Hill and Dogtown into more than 20 million bricks a year by 1839, and when fire destroyed a third of the city in 1849, a new ordinance forbade construction of wooden structures altogether. We like our buildings to outlive us. Today, our fair city abounds with wow-factor architecture. We could spend forever gazing at St. Louis’ magnificent homes, such as the mansions of Westmoreland and Portland Places, designed by Eames and Young; Mauran, Russell & Crowell; and others. Ignore the paved streets, and you’re back in the early 1900s. KIDS CAN BE KIDS No matter how far you roam, St. Louis is a natural pick when it comes time to settle down and have kids. There’s no shortage of great schools across the region, and the tree-lined streets seem straight out of Leave It to Beaver. Plus, we have a long list of affordable, kid-friendly attractions and top-notch hospitals. It’s no wonder families rarely leave, friends always return, and kids can create kinda-perfect memories that they’ll pass on to their own kids.

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ST. LOUIS STATS TO KNOW

2.8

Metro area’s population, in millions

20 8,458 79

National ranking among U.S. cities by population

Square mileage of the metro area

Neighborhoods in the city

90 1764

Municipalities in the county

Year St. Louis was founded

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Where We Live A look at life across the region

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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Where We Live

DOWNTOWN & THE NEAR SOUTH SIDE FROM DOWNTOWN TO BENTON PARK, LAFAYETTE SQUARE TO SOULARD, THE HEART OF THE CITY HAS SEEN A SURGE OF INVE STMENT—BOTH LARGE-AND SMALL-SCALE.

Two decades ago, no one r e c ko n e d o n a s p e e d y recovery for downtown. Now lofts, boutiques, and restaurants rise above Washington Avenue, where the Mercantile Exchange and National Blues Museum have transformed the landscape. Ballpark Village is also preparing for a dramatic second phase: a 29-story residential tower and a class-A office building, located next to Busch Stadium. At the same time, the near South Side is experiencing a smaller-scale, grassroots resurgence. Coffee shops, corner bars, and restaurants have opened in Lafayette Square and Fox Park, and the number of rehabs in historic areas such as Benton Park is steadily growing. H I S T O R Y : St. Louis stayed much the same between 1774 and 1804. At the time of the Corps of Discovery, there were only 180 houses, concentrated mainly on Main, Second, and Third streets (which, at the time, had French names). In 1896, a tornado swept away huge sections of the near South Side. In Lafayette Square, nearly all that remained standing was a statue of Thomas Hart Benton. A R C H I T E C T U R E : Between 1865 and 1885, most Lafayette Square houses were Second Empire townhouses, the largest north of the park

A rendering of the forthcoming aquarium at Union Station

on Benton Place and Park Avenue; after 1890, architecture went Germanic: red brick, wide arches, turrets, classical-columned porches and iron balconies. The only remnant of St. Louis’ once thriving Real Estate Row is the Old Post Office, which has been dramatically renovated. Louis Sullivan’s Wainwright Building was one of the first skyscrapers in the world, combining a steel frame with an elegant ornamental terra-cotta exterior. I N T H E N E I G H B O R H O O D : T-REX, housing 200 companies, including 180 startups and entrepreneur support

organizations… The petfriendly offices of Nestlé Purina, which sponsors the annual Beggin’ Pet Parade in Soulard… The centuriesold Soulard Farmers’ Market R I T U A L S : Parades galore: the Annie Malone May Day Parade, VP Parade, St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Mardi Gras Grand Parade, Thanksgiving Day Parade, Labor Day Parade…

S O O N TO C O M E: Union Station’s past is inspiring its future. Lodging Hospitality Management is remaking the historic train station into a family-friendly attraction. After bringing a 3-D projected light show to the Grand Hall and a fire-and-light show beneath the train shed, LHM is building a 65,000-squarefoot aquarium and a 200foot Ferris wheel, slated to open in 2019. At the same time, the ambitious overhauls of the Arch grounds and Kiener Plaza are drawing visitors and St. Louisans alike. The Arch’s new museum is expected to open this summer.

H A N G O U TS : Three Sixty / Soulard Coffee Garden / Bridge Tap House & Wine Bar / Polite Society / Ballpark Village / Broadway Oyster Bar / 33 Wine Bar

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts, rendering courtesy of St. Louis Union Station

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CENTRAL WEST END & MIDTOWN ST. LOUIS’ MOST COSMOPOLITAN NEIGHBORHOOD, LOCATED AT THE EAST EDGE OF FORE ST PARK, CONTINUE S TO GROW—AND NEARBY MIDTOWN IS EVOLVING, TOO.

The entertainment district of Gaslight Square reached its apex between the late 1950s and the late ’60s, drawing the nation’s top music acts.

The Jewel Box in Forest Park

DID YOU KNOW? Not content to be just the geographical center of St. Louis, Grand Center represents a cultural nexus of the city: the conductor’s baton rises and falls at Powell Symphony Hall, world-class artists present their work at the Pulitzer and Contemporary, and future great minds traipse across the Saint Louis University campus. Farther west is the city’s most cosmopolitan neighborhood, the Central West End, where locals and tourists alike shop at Maryland Plaza and enjoy nearby Forest Park.

When the Fox Theatre opened in January 1929, its 6,000-seat capacity made it the second-largest venue of its kind in the world.

H I S T O R Y: Drawn by the grandeur of Forest Park in the late 1800s, wealthy city residents migrated west and settled in the areas just north and east of the park, establishing Westmoreland Place, Portland Place and what would become Lindell. The private streets and cul-de-sacs still remain…

IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD: Anchored by destinations, diversions and amenities of every sort, Midtown is almost best defined by what isn’t there, such as an overabundance of strip malls and chain restaurants. Grand Center grew even grander with the recent addition of the .ZACK and the Public Media Commons. Nearby, IKEA’s been a game changer for the neighborhood. “Without question, City Foundry would not be happening without IKEA,” says developer Steve Smith, referring to his forthcoming $300 million retail development, City Foundry. “We could not convince national retailers that this was a good investment without the credibility that IKEA provides.” Prefer boutiques over big box? The Central West End has them, along with an everexpanding tech scene. The Cortex Innovation Community, near Washington University’s medical campus, is one of the nation’s fastestgrowing startup scenes. (See the next page for details). It also houses Vicia, Michael and Tara Gallina’s acclaimed restaurant that Eater proclaimed among the best new restaurants in the country.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Josephine Baker Sonny Liston Tennessee Williams Kate Chopin Sara Teasdale T.S. Eliot

O N T H E H O R I ZO N : The CWE just keeps evolving, with high rises sprouting up every block or two: notably, the 12-story Citizen Park luxury apartments, at Lindell and Euclid; The Orion, a mixeduse development housing a Whole Foods; and the Koman Group development across the street, boasting the city’s first Shake Shack. The modern 36-story One Hundred tower is planned along Kingshighway. And a new high-rise on Wash. U.’s medical campus will expand space for clinical care at Siteman Cancer Center and offer a sixth-floor rooftop garden for patients.

H A N G O U TS : The Chase Park Plaza / Dressel’s Pub / Coffee Cartel / Urban Chestnut Brewing Company / Pappy’s / The Fountain on Locust

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts and courtesy of Forest Park Forever

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Where We Live

The Startup Scene HOW ST. LOUIS BECAME THE SILICON VALLEY OF THE MIDWE ST

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Midwestern values, cheap office space, and, yeah, IKEA help make St. Louis a destination city for budding entrepreneurs. Square co-founder Jim McKelvey can rattle off a laundry list of reasons the region has become a magnet for startups: affordable office space, great schools, IKEA… “I don’t think I’ve started a company in the last 10 years where we didn’t make an IKEA run,” he adds. In fact, the popular mobile payment company he launched with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey recently opened an office near the new IKEA, in the Cortex technology district. The campus, which sits on 200 acres in the Central West End, has become a hub for startups such as Square. Business Insider proclaimed St. Louis the fastest-growing startup scene in the nation. To some people on the coasts—who’ve mostly heard national news about crime, police shootings, and the Rams’ leaving town—the buzz about the startup scene might come as a surprise. But Cortex CEO Dennis Lower says that what might appear an overnight success was years in the making. The site dates back more than 15 years, when leaders of such nearby organizations as Washington University, BJC HealthCare, and the Missouri Botanical Garden convened to discuss how St. Louis—already the home of a thriving bioscience industry—could grow into an innovation hub. Cortex was born in 2002. The district’s master plan projects $2.1 billion in construction and more than 4.5 million square feet of mixed-use development. Though Lower says there is room for growth, he adds, “we have come miles in establishing a broad metro technology ecosystem.” Of course, that ecosystem extends beyond the CWE. The Lawrence Group is planning a significant mixed-use development nearby. In Creve Coeur, the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center recently added a $45 million addition, and the 39 North ag-tech district is attracting new talent. And downtown is the T-REX technology incubator, where more than 100 startups reside— making it ideal for collaboration and innovation. Among the T-REX tenants is Arch Grants, a nonprofit that provides essential funding to budding entrepreneurs. Its former executive director, Ginger Imster, concurred with McKelvey’s assessment of St. Louis as an attractive place for startups—because we’re not in Silicon Valley. “Our Midwestern values are one of our N AT I O N A L P R E S S greatest assets in term of how we are building Fastest-Growing Startup City the startup communi—Business Insider, Jan. ’16 ty in St. Louis,” she said. “There is a donor comBest Startup City in America —Popular Mechanics, Feb. ’15 munity that is anxious to see the headlines “The Next Silicon Valley” about St. Louis change —CB Insights, Nov. ’14 from negative to positive.” —ERIC BERGER

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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SOUTH CITY HOME TO SOME OF THE REGION’S HIPPE ST NEIGHBORHOODS, THE SOUTH SIDE IS A MIX OF NEW AND OLD —AND A BLEND OF CUISINE S AND CULTURE S.

Just 15 years ago, South St. Louis was scrubby Dutch and whitebread; just 30 years ago, the Grand business district was sound asleep. Today, Vietnamese, Thai, Iraqi, Afghan, Filipino, Arab, German, Roma, Bantu ,and Somali cultures weave a path down South Grand. Cherokee’s business district mixes taquerias and bodegas with its funky antiques and historic Casa Loma ballroom. Dusty corner bars and boarded-up shops have turned into Bosnian coffeehouses and international markets. And the value of those little gingerbread houses has skyrocketed. HISTORY: The Bevo Mill neighborhood took its name from the whimsical 60-foot windmill restaurant built by August Busch Sr. Today, the old windmill houses the new Das Bevo bierhall. A R C H I T E CT U R E T I D B I TS : Many of St. Louis’ early corporate leaders settled in Compton Heights’ mansions… In Shaw Place, Henry Shaw re-created a street from Victorian England—an oval drive around a parkway with a fountain—and planted the seeds for the renowned Missouri Botanical Garden. R I T U A L S : Festival of Nations, St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dogtown, Cinco de Mayo on Cherokee Street, Candy Cane Lane

Missouri Botanical Garden

W H A T ’ S N E W : Though bars helped stabilize The Grove for years, the turning point came when Urban Chestnut opened its brewery and bierhall. “It was the stake that went into the ground and said, ‘This is a place to invest,’” says St. Louis City Talk’s Mark Groth. Neighborhoods near Tower Grove Park are also seeing significant investment. Botanical Heights is blooming, largely thanks to developer UIC. Last August, SSM Health broke ground on SSM Health Saint Louis University Hos-

pital and Ambulatory Care Center, a $550 million medical center expected to open in 2020. Nearby, architect firm HOK has designed a 124-unit apartment complex on a former YMCA site along South Grand. And in The Hill, the Sansone Group is planning a $40 million residential development on an 11-acre site. Farther south, Cherokee’s Antique Row still has its neighborhood vibe, and the other side of Jefferson is vibrant with up-andcoming businesses. Packed with 1940s brick bungalows, Southampton is also evolving, with Macklind Avenue now a restaurant destination. And to the southeast, French-settled Carondelet might be described as having a New Orleans–style vibe.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Yogi Berra Joe Garagiola Harry Caray

It has the largest collection of “Scrubby Dutch” architecture in the city and a business strip that Groth describes as the city’s “most untapped commercial corridor…just waiting for someone to come in and do what they did on Cherokee or South Grand.”

H A N G O U TS : Ted Drewes / Milo’s Bocce Garden / Olio / O’Connell’s Pub / Fortune Teller Bar / Atomic Cowboy / HandleBar / MoKaBe’s / The Mud House

Photo by Dan Brown, Kevin A. Roberts

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Where We Live

NORTH CITY THE NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL-INTELLIGENCE AGENCY IS JUST THE LATE ST CHAP TER IN A COMMUNITY WITH A RICH, STORIED HISTORY.

Once the site of some of St. Louis’ most vibrant neighborhoods, North City suffered a huge population loss in the 1950s, mostly as a result of white flight and later due to significant black flight. For 40 years, the area hung on through redlining, population loss, decay, and a shrinking tax base. In recent years, though, the North Side is beginning a comeback, especially near Old North’s iconic Crown Candy Kitchen, where the 14th Street pedestrian mall has been revived as Crown Square. H I S T O R Y : Bordered by Martin Luther King, Sarah, St. Louis and Taylor, the Ville is the Harlem of St. Louis. (Read more on p. 29)… The old Sportsman’s Park, originally called the Grand Avenue Ball Grounds, is now the Herbert Hoover Boys & Girls Club.

The last surviving remnant of prairie inside the 270 corridor is located in Calvary Cemetery, overlooking the Mississippi River.

A R C H I T E C T U R E : Just north of Hyde Park are two of the nation’s seven remaining standpipe water towers: the red tower at Bissell and Blair and the white tower on East Grand, considered the largest perfect Corinthian column in existence when it was built in 1871. Penrose Park features the velodrome, the only such bike-racing track in St. Louis.

of Black History, where Lois Conley curated an exhibit dedicated to the residents who moved to make way for the development. But the NGA is just one piece of a larger picture called Project Connect, which coordinates the development of neighborhoods across St. Louis’ northeast side. The plans comprise

W H A T ’ S N E X T : The footprint of the National GeospatialIntelligence Agency’s new building ends across the street from the Griot Museum

DID YOU KNOW?

myriad smaller projects coordinated in collaboration with multiple municipalities, federal agencies, community groups, and developers. “The intent of Project Connect is to physically connect all of these projects,” says Isa Reeb, one of the team’s leaders. Construction on the site is set for completion by 2022, when the NGA plans to move into the facility, and street improvements will also be complete. At the same time, national nonprofit Urban Strategies will help execute several projects thanks to funding from grants, including the construction of 700 mixedincome housing units in Preservation Square, a community center, and microfinance initiatives. Many of these

improvements are being made in response to community needs but are also geared toward attracting more grants and additional development.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Arthur Ashe Dick Gregory Grace Bumbry Chuck Berry Redd Foxx

H A N G O U TS : Crown Candy Kitchen / Shady Jack’s / Harlem Tap Room / LaMancha Coffee House / Cornerstone Café / Palomino Lounge

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Photography by Michael Thomas

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CLAYTON & UNIVERSITY CITY THE SEAT OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY, CLAYTON IS A CORPORATE AND CULINARY HUB. NEARBY, THE DELMAR LOOP CONTINUE S TO ROLL OUT NEW SURPRISE S.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Vincent Price Kevin Kline Rocco Landesman William Burroughs Walker Evans A.E. Hotchner Howard Nemerov Harriett Woods Nelly

Saint Louis Art Fair

Not quite the city and not quite the ’burbs, Clayton and University City offer aspects of both. The county seat, Clayton is home to some of the area’s corporate leaders, including Enterprise Holdings and Centene, as well as an ever-evolving restaurant scene. With the younger crowd drawn to Washington University and U. City’s hip amenities, its diverse mix of residents is constantly changing as well. H I S T O R Y : Ralph Clayton and Martin Hanley’s donation of 104 acres of land in 1876 eventually spawned the

mini-metropolis of Clayton that has come to be known as St. Louis’ second downtown. When Clayton was still in its infancy, Edward G. Lewis hatched his plan to develop the land to the north. The visionary publisher was the driving force behind what became University City. R I T U A L S : The Saint Louis Art Fair in downtown Clayton ranks as one of the nation’s top art fairs. And families can always find fun along the Delmar Loop, including at COCA and such annual festivals as the Loop Ice Carnival.

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N : Wash. U. is getting a major facelift— the largest project ever undertaken on the Danforth campus. The project spans 18 acres and includes three new academic buildings, two new multi-use facilities, an expanded Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, and a new space for respite: Ann and Andrew Tisch Park. Most of the work is slated for completion by 2019.

I N T H E L O O P : Over the past 45 years, developer Joe Edwards has dramatically transformed the Delmar Loop, opening such beloved destinations as Blueberry Hill, the Tivoli, The Pageant, Pin-Up Bowl, the Moonrise Hotel, and Delmar Hall, as well as spurring the St. Louis Walk of Fame and a statue to honor Chuck Berry. But perhaps his most ambitious undertaking is the return of the Loop’s namesake: an old-time trolley line. Though there have been delays (it was originally expected to be rolling by 2014), St. Louis will soon find out whether it was all worth the wait. The trolley is expected to be running this year. Three vintage trolley cars will shuttle folks between the Loop and the Missouri History Museum.

H A N G O U TS : Blueberry Hill / Fitz’s / Público / Meshuggah Café / City Coffeehouse & Crêperie / Bar Napoli / Pastaria / Herbie’s / Louie’s Wine Dive

Photography by Richard Maury and Kevin A. Roberts

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Where We Live

INNER-RING SUBURBS NOT QUITE THE CITY OR THE BURB S, THE INNER RING OFFERS CLOSE-KNIT NEIGHBORHOODS AND CHARMING BUSINE SSE S.

Webster University’s Browning Hall

DID YOU KNOW? From the turn-of-the-century homes and shaded lawns to the block upon block of wellkept bungalows and Arts and Crafts homes, the inner ring offers some of the area’s most picturesque suburbs. In Webster Groves, Webster University recently opened Browning Hall, an interdisciplinary science building complete with 27 labs and a 129seat auditorium. It’s located by Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, where The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis and Opera Theater of Saint Louis stage worldrenowned productions. H I S T O R Y : Kirkwood has the distinction of being the first planned suburb west of the Mississippi River. Named after James Pugh Kirkwood,

The inventor of the looseleaf binder lived on Vine in Maplewood.

the engineer in charge of building the railroad, this bedroom community was meant to be a haven from congestion and cholera. A R C H I T E C T U R E : Brentwood has been dubbed the “City of Warmth,” Kirkwood the “queen of St. Louis suburbs.” Webster has won the Tree City USA Award for years… Amid Webster Groves’ Queen Anne and frame homes

stands a startling cluster of ’50s modern houses off Grant Road; young architects still vie to live there… Kirkwood has a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Ebsworth Park, and the 1853 Kirkwood train station (which is undergoing a renovation) boasts an elegant Richardsonian architecture.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S

RITUALS: Let Them Eat Art, Old Webster Jazz & Blues Festival, Kirkwood Greentree Festival, Glendale Jazz Festival, Webster Arts Fair, Taste of Maplewood, Rock Hill Fall Festival, Turkey Day Game

Jonathan Franzen Marsha Mason Phyllis Diller Russ Mitchell John Lutz David Sanborn Scott Bakula Jane Smiley Joe Buck

R E TA I L : As one of the nearest outposts for big-box stores near the city, Brentwood and Richmond Heights have experienced something of a retail boom in

recent years. And just south of Highway 40, The Crossings at Richmond Heights will soon add even more retail, restaurants, and a hotel.

H A N G O U TS : Side Project Cellar / Olive + Oak / Schlafly Bottleworks / Billy G’s / The Block / Spencer’s Grill / Katie’s Pizza & Pasta / Carl’s Drive-In

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2018

Photography by Hollis King, Kevin A. Roberts and courtesy of Webster University

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Maplewood Makeover AN INNER-RING SUBURB’S REVIVAL

A hot topic among urbanists in St. Louis is the so-called inner-ring suburb, the term for a community that rose up on the city’s border in the early 20th century. Often accessible by way of mass transit, “streetcar suburbs” are home to walkable urban neighborhoods. Yet these peaceful refuges have arrived at a moment of reckoning: The houses are 100 years old, and the residents must decide whether to reinvent their towns or move on. Case in point: Maplewood. More than a decade ago, the city’s leaders realized their community needed a new spark, a new call to action. At the time, the city’s face, the commercial strip along Manchester and Sutton, was suffering; at one point there were more than 15 vacant storefronts, indirect reminders of business stolen by Crestwood Mall half a century ago. So they started by ensuring that longtime businesses such as Sunnen Products and Citizens National Bank would remain in the community. Still, people needed another reason to visit Maplewood, recalls community development director Rachelle L’Ecuyer. So rather than focus on attracting chains (with the exception of niche businesses like Penzeys Spices), Maplewood and its longtime city manager, Marty Corcoran, encouraged small businesses. L’Ecuyer also organized and promoted dozens of events, from Schlafly’s farmers market to brokers’ tours, to drive foot traffic. At the same time, the business district embraced environmentalism, which helped improve revenue. Consolidating dumpsters and recycling bins, for instance, increased recycling while delivering savings in reduced hauling expenses. (In fact, Maplewood promptly won the EPA’s Green Power Community of the Year Award.) Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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Yet as the shopping district grew, the Maplewood–Richmond Heights School District floundered. When Linda Henke became superintendent, in 2000, the district was fulfilling just 57 of the 100 requirements for state accreditation— the bare minimum to remain accredited. The district had cycled through four superintendents in five years, and one eighth-grade class had burned through seven math teachers in one year. The school board faced two choices: The district could dissolve, or it could change. Fresh with new members who stood behind the superintendent, the board went to work. First, Henke terminated more than 30 percent of the teaching staff. She also began to combat the district’s image as a training ground for teachers to gain experience before moving to more prosperous districts. She credits the educators—“quiet saints,” as she dubs them— who found a way to thrive. She fought to update historic school buildings and insisted on five teachers per grade level. Henke also sought to make Maplewood a “boutique district,” one that modeled itself on prestigious private schools such as Crossroads College Prep and The College School. And, perhaps most impor-

tant, she worked to instill greater pride in the district. At one point, a mutual friend suggested that Henke contact social entrepreneur Karen Kalish, who introduced her Home Works! teacher home visit program. The two realized that reviving the link between school and home was critical to resurrecting Maplewood’s schools. When the program was first implemented, about one-third of parents responded enthusiastically; another third were indifferent, and the last third never responded. The two women knew that it was perhaps most critical to reach this last group. Eventually most of the recalcitrant parents came around. By 2003, the district was scoring 100 on accreditation goals—a record level of improvement. Kalish largely credits Henke—“the power of one person and her vision”—for the turnaround. Yet Henke and others community leaders are reluctant to take all of the credit. They humbly insist that it was a communitywide effort. “Business owners said, ‘What is good for Maplewood is better for me,’” says L’Ecuyer. “Maplewood is The Little Engine That Could.” —CHRIS NAFFZIGER

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Where We Live

OUTER-RING SUBURBS WE ST COUNTY OFFERS A BIT OF EVERYTHING, FROM OUTLET MALL S TO FORTUNE 500 COMPANIE S, FINE DINING TO FE STIVAL S, HIKING TO ZIPLINING.

Major developments are afoot across West County. Chesterfield Valley has become a shopping mecca, with two major outlet malls just miles apart. In Maryland Heights, Lodging Hospitality Management has breathed new life into Westport Plaza. “When we bought the plaza in 2012, the office occupancy rate was at 72 percent,” says Steve O’Loughlin, LHM’s president and chief operating officer. By June 2017, it was at 95 percent, and most of the retail spaces were occupied. Among the additions is Westport Social, a 12,500-squarefoot restaurant and game bar. Nearby, World Wide Technology recently opened its new seven-story, LEEDcertified global headquarters. Its employees can walk to Westport Plaza via “The Lid,” a 12,000-square-foot outdoor event space that doubles as the roof of the underground parking lot. HISTORY: Though some St. Louisans think of West County as relatively new, Chesterfield actually dates back to 1817, and Pacific (originally named Franklin but renamed for the Missouri Pacific Railroad) dates back to 1819, around the time the state was created.

Westport Social

H A P P Y T R A I L S : Town & Country is crisscrossed with trails; Wildwood has more than 30 miles of trails; trails connect Ellisville’s myriad parks; and the Western Greenway runs between the Meramec and Missouri rivers. Where water once filled Chesterfield Valley, during the Flood of ’93, the Monarch-Chesterfield Levee Trail runs alongside sports fields and outlet malls. Looking for something different? Paddle the Creve Coeur Water Trail, a 6-mile trek across Creve Coeur Lake that continues up Fee Fee Creek—or venture through the treetops on the nearby Go Ape! Zip Line & Treetop Adventure course. Then unwind at the Creve Coeur Lakehouse.

ARCHITECTURE: At Olive and Hog Hollow stands what was once the general store for the town of Lake… At one time, Wildwood’s City Hall was housed in a former inn in the historic community of Grover, with the old blacksmith’s shop located across the street… Valley Park started life as a railroad station; then, in 1903, a glass company built itself a town, scaling the houses to their residents’ rank in the company… A wonderful group of Tudor Revival houses stand in Glen Forest, just north of Fair Oaks in Ladue. R I T U A LS : There’s a party every month in West County, especially during the summer: Ballwin Days, Town & Country’s

Fire & Ice… And Chesterfield Amphitheater regularly hosts concerts and festivals, including Taste of St. Louis.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Jenna Fischer Ellie Kemper Jon Hamm Ernest Trova James Gunn David Freese

H A N G O U TS : Annie Gunn’s / Village Bar / Stovall’s Grove / The Wolf / Corner Pub / Walnut Grill / J. Gilbert’s / Cooper’s Hawk / Napoli 2

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts, J.R. Mankoff

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SOUTH COUNTY THE ONE-TIME HOME OF JOHN GOODMAN, AFF TON AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITIE S OFFER A DOWN-TO -EARTH CHARM, AFFORDABLE HOUSING, AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS.

Huge chunks of South County are unincorporated, yet you always know where you are. Affton has a smalltown feel, its brick homes built before World War II and often occupied by three generations of the same family. Lemay has an old riverside urban industrial edge. Though far newer than the city, Crestwood has a rich history, with Route 66 running through it and the historic Sappington House— and it’s looking to the future, replacing Crestwood Mall with a multi-use facility, The Crest, complete with a movie theater, retail, restaurants, and office space. And closer to the Mississippi, Lemay boasts River City Casino, which houses gaming and fine dining, including Cibare Italian Kitchen. H I S T O R Y : A military barracks opened in 1826, built on 1,700 acres bought from Carondelet for $5. On July 4 of that year, Thomas Jefferson died, and the name was promptly changed to Jefferson Barracks… Affton started as the plantation of Kenneth MacKenzie, a Scotsman—but it was named for its first postmaster, Johann Aff, who ran a general store at the Ten Mile House… Lakeshire was one of

River City Casino

St. Louis’ first true suburbs… Between 1950 and 1960, Crestwood jumped from 1,645 to more than 11,000 in population. (Crestwood takes its name from a tree at the crest of a hill—and the tree still stands, at 845 Diversey.)… The Federhofer Bakery sign and the giant ice cream cone from Velvet Freeze now stand in front of Mesnier School. A R C H I T E C T U R E : Much of South County’s housing stock was built in the ’50s and ’60s. Now like other nearby communities, it’s seeing a shift as the original homeowners—now empty-nesters—move into

more manageable living arrangements and young families buy up the singlefamily homes… Hunting an Art Deco house? Try Gravois Gardens, at the southwest corner of Gravois and Weber… The Wilbur Park area has street after street of gingerbread houses… One of the best collections of ranch houses in the area is the group set in an oak forest at Grantwood Village. The neighborhood includes the Ulysses S. Grant historic site and Grant’s Farm, the beloved family-friendly attraction with 900-plus animals (and free beer samples).

S H I F TS : St. Louis has the largest concentration of Bosnians outside Europe. And though Little Bosnia remains in South City, where the American Czech Educational Center is located, many Bosnian-Americans now live in South County as well. “In the last couple years, we have come to see BosnianAmericans as part of Affton’s identity,” says Affton High School teacher Brian Jennings. The newcomers have brought “a neighborliness,” he says. “In Bosnia, people would leave their doors open and walk in and out of each other’s houses.”

H A N G O U TS : Helen Fitzgerald’s / O’Leary’s / Gianino’s / J.P.’s Corner / Mellow Mushroom / Three King’s Pub / Joey B’s / Concord Grill / Syberg’s

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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Where We Live

NORTH COUNTY THERE’S FAR MORE TO FERGUSON AND NEARBY COMMUNITIE S THAN OUT- OF-TOWNERS MIGHT EXPECT. A CLOSER LOOK REVEAL S A STRONG COMMUNITY FULL OF HIDDEN GEMS, REWARDING PROGRAMS, AND RE SILIENT CITIZENS.

Ferguson Youth Initiative

North County isn’t just a postwar suburb—people have been living there for centuries. Bridgeton’s original 15 blocks were plotted in 1794, when it was known as Marais des Liards. Florissant’s Taille de Noyer House dates back to 1790, and Hazelwood was home to Indian settlements in 4000 B.C. And Ferguson’s Citywalk district boasts the historic Savoy Theater building and Ferguson Depot, a train depot–turned-museum that also houses the Whistle Stop custard shop. AT T R A C T I O N S : The volunteerrun Ferguson Farmers’ Market is among the region’s freshest options. The historic Grand Staircase at Fort Belle Fontaine Park leads

straight down to a riverfront trail. Charbonier Bluff, in the St. Stanislaus Conservation Area, offers a challenging hike on 600-foot river bluffs and diverse habitats for birdand wildlife-watching. And Hazelwood offers more than 15 parks, which include outdoor swimming, fishing, and a Frisbee-golf course. A R C H I T E C T U R E : Pasadena Hills is the only neighborhood in the state whose entire municipality is on the National Register of Historic Places… Florissant has more than 40 sites on the National Register, among the most in the county… Old Ferguson West is full of beautiful (and affordable) Victorian and Craftsman homes.

C O M I N G T O G E T H E R : After the unrest in Ferguson following the 2014 police shooting of Michael Brown, participants in the Ferguson Youth Initiative’s Second Saturdays art program painted an eightpanel mural that read, “One Love,” with a heart between the words. Sections of the painting were placed around town “to get people to see all the parts of Ferguson,” says FIY’s Gail Babcock. The Initiative also oversees such programs as Earn-a-Bike, Earn-aComputer, and the Ferguson Community Service Program.

H A N G O U TS : Hendel’s Market Café / Ferguson Brewing Company / Cork Wine Bar / Henke’s Tavern & Grill

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INVESTING IN FERGUSON Cordell Lewis speaks with enthusiasm about Starbucks’ coming to Ferguson, describing the hope and economic opportunities the store represents. Located at West Florissant and Somerset, the location is part of the chain’s nationwide initiative to open stores in lowto medium-income urban communities. The Ferguson Starbucks employs approximately 50 people from the community. Lewis, a resident of the area, once managed a video game store in Ferguson that built community through music and poetry readings. “It’s common practice for stores to hold events,” he says. “I went a little bigger with it.” Lewis recruited at area high schools, UMSL, and St. Louis Community College in Florissant. “The amount of people with great character who want to work is one of the community’s strengths,” he says. Photography by Lindy Drew

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Unincorporated Living DEBUNKING FIVE COMMON MISPERCEP TIONS

More than 300,000 people currently live in unincorporated St. Louis County. If they banded together, they’d form the second largest city in the state. So what does it really mean to live in an unincorporated area? Lori Fiegel, director for the county’s strategy and innovation department, explains some of the most common misconceptions. —NANCY CURTIS

Myth #1

YOU DON’T HAVE TO PAY LOCAL OR REAL ESTATE TAXES. “Everyone in the county pays the countywide property tax. In some municipalities, you may have to pay an additional city property tax. So it’s true that if you live in unincorporated areas, you may have a lower tax burden, because you avoid paying that additional city property tax.” (Utility taxes can range from one city to the next, but the county caps utility taxes for unincorporated areas.)

Myth #2

YOU DON’T GET CITY SERVICES SUCH AS TRASH, SEWER, OR ROAD MAINTENANCE. “Your local government for certain services is through the county, so the county acts like your municipality. St. Louis County’s department of transportation is the second-largest steward of roads after MoDOT, so all of those subdivision streets are taken care of by the county highway department. You do have a bundle of local municipal-like services through the county. Trash services are fee-based and separated into trash districts through that particular company.”

Myth #3

BECAUSE THERE ISN’T A MAYOR OR CITY COUNCIL, THERE IS LESS GOVERNMENT CONTROL. “Our residents in unincorporated county have a lot of opportunity to engage in local government. The meetings might not be quite as close by, but we have so many cities across the county, with difPhotography by Whitney Curtis

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ferent levels of participation. If folks are inclined to be active, they’re going to be active in unincorporated areas.”

Myth #4

LIFE IN NEW TOWN Longtime radio show host John Carney

IT TAKES LONGER FOR POLICE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES BECAUSE THEY’RE DELIVERED THROUGH THE COUNTY. “We have a large police department, and we have precincts and substations throughout the county. The police department could give you exact numbers on response times if you want them, but they are located in many places throughout the county.”

Myth #5

ANNEXATION RARELY HAPPENS. “We have one of the most complicated jurisdictions in the country. We have boundary laws under the Missouri statute that only apply to St. Louis County. There’s something called a Boundary Commission, an independent, statecreated commission that reviews all of the annexations. In the county, a lot of places that wanted to be part of a city, a lot of that has already happened. Things quieted down, particularly with the recession… If constituents want to be part of another community, it’s certainly a doable thing. To create a new city is more complicated because we already have 90 cities, and you have to have a minimum of 10,000 people, and there has to be a petition under the state law to announce your interest in creating a new city; then you have to create another petition with all of the information about boundaries, etcetera— there’s a lot involved.”

“I always felt the need to be in the city because I wanted to be near the action, but since it’s been awhile since I’ve seen any action—that and looking at the possibility of having four kids in private schools in the city—proximity was no longer a concern. And as a 51-year-old man with two kids in single digits, retirement was not an option. The big broadcast will probably come while I’m still working. “When I realized I could build a huge house in New Town and fare way better than attempting even a lateral move near Clifton Heights, where I was before, that was it. It was modern urbanism being discreetly conducted in a cornfield in St. Charles County. “I expected a laid-back, quiet-at-night, close-knit community where kids could run free, and the reality was just that. It’s a modern-day Mayberry—with Cabernet. Did I mention we have a wine bar out here? There are canals and several sizable lakes. You see windsurfing, kayaks, and a sixman raft that Dad gets to row until his face turns purple. “What I did not expect was getting stuck in a line of traffic that consisted solely of golf carts; apparently I moved to Boca Raton. And there’s cart rage. That obnoxious “ah-OOO-gah” horn was a $150 option that I did not get—yet. “My band is playing out here Memorial Day weekend. It’ll be the first gig I’ll ever have driven a golf cart to, my drum set hanging off the back. “It’s just one surreal experience after another.”

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Where We Live

ST. CHARLES COUNTY WITH SCENIC WINERIE S AND COBBLE STONE STREETS, THE FAR WE ST REACHE S OF THE METRO REGION ARE A GREAT PLACE TO E SCAPE— OR TO SETTLE DOWN.

St. Charles County was first settled in 1541 by the Spanish, yet today it’s synonymous with all that’s new: subdivisions, cars, babies. For years, it’s been the fastest growing part of the metro area, with major developments sprouting up, including New Town and the Streets of St. Charles. H I S T O R Y : When St. Charles was founded in 1765 by Louis Blanchette, the territory was Spanish, the townspeople French. When the first wave of German immigration began in 1833, St. Charles became the site of the first German settlement west of the Mississippi… Daniel Boone’s four-story home in Defiance has seven fireplaces and a ballroom. A R C H I T E C T U R E : The first town on the Missouri River, St. Charles served as a stopoff for westbound trappers, pioneers, explorers and immigrants. As a result, it was bigger than most frontier towns—South Main is Missouri’s largest historic district. Architectural styles include colonial French and a French-German hybrid style that’s unique to the area. S I G H T S T O S E E : The Foundry Art Centre in St. Charles. Housed in a renovated 36,800-square foot train-car factory built in the 1940s, the Foundry hosts highprofile national touring

Augusta Winery

DID YOU KNOW? shows but also hangs work by local and regional artists… The Rau Garden in Blanchette Park was created in the ’30s as a WPA project, and its beds, planted with 100 perennials and 1,000 annuals, are constantly in bloom. G E T M O V I N G : St. Peters has 25 parks, but that’s just a warm-up compared to its gem of all gyms: the 236,000-square-foot RecPlex, replete with a worldclass natatorium and diving tank, three NHL-sized hockey rinks, a day-care center, and a training facil-

While a dedicated building was being built in Jefferson City, lawmakers met upstairs in a St. Charles hardware store that served as the state’s first capitol.

R I T U A L S : Festival of the Little Hills, St. Charles Christmas Traditions, Renaissance Faire, Heritage & Freedom Fest, Lake Saint Louis’ Pirate Party

ity with cutting-edge equipment for athletes who want to take their game to the next level. In O’Fallon, you can lift at the Renaud Spirit Center, swim at Alligator’s Creek Aquatic Center, or skate at Westhoff Park. Not to be forgotten: the Ozzie Smith Sports Complex and T.R. Hughes Ballpark, home to the River City Rascals and the St. Charles County Amateur Sports Hall of Fame. At nearby Dardenne Prairie’s Youth Activity Park, teens can ollie at the state’s largest skate park, go rock climbing, and play volleyball.

W H E R E T O U N W I N D : While some towns in St. Charles County have developed quickly over the past decade, Augusta and Defiance are known for the opposite: peace and relaxation. The small towns draws tourists to the area’s many wineries, including Mount Pleasant, Chandler Hill Vineyards, and Augusta Winery—to name just a few. (Visit missouri wine.org for more options.) And if a drink isn’t enough to help unwind, the serene Mid-America Buddhist Association is nearby.

H A N G O U TS : BC’s Kitchen / Stone Soup Cottage / Prasino / Firebirds Wood Fired Grill / Trailhead Brewing Company / McGurk’s Public House

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts and courtesy of Augusta Winery

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METRO EAST THE EAST SIDE OF THE RIVER OFFERS A BIT OF EVERYTHING: RIVER TOWNS AND FARMING COMMUNITIE S, BLUE- COLLAR CITIE S AND COLLEGE TOWNS—PLUS ENOUGH ATTRACTIONS TO KEEP ST. LOUISANS ON THE MISSOURI SIDE COMING BACK FOR MORE.

Art on the Square

REVIVING EAST ST. LOUIS Navy veteran Charmaine Savage

Metro East is a mix of communities: a group of booming towns surrounded by their own suburbs; bluecollar towns that are bouncing back; and near-rural towns, such as Lebanon, Columbia, Waterloo, and Millstadt. And there are plenty of destinations for those who live on the Missouri side, including Pere Marquette State Park, Madison’s recently revived Gateway Motorsports Park, and Belleville’s Art on the Square in mid-May.

A R C H I T E C T U R E : T h e r e ’s a happy mix on the East Side, from whitewashed farmhouses to Alton’s Victorian ladies and Elsah’s Greek Revival and gray-stone French houses… Upton Sinclair once called Leclaire, a company town created in the late 1800s at the edge of Edwardsville, a dream ahead of its time… Granite City was founded as an industrial complex to support production of a revolutionary household product called graniteware. C O N D I M E N T C A P I TA L : Collinsville is known as the “Horseradish Capital of the World” and sports a ketchup bottleshaped water tower.

H A N G O U TS : Gallagher’s / Fast Eddie’s Bon Air / The Loading Dock

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts, Whitney Curtis and courtesy of Art on the Square

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CATCH THE FERRY: Fifteen miles up the River Road from Alton is Grafton, a village at the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers. For a modest amount, a ferry will take cars and trucks to St. Charles County, just 10 miles from downtown St. Chuck.

H O M E TO W N H E R O E S Jackie Joyner-Kersee Miles Davis Jimmy Connors Red Schoendienst Jeff Tweedy

Charmaine Savage graduated from Lincoln High School, attended college, and married her high school sweetheart, Lorenzo. The couple traveled the world during her career as a U.S. Navy officer. “But when we left home in 1989, we didn’t leave with the intention of staying gone,” she says. During return visits to St. Louis, she couldn’t resist posting “Home sweet home!” on Facebook. So after retiring, the Savages moved back to East St. Louis. In January 2016, Charmaine founded I AM EStL, a publication that, she says, tells “real stories about real people.” The first issue featured interviews with such East St. Louis natives as U.N. ambassador Donald McHenry, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, and Mayor Emeka Jackson-Hicks, as well as Remy Joh, a young woman with a disability who’s launched her own holistic business; artist Reginald Petty; and Billie Miller, owner of Billie’s Pastries, a community gathering spot. Savage aims to showcase talents of the city’s natives. “They are all around the planet, representing us well,” she says.

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A guide to some of the region’s most memorable experiences

1. 101_GATEWAY.indd 25

Pick your favorite tag on the graffiti-covered floodwall. Consider it a 4-mile-long, 20-foothigh concrete canvas for outdoor artists—a wall less divisive than others, where differences are celebrated in a rainbow of colors. Chouteau at S. Leonor K. Sullivan. ST. LO U I S E C O N O M I C D E VE LO PM E N T PA RT N E RSH IP

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1 0 1 TH I N G S EVERY ST. LOUISAN M UST D O

D OWN TOW N, N O RT H CI T Y & T HE N EA R S O U T H S I DE

5. Tour the brewery.

2.

Sure, you’ve stood in the Clydesdale stable, gazed up at Reynard the Fox, and sipped a free beer. But you’re a St. Louisan, so you need to take it a step further. For beer novices, there’s the 45-minute Beer School (teaching beer styles and the proper pour), as well as the 75-minute Day Fresh tour (following the entire beer-making process, from “Seed to Sip”). History buffs will enjoy the Beer Museum Tour, with a stop at the Old Schoolhouse. And for the true brew lover, there’s the two-hour Brewmaster Tour, an exhaustive behind-the-scenes journey across the campus, complete with a sip from a finishing tank and A-B mementos. 12th & Lynch.

See the Cardinals on the cheap. In this baseball-crazy town, we could create a whole separate list titled “100 Things Cardinals Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die.” Wait, sportswriter Derrick Goold already wrote a book by that name. OK, we’ll just pick one: Wake up early on game day and hurry to the Eighth Street ticket windows, near Gate 3. Snag one of 275 vouchers for First Pitch Tickets and purchase two tickets for $11.20 after they go on sale at 9 a.m. Go to Gate 1 just 10 minutes before game time and pick up an envelope containing two tickets. They might be standing room only, or they might be green seats—that’s part of the fun. Either way, you can catch a game for less than a beer will cost you once you’re inside Busch Stadium. 700 Clark.

4. Walk out on the bus at City Museum.

Go on a Tuesday night, and bring cash. At the Venice, plastic’s reserved for toys. Start upstairs, in The Explorers Room. While you’re there, use “The Blue Hole,” even if you don’t have to, because it’s an unforgettable loo. Then go down and listen to Jeremy Segel-Moss play the blues. If it’s balmy out, order jerk chicken from the shack and play seek-and-find for Lockheed’s outdoor sculptures. You’re inside the world’s artiest jigsaw puzzle. 1903 Pestalozzi. @AALIYAHJORDYN

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Last year, the team turned 50 and had somewhat of a midlife crisis, leaving Ken Hitchcock for a younger coach and splurging on a fancy outing at Busch Stadium to show up old rivals. Still, the club isn’t showing any signs of its age: Unlike a certain former St. Louis pro sports team that will go unnamed, the Blues have made the playoffs the past six years, led by All-Star Vladimir Tarasenko, and won legions of loyal fans, from Jon Hamm to Tony X. 1401 Clark.

@TYLERJCONRAD

3. Visit Venice (Café).

6. Repeat after us: “Let’s go Blues.”

It seems to teeter several stories up, dangling off the edge of the roof. As with many of his ideas, it was a whim of the museum’s late founder, Bob Cassilly, to hoist the retired Roxana School District bus atop the building in August 1999. The next day, a fire in the elevator tower drew the city’s attention to the bus. “We didn’t really have a parking permit for that at the time, so there was a little bit of controversy over that,” Cassilly later admitted. Today, the bus remains a symbol of the sculptor’s childlike imagination and his willingness to push creativity to the brink. 750 N. 16th.

7. Admire the Arch. The most postcard-perfect vantage point of the city skyline: the overlook at Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park, across the river from the Arch. Rather sip while you admire? Try the rooftop patios at Three Sixty or Cielo. 185 W. Trendley, East St. Louis; 1 S. Broadway; 999 N. 2nd. Photography courtesy of St. Louis Cardinals

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@MARSHALLHAAS

10. PICK A FAVORITE… HOLIDAY LIGHT DISPLAY

12. Watch the sunset from the top of the Arch. If you’re going to stuff yourself into one of those egg-like contraptions, make it worth the trip. Purchase tickets online in advance for a time just before dusk, then ride to the top, spot local landmarks miles away, take in the sunset, and see a serene view of the city after nightfall. 1 N. Leonor K. Sullivan.

Whatever the setting, St. Louis has you covered. CANDY CANE LANE:

House decs on steroids. BREWERY LIGHTS: Hops meet holidays. WINTER WONDERLAND: Carriage rides in Tilles Park. GARDEN GLOW: Neon installations amid flora and fauna at the Missouri Botanical Garden. OUR

8. Browse the Soulard Farmers’ Market. As the late Joe Bonwich put it, “Soulard Market is St. Louis. Period. People of all ages, races, and economic levels are drawn to the area’s ‘original’ farmers’ market. Purists sometimes complain that Soulard isn’t a real farmers’ market because it mostly consists of produce brokers selling grapes and oranges and tchotchke vendors selling sunglasses and socks. But hit either of the eastern legs of the H-shaped market and you’ll find local farmers, as well as local cheese, meat, and other commodities.” 730 Carroll.

9. Hear the blues at the National Blues Museum. Want to unwind on a Friday night but can’t stay out to catch the headliner at BB’s (see No. 13)? Consider Howlin’ Fridays. Admission is $10, music starts at 7 p.m., and the acts are impressive: Big George Brock, Marquise Knox… Carve out enough time to tour the museum beforehand. 615 Washington.

LADY OF THE SNOWS’ WAY OF LIGHTS: Jesus,

lasers, and camel rides.

13. Keep the party going on Broadway. 11. See a big name at the Peabody Opera House. It hosted the Rat Pack, the Rolling Stones, President Harry S. Truman…and then sat dark for nearly 20 years. When it reopened, in 2011, Wilco graced its stage, and it’s brought in big-name acts ever since, including St. Louis natives Michael McDonald and Kathleen Madigan last November. Its Art Deco design and velvet seats provide a civilized event alternative to the arena next door. But don’t take our word for it; go see a show. 1400 Market.

It’s a little slice of the Big Easy on Broadway. Though BB’s Jazz, Blues and Soups founder Mark O’Shaughnessy died earlier this year, blues legends continue to draw toe-tapping crowds to the onetime hotel. Nearby, Broadway Oyster Bar also serves up nightly music acts, along with Cajun food, in a colorful atmosphere that now includes a 60-seat space with a retractable roof, added in 2015. Across the street, Beale on Broadway, with its comfy patio, hosts such local legends as Kim Massie. 700 block of Broadway.

SEE WHAT’S NEW ALONG THE GATEWAY MALL.

14. Start at Aloe Plaza, where the nude sculptures of Carl Milles’ The Meeting of the Waters once caused a stir but now light up the night. (The city installed new lighting five years ago.) Illustration by Andrew Kay

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15. A dramatic overhaul of the Soldiers’ Memorial will include the Court of Honor, across the street. Look for new fountains and monuments to honor fallen St. Louisans.

16. Though it opened in 2009, Citygarden still feels brand new with its contemporary sculptures, 16-foot LED video screen, and arguably the hippest Kaldi’s Coffee location.

17. The Instagramready “Running Man” sculpture in Kiener Plaza remains, but after a $23.7 million makeover, it’s surrounded by a splash pad, playground, and shade garden.

18. The Old Courthouse has received a facelift: Its exterior’s been polished and its exhibits rethought. And the adjacent Park Over the Highway now connects downtown with the Arch.

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As historian Michael Allen has noted, “Over one hundred years since publication of A City Plan for St. Louis, the Gateway Mall reflects a tortuous implementation and constant boundary changes.” Now it’s finally beginning to take shape. Don’t believe us? Take a hike downtown.

19. The reimagined Arch Museum is slated to open this summer, after multiple delays. Planners promise it will be worth the wait, with dynamic exhibits on St. Louis history and the Arch.

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26. Order a pretzel from Gus’ Pretzels.

20. Bite into a BLT at Crown Candy. In case you’re wondering, there’s three quarters of a pound of bacon on the legendary sandwich. Pair the behemoth with a malt (we suggest the banana chocolate). Consider splitting both. 1401 St. Louis.

21. Grab Mexican food on Cherokee.

While devotées disagree on which Gus’ pretzel is best—stick or twist—you’ll find us working our way through a bag of pretzel ends, the best $1.50 deal in town. You can’t eat just one, but you can eat one 15-count bag. 1820 Arsenal.

24. FIND A FAVORITE… DONUT SHOP

A staple in small towns and big cities alike WORLD’S FAIR DONUTS: For the nostalgic. DONUT DRIVE-IN: For a Route 66 road trip. JOHN’S DONUTS: For the graveyard shift. DONUT HOUSE: For around-theclock cravings. STRANGE DONUTS: For the truly

27. Check out the Central Library. Not long ago, the Cass Gilbert–designed downtown library underwent a $70 million makeover, replete with a 250-seat auditorium, a computer commons, and a café. Most breathtaking of all, however, was the dramatic restoration of the Great Hall and Olive Street foyer, with Renaissanceinspired ceilings and antique lighting. “It was built as a great palace,” the library executive director, Waller McGuire, told us at the time, “but it’s unique in that it’s a palace that belongs to everyone.” 1301 Olive.

quirky.

Picking a favorite restaurant or dish is difficult here, so we’ll hedge: Lunch on a torta and a paleta at La Vallesana, pick a wacky ice cream flavor at The Taco & Ice Cream Joint, and grab an overflowing taco from Taqueria El Torito. Cherokee Street.

22. Visit the Griot.

23. Race around the Velodrome.

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25. Cross the Eads Bridge. Before the Arch, St. Louis was known for the Eads. When it opened, shortly after the Civil War, the mighty steel structure was the world’s longest arch bridge, stretching 6,442 feet across the Mississippi—long enough, it took an elephant crossing it to convince people that it was safe. A 15-milelong parade and President Ulysses S. Grant turned out on Independence Day 1874 to celebrate its opening, which helped fuel the city’s continued growth. A century later, The New York Times declared the bridge “among the most beautiful works of man.” Whether you walk, drive, or ride, know that you’re crossing an essential piece of St. Louis history. @YELLOWUMBRELLAPHOTO

A curious sight south of I-70, the sloped track in Penrose Park might be mistaken as a training ground for wee NASCAR enthusiasts. In reality, it’s one of just 27 such velodromes across the U.S. When it was built, in 1962, the 1/5-mile track hosted the U.S. National Track Cycling Championships. But over time, it fell into disrepair, earning the nickname Mr. Bumpy Face. Today, a group of avid cyclists is working to give the 55-year-old track a much-needed facelift. 4200 N. Kingshighway.

@MRS_BEESKNEES

The Griot Museum of Black History— whose moniker (pronounced “GREE-oh”) refers to a West African storyteller who collects and shares a culture’s tales and traditions—lives up to its name. Using wax figures, art, artifacts, and interpretative programs, it vividly conveys the experiences of African-Americans in St. Louis, from Dred Scott to Sherman George, Josephine Baker to Miles Davis. 2505 St. Louis.

28. Sip a cocktail in Union Station’s Grand Hall. It’s hard to imagine a more scenic spot to relax. And just when you think the space, with its soaring ceiling and intricate mosaics, can’t be more breathtaking, it comes alive with a 3D light show. It’s enough to make you wonder whether you sipped one too many Santa Fe martinis and drifted off into some splendiferous dream. 1820 Market.

Illustration by Andrew Kay

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Photography by Danny Clinch

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Visit Chuck Berry’s old stomping grounds. St. Louis is a city of neighborhoods, and few encapsulate its ups and downs like The Ville. In 1875, the first African-American high school west of the Mississippi, Sumner High, opened there. At the turn of the century, Antioch Baptist Church, St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church, and what came to be known as the Annie Malone Children’s Home served as beacons in the community. It was one of the few havens from restrictive real estate covenants for African-American families; by 1930, more than 85 percent of the neighborhood’s residents were black—a dramatic change from 8 percent just a decade earlier. When a teaching hospital devoted to caring for African-American patients opened there, in 1937, then-Mayor Bernard Dickmann said it was “a great day because it gives us another opportunity to advance civilization.” (At one point, Homer G. Phillips Hospital was said to have trained the largest number of African-American doctors and nurses in the world.) Indeed, The Ville advanced civilization in myriad ways, becoming what’s been called the “cradle of black culture in St. Louis.” Josephine Baker, Sonny Liston, Arthur Ashe, Dick Gregory, Tina Turner, and Grace Bumbry all once lived there. And it was The Ville where a boy named Charles Edward Anderson Berry learned to play the guitar. In 1950, Berry and his bride, Themetta, bought their first house, a three-room redbrick home, at 3137 Whittier. “The white family of Dimottios who lived next door welcomed us with open arms, giving us a pot of spaghetti over the backyard fence,” he recalled. It was in that house where Berry wrote “Maybellene,” “Johnny B. Goode,” and a string of other songs that would lay the foundation for rock ’n’ roll. At the same time, though, as racial covenants were ending and desegregation was beginning, many black professionals started leaving The Ville. (Berry and his growing family moved in 1958.) By the time the city closed the once-renowned teaching hospital, in 1979, spurring months of protests, the neighborhood had already fallen on hard times. For years, Berry’s onetime home, like many others nearby, sat vacant and dilapidated, a shell of what it once was. Today, though, efforts are underway to save the late rocker’s former residence, and the school and churches remain cornerstones of a storied community. ST. LO U I S E C O N O M I C D E VE LO PM E N T PA RT N E RSH IP

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30. See what’s new at the Contemporary Art Museum. In August 2017, CAM welcomed chief curator Wassan Al-Khudhairi, a founding director of Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, in Qatar, who’d been asked to curate the Asian Art Biennial 2017, in Taiwan. Art lovers citywide are eager to see what she’ll bring to St. Louis. 3750 Washington.

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31. Cross the Victorian footbridge.

32. See the seasons on Art Hill.

Built in 1885 as an entrance to the park from the streetcar line, it’s among Forest Park’s oldest attractions. Yet many St. Louisans don’t even know it exists until stumbling upon it while strolling the park’s northeast corner. Stop, linger, and listen the next time you cross it. Northeast corner of Forest Park.

In winter, it’s a Norman Rockwell painting, with rosy-cheeked children on toboggans. In spring, it cries out for picnics on lazy Sunday afternoons. In summer, it’s a bustling spot for outdoor movies and concerts. In fall, it’s a quiet place to sit and reflect. With King Louie perched atop its crest, it embodies the best of our city. Forest Park.

See Kali the polar bear at the zoo. He was orphaned as a baby in the Alaskan wilderness and spent time in Buffalo, New York, before moving here in 2015. Since Polar Bear Point opened—next to the equally popular Penguin & Puffin Coast—Kali has captivated crowds. Seeing him plunge into the 50,000-gallon Polar Dive Pool and swim up to the glass is an unforgettable experience. 1 Government, Forest Park.

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Photography courtesy of Saint Louis Zoo

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38. Play at Turtle Park. @ADRAKE1215

34. Celebrate The Muny’s centennial. There’s a reason that the nation’s largest outdoor theater is also its oldest: When something’s right, it endures. Mike Isaacson—just the third executive producer in the theater’s storied history—does a masterful job, mixing timeless shows with contemporary classics, attracting Broadway’s brightest stars to perform on elaborately constructed sets. 1 Theatre, Forest Park.

For more than two decades, the seven concrete turtles have held court near the zoo. Philanthropist Sunny Glassberg, who commissioned the late Bob Cassilly to create the reptiles, called the turtles “symbols of peace.” They were inspired by the critters Glassberg’s children brought home at one time—and have helped create countless memories for other children. 6401 Oakland.

41. Skate at Steinberg. The largest outdoor rink in the Midwest, Steinberg has a certain Currier & Ives vibe. It’s open every day between mid-November and late February, providing the perfect place to skate off those carbs from Grandma’s mashed potatoes and burn off the sugar rush from one too many candy canes. 400 Jefferson.

35. Experience the Pulitzer. Since 2001, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation has filled its striking Tadao Ando building with challenging exhibitions. In fact, the building itself and three other works, two of which were commissioned by founder Emily Rauh Pulitzer (Richard Serra’s winding “Joe” and Ellsworth Kelly’s “Blue Black”), serve as the only permanent works. 3716 Washington.

In case you’re wondering, the pavilion wasn’t around for the World’s Fair. It was built five years later with the fair’s proceeds. Today, after a dramatic restoration, it shines atop a hill holding picturesque fountains and a reflecting pool. Athletes often run up and down the hill’s steps. Forest Park.

37. See the Beckmanns at the Saint Louis Art Museum. A source of inspiration and scholarship, SLAM’s collection includes contemporary works and antiquities, African and Asian works. It’s practically mandatory for St. Louisans to visit the works of one-time Wash. U. art professor Max Beckmann— SLAM houses the largest public collection of his paintings in the world. 1 Fine Arts, Forest Park.

Illustration by Andrew Kay

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There’s something so classic-movie charming about the paddleboats in Forest Park. Maybe the fact that people have been boating there since 1876 lends a certain sepiatoned something. Before you head to the Grand Basin—where you can make a game of counting all of the posing wedding parties on a weekend afternoon—grab a quick bite at the dog-friendly Boathouse (reopening with a new menu later this year). 6101 Government, Forest Park.

42. Stargaze at the Science Center. The planetarium’s space-age Zeiss Universarium (even the name is cool!) projector beams more than 9,000 stars, planets, and other interstellar objects onto a 24-meter dome. It can simulate eclipses, comets, and meteor showers in true-to-life depiction. For those in the city, whose view of the night sky is obstructed by bright lights and smog, it’s a magical escape. 5050 Oakland.

@RONAKRONAKRONAKRONAKRONAK

36. Race uphill to the World’s Fair Pavilion.

39. Grab lunch at the Boathouse and paddle to the Grand Basin.

40. FIND A FAVORITE… SLINGER

The classic hangover cure at a classic diner WHITE KNIGHT: The

diner featured in the film White Palace serves the Super Slinger, with mushrooms, bell peppers, and onions. COURTESY DINER: The Devil’s Delight has all the staple ingredients, minus the hamburger. GOODY GOODY DINER: Get dollar cakes on the side of your slinger. SPENCER’S GRILL: An alternative to the slinger, the Slammer’s topped with gravy. TIFFANY’S ORIGINAL DINER: The Yin Yang is

smothered in chili and gravy.

43. See the Cathedral Basilica’s spectacular mosaics. Whatever your spiritual persuasion, the New Cathedral’s a sight to behold. Installation of the 83,000 square feet of vibrant mosaics, depicting biblical scenes and moments from the life of our city’s namesake, began in 1912 and lasted until 1988.Take a tour, or behold the cathedral on your own. (Just be sure that Mass isn’t underway). 4431 Lindell. ST. LO U I S E C O N O M I C D E VE LO PM E N T PA RT N E RSH IP

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44. See the Kemper and MOCRA. Wash. U.’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum is undergoing a dramatic expansion, including 30-foot-tall pleated stainless steel panels and a 2,700-square-foot gallery. Among the latest acquisitions at SLU’s Museum of Contemporary Religious Art is Texas artist Michael Tracy’s moving depiction of martyred Bishop Oscar Romero. 1 Brookings; 221 N. Grand.

45. Take an author-inspired tour of the Central West End. Many of the homes that once housed literary greats are still standing in the CWE (though they’re private residences, so gawk from a distance). In his classic novel Junky, William S. Burroughs described his childhood home (4664 Pershing Place) as a “solid, three-story, brick house in a large Midwest city.” Tennessee Williams (4633 Westminster Place) openly loathed that city, calling St. Louisans “cold, smug, complacent, intolerant, stupid, and provincial.” Poet T.S. Eliot (4446 Westminster Place) and author Kate Chopin (4232 McPherson), on the other hand, credited their hometown as a fine, inspiring place in which to grow up.

@ABBEYSCHWISTERLEE

46. Marvel at The Chase.

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St. Louis’ rise in the world of chess is something of an underdog story (fueled by multimillionaire Rex Sinquefield). We boast the World Chess Hall of Fame, the U.S. Chess Championships, Webster University’s powerhouse chess team (which recently won its fifth consecutive national championship under the tutelage of coach/grandmaster Susan Polgar), and even the World’s Largest Chess Piece. Some of the world’s top players live here, and more important, the game is being taught at schools, hospitals, and community centers. It’s even inspired avant-garde fashion, including the internationally renowned A Queen Within exhibit and grandmaster-designer collaborations. Experts and novices alike gather at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, in the Central West End; eavesdrop at the Kingside Diner while they rehash clever moves. 4600 block of Maryland.

The breadth of MoHist’s recent exhibits is impressive: coffee, Nazis, the Arch, fashion, terrorism, Route 66, World War I, panoramic photos… But none is more relevant at the moment than current exhibit #1 in Civil Rights: The African American Freedom Struggle in St. Louis. 5700 Lindell.

50. Spend time inside the Jewel Box. Built in 1936, the Art Deco masterpiece is a gleaming treasure, with more than 4,000 glass panes set in wood and iron. The greenhouse was initially built to showcase plants that could survive city smog levels; these days, it’s an inspired choice for weddings, parties, or just ogling. Don’t miss the special floral shows throughout the year, particularly poinsettias for the holidays. Wells and McKinley, Forest Park.

51. See St. Louis’ most famous historic homes.

48. PICK A FAVORITE… MUSIC SERIES A concert for every day of the week

MONDAY: Musical Mon-

days, Compton Heights Concert Band TUESDAY: Twilight Tuesdays, Missouri History Museum WEDNESDAY: Whitaker Music Festival, Missouri Botanical Garden THURSDAY: Summer Concert Series, Kirkwood Station Plaza FRIDAY: Jungle Boogie, Saint Louis Zoo SATURDAY: Sounds of Summer Concert Series, Chesterfield Amphitheater SUNDAY: Carondelet Summer Concert Series, Carondelet Park

Architect Ernst Janssen designed the Magic Chef Mansion (3400 Russell) a century ago for Charles Stockstrom, founder of the Magic Chef stove company. Fur trader Robert Campbell’s downtown family home (1508 Locust), built in 1851, now serves as a museum with artifacts and photographs from the 1880s. The Lemp Mansion (3322 DeMenil Place) housed the forefathers of the city’s beer heritage and, some say, retains ghostly vestiges of the tragic family’s misfortunes. The nearby Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion (3352 DeMenil Place) was home to descendants of the city’s founders; an example of the Greek Revival style, the house sits over caves used as beer production rooms and housed prehistoric animal remains. And the Scott Joplin House (2658 Delmar), a two-story brick building constructed around 1860, is the King of Ragtime’s only known surviving home. In 1983, it became the first historic state site devoted to African-American heritage. @CHERYL66STL

At nearly 100, The Chase Park Plaza rises above the CWE like a dignified grandparent watching over energetic youngsters. It’s as hip as any of them, having hosted Sinatra and Nat King Cole, Bob Hope and George Clooney. The new restaurants, The Preston and Chase Club, capture the same timeless glamour. Sipping a cocktail while overlooking the Mediterranean-style pool still conjures visions of old-time Hollywood, like La La Land on Lindell. 212 N. Kingshighway.

47. Learn the difference between a bishop and a rook.

49. Experience a vast range of stories at the Missouri History Museum.

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52.

CATCH A SHOW IN GRAND CENTER.

The arts and entertainment district continues to evolve, from historic and ornate to modern and minimalist. 52. The Fox Theatre BUILDING OPENED: 1929 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: Siamese Byzantine FORMER LIFE: One of five grand movie palaces built by the Fox Film Corporation in the late ’20s CAPACITY: 4,500 IN A NUTSHELL: Mary Strauss revived the vacant theater in the early ’80s; just a few years later, Chuck Berry took the stage alongside the likes of Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Etta James. INSIDER TIP: Grab a glass of bubbly and toast at the Curtain Call Lounge, St. Louis’ first champagne bar, before or after the show. 527 N. Grand. 53. Powell Hall

BUILDING OPENED: 1925 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: French Baroque FORMER LIFE: Vaudeville and movie

house, originally known as the St. Louis Theater CAPACITY: 2,683 IN A NUTSHELL: Best known as the home of the St. Louis Symphony, Powell Hall also hosts the St. Louis Speakers Series. INSIDER TIP: PreConcert Conversations, offered one hour before subscription performances, provide fascinating insights about the performance to come. 718 N. Grand.

Photography courtesy of The Fox Theatre

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54. The Sheldon

BUILDING OPENED: 1912 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: Architect Louis C.

Spiering, of 1904 World’s Fair fame, designed the building. FORMER LIFE: Onetime home of the Ethical Society of St. Louis, as well as a former church SEATING: 712 IN A NUTSHELL: Renowned for its acoustics, The Sheldon is an intimate alternative in which to see big-name performers and rising stars, such as Grammy winners Ricky Skaggs and Cécile McLorin Salvant. INSIDER TIP: The Sheldon Art Galleries are open an hour before performances and during intermission. 3648 Washington. 55. The Grandel Theatre

BUILDING OPENED: 1884 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: Romanesque Revival FORMER LIFE: First

Congregational Church; formerly housed The Black Rep and St. Louis Shakespeare CAPACITY: 465 IN A NUTSHELL: Kranzberg Arts Foundation and Grand Center Inc. manage the theater, but its myriad residents—among them The Big Muddy Dance Company, Dance St. Louis, Metro Theater Company, and Shakespeare Festival St. Louis— handle programming. INSIDER TIP: The Dark Room serves up one of the best brunches around, complete with music and fine art. 3610 Grandel Square.

56. Ferring Jazz Bistro OPENED: 2014 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: Jazz at the Bistro’s former digs and an adjacent building were gutted and renovated to create the new masterpiece. FORMER LIFE: In 1995, Barbara Rose moved the Just Jazz nightclub from the Hotel Majestic to Patty Long’s Grand Avenue Bistro and changed the name. Jazz at the Bistro was born. CAPACITY: 220 IN A NUTSHELL: The Harold and Dorothy Steward Center for Jazz includes the Ferring Jazz Bistro, an education center, and Jazz St. Louis’ offices. INSIDER TIP: On brunch-happy holidays (Easter, Mother’s Day), the bistro often serves up breakfast with a side of jazz. 3536 Washington.

58. The Stage at KDHX OPENED: 2013 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: A bamboo stage and state-of-theart audio equipment have replaced the graffiti and grime. FORMER LIFE: Creepy Crawl, the onetime music club/dive bar CAPACITY: 140 IN A NUTSHELL: In 2013, independent radio station KDHX moved from Magnolia Avenue to the 13,000-square-foot Larry J. Weir Center for Independent Music, complete with a listening room, café, studios, and offices. INSIDER TIP: Each month, on select Saturdays, DJ G. Wiz hosts Musical Edu-tainment, schooling audiences with a mix of soul, hip-hop, R&B, jazz, and pop from the ’60s to today. 3524 Washington.

57. .ZACK

59. Public Media Commons OPENED: 2014 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: 2015 Merit Award from the American Institute of Architects St. Louis Chapter FORMER LIFE: Parking lot CAPACITY: 700 IN A NUTSHELL: Located between the Nine Network and St. Louis Public Radio, the 9,000-square-foot courtyard is flanked by two-story video walls that heighten performances and special events. INSIDER TIP: The space is available for rent, and it’s hosted a wide range of events: musical performances, fashion shows, storytelling, movies, tastings—even weddings. 3653 Olive.

BUILDING OPENED: 1919 ARCHITECTURAL NOTES: Egyptian Revival FORMER LIFE: A car dealer, part of Midtown’s Automobile Row CAPACITY: 202 (in the theater) IN A NUTSHELL: Last year, the Kranzberg

Arts Foundation—which already reimagined the space at 501 N. Grand as the Kranzberg Arts Center and opened The Marcelle naerby— transformed the Cadillac Building into a multi-use arts facility. INSIDER TIP: Besides the arts, .ZACK houses Turn restaurant, Sophie’s Artist Lounge & Cocktail Club, and the Music Record Shop. 3224 Locust.

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@SALVEOYOGA

62. Take a culinary trip around the world along South Grand. Start with happy hour sushi and sake at Café Mochi. Then make your way north, grabbing Persian at Cafe Natasha’s, Vietnamese at Pho Grand, Thai at Basil Spice or King & I, and Lebanese at The Vine. 3100– 3200 blocks of S. Grand.

63. Have a progressive dinner date at The Cheshire. Start a Friday evening by heading south from The Loop to Clayton Road. Have drinks at Basso, then dinner at Boundary, the sleek space upstairs with its own raw bar. Sip a nightcap at Fox & Hounds and listen to live music. Finally, shack up in a novelty suite at The Cheshire. 6300 Clayton.

64. Try a Provel-topped pie.

60. Wander The Hill. There are too many noteworthy restaurants and sandwich shops to name here, so do yourself a favor: Start at St. Ambrose Church, beside the statue of two Italian immigrants; do bocce and beers at Milo’s; grab some wine and meats at DiGregorio’s, Viviano’s, or Volpi; break bread at Missouri Baking Company or Marconi Bakery; pick up some Herbaria soap and a Bertarelli knife. Once you’ve done all that walking and worked up a proper appetite, grab a bite.

Food scribe Joe Bonwich once traced the lineage of the oft-debated cheese, concluding, “All legitimate Provel is distributed through Roma Grocery Co. on The Hill. The late president of Roma, Toots Pezzani, was the uncle of Ed Imo.” It’s a fitting twist, considering Imo’s has made the St. Louis–style pizza, that concoction of cracker-thin crust and mystery goo, a local favorite. Order a squareshaped Imo’s Deluxe—and a side of T-ravs for good measure. 1000 Hampton.

65. See the city from atop the Compton Hill Water Tower.

Long after he could’ve retired, Berry continued playing shows with his family in the Duck Room, performing more than 200 monthly concerts. It might’ve been Fats Domino who popularized the restaurant’s namesake song, but it was Berry whose name grew synonymous with Joe Edwards’ landmark establishment over four-plus decades. Outside, along the ever-evolving street, the St. Louis Walk of Fame recognizes dozens of St. Louis celebs with bronze stars, but only one has his own statue: the Father of Rock ’n’ Roll. This one’s for you, Chuck. (See also No. 29.) 6504 Delmar.

“The view is just outrageous,” park/water tower society president John Maxwell once told SLM. “It’s this incredible Cinderella– Rapunzel tower with fancy ironwork stairs.” Climb 198 steps—particularly on a fully moonlit night—for a scenic view from atop a 120-year-old landmark. 1700 S. Grand.

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On summer Saturdays, visit the farmers’ market at 8 a.m., before the crowds pick over the freshest produce, and then unwind with yoga at 9 a.m. and tunes, 10 a.m.–noon. (If you have kids, consider a swimsuit for the Wading Pool Pavilion, a favorite for tykes.) On Sundays, grab brunch at Café Madeleine in the Piper Palm House, then relax beside The Ruins (the remains of the Lindell Hotel, once the largest hotel in the U.S.) or in one of the 11 ornate pavilions. Rather burn calories? The South City gem offers three grass tennis courts (the only such public courts in the nation), as well as hard-surface and pickleball courts. 4256 Magnolia.

@SHAHSTAGRAM

61. Play a Chuck Berry tune on the jukebox at Blueberry Hill.

66. Spend a morning in Tower Grove Park.

Illustration by Andrew Kay

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St. Louis might not have a Major League Soccer team, but the city has an incredibly rich soccer history. A group of friends from The Hill played on the 1950 U.S. soccer team and inspired the film The Game of Their Lives. Between 1959 and 1973, SLU won 10 college soccer championships. And the Saint Louis Football Club draws a diehard legion of fans to World Wide Technology Soccer Park, whose namesake’s co-founder, Jim Kavanaugh, played on the 1984 Olympic team and serves as board president of the St. Louis Scott Gallagher Soccer Club. 3330 Laclede; 1 Soccer Park.

68.

@CHANELLEKMORRIS

@JODIEJUHNALLEN

67. Catch a soccer game.

69. FIND A FAVORITE… MOVIE THEATER Take a seat at one of these classic spots.

ESQUIRE: Reservable recliners + stadium seating MOOLAH: Leather couches + downstairs bowling alley TIVOLI: Traditional red-cushioned rows + local movie memorabilia HI-POINTE: Aquamarine aisles + reasonably priced popcorn SKYVIEW DRIVE-IN: Lawn chairs + double features

Get lost in the Kaeser Memorial Maze at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Located in the garden’s genteel Victorian District, the maze is a replica of one that garden founder Henry Shaw built in the 1800s. (It was replanted nearly a decade ago, so those yew hedges are plenty tall now.) Before you leave, be sure to stroll through the Japanese Garden, admire the Climatron, and let your kiddos play at the children’s garden. 4344 Shaw.

70. Do the Drewes. Turning a creamy cup of frozen-custard perfection upside down would be sacrilegious if those extra-thick concretes didn’t stay put in Ted Drewes’ iconic yellow cups. You can’t go wrong with any topping, but consider adding hot fudge, just to make it that much more decadent. 6726 Chippewa; 4224 S. Grand.

71. See a show at Joe’s Cafe & Gallery. Located around the corner from the Delmar Loop, on Kingsbury, Joe’s is chockfull of vintage neon signs, kitschy décor, and memorable entertainment (e.g., pop-up concerts and rotating art exhibits). (It’s only open occasionally, though, so check Joe’s Facebook page for show times.) 6014 Kingsbury.

72. Rock out in the pit at The Pageant. The intimate concert venue’s eclectic schedule often holds big-name surprises, from Green Day to a Karlie Kloss–helmed fashion show. For the most visceral live music experience, trade a cocktail table for a spot on the dance floor. Want something a smidge more low-key? Try a show at Delmar Hall, next door. 6161 Delmar. @_GINGERSAURUSREX182

Photography courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden

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ST. LO U I S C O U N T Y

73. See a show at the Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts. In this age of TV, movies, and blockbuster music festivals, it’s nice to dial it back and watch a live, in-your-face performance. Look no further than this intimate venue on Webster University’s campus, home to both The Rep and Opera Theatre of St. Louis. The stage is versatile, permitting productions of everything from Shakespeare (in a black box theater of just 125 seats) to Verdi (in front of an auditorium of 763, with nary a seat more than 20 rows from the action). 130 Edgar.

74.

75. Kayak Creve Coeur Lake.

Visit Shaw Nature Reserve. Missouri is a big state with a startling variety of terrain and plant life. How fortunate, then, that the metro area has this 2,400-acre reserve, where the rolling prairies meet the Ozark Plateau. Within minutes, you can trek through prairieland, wetland, and woodland to get a sense of the state’s diverse topography. 307 Pinetum Loop, Gray Summit.

Paddle the Creve Coeur Water Trail, a 6-mile trek across the lake and up Fee Fee Creek. Along the way, get the skinny (from a brochure or your smart phone) at several points of historical or natural interest—or just take in the herons, dragonflies, and submerged trees on your own. If you’re scared of the water, stick to the lakeside trails and disc golf—or venture through the treetops on the Go Ape! Zip Line & Treetop Adventure course. 13219 Streetcar.

76. Play at Faust Park. The 200-acre park and preserve in Chesterfield covers a lot of historical territory, including Thornhill, the 1819 home of Missouri’s second governor, Frederick Bates, as well as a historic village of salvaged buildings from 1840–1910. But kids are drawn to the modern attractions, including the 1920s St. Louis Carousel—boasting 64 handcarved horses and deer in a climate-controlled building—and the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House, which hosts the must-see Morpho Mardi Gras in spring. 15185 Olive.

77. Climb the grand staircase at Fort Belle Fontaine. Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the five-tier staircase of rugged limestone in 1939, but it’s actually one of the park’s newer features. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark camped here in 1804 and stopped here again on the last day of their trip, in 1806. (The charming ruins near the river look almost that old, but they’re actually WPA-era bathhouses.) 13002 Bellefontaine.

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Photography by Ann White, Illustration by Andrew Kay

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@EAKDESIGN

78. Visit Jefferson Barracks’ growing museum district. Long known for its bluff-top views and nearby national cemetery, the South County park’s recently become a hotbed of history museums, including the Missouri Civil War Museum, the Telephone Museum, the Laborer’s House, the Old Ordnance Room, and the Powder Magazine Museum. Considering Jefferson Barracks’ long history as a military post, it’s an apt setting. 345 North.

79. Find St. Louis beer barons in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

81. Take a selfie in front of “Eye” at Laumeier.

85. Take a train ride at the National Museum of Transportation.

There are tons of photo-ops at the 105-acre Sunset Hills sculpture park, but artist Tony Tasset’s gigantic fiberglass eyeball is the perfect place to let Instagram know where you are. Once you’ve strolled past the outdoor art (some of it sited in the surrounding woods), stop inside the sleek new Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center. 12580 Rott.

What better way to traverse the grounds of a museum dedicated to the history of getting around than by train? The C.P. Huntington miniature train pulls out of the station every 20 minutes for a sevenminute excursion around the West County campus, where you can spot old boats and planes and all other modes of conveyance from the comfort of your seat. A $5 wristband gets you unlimited rides all day. All aboard! 2933 Barrett Station.

82. Cheer on the talented dogs at Purina Farms.

Each October, the cemetery hosts its annual Beer Barons Tour, during which you can ride a trolley past tombs and mausoleums bearing such names as Busch, Anheuser, Uhrig, Lemp, Wainwright, and Griesedieck. 4947 W. Florissant. @BENKOUSH

Pack up the pooch and head to Purina Farms, where you can catch the incredible Pro Plan Performance Team. The canines demonstrate dock diving, agility and, of course, wildly popular Frisbee tricks, in which the furry athletes soar and snatch discs in midair. 500 William Danforth Way, Gray Summit.

83. Admire the wildlife of West County. Observe Missouri fauna and wildlife in their natural digs. Spot eagles, hawks, buzzards, owls, parrots, and even bats at the World Bird Sanctuary. Then look for deer, bison, wild turkey, and elk at Lone Elk Park. 125 Bald Eagle Ridge.

80. Meet a Mexican gray wolf at the Endangered Wolf Center.

Where to spend a Friday during Lent

ST. CECILIA CATHOLIC CHURCH: Chiles rellenos,

Pull yourself away from the beer and baby goats long enough to pay homage to A-B’s iconic stars. Petting the majestic animals, you can feel the power that made them synonymous with the world’s largest beermaker. Next thing you know, “Here Comes the King” is on repeat in your head—and you’re headed back to the Bauernhof courtyard for another round. 10501 Gravois.

87. Sit in the Oval Office at The Magic House. The Magic House has long been the go-to for kids to get hands-on with science. When the Kirkwood attraction expanded, though, administrators decided it was time for citizens young and old to get a civics refresher. In the Star-Spangled Center, you can cast an electronic ballot, apply your John Hancock to the Declaration of Independence, and sit at the POTUS’s desk in a replica Oval Office. Politics aside, it’s a powerful experience for aspiring politicos. 516 S. Kirkwood.

mariachis and folkloric dancers. ST. MARY MAGDALEN SCHOOL: With a drive-thru and central location, it’s ideal for those on the go. HOLY SPIRIT PARISH: Weekly specials, raffle tickets, and a drive-thru to boot.

@LONGHRN5

The Mexican gray wolf, or el lobo, was plentiful all over the American Southwest, before the spread of the livestock industry chased it onto the endangered list in the 1970s. In 1998, for the first time in 50 years, a puppy was born in the wild. That puppy’s father was born at this nonprofit in Eureka, where you can see a pack of five wild-born gray wolf pups on the species’ long road to recovery. 6750 Tyson Valley.

84. FIND A FAVORITE… FISH FRY

86. Pet a Clydesdale at Grant’s Farm.

ST. FERDINAND CATHOLIC CHURCH: Open Fridays year-round. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ST. LOUIS: Tired of fish?

Try the falafel.

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BEYO N D T HE CI T Y & C O U N T Y

88. Explore the National Building Arts Center.

91. Revel at Fast Eddie’s Bon Air.

The life project of preservationist Larry Giles, it’s located in an industrial pocket of Sauget, Illinois. Its more than 300,000 holdings include stained-glass windows, marble caryatids, and a terracotta cornice from the Lincoln Trust Building, considered the finest example of its type in the world. There’s also a more traditional archive, overflowing with blueprints and trade journals. 2300 Falling Springs, Sauget, Ill.

89. Harvest the season at Eckert’s. Gathering apples—or pumpkins, peaches, strawberries, or blackberries—is only part of the family fun. There are also cooking classes, live music, and seasonal fun (haunted hayrides in fall, Santa in winter). Oh, and did we mention that kids eat free at the Country Restaurant on Thursdays? 951 S. Green Mount, Belleville, Ill.

Take a number for the 39-cent shrimp and Big Elwood on a stick and order up a cold frosty one. Then settle in for some tunes, inside or on the expansive patio. (Just remember to bring cash—the place doesn’t take plastic.) 1530 E. Fourth, Alton, Ill.

92. Catch a Frontier League game. You won’t find big-league players—or bigleague prices—at a River City Rascals or Gateway Grizzlies game. Lawn seats are $5ish, and parking’s free. For a family looking for a cheap night at the ballpark, it’s a welcome changeup. 900 T.R. Hughes, O’Fallon, Mo.; 2301 Grizzlie Bear, Sauget, Ill.

Start at the Katy Trail, which runs along the Missouri River. Then take in the lush Meramec Valley on the paths at Castlewood State Park, or spot deer and other wildlife while walking through Powder Valley Nature Area, in Kirkwood. Rockwoods Reservation, in Wildwood, is another hiker’s paradise, with six trails of varying distances and terrains for a leisurely stroll or an intense workout—all in the tranquility of nature, just outside the city.

@JANELPEYTON

93. FIND A FAVORITE… MICROBREW Something for every taste

Mint Chocolate Stout

96. Visit Missouri’s first capitol.

A BIT MALTY: Ferguson

Brewing’s Pecan Brown Ale A BIT HOPPY: 2nd Shift’s Art of Neurosis A BIT SOUR: Side Project’s Saison du Blé A BIT CITRUSY: Modern Brewery’s Citrapolis A BIT FRUITY: O’Fallon Brewery’s Wheach A BIT ST. LOUIS: 4 Hands’ City Wide

90. Climb at Cahokia Mounds. Kids once sledded down Monks Mound, unaware that the site was once home to the continent’s largest civilization. Today, you can climb to the highest peak at the UNESCO World Heritage Site and envision life there. 30 Ramey, Collinsville, Ill.

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Whether you want to go high (50 feet), higher (100 feet), or really high (150 feet), hop on the elevator for a sweeping view of the Mississippi River bottoms, including the confluence, the Clark Bridge, and lots of industry. (On a clear day, you can see the Arch, too.) Don’t miss the historic garden once you’re back on terra firma. 435 Confluence Tower, Hartford, Ill.

95. Take a hike.

AN AMERICAN CLASSIC: Schlafly Pale Ale AN ENGLISH CLASSIC: Civil Life’s British Bitter A GERMAN CLASSIC: Urban Chestnut’s Zwickel A BIT STOUT: Perennial’s 17

EXPERIENCE OUR MONTHLY MUSTS.

94. Sightsee at the Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower.

JANUARY

Loop Ice Carnival

FEBRUARY

Soulard Mardi Gras

Before you hit the quaint shops along St. Charles’ historic Main Street, tour Missouri’s first capitol building. The ground floor once housed goods and residents; legislators met upstairs to decide the state’s direction at a time when Thomas Jefferson was still pondering the shape of the Louisiana Territory. 200 S. Main, St. Charles.

MARCH

Dogtown St. Paddy’s Day Parade

APRIL

Earth Day Festival

MAY

Cinco de Mayo on Cherokee Street

Illustration by Andrew Kay

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97.

Birdwatch at the Audubon Center at Riverlands. Located thrillingly close to the shores of the Mississippi, the 3,700-acre site is the ideal place to look for birds: trumpeter swans, eagles, warblers, herons, pelicans, kestrels, terns, harriers… Hike the 8.5 miles of trails, peer out at Heron Pond from inside the modern avian observatory, or look through one of the powerful spotting scopes inside the visitor center. Don’t know that bird? A guide’s typically nearby, ready to help. 301 Riverlands, West Alton, Mo.

98. Cross the Old Chain of Rocks Bridge.

99. Motor down the Great River Road.

100. Get out on the river.

The bridge is unparalleled in structure and sights, with its 22-degree bend and pair of picturesque water-intake towers just below. Today, all that remains of its Route 66 glory days are weathered vestiges—an auto court sign, a vintage Texaco gas pump, an old firetruck—and the parking lot on the Missouri side is closed because of car break-ins. Still, on a clear day, it’s worth parking at North Riverfront Park or the Illinois bridge entrance and biking across.

In fall, the road’s lined with brilliant foliage on one side. Pere Marquette Lodge offers Sunday brunch (and a Wine Festival in November), and at Grafton Winery, you can pair vino with live music and a sweeping view of the river. In winter, head to Alton or Piasa Harbor (named for another impressive bird native to the River Road) to watch eagles hunt over the icy waters of the Mississippi—or see them close up at TreeHouse Wildlife Center. greatriveroad-illinois.org.

Start at the National Great Rivers Museum (2 Locks and Dam Way) and Melvin Price Locks and Dam. Then drive up to Grafton and take a ferry—the Grafton (open weekends; 800-258-6645) or Golden Eagle (calhounferrycompany.com)—across the river. For a longer outing, take the Blues Cruise (gate wayarch.com) on select Thursdays. And if you’re really venturesome, go out in a canoe with Big Muddy Adventures (2 muddy.com).

JUNE

Pridefest, Circus Flora, Shakespeare in the Park

JULY

Fair Saint Louis

AUGUST

Festival of Nations

SEPTEMBER

Great Forest Park Balloon Glow & Race, LouFest, Saint Louis Art Fair, Big Muddy Blues Festival

OCTOBER

Best of Missouri Market, Shaw Art Fair

NOVEMBER

St. Louis International Film Festival

DECEMBER

St. Louis Symphony’s NYE Celebration

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Park Place Lafayette Park

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Maybe if the world were a little calmer and greener, and everybody had a big, self-mowing back yard with a lake‌ But most of us don’t. We need our parks: They keep us sane and happy and connected; give us breathing space; kindle romance; and absorb kid and canine energy. If Forest Park is the heart of St. Louis, then these parks help circulate its oxygen. ST. LO U I S E C O NO M I C DE VE LO PM E NT PA RT N E RS HI P

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nature

WATERSHED NATURE CENTER

The Nature Institute

KLONDIKE PARK Here’s how to make a single weekend both rugged and civilized: 1. Reserve a camping spot at Klondike Park—ideally, a primitive site tucked away from others—for a Friday night. On the way to your camp site, rent a bike ($25 per day) at Katy Bike Rental in Defiance. Then build a bonfire before bedtime. 2. Start Saturday morning by hiking around the park’s scenic lake, observing the white high-silica sand that was used to create glass at the one-time quarry. 3. Bike along the Katy Trail, running just south of the park, and follow it west to Augusta. 4. Sample the wines at Mount Pleasant Winery and Augusta Winery, then head back to your campsite before sunset. 5. After a restful slumber and packing up, stop at Trail Smokehouse in Defiance for an early lunch.

THE NATURE INSTITUTE The view from atop the bluffs is stunning: the Mighty Mississippi stretching into the distance, the Great River Road wrapping alongside it, those distant smoke-stacks towering over the trees… Well, maybe that last part’s not so great, but otherwise, the view from Olin Nature Preserve and the adjacent Mississippi Sanctuary is unparalleled. While exploring the sanctuary,

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This lagoon turned nature preserve, near Edwardsville, Ill., includes a treehouse and an observation tower.

follow the westernmost trail, past Creek Trek Waterfall, to a scenic overlook. At the preserve, take the 1.4mile Loop Trail, with a brief detour at the former skeetshooting range. And on the way out, stop at Talahi Lodge, where you can relax and enjoy a picnic. (Note: The Nature Institute’s trails are closed until April 1, because of a restoration period.)

EDWARD “TED” AND PAT JONES–CONFLUENCE POINT STATE PARK

Powder Valley Conservation Nature Center

When exploring nature, where better to start than the spot where Meriwether Lewis and William Clark embarked on their storied expedition? (OK, so technically, the rivers then met two miles from where they intersect today.) At what’s now Confluence Point State Park, you can follow an interpretive trail through the floodplain. There, at the shore of the confluence, witness the rivers’ raw power, as the current efforlessly sweeps entire trees downstream. Gaze along the banks and overhead to spot the wildlife

that dots the landscape. Then, on your way home, pass through the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary and stop at the Audubon Center at Riverlands, where you just might see 1,000 trumpeter swans if it’s the right time of year, and learn about bird migration patterns, and peer through spotting scopes. Students and faculty at Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts designed the Riverlands Avian Observatory, a bird blind near the center’s Heron Pond. The modern design was named a finalist in the Architizer A+ Awards, garnering international attention.

Opening spread photography courtesy of Your Story by Jeremy Keltner; this page courtesy of The Nature Institute; St. Louis County Parks; and The Missouri Department of Conservation

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POWDER VALLEY CONSERVATION NATURE CENTER This 112-acre gem isn’t as sprawling as the state parks west of it, but Powder Valley has a lot going on, particularly for families. The location is convenient, near Interstates 44 and 270 in Kirkwood. The park’s three paved trails are easy to navigate, with Tanglevine Trail accessible to hikers with disabilities. And the on-site learning center is among the area’s best, with a 3,000-gallon aquarium, a 250-seat auditorium, a two-story tree exhibit, a wildlife-viewing area, and more. The only downside? Fido has to stay at home.

LONE ELK PARK There’s a poignant story behind the name. After World War II, the one-time military ammo depot transformed into a park stocked with 10 elk from Yellowstone

National Park. That herd grew to more than 100 by the late ’50s, when the military again seized control of the grounds—and the elk were exterminated one winter for safety reasons. But one bull escaped, wandering the hills alone for years. Finally, in 1966, the same year the land was renamed Lone Elk Park, locals purchased six more elk from Yellowstone. Six bison joined them in 1973, and the herds have grown since. For those who dare to venture out of their cars, White Bison Trail makes a 3-mile loop through the park, allowing visitors to get relatively close and personal with the elk. On the way out, stop at the World Bird Sanctuary, and pay homage to another iconic North American animal, the bald eagle. But keep in mind that dogs, those other beloved beasts, are prohibited at the park.

naturecentric parks would be complete without visiting a cave. Cliff Cave is among the best-known, and it’s St. Louis County’s second-longest cave. In 2009, a gate was added to protect the endangered Indiana bats that live inside. Nonetheless, you can follow the rugged 3-mile Spring Valley Trail to the face of the cave, hike or bike along the 5.1-mile paved Mississippi Trail, or stroll along the 1-mile River Bluff Trail for a view of the Mississippi River and surrounding valley.

CLIFF CAVE PARK Missouri is the Cave State, so no list of

ISLANDS OF ADVENTURE

Cliff Cave Park

Photography courtesy of Missouri State Parks; Missouri Department of Conservation; and St. Louis County Parks

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Howell Island Conservation Area: This low-lying island in the Missouri River, located near Wildwood, is accessible by following Olive Street/Eatherton Road. Louis H. Bangert Memorial Wildlife Area: Just south of the Blanchette Bridge, this 160-acre island in the Missouri River is accessible via the Katy Trail. Maple Island Conservation Area: This spot, located near Alton, is popular among fishermen. Pelican Island Natural Area: Adventurers can reach the island at the heart of the 2,260-acre area by boat, launched from the mainland adjacent to Sioux Passage Park in North County. Walkers Island: A causeway on the southeast side of Horseshoe Lake, located near Granite City, Ill., extends to this island, another prime fishing spot.

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history

Compton Hill Reservoir Park

OUR TWO BEGINNINGS The world has claimed Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site (it’s on the UNESCO World Heritage List), and archaeologists come from everywhere to excavate here. Peer at their digs, then climb 100 feet to the top of Monks Mound, the largest earthen mound in the Americas. “People don’t think of Indians having cities,” says Cahokia archaeologist William Iseminger, “but this was America’s first”: a highly civilized metropolis that in the year 1250 was larger than London. The Mississippians built other mounds nearby— including one across the river, near the site Pierre Laclede and Auguste Chouteau would choose for the village of St. Louis. The city’s Norman grid is now shaded by the Gateway Arch and the Old Courthouse. The grounds of the 91-acre Jefferson National Expansion Memorial park are “almost sacred to our history as a nation,” says local historian NiNi Harris.

FORT BELLE FONTAINE It’s 1806. Zebulon Pike leaves from this new cantonment on the Missouri River to explore the great Southwest (where Pikes Peak awaits its name). Two months later, exhausted at their journey’s end, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set up camp here, and their pals in the Company of Artillery fire off 17 rounds in their honor. By day, the fort’s cottonwood Located near Scott Air walls absorb the stories of Force Base, the park includes six historical soldiers, merchants, and Sac types of aircraft. and Fox trappers who meet here to trade furs for vice (whiskey, tobacco, knives) and elegance (fabric, glass beads). By 1939, teens in reform-school cottages at the Missouri Hills Home for Boys have replaced that rowdy mix. First lady Eleanor Roosevelt visits and sits amid 300 flowering trees to hear a concert on the stone Grand Staircase, built by her husband’s Works Progress Administration. Today, the early machismo’s gone, and the 1930s grandeur is stained by an elegant melancholy, but you can still tell that this place Cahokia Mounds mattered. State Historic Site

SCOTT FIELD HERITAGE AIR PARK

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Photography courtesy of Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site; St. Louis County Parks; Missouri Division of Tourism

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JEFFERSON BARRACKS Missouri’s new military barracks opened six days after President Thomas Jefferson died. It was named in his honor. Jefferson Barracks would play a role in every U.S. war that followed. Its founder, Col. Henry Atkinson, led an action that started the Black Hawk War. JB funneled men and materials to the Mexican War, served as a hospital for both sides during the Civil War, and trained soldiers for both world wars. Jeanette MacDonald and Judy Garland sang for the troops at the park’s amphitheater, built in the 1930s. Decades intermingle at JB, now the site of multiple museums, but the single theme is courage.

of the cost, asked the German sculptor to drape the truth discreetly. He refused. In compromise, she was cast in bronze, rather than glaring white marble.

MARQUETTE PARK “Boy, there’s a lot of history packed into that little 15-acre park,” Harris says of the green space in South City’s Dutchtown. “It was the site of a hospital for Union soldiers during the Civil War; the site of a very large orphanage and industrial school; the site of tryouts for the 1948 Olympic [water] polo team; and the location for filming The Game of Their Lives.”

COMPTON HILL RESERVOIR PARK On the night of the full moon, climb the 170-foot Compton Hill Water Tower, and see 360 degrees of the city sparkle. Built in 1898, the tower is one of a handful left standing in the U.S. (three are in St. Louis). Engineer James Kirkwood chose the site; the city’s water division wanted reservoirs to be in parks, purified by trees and fresh air. Sculpture wasn’t mandatory, but Compton Heights has a beauty: The Naked Truth is a tribute to three GermanAmerican newspaper editors. Adolphus Busch, who was donating the lion’s share

Fort Belle Fontaine

Photography courtesy of Jeff Meyers; Missouri Division of Tourism

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Jefferson Barracks

MORE THAN JUST A CEMETERY In recent years, you might have seen clever billboards with tag lines like “The other botanical garden.” That’s not just some PR boast; Bellefontaine Cemetery is a certified arboretum. On its 314 acres, Bellefontaine Cemetery boasts 1,100 shrubs and more than 5,000 trees from more than 200 species. And the cemetery is expanding its gardens, focusing on sustainable, droughttolerant native species. Bellefontaine also is home to foxes, raccoons, and other wildlife. The cemetery has a two-year partnership with the Audubon Society, which is doing a bird count (with 130-plus species counted to date) and recommending native grasses, shrubs, and trees to provide additional habitat for the area’s migratory birds and small mammals. Then there are Bellefontaine’s other attractions: its architecture, art, and history. For instance, more than 50 beer-related people are buried there, and the cemetery holds a historic Beer Baron’s event every fall. It also offers a range of free guided tours from March through November. Visit bellefontainecemetery.org for details.

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LAFAYETTE PARK

strolling

The oldest park in St. Louis, Lafayette is a perfect square, surrounded by Victorian architecture. Enter through any of several wrought-iron gates, and make your way toward the centerpiece: a lake that Victorians once paddled in swan boats. Real swans remain, and on the grassy field beyond, the Perfectos crack skinny vintage baseball bats. In the southeast corner’s romantic little Rockery, an iron bridge arches over a pond. Check out the cannons removed from a British frigate, the HMS Actaeon; the formal statues of George Washington and Thomas Hart Benton; and the late Bob Cassilly’s concrete frog sculpture, smirking from the playground.

TOWER GROVE PARK This wooded Victorian strolling park rewards meandering. Its myriad kinds of trees could chart every shade of green, and they attract 200 kinds of birds, from red-shafted flickers and monk parakeets to ospreys and ring-billed gulls. Henry Shaw developed the park to give St. Louis “a grand pleasure ground,” with wide lanes for horse-drawn carriages, gates guarded by zinc griffins, and exotic pavilions and gazebos. Every few feet, there’s something

to see: lions copied from the tomb of Pope Clement XIII, heroic sculptures (Shakespeare’s here), busts (including Mozart), and antiquities (columns from the Old Courthouse and stone “ruins” from the old Lindell Hotel, reflected in one of the most picturesque ponds in St. Louis).

CARONDELET PARK “This park helped a lot of marriages survive retirement,” says local historian NiNi Harris, who’d see men fishing from the pergolas or playing pinochle at Lyle House. Tree-lined boulevards and old brick homes with character surround the “undulating landscape,” so prized by 19th-century landscape designers. In the ’30s, some of the sinkholes were merged into a shallow, picturesque lagoon. The YMCA’s Carondelet Park Rec Complex adds a little splash, with its lazy river and water slide, and a Great Rivers Greenway trail that hooks Carondelet to Jefferson Barracks and runs to Soulard’s Lyon Park.

FRANCIS PARK The town square of St. Louis Hills, Francis Park is cornered by four churches and outlined

by a stream of walkers, bikers, and joggers who like counting their 1-mile laps. Originally the farm of David Francis, the park is almost as lively as the World’s Fair that he spearheaded. People chat on mosaic benches by the formal lily pond; they go to art shows and car shows, old-fashioned band concerts and the Grub & Groove rock and restaurant festival in August. Kids shriek down the sledding hill, hunt Easter Eggs, slurp cocoa at the Christmas-tree lighting. On summer nights, astronomers set up telescopes on the sidewalks. And Friends of Francis Park is hoping to add a seven-foot bronze statue of the park’s namesake for even more interest.

CLIFTON HEIGHTS PARK Say you’re in Manhattan’s Diamond District, sifting through bag after bag of chipped, flawed, cloudy stones, and you come upon a small, perfect, brilliant-cut emerald. That’s Clifton Heights Park. Ringed by Victorian houses and Arts and Crafts bungalows, it has a lake that’s scooped deep, a basin protected by steep grassy slopes. Two fountains soften the air, and a viewing deck and boathouse add visual interest to the gentle, tenth-of-a-mile lap.

QUAIL RIDGE PARK

This Wentzville park is home to the National Horseshoe Pitchers Hall of Fame & Museum.

Lafayette Park

Tower Grove Park

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Photography courtesy of Your Story by Jeremy Keltner; Ron Dawson; Mark Abeln

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THE GEM OF THE CITY A look at Forest Park’s dramatic rebirth

It all started when they buried the River des Peres. First, they took the Forest Park section underground to make room for the World’s Fair. But in 1915, a flood of slimy, gray water convinced the city to bury another 18 miles of the river, and soon a giant concrete tunnel had to be built to keep sewage from seeping into the park. It was an engineering coup, but it cut the park’s lakes and lagoons off from each other, leaving them to stagnate, scum over with algae, and slurp away their banks. Over the next six decades, the surrounding land grew more crowded, less serenely beautiful. Designed for carriage rides and picnics, Forest Park’s winding roads were now crumbling and clogged with traffic, its streetlights broken, its shadowy glens hide-outs for drug deals and illicit sex. Alarmed, civic leaders wrought consensus from a series of community meetings in the mid-’90s. John Hoal, a determined architect from South Africa, took calm charge of the master plan. He started by layering transparent sheets that mapped terrain, land use, the original River des Peres course, and the changes over the years. Instantly, it became obvious: The park needed a waterway again. And doing it right would cost a pretty penny. Forest Park Forever threw itself into fundraising, the city issued bonds, voters approved a sales tax—all told, St. Louis raised $102.6 million, setting a national record for urban-park renovation. By 2004, a century of wear and tear had been cleared away, and the park looked new again. In an exuberant bulb blitz, volunteers planted 27,800 perennials in four days. Today, the Grand Basin at the foot of Art Hill looks like something you’d see in Paris; The Boathouse feels like summer in Maine. Instead of manicured artifice, there’s nature—artfully designed. Breezes ruffle tall native grasses around Pagoda Island. A long waterway curves past prairie and savannah,

around Picnic Island, under arched wooden footbridges, through wetlands. Flat rocks create weirs—natural dams—and the water riffles, glides, cascades, flows into the next lake or lagoon. Everything is connected again. Shrubs and flowers are native to Missouri, so they flourish. Yells from the handball courts or ball fields are balanced by places of utter quiet or gentle romance; the bustle of the museums by lone cyclists and the college kids who study by the waterfall. The institutions aren’t at odds with the surrounding landscape; the park’s surprises continue a visitor’s experience of science, art, history, zoology, or horticulture. Graffiti and trash are no longer a scourge; the park’s users are fiercely protective. For good reason. —JEANNETTE COOPERMAN

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

THE MUNY

SAINT LOUIS ART MUSEUM

SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

SAINT LOUIS ZOO

ORIGINS

Founded in 1866; reopened in current building in 1913

First put on a show in 1916; officially founded in 1919

Founded as the St. Louis School and Museum of Fine Arts in 1879; reopened in Forest Park building in 1906; renamed the Saint Louis Art Museum in 1971

The Academy of Science of Saint Louis was founded in 1856; it established the Museum of Science and Natural History in 1959, which reopened as the SLSC in 1985

Founded in 1910 as the Zoological Society of St. Louis

CLAIM TO FAME

Holds 3,100 artifacts associated with Charles A. Lindbergh

The nation’s oldest and largest outdoor musical theater

Holds 428 artworks by Max Beckmann—more than any other public institution in the world

Attendance is among the top five for science museums nationally and in the top 10 internationally

Named the country’s top zoo by Zagat Survey and Parents magazine

INSIDER TIP

“History on the Side,” a free documentary series, is held every month

1,500 free seats (the last nine rows) are available for every show

Special exhibitions are free on Fridays

The best seat in the OMNIMAX? As far up and as near the center of the row as possible

The Children’s Zoo is free for the first hour of every day

HISTORICAL TIDBIT

The museum’s building was the country’s first Jefferson Memorial

On opening night, As You Like It was rained out after Act II

The museum’s original building was located at what’s now Locust and 19th

McDonnell Planetarium was designed by St. Louis’ own Gyo Obata

Since its 1963 debut, the Zooline Railroad has carried 30 millionplus passengers

Photo courtesy of Anne Grossmann/Forest Park Forever

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Citygarden

CITYGARDEN

Igor Mitoraj’s sculpture Eros Bendato (that wonderful giant head) is one of the landmark sculptures here. In nice weather, sit and watch: Not a moment will pass without someone peeping out of one of the hollow eyes (and not always a kid). Every piece here is its own sort of landmark. Even if you can’t bring the title or the artist’s name to mind, you probably know it visually—for instance, Erwin Wurm’s Big Suit or Tom Claassen’s Untitled (Two Rabbits). Jim Dine’s Big White Gloves, Big Four Wheels explores the distance between Disney’s Pinocchio and Carlo Collodi’s original, spookier story; it’s thematically echoed by Tom Otterness’ darkly comic Kindly Geppetto, which depicts the carpenter as a cartoony figure taking a swing at Pinocchio’s head with a mallet. Worldclass abstract sculpture also abounds here, including Mark di Suvero’s monumental Aesop’s Fables (above), which

now serves as a visual connector to Richard Serra’s Twain, a work that stood alone on the Gateway Mall for years, marooned and misunderstood. Another main point of interest: the 14-foot-long video wall, which screens films, photography, and Cinema at Citygarden, a biennial program organized by Cinema St. Louis and open to local filmmakers. (And if you have a smart phone, be sure to download the free Citygarden app before you visit; you can find it and more info at citygardenstl.org.)

per—Laumeier is still as pioneering as it was when it was incorporated in 1977. The permanent collection began with 40 pieces donated by the late sculptor Ernest Trova, and his presence here

LAUMEIER SCULPTURE PARK

You can approach Laumeier as a series of surprises and mysteries—tie your shoelaces tight, put your dog on a leash, and lose yourself in its 105 acres. Or explore it as a tourist, plotting out what to see before you go. Internationally revered for its world-class collection—with pieces from such artists as Niki de Saint Phalle, Donald Judd, and Beverly PepLaumeier Sculpture Park

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includes the 1974 COR-TEN sculpture tures, Gox A and Gox AB (Gox No. 3 can Profile Canto IV, as well as Falling Man/ be found at Laumeier), as well as MauStudy (Wrapped Manscape Figure) (be- ra, a figurative piece by Don Wiegand. low). One of the park’s best-known and The latter statue, a bronze figure of a best-loved pieces is Tony Tasset’s Eye, running girl mounted on a stone base the giant fiberglass eyeball that’s mod- in the shape of her shadow, was dedieled after one of the artist’s own eyes. cated on June 26, 1999, at 10 a.m., and (It’s also, we’re guessing, the backdrop its shadow lines up with its stone counfor a thousand selfies.) Other pieces, terpart on that day every year. Aspire, an interactive sculpture by Rod Callies like Dan Graham’s Triangular Bridge comprised of four massive steel spires Over Water, are tucked in the woods. And some are essentially invisible, such painted white, can be found alongas Eric Hall’s SITE/SOUND, a series of side the Stream Walk by Chesterfield aural portraits of the sculptures comAmphitheater, which often stages popuposed by St. Louis musicians, which you lar events, including concerts, movies, can hear via smartphone by downloadand festivals. ing the tour from laumeier.org. Among the newest additions SHAW PARK is the $4 million Adam AronTrova made his home in BROEMMELSIEK son Fine Arts Center, which St. Louis County, so it’s PARK opened in fall 2015, as well appropriate that you’d The Astronomical Society as the recent renovation of of Eastern Missouri hosts the site’s 1917 Estate House public viewing sessions into the Kranzberg Educaon Friday nights. tion Lab.

find the sculptor’s work in the county seat’s oldest and largest park. Though Shaw is a recreational park, it’s also home to some carefully chosen public art. One newer acquisition is a site-specific piece by nationally recognized sculptor James Surls, an 18-foot-tall, stainless-steel and bronze sculpture titled Molecular Bloom with Single Flower, which celebrates the immediacy of nature. There are rewards in seeking out other pieces here as well, including Rod Baer’s brightly colored Dancing Chairs, Carol Fleming’s gorgeously ancient-looking Egg (in the Sensory Garden), and that Trova piece, Geometric Abstract No. 2, located in the Moneta Garden. One of the best times to appreciate art in Shaw Park is during Parties in the Park, hosted in nearby downtown Clayton on the second Wednesday of the month during the summer.

CHESTERFIELD CENTRAL PARK

Public art is sprinkled all across Chesterfield, with quite a bit in Central Park. One of the best-known pieces is J. Seward Johnson’s The Awakening (right). Seventy feet long and 5,700 pounds, the five-piece aluminum sculpture is meant to look like a bearded giant struggling to free itself from the earth. (A similar sculture at National Harbor, just outside Washington D.C., is a popular draw.) It not only attracts kids, who love to climb on its enormous hands and knees, but also has become a popular wedding spot. The park also has two 9-foot stainless-steel Trova sculp-

Chesterfield Central Park

GRAND CENTER’S POCKET PARKS Located in the middle of Grand Center’s bustle, Strauss Park is named for late arts patron Leon Strauss. (Fittingly, the park is situated across from the Fox Theatre, which Strauss helped save.) Nearby, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts teamed up on a cutting-edge take on the pocket park with PXSTL, a competition that calls for proposals for temporary installations for the empty lots at 3713, 3719, and 3721 Washington, with the most recent project being A Way, Away (Listen While I Say), created by artists Amanda Williams and Andres L. Hernandez. And stop at the nearby Ellen Clark Sculpture Park, located on the corner of Lindell and Grand boulevards, a spot that doubles as a public-arts destination and free unofficial dog park.

Photography by Kate Munsch; courtesy of Stefan Hester; Clayton Century Foundation; Chesterfield Arts

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sports

would look for fellow skateboarders while in St. Louis. But this park’s 33,000-squarefoot skate course— the largest outdoor park of its kind in the state — offers myriad challenges and obstacles: bowls of varying difficulty, a street course, ramps… The facility even has a rock-climbing wall.

BROWN ROAD PARK

QUEENY PARK

The park’s Greensfelder Recreation Complex plays host to carefree iceskaters from October through February. But it also transforms into an arena of hard hits, flying elbows, and ingeniously clever names when the Arch Rival Roller Derby, the St. Louis GateKeepers men’s rollerderby team, and Midwest Sport Hockey’s leagues take the floor.

PENROSE PARK

“Mr. Bumpy Face” (so called for its many bumps and undulations) is one of only 27 velodromes in the nation where cyclists can go to race around a NASCAR-like track. Efforts are underway to improve the site that once hosted USA Cycling’s Elite Track National Championships to its former glory, with a smoother concrete track.

GREENSFELDER PARK

At first, the 50-foot Alpine Tower doesn’t look like much: simply a series of logs, cables, ropes, and trees strung together. As groups attempt to scale it, however, they find it requires a blend of problemsolving, trust, and teamwork.

YOUTH ACTIVITY PARK

Dardenne Prairie probably isn’t the first place that an X Games enthusiast

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Te n a c r e s o f t h i s St. Peters park were transformed into Queeny Park a BMX track, complete with straights, berm turns, and rollers. Today, the St. Peters BMX Gateway group hosts races and practices here for off-road cycling enthusiasts.

CREVE COEUR PARK

Visitors without boats can still get out on the park’s popular 320-acre lake by visiting Creve Coeur Lake Rentals, which rents out kayaks and paddle boards ($10 for the first hour and $5 for every additional hour) and canoes ($15 for the first hour and $5 FOREST 44 every additional).

CONSERVATION AREA

Penrose Park

The Jay Henges Shooting Range has facilities for those with guns and bows.

GO APE!

Creve Coeur Park already offered no shortage of sports-related options: kayaking, disc golf, trails, archery, tennis courts… Then, the Go Ape Treetop Adventure Course opened in the upper park area. Here are some stats to know before visiting the attraction.

$58

admission for adults

2,624

feet of zip lines and obstacles

24

crossings, with such names as Flying Carpet

400

feet for the longest zip lines

2 to 3

hours that it takes to complete the course

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts; courtesy of Bob Dunnell

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10 HIKES WITHIN AN HOUR’S DRIVE

Thousands of acres await exploration across the region’s largest conservation areas and state parks. Pack your bags and get started.

Castlewood State Park

PARK

August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Center 2360 Highway D, St. Charles, 636-441-4554

Castlewood State Park 1401 Kiefer Creek, Ballwin, 636-227-4433

Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park

901 Babler Park, Wildwood, 636-458-3813

Hawn State Park

12096 Park, Ste. Genevieve, 573-883-3603

Meramec State Park

670 Fisher Cave, Sullivan, 573-468-6519

Pere Marquette State Park

13112 Visitor Center, Grafton, Ill., 618-786-3323

Rockwoods Reservation 2751 Glencoe, Wildwood, 636-458-2236

St. Francois State Park

8920 U.S. Highway 67 N, Bonne Terre, 573-358-2173

Washington State Park 13041 Route 104, De Soto, 636-586-5768

Weldon Spring Conservation Area Interstate 64 and Route 94, Defiance, 636-441-4554

Photography courtesy of Missouri State Parks

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MUST-HIKE TRAIL

DISTANCE

SIGHT TO SEE

Busch Hiking and Biking Trail

3.2 miles

Watch for the serene view of Lake 19, located midway along the looping trail.

River Scene Trail

3.3 miles

A series of overlooks above the Meramec River, from atop the park’s “castles” (limestone bluffs), provides some of the most scenic views west of St. Louis.

Dogwood Trail

2 miles

Pack a picnic, then take a spur trail midway along the looping trail to stop and enjoy lunch at the Bates Picnic Area.

Whispering Pines Trail–North Loop

6 miles

About a half mile from the trailhead off Park Drive, there’s a sweeping vista. After hiking Hawn, visit the double arch at nearby Pickle Springs Natural Area’s Trail Through Time.

Wilderness Trail

10 miles

Copper Hollow Spring is halfway along the looping trail. (Remember to pack plenty of water for the long hike.)

Goat Cliff Trail

1.7 miles

A lookout point atop McAdams Peak provides a scenic stop near the east end of the trail.

Lime Kiln Loop Trail

3.2 miles

Near the trailhead, a historic 40-foot kiln—the path’s namesake—rises over the rugged trail.

Mooner’s Hollow Trail

2.7 miles

Look for the point in the trail that crosses Coonville Creek and a serene, cascading mini waterfall.

1,000 Steps Trail

1.5 miles

After climbing the stone steps that compose the trail, stop and gaze out at the Big River valley.

Lewis Trail

8.2 miles

The hike takes approximately five hours, but the view from atop the bluffs overlooking the Missouri River is worth it.

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BUDER PARK

person. Apart from the carousel, Faust boasts a popular playground, as well as Historic Village, which includes two former blacksmith’s shops. The former Spanish Lake shop dates to 1881; the other shop, from Fenton, dates to 1908 and was moved to the park to serve as the village’s general store. Finally, walk to the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House, run by the Missouri Botanical Garden, for countless photo ops.

The park includes a model-airplane field, where the St. Louis Aeropilots radiocontrol flying club convenes.

SUSON PARK

Faust Park

TILLES PARK

Though known for its holiday lights display, St. Louis County’s Tilles Park draws St. Louisans year-round. More than 1,000 people visit the park every day. Among the draws is a playground that’s designed for children of all capabilities. The slide’s made from stainless steel, rather than plastic, allowing children with cochlear implants to use it. (Plastic slides tend to create static, which can damage the implants’ circuitry.) “All of the playground surfacing is rubberized and poured-in-place, and the playground is coated with a rubberized coating,” says Mike Flad, landscape architect and project manager for St. Louis County Parks, “so when the kids are walking, they tend to create less static electricity.” The park also has a soundboard musical instrument, bongo drums, and water play, with approximately a dozen nozzles at ground level that activate at different times. Even the jungle gyms include activities at lower levels, which

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are accessible to children in wheelchairs. “They can interact with the rest of the children,” Flad says. “This is for everybody.”

FAUST PARK

Attracting more than 2,000 visitors per day, this Chesterfield park can keep a brood amused for hours. The St. Louis Carousel’s calliope is reason enough to visit the park. Built in the 1920s, it once stood inside the Highlands Amusement Park. After a fire destroyed the park, in 1963, it moved to Sylvan Springs Park before being restored and installed in Faust Park. Today, a ride costs just $2 per

If your child yearns for the country, head to this 98-acre park in South County. Your little ones can learn to fish at one of three trout-stocked ponds. They also can see all sorts of animals, including miniature horses, a Percheron horse, a Belgian horse, a miniature Sicilian donkey, rabbits, turkeys, and chickens. And after Mother’s Day, check out piglets, a calf, baby goats, and baby lambs. “One of our most fun programs is Farm Fridays,” says Kyra Kaltenbronn, manager of park program services for St. Louis County Parks, referring to the popular summertime events geared toward kids ages 2–12. (Visit stlouisco.com/parks for dates.) “We have hayrides; pony rides; fishing lessons; face-painting; farm games like Find the Needle in the Haystack and riding pedal tractors around cones; and tours of the farm.” And there’s a large playground with lots of climbing options. “It is one of our signature parks,” says Kaltenbronn, “and it is just great.”

Tilles Park

Photography courtesy of St. Louis County Parks; Missouri Division of Tourism; Tim Parker; St. Louis County Parks

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF TRANSPORTATION

Though it may seem odd to include a museum in a list of parks, there’s a reason: The St. Louis County Parks department runs this 130-acre site, and half of the exhibits are outside. The Creation Station, a hands-on learning center designed for children age 5 and under, is located in the education center. Outside, visitors can board a historic trolley that departs from Roberts’ Pavilion Platform on the hour and at :20 and :40 past the hour. “Everyone can ride a streetcar from almost one end of the museum to another,” says Molly Butterworth, the museum’s director. Visitors also can explore railroad cabooses, steam locomotives, and historic passenger railcars. “We have a tugboat that was on the Missouri River and a World War II aircraft that was in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day,” adds Butterworth. “It’s a great opportunity for kids to put real three dimensions to what they’re learning in books.”

TOWNE PARK

This 109-acre St. Charles County park features a reconstructed homestead, formerly known as the Pink Plantation.

National Museum of Transportation

For kids, that may hold a certain amount of allure, but the Nature Explore Classroom will undoubtedly be a stronger calling card. The classroom consists of multiple learning spaces, including areas focusing on music and movement, messy materials, sand play, nature art, wildflowers, building, dirt-digging, balance, and water. The park also includes a fishing pond, a forest-themed playground, rain gardens, and hiking trails.

ROCKET PARK

It’s actually called Deer Creek Park, but most know it as Rocket Park. With a space-themed playground that includes a rocket ship, this Maplewood park remains a favorite for kiddos. Older visitors might be drawn to the volleyball court, baseball fields, shelters, and a trail that connects to other parks and the green space surrounding Deer and Shady creeks.

Suson Park

DON’T FORGET…

There are many other parks worth visiting. Here are just a handful. Bee Tree Park Best view of the Mississippi River Jaycee Park Best St. Charles playground for all abilities Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park Best city-skyline photo op Mastodon State Historic Site Best place to see a mastodon skeleton Shaw Nature Reserve Best green space worth the $5 price of admission

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DOWNTOWN & MIDTOWN CLAYTON NORTH CITY & NORTH COUNTY CENTRAL WEST END UNIVERSITY CITY ST. CHARLES COUNTY

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO

SHOPPING

CHESTERFIELD & FAR WEST COUNTY

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Illustration/photo by John Smith

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KIRKWOOD, WEBSTER GROVES & ROCK HILL

LOCALLY

MAPLEWOOD, BRENTWOOD & RICHMOND HEIGHTS LADUE, FRONTENAC & CREVE COEUR SOUTH CITY & SOUTH COUNTY METRO EAST

A NEIGHBORHOOD-BY-NEIGHBORHOOD LOOK AT ST. LOUIS CLOTHING BOUTIQUES

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CENTRAL WEST END

RETAIL DIRECTORY

AG Jeans 36 Maryland Plaza agjeans.com

DNA

A Taste of Luxurie 365 N. Boyle luxe-online.net East + West 387 N. Euclid eastandwest.store Enchanting Embellishments 4732 McPherson enchantingembellishments.net Fauxgerty 228 N. Euclid fauxgerty.com projects+gallery 4733 McPherson projects-gallery.com Warby Parker 304 N. Euclid warbyparker.com

DOWNTOWN Dapper Gents 1000 Washington, Ste. 2 dappergentsgrooming.com DNA 1308A Washington dnastl.com Epiphany Boutique 3431 Locust epiphanyboutique.bigcartel.com Honey’s Child Boutique 1927 Washington honeyschildboutique.com Le Divine Collection 1426 Washington ledivinecollection.com Levine Hat Co. 1416 Washington levinehat.com

CLAYTON Byrd Designer Consignment Boutique 8825 Ladue byrdstyle.com City Sprouts 8807 Ladue citysprouts.com Dimvaloo 8813 Ladue dimvaloo.com dotdotdash 736 DeMun dotdotdashboutique.com Dos Resale Boutique 14 S. Central

DOWNTOWN & MIDTOWN

The Fur and Leather Centre 7901 Clayton furcentre.com

Park near 14th and Washington and start at DNA, which carries premium brands such as Nike and Adidas alongside graphic tees and custom flat-brims. For more headgear, the century-old Levine Hat Co. boasts fine fedoras, caps, and sun hats. At Dapper Gents Grooming Lounge, men can get a trim, browse sportcoats and leather soles, and get a fresh shoeshine. For ladies, Honey’s Child Boutique owner Letitia Young offers plus-size fashions, including such brands as Liv&Kiss, Zellie for She, and Kiyonna. Le Divine Collection owner Ashley Puryea offers affordable jumpers, flashy floral crop tops, and platforms galore. And in Grand Center, Epiphany Boutique showcases classic dresses and heels alongside floral short suits.

Ivy Hill 8835 Ladue ivyhillboutique.com Lusso 165 Carondelet Plaza shoplusso.com

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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WHERE BLING IS KING

A rundown of area jewelry stores  Adam Foster Fine Art Jewelry 1600 S. Brentwood, Ste. 410 fosterjewelry.com Adler’s Jewelers 8468 Eager adlersdiamonds.com Albarré Jewelry 9711 Clayton albarre.com Cassandra Erin Studio 112 S. Main, St. Charles cassandraerin.com Clarkson Jewelers 1306 Clarkson/Clayton Center clarksonjewelers.com Craft Alliance 6640 Delmar craftalliance.org David Kodner 7710 Carondelet, Ste. 102 davidkodner.com The Diamond Family 14441 Manchester thediamondfam.com The Diamond Shop 12 N. Central thediamondshop.net Genovese Jewelers 12460 Olive genovesejewelers.com Huffords Jewelry 10413 Clayton huffordsjewelry.com James Durbin Jewelry Design 114 W. Jefferson jamesdurbinjewelry.com Mavrik Fine Jewelry 11220 Manchester mavrikjewelry.com

Novak Jewelers 14442 Clayton novakjewelers.com Paramount Jewelers 7348 Manchester paramountjewelers.com Robinson Jewelry 6497 Chippewa robinsonsjewelry.com Saettele Jewelers 279 Lamp & Lantern Village saettele.com Shane Co. 9643 Olive shaneco.com The Silver Lady 4736 McPherson, CWE; 7318 Manchester, Maplewood; 6364 Delmar, University City thesilver-lady.com Simons Jewelers 8141 Maryland simonsjewelers.com Southside Jewelry 8101 Gravois diamondjewelrystlouis. com Summit Jewelers 7821 Big Bend summitjewelersstl.com Vincent’s Jewelry 11733 Olive vincentsjewelers.com Vinciguerra Jewelry 701 Market, downtown; 735 New Ballas, Creve Coeur vinciguerrajewelry.com Ylang-Ylang Fine Designer Jewelry 8845 Ladue ylangylang.com

Photography by Jay Fram; courtesy of City Sprouts, Adam Foster Fine Art Jewelry

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E M I LY B R A D Y K O P L A R At one time, St. Louis was once second only to New York in manufacturing garments. Now, the Saint Louis Fashion Fund is working to restore the city’s role as a fashion player on a national level. Its signature program is the Fashion Incubator, a two-year residency for emerging fashion designers, which welcomed its inaugural class in January 2017. Among the designers is St. Louisan Emily Brady Koplar of Wai Ming, whose fashions have appeared on the likes of Emily Blunt and Kerry Washington.

CLAYTON

Where Clayton meets Ladue, Colonial Marketplace has quickly become a one-stop shopping center. City Sprouts offers stylish children’s apparel, gear, and toys. Splash owners Joni Ridgway and Kyrle Boldt draw inspiration from California and Australia, stocking fashionable swimwear and warm-weather clothing. Nonprofit The Woman’s Exchange offers both a tearoom and a plethora of pastel outfits, children’s clothes, and handmade jewelry. Byrd Designer Consignment Boutique stocks a selection of upscale secondhand pieces. Striking a middle ground between funky and preppy styles, Hillary Dutcher’s Ivy Hill Boutique features GiGi New York personalized clutches and a create-your-own jewelry stand. Dimvaloo carries Australian workout line Lorna Jane and hosts Wine Down Wednesdays starting at 6 p.m. In downtown Clayton, menswear store St. Louis Suit Co. boasts a table of ties for $5 apiece. Savile Row Custom Clothier & Shirtmaker offers alterations, wardrobe consultation, and dry cleaning. Lusso still carries great clothes, but now you can find even more furniture, pillows, and Kate Spade lamps. Look for new arrivals at Dos Resale Boutique on its Facebook page. At Clayton’s southern edge, The Fur and Leather Centre sells all varieties of furs in the onetime Byron Cade location. And in DeMun, dotdotdash has evolved from children’s clothing to women’s fashion—and a larger space.

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NORTH CITY & COUNTY

In Old North’s Crown Square, designers Kurt Brady and William Morris’ The Gallery lives up to its name, displaying ornate T-shirts (brands like N3VRMND the BRAND and William Morris Fashion) in gold frames. At nearby Le’Fit, women can get a custom fitting for bras and shapewear. Farther north, in Florissant, B’Relevant Boutique carries affordable chunky necklaces and asymmetrical skirts. Phancy Fingers and Feet Spa & Boutique allows you to peruse handbags, jewelry, and accessories while getting a fresh coat of nail polish and sipping a cup of tea. At Found by the Pound, neatly organized and decorated with graffiti and funky lighting, clothes are just $3 per pound. And in Ferguson, Juanita Morris reopened Juanita’s Fashions R Boutique after the original building was destroyed in November 2014, following a grand jury’s decision not to indict former police officer Darren Wilson. The location is larger than the first, accommodating an expansive selection of clothing and fanciful hats.

A SHOPPER'S TAKE

PEGGY HARRIS North County resident and fashion enthusiast

“I LOVE THAT I CAN AFFORD TO BE ECONOMICAL AND STYLISH AT THE SAME TIME—ALL WITHOUT LEAVING MY NEIGHBORHOOD!” 58 / GAT EWAY TO THE B EST

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts; courtesy of The Gallery

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RETAIL DIRECTORY

FAUXGERTY

Savile Row 8101 Maryland savilerowstl.com Splash 8811A Ladue splashtribe.com St. Louis Suit Co. 7903 Forsyth stlsuit.com The Woman’s Exchange 8811 Ladue woexstl.org

UNIVERSITY CITY Avalon Exchange 6392 Delmar avalonexchange.com Boutique Calla Lily 6195 Delmar boutiquecallalily.us Funky Buddha 6273 Delmar OSO: A Style Lab 6321 Delmar shoposo.com Paperdolls See Multiple Locations. Pitaya 6632 Delmar pitaya.com Plowsharing Crafts See Multiple Locations. Sole & Blues See Multiple Locations.

NORTH CITY & COUNTY B’Relevant 140 Washington brelevantboutique.com Fashions R Boutique 11833 New Halls Ferry Found by the Pound 6740 Romiss foundbythepound.com The Gallery 2603 N. 14th Le’Fit 2717 N. 14th lefitonline.com Phancy Fingers and Feet & Boutique 480 Rue St. Francois

CENTRAL WEST END

SOUTH CITY & COUNTY

Among the neighborhood’s newer additions is Kirkwood transplant East + West, a modern men’s store that emphasizes unique fabrics and patterns. At Fauxgerty, a cruelty-free store with a boho-rock vibe, art director Meg Ebaugh-Faris stresses a commitment to eco-friendly elements such as vegan leather and jacket linings made from plastic bottles. National eyewear chain Warby Parker's first St. Louis location, located along Euclid Avenue, has a library-inspired interior with colorful books that complement the various brands and an eye-catching mural created by local artist William LaChance. At AG Jeans, stacks of denim are displayed like books in an overflowing library. A historic building on McPherson houses Enchanting Embellishments (think feather shawls and sequined gowns), as well as a greenhouse-turned-tearoom. Fashion–meets–art space projects+gallery sells stunning accessories from its projects+impulse line. And farther east, you can snag a bodycon maxi dress or LBD at A Taste of Luxurie.

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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Bespoke 2650 Cherokee bespokesaintlouis.com Mix & Match 2207 S. 39th stlmixandmatch.com Parsimonia Vintage 3194 S. Grand shopparsimonia.com

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RETAIL DIRECTORY

Retro 101/ Cherry Bomb Vintage 2303 Cherokee

OSO: A STYLE LAB

Revive Thrift Shop 2202 S. Vandeventer revivethrift.org Ruby Francis 2310 Cherokee ruby-francis.com Ruth’s Vintage Clothing 2001 Cherokee SwedLife 6378 Delmar swedlifestore.com STyLehouse 3159 Cherokee stl-style.com The Vintage Haberdashery 3181 Morganford vintagehab.com Union Studio 1605 Tower Grove stlunionstudio.com

LADUE, FRONTENAC & CREVE COEUR Cha Boutique 9666 Clayton shop-cha.com Giddyup Jane 9670 Clayton giddyupjane.com Lu Lu Belle 9727 Clayton lulubelleofnaples.com Marta’s Boutique See Multiple Locations. Mister Guy 9817 & 9831 Clayton misterguyclothiers.com National Council of Jewish Women’s Resale Shop 295 N. Lindbergh ncjwstl.org/resale-shop Pink Magnolia 9810 Clayton pinkmagnoliashop.com Sam Cavato Mens Wear 501 S. Llindbergh Shine Boutique 9811 Clayton shineboutiquestlouis.com Sole Comfort See Multiple Locations. The Spotted Pig 9218 Clayton thespottedpigstl.com

UNIVERSITY CITY

Vie 9660 Clayton viestlouis.com

One of U. City’s most modern stores is OSO: a style lab, where co-owners Chris Rubin de la Borbolla and Jen Rieger curate styles as if in a modern art gallery, with pop art–inspired products from St. Louis and abroad. Nearby, longtime Loop boutique Pitaya is organized by color, offering statement jewelry and affordable prices. Since a recent makeover, the interior at Avalon Exchange provides a clean backdrop for funky finds and fall staples. Rich Howard-Willms’ fair-trade store Plowsharing Crafts helps sustain skilled artists worldwide with its handmade sandals, beaded jewelry, and vibrant skirts. Next door, Funky Buddha stocks handmade goods such as accessories from India and Nepal. Sole & Blues carries designer shoes and denim, including brands like Ben Sherman and Naked and Famous Denim. And just east of Skinker, the pink-and-black Parisian interior at Boutique Calla Lily holds formal dresses for all ages.

Woody’s Mens Shop 10411 Clayton, Ste. 104 woodyseclub.com

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JEN RIEGER AND CHRIS RUBIN DE LA BORBOLLA A SURVIVAL GUIDE TO THE OUTLET MALL SCENE Outlet mall veterans Nina and Jack Theobald know the ins and outs of Chesterfield’s outlet malls. Jack works at Tommy Hilfiger at St. Louis Premium Outlets, and Nina works at Coach at Taubman Prestige Outlets. The siblings know customer habits, where to find the best deals, and how to ensure a positive, productive shopping experience. PLAN AHEAD The two similarly named outlet malls can be confusing. You don’t want to wander around searching for DKNY at Taubman just to find out that you should be at Premium. Map out your shopping ahead of time by visiting the online store directories. AVOID THE CROWDS Shopping during the week means fewer crowds and less stress. If you have to hit the mall on a weekend, Taubman is typically less busy than its counterpart, says Nina: “I’ve seen tour buses roll into the Premium Outlets.” At the Coach store where she works, she knows regulars who choose the store because it’s less crowded. Keep in mind that brands like Coach, J. Crew, GAP, and Brooks Brothers have locations at both outlet malls. SAVE EVEN MORE Although outlets already offer seriously slashed prices, stopping by the visitor center can pay off. At Premium Outlets, for instance, a VIP coupon book is available for $5, or free for students with IDs; military, AAA and AARP cardholders; and Simon VIP members. (Hint: It costs nothing to become a Simon VIP member.)

Rieger and Rubin de la Borbolla are the creative minds behind OSO: a style lab, the eclectic boutique in the Delmar Loop that stocks “curious finds for curious minds,” such as the Blamo Rice Baby that Rieger is holding. The longtime St. Louisans opened OSO in April 2016 to bring their coastal vibes to the neighborhood. The response has been very energizing, they say, adding that they remain open to evolving and pushing the envelope.

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

The cobblestones and streetlamps of historic South Main Street pay homage to a quaint past—and another timehonored St. Charles tradition is shopping at longtime stores Thro’s and Michelle’s. Thro’s offers suits and sportcoats for men; Michelle’s stocks casual frocks, formal dresses, and more for ladies. Ooh La La! stocks affordable, comfortable women’s clothing. MOss Boutique carries trendy accesory brands such as Lenny and Eva and Alex and Ani bracelets. Joys by Austin Warren Design expanded its flagship store to a collective market of 50 local artisans. The rustic-chic market is known for its printed art and floor-length lace dresses; the original store is notable for pocketwatch necklaces. Jake’s on Main sells Life Is Good casual outdoor wear and gifts exclusively. Farther south, at the new Streets of St. Charles development, shoppers can find new locations of popular St. Louis boutiques, including Sole & Blues, MOD, and Leopard Boutique. And in O’Fallon, Two Pink Elephants updates its inventory every few days with such items as chevron dresses, leggings, and tunic tops. Finally, Carrie’s Boutique carries locally handcrafted jewelry and elegant apparel. (The store hosts shopping events complete with appetizers and drinks.)

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts; courtesy of St. Louis Premium Outlets, Joys by Austin Warren Design

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CHESTERFIELD & FAR WEST COUNTY

Chesterfield offers more than just outlet malls. For a pampered retail experience, visit boutique-meetssalon Ju Ju B’s. Nearby is Rachel’s Grove, which carries casual dresses. Named for owner Terrie Lynn, TLynn’s Boutique stocks comfy, stylish labels. A beagle mix named Bailey often greets patrons at Jeans, Jackets & Jewels, which has an athleisure section and top denim brands. Breaking out of the traditional brick-and-mortar format, Pulse Boutique has a strong online presence and notifies email list subscribers about occasional warehouse sales. In Town & Country, Klutch Boutique carries such lines as Show Me Your Mumu and GRLFRND jeans, and Laurie Solet stocks ever-popular Rebecca Minkoff purses. Farther west, in Ellisville, Marta Gaska and daughters Lauren Gaska and Tania Rakel run MOD and longtime retail staple Marta’s Boutique. The former emphasizes affordable options, and both emphasize service. Across the street, La Ville is filled with contemporary womenswear for special occasions. And in Wildwood, Pure by Jen offers women’s clothing and monogramming services, while Heels Boutique stocks shoes and more.

A SHOPPER'S TAKE

SARA ZIGMAN Chesterfield resident and interior designer

“MARTA’S BOUTIQUE AND MOD KNOW CLIENTS SO WELL—IF A NEW SHIPMENT COMES IN, THEY CAN SAY, ‘I KNOW SARA WILL LIKE THIS,’ AND THEY’LL CALL AND HELP ME PULL TOGETHER A WHOLE OUTFIT AROUND IT.” 62 / GAT EWAY TO THE B EST

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BLUSH

The Purple Cow Kids Resale 2325 S. Brentwood [RE]FRESH 1710 S. Brentwood refresh.foster-adopt.org Soft Surroundings 33 The Boulevard softsurroundings.com

RETAIL DIRECTORY

MAPLEWOOD, BRENTWOOD & RICHMOND HEIGHTS

Sole Survivor 7312 Manchester solesurvivorleather.com The Vault Luxury Resale 2325 S. Brentwood thevaultluxuryresale.com

KIRKWOOD, WEBSTER GROVES & ROCK HILL Blush Boutique 159 W. Argonne Civil Alchemy 8154 Big Bend civilalchemy.com Clay & Cotton 113 N. Kirkwood clayandcottonkirkwood.com finders keepers 112 E. Jefferson Fun in the Sun Sports & Leisure 121 N. Kirkwood funsunsports.com Ginger & Mary Ann Boutique 151 W. Jefferson gingerandmaryannboutique.com Lass & Laddie 161 W. Jefferson lassandladdiekirkwood.com Leopard Boutique See Multiple Locations. Paisley Boutique 233 W. Lockwood Paperdolls Boutique See Multiple Locations. Plowsharing Crafts See Multiple Locations. Sole Comfort See Multiple Locations.

FAR WEST COUNTY Heels Boutique 170 Plaza, Wildwood heelsboutiquestl.com

KIRKWOOD & WEBSTER GROVES

Jeans, Jackets & Jewels 117 Hilltown Village Center

Voted SLM readers’ favorite women’s boutique, Paperdolls is so popular, it’s expanded beyond Kirkwood, with locations in Ballwin, University City, and Des Peres. Bohemian pieces fill the rustic-chic interior at Blush Boutique. At Clay & Cotton, you’ll find women’s clothing, as well as home décor. Ginger & Mary Ann Boutique hosts Thirsty Thursday, when shoppers can sip wine while shopping. For sportier gear, Fun in the Sun carries such brands as Vineyard Vines and Southern Tide. The looks at Sole Comfort are infused with sporty practicality. For the little ones, Lass and Laddie stocks locally designed children’s clothing, and finders keepers sells both new and used fashions. In Webster Groves, both Paisley Boutique and Leopard Boutique offer stylish looks for ladies. And K. Hall Designs founders Kelley Hall-Barr and her husband, John Barr, sell everything from kitchen tools to their own brands of gin and maple syrup at Civil Alchemy, located in the Old Orchard business district.

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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Ju Ju B’s 48 Four Seasons Shopping Center, shopjujubs.com Klutch 1164 Town & Country Crossing klutchstyle.com Laurie Solet 1176 Town & Country Crossing, Town & Country lauriesolet.com

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RETAIL DIRECTORY

La Ville 15848 Fountain Plaza, Ellisville shoplaville.com Marta’s Boutique 1352 Clarkson Clayton Center, Ellisville.

THE VAULT

MOD See Multiple Locations. Paperdolls See Multiple Locations. Pulse pulsefashion.com Pure by Jen 16739 Main, Wildwood purebyjen.com Rachel’s Grove 129 Chesterfield Towne Center, Chesterfield rachelsgrove.com TLynn’s Boutique 1634 Clarkson, Chesterfield tlynnsboutique.com

ST. CHARLES COUNTY Carrie’s Boutique 2311 Highway K, O’Fallon carriesboutique.net Jake’s on Main 136 S. Main, St. Charles jakesonmainstcharles.com Joys by Austin Warren Design 600 S. Main, St. Charles findthejoys.com Leopard Boutique See Multiple Locations. MOD See Multiple Locations. MOss 329 S. Main, St. Charles mossboutique.com Ooh La La 703 S. Main, St. Charles Sole & Blues See Multiple Locations. Thro’s & Michelle’s 229 N. Main, St. Charles Two Pink Elephants 4255 Keaton Crossing, O’Fallon twopinkelephants.com

METRO EAST Circa Boutique & Gifts See Multiple Locations. The Clothes Line 100 S. Market, Waterloo Don Rodger’s Ltd. 6727 W. Main, Belleville donrodgersltd.net

MAPLEWOOD, BRENTWOOD & RICHMOND HEIGHTS

Glik’s 124 S. Buchanan, Edwardsville gliks.com

In Maplewood, skilled leather craftsmen create leather belts, purses, and wallets at Sole Survivor. In nearby Brentwood, the family behind Women’s Closet Exchange operates The Vault Luxury Resale, which carries high-end resale from the likes of Jimmy Choo, David Yurman, and Kate Spade. Children’s resale boutique Purple Cow shares the building. A short drive away, resale shop ReFresh donates its proceeds to the Foster & Adoptive Care Coalition. In Richmond Heights, The Boulevard–St. Louis offers retail options across from the Saint Louis Galleria. Soft Surroundings emphasizes comfort, with racks of items in stretch jersey and breathable cotton. The pieces epitomize resortwear and transition easily from day to night—ideal for waterfront dining or a sunset stroll on the beach.

Karma Clothing & Accessories 164 S. Main, Glen Carbon MOD See Multiple Locations.

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SUSAN SHERMAN

RETAIL ON THE MOVE

Pop-up and mobile boutiques LIVING COLLECTIVE Housed inside TechArtista, Katy Noonan’s former pop-up shop specializes in independent designers. As Noonan says, “We want to give people here a taste of what’s out there that you’re not going to find at the mall or other boutiques.”

A driving force on St. Louis’ style scene, Sherman has worked tirelessly to breathe new life into the local fashion landscape. As the Saint Louis Fashion Fund’s board chair, she helped make downtown’s Fashion Incubator a reality and has brought such fashion icons as Iris Apfel to town. She also helped launch Craft Alliance’s Fashion Lab, exploring the connection between art and fashion. “I look at designers as true artists,” she says.

KAYOSS IN THE CALM BOUTIQUE At Amy Johnson’s appointment-only showroom on Euclid, customers are outfitted with hand-selected fabrics in vibrant patterns. RACK+CLUTCH Jeff and Emily Ponath operate the area’s first fashion truck, working hard to outfit women in cool clothes and eye-catching accessories. NIKI + MICHE Camille “Niki” Dangerfield and Shavonne “Miche” Webb’s 22-foot truck is filled with contemporary women’s clothing (and its own fitting room). Look for it at area business during lunchtime and in packed locales on weekends. KAT’S CLOSET BOUTIQUE The truck’s owner, Kat Fish, stocks young women’s fashion for a college student’s budget. MIKI’S CLOSET Powered by the Saint Louis Fashion Fund, Miki’s Closet dubs itself a “stylish, state-of-the-art” pop-up. It carries collections from local designers, including the Fashion Incubator’s six designers, and educates students about fashion-related careers. Photography by John Fedele; courtesy of Rack + Clutch, Woody’s Men’s Shop, Giddyup Jane

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LADUE, FRONTENAC & CREVE COEUR

Boutiques line a short stretch of Clayton Road in Ladue. Start at one of the strip’s newest additions, Shine Boutique, which carries fun accessories at affordable prices. Then head east to Mister Guy Clothiers. In addition to stocking men’s apparel, it has a women’s branch that employs well-informed stylists. Fronted by a bright-pink door, Pink Magnolia offers Lilly Pulitzer’s classically colorful Palm Beach prints. The racks at Giddyup Jane are filled with classic Western pieces such as flannel shirts and turquoise necklaces, as well as fringed, embroidered, and rusty-red cowgirl boots. Next door, Cha stocks a range of women’s apparel, shoes, and accessories. The staff at Vie can help customers find looks that are “understated but sexy,” as owner Melodie Tauben puts it. And across the street, Lu Lu Belle, a recent addition to the Midwest after a decade in Naples, Florida, carries ultra-cute children’s styles. In Frontenac, Woody’s Men’s Shop offers quality brands like Eton and Baroni, as well as such services as the Made-to-Measure program. On Lindbergh, Sam Cavato Men’s Wear offers fine suits for dapper gentlemen. And finally, the National Council of Jewish Women’s Resale Shop donates its proceeds to various community programs, including a one-day event during which 1,400 area children receive much-needed clothes for school.

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SOUTH CITY & SOUTH COUNTY

South City is full of unexpected surprises. Need proof? Head to Cherokee Street’s Antique Row, where you’ll find heirloom shops and furniture stops. You might pick up a chic black 1960s dress at Ruth’s Vintage Clothing or a 1940s nightgown from Retro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage. Dorothy Jones’ custom design studio and shop, Bespoke, features made-to-order fashion, and Ruby Francis owner Stephanie Larimer transforms reclaimed fabrics into upcycled masterpieces. At STyLehouse, twin brothers Jeff and Randy Vines specialize in St. Louis–centric shirts. Peruse fashionable streetwear and skatewear at SwedLife. Farther north, on South Grand, Parsimonia specializes in “vintage for the modern world,” with old-fashioned items that seamlessly blend into everyday wardrobes. Vintage Haberdashery also offers nostalgic fashion, as well as costumes. The nearby Revive Thrift Shop redefines thrift with a well-curated selection whose proceeds support Mission: St. Louis. In Botanical Heights, Mary Beth Bussen’s Union Studio is full of hand-sewn bowties, turquoise jewelry, and handcrafted clutches. And in the Shaw neighborhood, Mix & Match offers styling services and trunk shows.

A SHOPPER'S TAKE

PSYCHE SOUTHWELL

South City resident and Economy of Style fashion blogger

“PARSIMONIA’S OWNER HAS SUCH A KEEN STYLE, I SIMPLY NEED TO SHOW UP TO FIND SOMETHING I LOVE. FOLLOW THE BOUTIQUE’S FACEBOOK PAGE FOR INVENTORY UPDATES.” 66 / GAT EWAY TO THE B EST

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RETAIL DIRECTORY

Peace By Piece Co. 132 W. Main, Belleville, peacebypiececo.com

MOD

Plowsharing Crafts See Mutiple Locations. Savannah’s Southern Charm 210 S. Main, Waterloo savannahssoutherncharm.com Too Blue Boutique 109 W. Gundlach, Columbia tooblueboutique.com What to Wear 921 S. Arbor Vitae, Edwardsville, whattowearboutique.com

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS Circa Boutique & Gifts 128 E. Main, Belleville; 101 E. Vandalia, Edwardsville ilovecirca.com Leopard Boutique 20 Allen, Webster Groves; 1650 Beale, St. Charles leopardboutique.com Marta’s Boutique 1352 Clarkson Clayton Center, Ellisville MOD 1650 Beale, St. Charles; 871 S. Arbor Vitae, Edwardsville; 2307 Hwy. K, O’Fallon, Missouri; 8827 Ladue, Clayton modontrend.com Paperdolls Boutique 110 E. Jefferson, Kirkwood; 14418 Clayton, Ballwin; 7700 Delmar; 12095 Manchester, Des Peres paperdolls.boutique Plowsharing Crafts 6271 Delmar; 137 W. Jefferson, Kirkwood; 1228 Town & Country Crossing plowsharing.org Sole & Blues 6633 Delmar, University City; 165 Beale, St. Charles soleandblues.com Sole Comfort 108 N. Kirkwood, Kirkwood; 8823 Ladue, Ladue solecomfortstl.com

METRO EAST

Though MOD has since expanded across the Mississippi, with locations in O’Fallon and St. Charles, it started in Edwardsville. At What to Wear, you’ll find both women’s clothing and housewares. The Clothes Line, in Waterloo, carries flirty, fun trends while Savannah’s Southern Charm offers picture-perfect gifts, home décor, and more. In Belleville, Peace by Piece stocks its shelves with almost exclusively American-made products, including jewelry from Belleville artisans. At Circa Boutique & Gifts, with locations in Belleville and Edwardsville, Andria Powell sells her custom line of Mellow Mountain jewelry. Don Rodger’s Ltd. carries carefully chosen men’s and women’s fashion and has seamstresses who can help with alterations. On the resale end, Karma Clothing & Accessories, in Glen Carbon, offers designer purses, cowboy boots, and more. Finally, whether you're looking for a comfortable swing dress, a North Face hoodie, or a classic pair of Top-Siders for half price, consider Glik’s.

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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MISSION TACO JOINT’S BAJA FISH, BBQ DUCK AND MOFU TOFU TACOS

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Online

THIS RESTAURANT COMPENDIUM IS AN ABRIDGED VERSION OF ST. LOUIS MAGAZINE’S 2017 DINING GUIDE. VISIT STLMAG.COM/DININGGUIDE FOR EVEN MORE GREAT DINING SPOTS ACROSS THE METRO REGION.

DOWNTOWN & MIDTOWN

p. 70

THE NORTH & SOUTH SIDES

p. 72

CENTRAL WEST END

p. 75

INNER-RING SUBURBS

p. 77

OUTER-RING SUBURBS & EXURBS

p. 83

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

p. 85

Key

RESTAURANT CUISINE HO U R S

Contact info

$ = Entrées $10 or less $$ = Entrées $11–$17 $$$ = Entrées $18–$24 $$$$ = Entrées $25 or more

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DOWNTOWN & MIDTOWN BAIKU SUSHI LOUNGE JAPANESE/SUSHI. Urbane lounge meets sushi

joint. The interior is swank, cool; the menu is wrapped around good sushi, teriyaki, and other Japanese specialties. Probably the best selection of sake, including some unusual gems, in town. LUNCH WED –FRI, DINNER TUE–SAT. 3407 Olive, 314-896-2500, baikustl.com. $$$

BALLPARK VILLAGE A M E R I CA N . At Cardinals Nation, reserve a spot on the AT&T Rooftop that includes ticketed seats overlooking Busch Stadium, an AYCE buffet and beverages, and passage into the Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum. At the Budweiser Brew House, when people say, “We’re here for the beer,” they could be referring to the beer flights, the self-serve 21-foot tap wall, or the 24 ABI-family beers on draft. Anchored by a monster 40-foot LED TV, FOX Sports Midwest Live! is BPV’s spectacular action-packed hub, the ideal perch for a beer and a Bacon Three Way Burger. HOURS VARY. 601 Clark, 314-345-9481, stlballparkvillage.com. $$

BROADWAY OYSTER BAR CAJUN/CREOLE. Live music nightly makes les bon temps rouler, but those charbroiled oysters, jambalaya, and catfish don’t hurt. It’s not a dive but instead a dip; don’t be put off by the scruffy exterior. Inside, it’s friendly and happily packed, with wonderful beer and drinks. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 736 S. Broadway, 314-621-8811, broadwayoysterbar.com. $$

CIELO I TA L I A N. Few local restaurants can match Cielo for its combination of sleek sophistication and exquisite dining. Vistas of the riverfront are stunning. The atmosphere is cool, refined. The menu tilts Italian with a decidedly upscale twist. B R E A K FA S T A N D

pling wine. Three-course specialties are a great bargain. Smaller offerings—such as arancini— are notable. The attached retail wine store is impressive. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY. 1122 Washington, 314-241-9463, copiastl.com. $$$

THE FOUNTAIN ON LOCUST AMERICAN. With a four-wall mural, eccentricities such as the World’s Smallest Hot Fudge Sundae, and award-winning bathrooms, this is a must for the young and young at heart. Pages of drinks, eats, and ice cream treats await you. Standouts include the Polish Dill Pickle Soup, Fig and Bacon Flat, and Coconut Almond Joy ice cream. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R T U E – S U N . 3037 Locust, 314-535-7800, fountainonlocust.com. $

HIRO ASIAN KITCHEN A S I A N . Perhaps the city’s only restaurant to make “Asian fusion” worthwhile, Hiro serves up such imaginative dishes as the San-Pei Chicken Claypot. Ramen with pork belly is a must-try. The décor is cool, the service is friendly, and the Asian eats are amazingly good (and don’t forget the cocktails). The Sunday brunch is spectacular. LU N C H T U E – SAT, D I N N E R T U E – S U N , B RU N C H SAT

1405 Washington, 314-241-4476, hiroasiankitchen.com. $$$

& SUN.

Those jonesing for shawarma who happen to wander into this pintsized diner will find an essential example here. Owner Ibrahim Ead also melds other cuisines into Middle Eastern standards: Care for a little chipotle? LUNCH DAILY, DINNER MON–SAT. 1327 Washington, 314-241-1356, medinagrill.com. $ MEDITERRANEAN.

BARBECUE . This award-winning spot serves

COPIA RESTAURANT AND URBAN WINERY

LUNCH AND EARLY DINNER MON–SAT, LUNCH

Relaxed and comfortable, Copia’s the place for an evening spent noshing and sam-

AND LATE LUNCH SUN.

AMERICAN.

SCHLAFLY TAP ROOM B A R & G R I L L . St. Louis’ first brewpub knew that in this town, it would have to get both the food and beer right. And so it did, with fish and chips, mussels, and sticky toffee pudding. There’s space to stretch out, live music, and frequent festivals. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 2100 Locust, 314-241-2337, schlafly.com/tap-room. $$

SOUTHERN S O U T H E R N. Chef Rick Lewis and Pappy’s Smokehouse’s Mike Emerson founded Southern, which serves up a winning combination of Nashville hot chicken and New Orleans–style sandwiches. Go early to beat the crowds. LUNCH AND EARLY DINNER WED – SAT, L U N C H A N D L AT E L U N C H S U N . 3108 Olive, 314-531-4668, stlsouthern.com. $

S M A L L P L AT E S . Famous for its wraparound vistas, Three Sixty has fire pits and cocktails that make for convivial gatherings. The menu’s a modern take on tapas, with fish tacos and individual pizzas. It’s hip, chic, and often busy. DINNER DAILY. 1 S. Broadway, 314-241-8439, 360-stl.com. $$

TONY’S PAPPY’S SMOKEHOUSE arguably the best Memphis-style barbecue in its class. Sample the dry-rubbed ribs and pulled pork to see why people don’t mind waiting in long lines and why items often sell out.

SAT & S U N .

ITALIAN. James Beard Award–winning chef Gerard Craft’s fast casual restaurant serves sustainable ingredients on a menu priced under $10. Keep an eye out for the specials: Craft and his team use Porano to test dishes for all of Niche Food Group’s restaurants. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 634 Washington, 314833-6414, poranopasta.com. $$

THREE SIXTY MEDINA MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

999 N. Second, 314-881-5759, cielostlouis.com. $$$$

LU N C H M O N – F R I , D I N N E R DA I LY, B RU N C H

PORANO PASTA

3106 Olive, 314-5354340, pappyssmokehouse.com. $$

ITALIAN. For many St. Louisans, this legendary place defines decorous dining. It’s a panoply of tableside presentations, genteel service, and a lavish atmosphere that balances just short of ostentatious. Sauces are luxurious, ingredients are impeccable, and preparations are flawless. It’s expensive but worth it. DINNER TUE–SAT. 410 Market, 314-231-7007, saucecafe.com/ tonys. $$$$

SEE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, PG. 85: Drunken Fish / Gioia’s Deli / Lombardo’s / Pi Pizzeria / Robust / Rooster / Rosalita’s Cantina / Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse / Sauce on the Side / Sugarfire Smoke House / Tucker’s Place / Wasabi Sushi Bar

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Porano Pasta

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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THE NORTH & SOUTH SIDES ANTHONINO’S TAVERNA

CROWN CANDY KITCHEN

ITALIAN/GREEK. With

a friendly staff and recent expansion, Anthonino’s serves handtossed pizzas, fresh pastas, sandwiches, salads, and gyros. LUNCH & DINNER MON–SAT. 2225 Macklind, The Hill, 314-773-4455, anthoninos.com. $$

This St. Louis institution has been serving up house-made chocolate candy and ice cream since 1913. The Heart Stopping BLT features almost a pound of kettlecooked bacon. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. 1401 St. Louis, Old North, 314-621-9650, crowncandykitchen.net. $ A M E R I CA N.

AYA SOFIA EUROPEAN. Drop by for eggplant moussaka, kebabs, or other Turkish delights flavored with exotic and tantalizing spices. Settle into one of the cozy curtained booths with pillows. LUNCH TUE– F R I , D I N N E R T U E – S U N, B RU N C H S U N. 6671 Chippewa, Lindenwood Park, 314-645-9919, ayasofiacuisine.com. $$$

CUNETTO HOUSE OF PASTA ITALIAN. For more than four decades, Cunetto has been serving up massive but affordable plates of pasta to those celebrating special occasions—or just another Tuesday night. LU N C H T U E – F R I ; D I N N E R T U E – S U N. 5453 Magnolia, The Hill, 314-781-1135, cunetto.com. $$

THE BIERGARTEN AT ANHEUSER-BUSCH Featuring a beer-inspired menu and a full lineup of draft beers, The Biergarten offers a relaxing space to unwind at St. Louis’ most iconic brewery. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R DAILY. 1200 Lynch, Soulard, 314-577-2333, budweisertours.com. $$ A M E R I CA N.

atmosphere is charming, and the location is historic. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER MON–SAT. 1111 Mississippi, Lafayette Square, 314-2419999, 1111-m.com. $$$

FARMHAUS AMERICAN. Chef Kevin Willmann’s hot spot is small, casual, and chef-owned, serving outstanding locally sourced food. The restaurant is sophisticated but with an approachable appeal in plate presentation, service, and ambience. Special attention is paid to fresh seafood, and the menu changes daily to showcase what’s fresh and seasonal. DINNER TUE–SAT. 3257 Ivanhoe, Lindenwood Park, 314-647-3800, farmhausrestaurant.com. $$$

FIVE BISTRO DOMINIC’S ON THE HILL Open since 1971, Dominic’s personifies an Old World–to–New World transition marked by teams of attentive servers, classic recipes, and a romantic atmosphere. DINNER MON–SAT. 5101 Wilson, The Hill, 314771-1632, dominicsrestaurant.com. $$$$

A M E R I CA N. Modern and seasonal, with a menu that’s constantly evolving, Five Bistro offers up food that makes a diner think. Many local providers are used, and the atmosphere is always welcoming. D I N N E R TUE–SAT, LUNCH SAT. 5100 Daggett, The Hill, 314-773-5553, fivebistro.com. $$$$

ELAIA

FRAZER’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

Tucked into an immaculately renovated house in blossoming Botanical Heights, Ben Poremba’s Elaia offers one of the city’s most complete dining experiences. The dishes, always beautifully plated, change nightly and are paired with a deep and esoteric wine cellar. Expect an exciting yet leisurely dining experience. DINNER WED –SAT. 1634 Tower Grove, Botanical Heights, 314-932-1088, elaiastl.com. $$$$

AMERICAN. Already popular for its innovative food, Frazer’s should be better known for its outstanding cocktails. The mood’s decidedly cool, and the menu changes constantly, with an emphasis on international flavors and superior ingredients. D I N N E R MON–SAT, BRUNCH SAT. 1811 Pestalozzi, Soulard, 314-773-8646, frazers goodeats.com. $$$

ITALIAN.

BOGART’S SMOKEHOUSE BARBECUE. This celebrated BBQ joint serves up brisket, smoked turkey, baked beans, apricot-glazed ribs, and more. The usual challenges of any great BBQ place are here—long lines and “We outta that” are testaments to its popularity—but it’s well worth it. LU N C H M O N – SAT, D I N N E R F R I & SAT. 1627 S. Ninth, Soulard, 314-621-3107, bogartssmokehouse.com. $$

BLUES CITY DELI AMERICAN. On Thursdays and Saturdays, the joint is packed as patrons gather for live music of a New Orleans bent. Every day, it’s a destination for exceptional sandwiches, including a massive muffuletta. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER T H U. 2438 McNair, Benton Park, 314-7738225, bluescitydeli.com. $

BYRD & BARREL S O U T H E R N. The chicken’s crispy, hot, and tasty. The place is downright fun, with an urban beer garden and a drive-thru, as well as in-house seating. The quirky menu includes Kool-Aid pickles—a hot dog stuffed into a pickle, then battered and fried like a corndog— and a South Side take on poutine. BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND DINNER DAILY. 3422 S. Jefferson, Marine Villa, 314-875-9998. $$

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M E D I T E R R A N E A N.

ELEMENT AMERICAN. The restaurant has a welcome fetish for beautiful presentations. The menu’s a constantly changing reflection of the chef ’s whims. The atmosphere is classy and understated, with a magnificent open-air lounge upstairs. Element was named “Best Restaurant With an Attached Rock-Climbing Gym.” DINNER TUE– SAT. 1419 Carroll, 314-241-1674, Lafayette Square, elementstl.com. $$

ELEVEN ELEVEN MISSISSIPPI I TA L I A N . This

welcoming place caters to locals with a bent for inventive dishes such as wild boar ravioli and braised rabbit. The

GOODY GOODY DINER DINER. The iconic diner delivers fried chicken, Belgian waffles, and eggs cooked to order 12 ways. Named one of “America’s Best Diners” by Travel + Leisure, Goody Goody sticks to its roots. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY. 5900 Natural Bridge, Wells/Goodfellow, 314383-3333, goodygoodydiner.com. $

GIAN-TONY’S ITALIAN. Located in an old house, this stalwart offers great versions of Italian standards, plus Sicilian specialties. The servers wear black ties, but patrons often dress in polos. Don’t miss the osso buco special. DINNER DAILY. 5356 Daggett, The Hill, 314-7724893, gian-tonys.com. $$$

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GRACE MEAT + THREE Chef Rick Lewis throws down Southern-style cooking, with cracklin’ cornbread, fried catfish, and sweet tea-brined turkey legs. There are vegetarian offerings, too, like hot fried Mofu Tofu, topped with an egg and served with biscuits and vegetarian gravy. In-the-know guests still order the famous fried chicken that Lewis is known for, hot as Hades and served with grace. LUNCH A N D D I N N E R W E D – S U N. 4270 Manchester, The Grove, 314-533-2700,stlgrace.com. $$ S O U T H E R N.

GRBIC

fed meats and organic vegetables. Vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free options, as well as substitutions, are no problem here. DINNER MON–SAT. 3825 Watson, Lindenwood Park, 314781-4344, kounterkulturestl.com. $$

crab legs, an upscale take on Mexican seafoodstyle fare. LUNCH AND DINNER THU–TUE. 4561 Gravois, Bevo Mill, 314-282-0772. $$$

THE MUD HOUSE

BAR & GRILL. Surprising dishes include smoky mango wings and gooey butter baklava. The extensive burger menu includes beef, lamb, turkey, bison, and veggie. Layla’s adjacent lot makes parking a breeze. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT–SUN. 4317 Manchester, The Grove, 314-553-9252, laylastl.com. $$

CAFÉ. It’s the only coffeehouse in town with fulltime chefs—and the occasional guest chef transitioning between gigs. They crank out dishes that play several levels above the cup of Joe–and–go usual. In other words, you can find good eats at an attractive price here pretty much any time of the day. B R E A K FA ST A N D LU N C H DA I LY. 2101 Cherokee, Benton Park, 314-776-6599, themudhousestl.com. $

LAYLA

E U R O P E A N . Friendly service and hearty food charm customers at this family-owned restaurant. Don’t miss ćevapi, juicy beef sausages, and tarhana soup. It’s a good place for a quiet conversation, even when there’s a wedding or community gathering being catered next door. LUNCH SAT–SUN, DINNER TUE–SUN. 4071 Keokuk, Dutchtown, 314-7723100, grbicrestaurant.com. $$

LONA’S LIL EATS

NIXTA

Pining for Xishuangbanna eats? Lona serves her own version, Thai-Chinese food wrapped in giant rice wrappers. And don’t forget the superb dumplings. This place is tiny and inevitably busy. LUNCH AND DINNER T U E – SAT. 2199 California, Fox Park, 314-9258938, lonaslileats.com. $

GUERRILLA STREET FOOD

LORENZO’S TRATTORIA

MEXICAN. Traditional cucina ingredients are magically combined into small-plate presentations offering a whole new level of taste. The bar’s a good place to wait until dinner, which includes such dishes as empañadas stuffed with citrus-braised pork shoulder and the stunningly complex molè. DINNER TUE– SAT. 1621 Tower Grove, Botanical Heights, 314-899-9000, nixtastl.com. $

ASIAN. Guerrilla Street Food maintains its street

ITALIAN. Sure, there are pastas and risotto, but you’ll also find a pork flatiron steak with tomato truffle bread pudding, veal liver, and ricotta cheesecake. Expect solid service in an informal atmosphere. Weekend reservations are a good idea. DINNER DAILY. 1933 Edwards, The Hill, 314-773-2223, lorenzostrattoria.com. $$$

swagger and serves startlingly good food in its crisply delineated space at Arsenal and Grand. The place exudes energy, fueled by the tastiest street food this side of Manila. Everything is reasonably priced and expertly cooked. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. 3559 Arsenal, Tower Grove East, 314-529-1328, guerrillastreetfood.com. $

ASIAN.

LORUSSO’S CUCINA GUIDO’S PIZZERIA & TAPAS ITALIAN/SMALL PLATES. Pizza and paella on

the same menu? Sure. After finishing some traditional-style tapas, try the St. Louis–style pizza, which is way more than just an afterthought. Like Modesto, this is not the sort of spot you’d expect to find on The Hill. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 5046 Shaw, The Hill, 314-771-4900, guidos stl.com. $$

I TA L I A N. With Italian standards and new ideas on that theme, LoRusso’s is one of the most vegetarian-friendly restaurants in town. There are gluten-free options as well. A pleasant wine list, warm hospitality, and occasional music in the bar make for festive dining. DINNER TUE–SUN. 3121 Watson, Lindenwood Park, 314-647-6222, lorussos.com. $$$

LULU’S LOCAL EATERY HODAK’S RESTAURANT Winner, winner: Hodak’s is required eating for anyone who enjoys a fried chicken dinner. Popular long before there was a fried chicken trend, Hodak’s specializes in crowd-pleasing birds wrapped in a distinctive savory cornbread-and-flour coating. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 2100 Gravois, Benton Park, 314-776-7292, hodaks.com. $$

VEGETARIAN. Experience interesting vegan fare made from scratch using locally sourced ingredients. Don’t miss the spicy Buffalo Cauliflower Bites, the Sweet Potato Black Bean Burger, or the BBQ Jack—a jackfruit sandwich so good, you won’t notice the meat’s missing. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R M O N – S AT, CHANGES SEASONALLY. 3201 S. Grand, South Grand, 314-300-8215, luluslocaleatery.com. $

KOUNTER KULTURE

MARISCOS EL GATO

Known for its unusual dishes, this carryout restaurant earns extra points for its farm-to-table philosophy and use of grass-

MEXICAN. Chef Pedro “El Gato” Diaz puts the emphasis on spectacular overflowing platters of whole roasted fish and piles of shrimp and

SOUTHERN.

A S I A N.

O’CONNELL’S PUB BAR & GRILL. A longtime St. Louis tradition, O’Connell’s is known for affordable pints, cozy seating, and burgers that are seared to the pinnacle of crusty, caramelized perfection. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 4652 Shaw, Southwest Garden, 314-773-6600, saucemagazine.com/oconnells. $

OLIO M E D I T E R R A N E A N . Diminutive in size but large in aspirations, the sister wine bar to Elaia is ideal for light snacking, full meals, great drinks, or any combination thereof. Creative cocktails and a broad beer and wine list pair with shareable small plates. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 1634 Tower Grove, Botanical Heights, 314-932-1088, oliostl.com. $$

THE PAT CONNOLLY TAVERN BA R & G R I L L . Better known as Pat’s, this bar has been feeding families for decades. Fried chicken is the star, but there are also tasty sandwiches and desserts from Sugaree Baking. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & S U N. 6400 Oakland, Dogtown, 314647-7387, patconnollytavern.com. $$

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THE PEACEMAKER LOBSTER & CRAB COMPANY S E A F O O D. A

lobster shack fell in love with a crab house and produced this rustic local favorite. Crab boils, lobster, mussels, clams—it’s a taste of the coast transplanted into a historic Midwest space. LUNCH MON– F R I , L AT E L U N C H S U N , D I N N E R D A I L Y.

1831 Sidney, Benton Park, 314-772-8858, peacemakerstl.com. $$

products. Dinner is a particular focal point. Enjoy candlelit dinners on the lovely, tree-covered patio at night. Or if weather’s an issue, choose between the two dining rooms. And don’t forget the sweets: Owner Russell Ping’s gooey butter cake (made with a shortbread crust) is legendary, and the signature chocolate-andwhipped cream layer cake is nearly a foot tall. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH, TUE–SUN, DINNER

A M E R I CA N . So they can’t spell, and “gastrobar” isn’t really a word. Nonetheless, the atmosphere’s comfortable and the food’s outstanding. Paired with a craft beer, the roasted chicken or mushrooms and grits make for a perfect dinner. DINNER TUE–SAT. 3500 Watson, Lindenwood Park, 314-3539463, snaxstl.com. $$

5400 Murdoch, Southampton, 314553-9994, russellscafe.com. $$$

SOUTHWEST DINER

TUE–SAT.

PICCADILLY AT MANHATTAN High five–worthy fried chicken is served with sides like Grandma used to make. Piccadilly’s fried chicken sports a crisp, salty crust that begs for a generous slathering of hot sauce and honey. Extra napkins are a must, as are the complimentary wet naps. LUNCH AND D I N N E R T U E – SAT. 7201 Piccadilly, Ellendale, 314-646-0016, thepiccadilly.com. $$

SEAMUS MCDANIEL’S

PLANTER’S HOUSE

THE SHAVED DUCK

A M E R I C A N . Co cktail House is more like it. The drink menu is stunningly extravagant. But don’t overlook the food, from nibbles to full meals. The interior’s magnificent, a step back in St. Louis history. D I N N E R T U E – S U N . 1000 Mississippi, Lafayette Square, 314-696-2603, plantershousestl.com. $$

BARBECUE . Fans line up early for the eats at this cozy 40-seater, where you’ll find live guitar music every night. The St. Louis–style ribs are worthy of attention, but we’re partial to a serving of smoked chicken, frites prepared in duck fat, and the homemade sides. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 2900 Virginia, Tower Grove East, 314-776-1407, theshavedduck.com. $$

POLITE SOCIETY

SHEESH

At this wonderful little brickwall joint that’s heavy on the folksy, you’ll feel compelled to come in for a cocktail and stay for bistro steak or confit chicken wings. The bookshelves aren’t for show: There’s an array of readable tomes on seemingly every subject.

EUROPEAN. For nights when you crave outstanding Turkish food, Sheesh offers a completely casbah setting, copper dishes, and lounge-type seating. The fare is authentic, too, from the stuffed grape leaf appetizers to aromatic kebabs to Turkish apple tea. Lively and fun, it’s great for couples or small groups. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 3226 S. Grand, Tower Grove East, 314-833-4321, sheeshrestaurant.com. $$

AMERICAN.

A M E R I CA N .

DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH AND DINNER SAT &

1923 Park, Lafayette Square, 314-3252553, politesocietystl.com. $$$ SUN.

BAR & GRILL . This popular Irish pub has a large covered patio in the rear. Many opt for the immense burger, but we yearn for the pork tenderloin sandwich. Onion rings trump the fries by a country mile. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 1208 Tamm, Dogtown, 314-6456337, seamusmcdaniels.com. $$

PUEBLO SOLIS MEXICAN. A delicious merger of traditional Mexican dishes and Tex-Mex favorites is a mainstay here. Locals can be seen sipping potent margaritas and sharing from plates of tamales filled with simmered black beans, pork, cheese, and jalapeño. DINNER DAILY. 5127 Hampton, St. Louis Hills, 314-351-9000, pueblosolisstl.com. $$

RUSSELL’S ON MACKLIND CAFÉ . Like its sister location in Fenton, this South City spot emphasizes locally sourced

SNAX GASTROBAR

D I N E R . Simple, solid Southwestern fare is executed with precision and flair in a classic diner setting. Favorites include a New Mexico–style breakfast burrito and Jonathan’s Famous Fiery Scramble. B R E A K FA ST A N D LUNCH DAILY. 6803 Southwest, Ellendale, 314-260-7244, southwestdinerstl.com. $

TRATTORIA MARCELLA I TA L I A N. Owned by the brothers Komorek (Steve and Jamie), Trattoria Marcella is a classic, ever-popular place. The lobster risotto special is a headliner, but almost anything on the menu swings. D I N N E R T U E – SAT. 3600 Watson, Lindenwood Park, 314-352-7706, trattoriamarcella.com. $$

UNION LOAFERS BA K E RY. Using fresh bread as its foundation, this bakery/café in Botanical Heights blends great food with a lively space. LUNCH W E D – S U N , D I N N E R W E D – SAT. 1629 Tower Grove, Botanical Heights, 314-833-6111, unionloafers.com. $

VISTA RAMEN JAPANESE. Chef Chris Bork serves up steaming bowls of creative soup in a hip space on Cherokee Street. Small plates and cocktails are equally compelling. D I N N E R M O N – SAT, BRUNCH SUN. 2609 Cherokee, Benton Park, 314-797-8250, vistaramen.com. $$

SIDNEY STREET CAFÉ AMERICAN. Legions of local fans consistently rate this Benton Park mainstay among St. Louis’ finest. Flavors of the South, Southwest, and France mingle in a constantly changing menu. Aged wood, brick, and crisp linen make the ambience; it’s relaxed, yet this is a place for serious food. D I N N E R T U E – SAT. 2000 Sidney, Benton Park, 314-771-5777, sidneystreetcafe.com. $$$$

VIN DE SET F R E N C H . Consistently good, Vin de Set offers numerous reasons to make it a regular destination. The Sunday brunch is opulent. Rooftop seats offer unparalleled vistas. There’s a classy bar with a tempting wine list, impeccable service, and a main dining room that’s often overlooked. LUNCH TUE– F R I , D I N N E R T U E – S U N, B RU N C H S U N. 2017 Chouteau, Lafayette Square, 314-241-8989, vindeset.com. $$$

SEE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, PG. 85: Bartolino’s / Charlie Gitto’s / Gioia’s Deli / Joey B’s / McGurk’s Public House / Rooster / Salt + Smoke / Sasha’s on Shaw / Sauce on the Side

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CENTRAL WEST END 1764 PUBLIC HOUSE Like a trip downtown—and downriver—Lucas and Derek Gamlin’s third restaurant along Euclid Avenue is a tribute to the city’s French history, founding year (1764), and flavors (Crawfish Toasted Ravioli, Cajun Char Crust Ribeye). BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND DINNER DAILY. 39 N. Euclid, 314-405-8221, 1764pub.com. $$$ AMERICAN.

BAR ITALIA ITALIAN. Come spring, enjoy a gentle breeze and a Negroni on the patio. The veal, salads, and pastas are notable, as are the antipasti and drinks. It’s a perfect place for people-watching. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–SUN, BRUNCH

13 Maryland Plaza, 314-361-7010, baritaliastl.com. $$$ SAT & SUN.

fé’s ingredients are grown in season. Breakfast on the sun-dappled patio is a perfect start to the day. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY. 4605 Olive, 314-454-6868, bowoodfarms.com. $$

THE CHASE PARK PLAZA AMERICAN. The Tenderloin Room is known for seared steaks and sauced pepperloin à la tenderloin, gentle refinement, and stellar service. The Preston is old-style cool and sophisticated, with a serious bar and elevated small plates, including the beautiful charred octopus. And the Chase Club provides a more affordable dining option, with a patio beside the iconic pool. SEE WEB SITE FOR HOURS. 212 N. Kingshighway, 314-633-3000, sonesta.com. $$–$$$$

DRESSEL’S PUBLIC HOUSE BLK MKT EATS Burrito-size sushi rolls are stuffed with such ingredients as buttermilk fried chicken and house-cured salmon. Oh, and there’s Puck’s artisanal soda. Yes, it’s weird. But you’re going to enjoy it. LUNCH AND D I N N E R DA I LY. 9 S. Vandeventer, 314-3048420, blkmkteats.com. $$

BAR & GRILL . Few places capture the Welsh pub experience as well as Dressel’s. The dark wood–and–brick interior holds a lively crowd enjoying draft beers. Completing the effect is the food: rarebit, lamb burgers, fish and chips, soft pretzels. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY, B RU N C H S U N. 419 N. Euclid, 314-361-1060, dresselspublichouse.com. $$

THE BOATHOUSE

GAMLIN WHISKEY HOUSE

Beloved by locals, the Boathouse offers charming vistas of Post-Dispatch Lake. Now under new management, the kitchen will serve up popular items from Cyrano’s, HiPointe Drive-In, and Sugarfire Smoke House when it reopens later this year. S E E W E B S I T E F O R H O U R S. 6101 Government, Forest Park, 314-367-2224, boathouseforestpark.com. $$

STEAKHOUSE. If you want something more than the myriad whiskeys available, the restaurant can fix you up with prime rib, chicken and waffles, or shrimp and grits. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 236 N. Euclid, 314-8759500, gamlinwhiskeyhouse.com. $$$

JAPANESE/SUSHI.

AMERICAN.

BRASSERIE BY NICHE Gerard Craft’s third restaurant is simply the best brasserie in town. Don’t believe us? Try the mussels, served Normandy-style with cider and leeks. Or savor the braised beef, exquisite steak frites, a glorious croque-madame—and a local beer to boot. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 4580 Laclede, 314454-0600, brasseriebyniche.com. $$$ FRENCH.

CAFÉ OSAGE AMERICAN. A hidden gem, Café Osage is tucked into a lush urban nursery where many of the ca-

PIG & PICKLE Folksy meets fine dining here with deliciously inventive combinations, such as shrimp-and-cabbage-stuffed squid and brisket jambalaya. Though there’s a chicken-and-biscuit Southern accent, the collection of small plates bounces all over the culinary landscape. DINNER TUE–SAT, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 5513 Pershing , 314-349-1697, pigandpickleeatery.com. $$ AMERICAN.

RETREAT GASTROPUB AMERICAN. The menu is described as “scratchmade American pub food with a modern twist,” one being that half the items are vegetarian while the other half are gastropub staples. Even the house salad is superior. LUNCH AND DINNER WED –MON, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 2 N. Sarah, 314-261-4497, retreatgastropub.com. $$

SCAPE AMERICAN. Among the reasons to visit: candlelight, starched linens, a tucked-away courtyard patio, impeccable service, great drinks, and seasonal cuisine. The Sunday brunch is among the best around. DINNER TUE–SAT, BRUNCH SUN. 48 Maryland Plaza, 314-361-7227, scapestl. com. $$$$

THE SCOTTISH ARMS BA R & G R I L L . The front room’s casual, with tall tables and a roomy bar. In back, the dining is more formal. The food is grand, an interpretation of traditional Scottish dishes. LUNCH AND D I N N E R DA I LY, B RU N C H SAT & S U N. 6–8 S. Sarah, 314-776-1407, thescottisharms.com. $$$

JUNIPER SOUTHERN. Juniper serves some of the best fried chicken in town, along with other downhome Southern eats conjured in a delightfully uptown style. The bread basket is mandatory. DINNER MON–SAT. 360 N. Boyle, 314-329-7696, junipereats.com. $$

SHAKE SHACK AMERICAN. Danny Meyer’s paean to the smash burgers, crinkle-cut fries, and custard concretes of his St. Louis youth opened to much fanfare in mid-December. So was it worth the wait and hype? Absolutely. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 32 N. Euclid, 314-627-5518, shakeshack.com. $

PANORAMA AMERICAN. Located in the Saint Louis Art Museum, Panorama is elegant without pretense. The menu emphasizes seasonally changing cuisine, and there’s a weekend brunch. LUNCH TUE S– FRI, BRUNCH SAT–SUN. 1 Fine Arts, Forest Park, 314-655-5490, slam.org. $$

TASTE SMALL PLATES. This speakeasy-inspired spot combines cool and romantic. Pair excellent tapas-style noshables with fabulously creative cocktails. DINNER DAILY. 4584 Laclede, 314361-1200, tastebarstl.com. $$

SEE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, PG. 85: The Block / Drunken Fish / Pi Pizzeria / The Tavern Kitchen & Bar / ’ZZA Pizza + Salad

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801 Fish

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Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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INNER-RING SUBURBS 801 CHOPHOUSE

AVENUE

BILLIE-JEAN

STEAKHOUSE.

This restaurant is a throwback to the days when green-coated servers pushed guéridon carts through fine dining rooms. A magnificent oval bar anchors the restaurant, the fifth location of the Des Moines, Iowa– based chain. DINNER DAILY. 137 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton, 314-875-9900, 801restaurant group.com/st-louis. $$$$

Chef Bryan Carr’s reliable newest outpost serves modern and homestyle fare with French accents. Ask for a seat in the back room, with its fireplace and chandelier; it’s a great spot for a quiet business breakfast. BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 12 N. Meramec, Clayton, 314-727-4141, avestl.com. $$$

AMERICAN. A stone’s throw from owner Zoë Robinson’s other two restaurants (I Fratellini and Bar Les Fréres) is her newest, named after her parents. The culinary focus is American and Asian; the black walls and white accents conjure a 1940s New York supper club. D I N N E R T U E – SAT . 7610 Wydown, Clayton, 314-797-8484, billejeanstl.com. $$$

801 FISH

BARCELONA TAPAS RESTAURANT

BILLY G’S KIRKWOOD

At St. Louis’ most lavish seafood restaurant, everything is posh and sleek, and the wine list shines. The oceans’ best appears with a minimum of fussiness—the emphasis is on the fish itself. 801 boasts the best chilled shrimp and fried clams this side of the Mississippi. Go early for the felicitous happy hour. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY. 172 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton, 314-875-9636, 801fish.com. $$$$

This high-energy spot is famous for its sangria, small plates, and sidewalk tables. It’s well suited for a night out watching the game or a first date. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 34 N. Central, Clayton, 314-8639909, barcelonatapas.com/st-louis. $$

AMERICAN. It looks like the Taos Pueblo outside. Inside are burgers the size of your head, decent BBQ, pizzas, and nachos. The bar is comfortable, and the terrace is spacious, with attractive fire pits. It’s a family-type place, though a younger crowd moves in as the night deepens. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 131 W. Argonne, Kirkwood, 314-984-8000, billygskirkwood.com. $$

SEAFO OD.

ACERO Cucina povera is glorious at this simple-yet-trendsetting place, where lighter pasta portions and affordable wine quartinos contribute to satisfying, memorable dinners. The four-course prix fixe is inevitably worthwhile. D I N N E R M O N – SAT. 7266 Manchester, Maplewood, 314-644-1790, fialafood.com/acero. $$ I TA L I A N .

AMERICAN.

S M A L L P L AT E S.

BAR LES FRÈRES FRENCH. Despite the name, Bar Les Frères is not your brothers’ bar. (It’s actually across the street from I Fratellini, also owned by restaurateur Zoë Robinson.) One of the most romantic restaurants in town, the tiny storefront is the perfect spot for a glass of Champagne, whether to make a first impression or to celebrate a special occasion. DINNER MON– SAT. 7637 Wydown, Clayton, 314-725-8880, barlesfreres.net. $$$

On the increasingly competitive fried-chicken scene, this popular inexpensive haunt—which also boasts many notable New Orleans–influenced dishes— continues to shine. LUNCH TUE–FRI, DINNER TUE–SAT. 8127 Maryland, Clayton, 314-725-1019, almondsrestaurant.com. $$

AMIGOS CANTINA

BIG SKY CAFE

This fun, informal eatery is perhaps the best margarita bar in town. You’ll find the usual Mexican offerings, including some excellent fajitas. The lunch specials are tasty, too. The restaurant is often busy and can get loud, so opt for the rear patio (El Porche) if weather permits. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 120 W. Jefferson, Kirkwood, 314-8210877, amigoskirkwood.com. $$

AMERICAN. The presentations here are among the most artistic in town—they can actually distract diners from the wildly decorated interior. Seasonal menus guarantee return visits. Favorites include the salmon burger and the passing freight trains. The service is snappy, so Big Sky’s an ideal destination when you have plans for later in the evening. LUNCH TUE–FRI, DINNER TUE–SUN, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 47 S. Old Orchard, Webster Groves, 314-962-5757, bigskycafe.net. $$$

AMERICAN.

MEXICAN.

AMERICAN. This Loop landmark is known for its pop culture memorabilia and darts tournaments. But it’s also a destination for hearty bar food, all-day breakfast, and a latenight menu. The Duck Room downstairs was a fixture for the late Chuck Berry. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 6504 Delmar, University City, 314-727-4444, blueberryhill.com. $

BASSO ITALIAN. The draw here, at one of the hippest bistro-type eateries in town, is smallportion Italian fare: roasted Brussels sprouts, seared pork belly, creamy burrata. Pizzas are topped with unexpected ingredients like duck egg and shrimp sausage. And happy hour doesn’t cease till 7 p.m. DINNER DAILY. 7036 Clayton, Richmond Heights, 314932-7820, basso-stl.com. $$

ALMONDS RESTAURANT

BLUEBERRY HILL

BOUNDARY A M E R I C A N . The flagship restaurant at The Cheshire (formerly The Restaurant) rebranded, adding a raw bar and an array of comfortable seating options. The open kitchen and the chef ’s table remain for those who like to see the back of the house at work. LU N C H M O N – SAT, D I N N E R DA I LY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 7036 Clayton, Richmond Heights, 314-932-7818, boundary-stl.com. $$$

BRICKTOP’S A M E R I CA N. This attractively appointed, dimly lit place near Plaza Frontenac fills the bill, no matter what sounds good for dinner. Fresh seafood is delivered daily, and you can find classics such as meatloaf, prime rib, salads, and burgers. Don’t miss the candied bacon–and–deviled egg appetizer. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R D A I LY. 10342 Clayton, Frontenac, 314-567-6300, bricktops.com/st-louis. $$$

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BRIO TUSCAN GRILLE

LUNCH AND DINNER MON–FRI, DINNER SAT

Lots of marble, drapes, and warm colors lend a lush Mediterranean touch at this popular chain. The fare includes Americanized Italian favorites, with some superior pasta dishes and grilled specialties. Go early and hang out at the bar or the popular patio. After dinner, try the seasonally flavored bread pudding. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 1601 S. Lindbergh, Frontenac, 314-432-4410, brioitalian.com. $$$

& SUN.

ITALIAN.

CAFÉ NAPOLI I TA L I A N. A favorite among Clayton power brokers, Napoli serves pasta and other Italian standards. Pair your meal with a glass from the extensive wine list, available on tablets. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER MON–SAT. 7754 Forsyth, Clayton, 314-863-5731, cafenapoli.com. $$$

CAFÉ PROVENCAL FRENCH. Temptations abound at this bastion of civilized French dining in West County. The atmosphere resembles a Burgundy kitchen, with a splendid wine list and exquisite Epi bread. Consider lunch here, with salad Niçoise, croque-madame, or garlicky escargots. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. 427 S. Kirkwood, Kirkwood, 314-822-5440, cafeprovencal.com. $$$

CANTINA LAREDO MEXICAN. The St. Louis outpost is the modern Mexican chain’s eighth location—though the sleek space reads more Clayton than chain. Grab a margarita and a seat by the open fireplace, and order some freshly made guacamole. Don’t miss the generous happyhour specials. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 7710 Forsyth, Clayton, 314-725-2447, cantinalaredo.com. $$

CANYON CAFÉ AMERICAN. It’s more Tex than Mex—think of

it as Southwestern Spicy. Sirloin gets a chili rub, and chicken chowder is spiked with poblanos. Enchiladas, “street” tacos, and fajitas are all good. Regulars rave about the chips and “limit-two” margaritas. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 1707 S. Lindbergh, Frontenac, 314-872-3443, canyoncafe.com. $$

THE CAPITAL GRILLE S T E A K H O U S E . Dry-aged beef, luxurious seafood, and meticulous service are specialties at this high-end addition to the Clayton dining scene. The wine selection is award-winning. At lunchtime, consider the lobster-and-crab burger.

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101 S. Hanley, Clayton, 314-725-0930, thecapitalgrille.com. $$$$

fresh, affordable offerings in an inviting atmosphere with a walk-up window. BREAKFA ST A N D LU N C H DA I LY. 100 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves, thecloverandthebee.com. $$

CARDWELL’S AT THE PLAZA AMERICAN. Located inside Plaza Frontenac, Cardwell’s continues to hit the mark after more than 20 years in business. Bill Cardwell’s offerings make for superior meals, and a woodfired oven, elegant wine list, and well-trained staff add to the experience. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 94 Plaza Frontenac, Frontenac, 314-9978885, billcardwell.com/cardwells.html. $$$

THE CROSSING EU R O P E A N. At this classic spot, the fourfor-$35 tasting menu is a frontrunner for the best dining deal in St. Louis. At lunch, the burger is not to be missed. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER MON–SAT. 7823 Forsyth, Clayton, 314721-7375, thecrossing-stl.com. $$$$

CYRANO’S CARL’S DRIVE-IN Waiting for one of only a handful of seats in this closet-sized place is a St. Louis tradition. Crispy spatula-thin burgers sizzle, and golden onion rings crackle in hot oil. The aroma conjures pure, delicious nostalgia. Don’t even think about skipping the root beer float. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–SAT. 9033 Manchester, Brentwood, 314-961-9652. $ AMERICAN.

DESSERTS/CAFÉ . Once the dessert destination in St. Louis, Cyrano’s has a reputation that remains deservedly formidable. The dinner menu includes sandwiches and heartier fare: steak frites, pork tenderloin, shrimp Creole… The vibrant pastels, glittery tiles, and bright lantern lighting make for a pleasant, upbeat atmosphere. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY . 603 E. Lockwood, Webster Groves, 314963-3232, cyranos.com. $$

CIBARE ITALIAN KITCHEN I TA L I A N . Blackjack, Barolo, and Bolognese are finally under one roof at River City Casino’s newest restaurant, which cooks up fresh breads and pastas, as well as Italian-themed cocktails. Cibare’s retail bakery and coffee shop also serves Lavazza, “Italy’s favorite coffee.” LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 777 River City Casino, Lemay, 314-388-7777, rivercity.com. $$

DAILY BREAD BAKERY AND CAFE CAFÉ . Panum nostrum was never so delectable. Soups change daily, and particularly extravagant sandwiches change with the seasons. You can’t miss the cakes, cookies, brownies, and incredible seasonal sour cream breads. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY, DINN E R M O N – F R I . 11719 Manchester, Kirkwood, 314-909-0010, thedbcafe.com. $

CITIZEN KANE’S STEAKHOUSE ST E A K H O US E . Located in a Victorian house, Citizen Kane’s matches steakhouse luxury with down-home affordability. A delicate char adorns juicy, glistening steaks. Salads and sides reflect a kitchen that’s determined to please. It’s a steak place without the usual accoutrements—but all of the flavor. D I N N E R T U E – S U N. 133 W. Clinton, Kirkwood, 314-965-9005, citizenkanes. com. $$$$

DEMUN OYSTER BAR S E A FO O D. This diminutive on-trend oyster bar wows with its rotating selection of fresh bivalves, killer chowders, and array of wines, craft cocktails, and beer. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY, B R U N C H SAT

740 DeMun, Clayton, 314-725-0322, demunoysterbar.com. $$ & SUN.

EDGEWILD BISTRO & TAP COLLEEN’S What began as a custom cookie bakery (and a darn good one) has morphed into a bakery/café with sandwiches and salads that match the quality of the expanded cookie and pastry selection. Renowned chef Chris Lee has improved upon an already solid menu. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY. 7337 Forsyth, University City, 314-727-8427, colleenscookies.com. $ A M E R I CA N.

A M E R I CA N. The menu’s ambitious: pizza, sandwiches, salads, along with such meals as Cajun penne and fried smoked chicken. It’s one of those places that’s suitable for a business lunch or a weekend dinner with the family. The beer selection is worthy, too. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 12316 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-548-2222, edgewildbistro.com. $$

FAROTTO’S PIZZERIA THE CLOVER AND THE BEE From the creators of Olive+Oak, this breakfast-and-lunch spot serves up AMERICAN.

I TA L I A N . St. Louis–style pizza is served alongside fish, chicken, and pasta, but the real secret here is a spectacular meatball sand-

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wich. The Rock Hill institution has a spacious new patio and a large banquet space. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY. 9525 Manchester, Rock Hill, 314-962-0048, farottos.com. $$

FORK & STIX THAI. This small eatery serves up authentic northern Thai cuisine from the Cheng Mai region, including traditional soups, salads, spring rolls, and noodle, rice, meat, seafood, and vegetarian entrées, often containing locally sourced meats and produce. LUNCH A N D D I N N E R T U E – S U N. 549 Rosedale, University City, 314-863-5572, forknstix.com. $

FOX & HOUNDS TAVERN A M E R I C A N . Cozy, retro-romantic, and chockfull of nooks, the Fox & Hounds is where you’ll stop for a cocktail and end up staying for more, such as the Liverpool wings, grilled salmon, or chocolate gooey butter cake. The fireplace is a perfect place to gather and reminisce. DINNER AND EARLY DINNER DAILY. 6300 Clayton, Richmond Heights, 314-647-7300, cheshirestl.com. $$

HERBIE’S In late 2016, Herbie’s, along with many of the legendary posters and mirrors, moved from the Central West End to the former Cardwell’s in Clayton space. Expect the same signature dishes, as well as a refined version of Midwest comfort food with French influences, including some tableside presentations. L U N C H M O N – F R I , D I N N E R DA I LY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 8100 Maryland, Clayton, 314-769-9595, herbies.com. $$$ AMERICAN.

HI-POINTE DRIVE-IN A M E R I CA N. The hippest hamburger joint in town keeps a few top-secret menu items under wraps in its cargo container funhouse. Ask for the Double Secret Probation Burger, a double bacon cheeseburger run through the garden and nestled in fried chicken buns. And try the Weenie in Betweenie chili cheese dog grilled cheese and the Philly Mac & Cheese Steak, stuffed with cheesy pasta. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 1033 McCausland, Hi Pointe, 314-3492720, hipointedrivein.com. $

I FRATELLINI FRANK PAPA’S RISTORANTE Linen tablecloths, sparkling tableware, and a splendid wall of wine are hints: This is classic—surprisingly affordable— Italian dining. It’s posh. Chocolate ravioli is the best dessert; before getting there, you’ll work your way through superior veal dishes, some grand pastas and risotto, and delightful primi offerings like mussels diavolo. DINNER M O N – SAT. 2241 S. Brentwood, Brentwood, 314-961-3344, frankpapas.com. $$$ ITALIAN.

GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN A M E R I C A N . This popular chicken house from Memphis offers spicing that varies a little from day to day, as well as countrystyle sides. The medium-spicy chicken (and less-spicy chicken fingers) have legions of devotees. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 7434 Manchester, Maplewood, 314-899-9899, gusfriedchicken.com. $$

HENDEL’S MARKET CAFÉ & WINE BAR This family-owned restaurant is housed in a historic brick building with a covered porch and ivy-draped brick courtyard. Many come for the steak—USDA Choice beef, aged at least 21 days. The signature Louisiana-style crab cakes are served with a tobacco-onion remoulade. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–SAT, BRUNCH SUN. 599 St. Denis, Florissant, 314-837-2304, hendelsrestaurant.com. $$ A M E R I CA N.

ITALIAN. A longtime staple, Zoë Robinson’s cozy but elegant 40-seater is located in a quiet pocket of Clayton. Make a reservation and enjoy a romantic dinner of straightforward Italian classics. LU N C H M O N – F R I , D I N N E R MON–SAT. 7624 Wydown, Clayton, 314-727-7901, ifratellini.com. $$$

IL BEL LAGO I TA L I A N . Among West County’s upscale formal Italian restaurants, Il Bel Lago is consistently one of the best. Presentations are extravagant. The menu’s classic Italian. Happy hour, lasting until 8 p.m., offers lots of affordable small plates. L U N C H M O N – F R I , D I N N E R M O N – S AT.

11631 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-994-1080, bellagostl.com. $$$

J. GILBERT’S STEAKHOUSE . It’s a cut above, so to speak, with USDA Prime steaks, a broad-ranging menu, above-average starters and sides, and the most comfortable bar stools in town. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY. 17A West County Center, Des Peres, 314-965-4600, jgilberts.com. $$$$

KASLIK MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE M E D I T E R R A N E A N . Thank owner-chef Wasem Hamed (of Layla and Ranoush) for serving some of the best Mediterranean

food around. Carefully sourced authentic spices are part of the reason that the flavors are so bold. BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND DIN NER DAILY. 7847 N. Lindbergh, Hazelwood, 314-972-8282. $$

KIRKWOOD BREWHOUSE A M E R I CA N. Smoked meats abound at this sports fan– and family-friendly neighborhood joint, yet we seem to revert to the grass-fed candied bacon burger on a pretzel bun. Though it’s not a strict brewhouse, suds heads will find 25-plus beers on tap and another dozen by bottle. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 10312 Manchester, Kirkwood, 314-394-1365, kirkwoodbrewhouse.com. $$

KREIS’ STEAKHOUSE & BAR STEAKHOUSE. Generations of St. Louisans have dined sumptuously at Kreis’. The atmosphere’s strictly dark wood and soft lighting. Everything’s à la carte. There are hefty steaks; the prime rib is a specialty. Wines are refreshingly affordable. The staff’s been there since the Eisenhower administration. It’s opulent, timeless, and satisfying. D I N N E R DA I LY. 535 S. Lindbergh, Ladue, 314-993-0735, kreisrestaurant.com. $$$$

LA BONNE BOUCHÉE CAFÉ. If you can make it past the pastry case, your self-discipline is exemplary. Enjoy the quiches, onion soup, frittatas, pastry-wrapped vol au vent, and ruinously rich croissants. The atmosphere is civilized. And the macarons, tarts, and tortes are waiting on your way out. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY, DINNER MON– SAT. 12344 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-576-6606,

labonnebouchee.com. $

LESTER’S SPORTS BAR Although there are plenty of big TVs, the name is misleading. It’s less sports bar, more neighborhood eatery. There are house-smoked meats, fine sandwiches, and decent barbecue. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DAILY. 9906 Clayton, Ladue, 314-994-0055, lestersrestaurant.com. $$ BAR & GRILL .

LOUIE I TA L I A N. On DeMun Avenue in Clayton, renowned restaurateur Matt McGuire rekindles some of the magic of the former King Louie’s, where an all-star kitchen crew executing his vision of a neighborhood Italian restaurant, boasting items like wood-roasted black cod and tonnarelli with morels, favas, and asiago. L U N C H M O N - F R I , D I N N E R M O N – SAT . 706 DeMun, Clayton, louiedemun.com. $$

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LOUIE’S WINE DIVE

M O N – F R I , D I N N E R DA I LY, B R U N C H SAT &

ro o m q u e s a d i l l a s a n d c h i l i - s p i ke d smashed potatoes, for instance— elevates it considerably. The margaritas are also excellent, and the queso con chorizo is not to be missed. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE– SUN. 20 Allen, Webster Groves, 314-962-4300, milagromodernmexican.com. $$

16 S. Bemiston, Clayton, 314-875-9373 louieswinedive.com. $$

NATHANIEL REID BAKERY

Wine, yes. Dive, no. The place is so handsome, it’s hard to believe that it’s part of a small chain. The food is as much the focus as the wine is. The don’t-miss dish is the deviled eggs, which are festooned with bacon. LUNCH AMERICAN.

SUN.

LULU SEAFOOD & DIM SUM A S I A N. A red-and-gold entrance prepares you for the authentic dining experience you’re about to experience. The restaurant’s four chefs hail from Sichuan, Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing. They bring the regions’ best culinary techniques with them. Two chefs are experts in dim sum and pull out all the stops for the weekend carts. And karaoke is available in English, Chinese, and Korean. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 8224 Olive, University City, 314-997-3108, luluseafood.com. $$

MAI LEE VIETNAMESE . Mai Lee is St. Louis’ go-to for beefy, herby pho. The menu’s big and so is the space, which is always crowded. If you’re adventurous, ask the staff for suggestions, or try the canh chua ca, an addictive fish stew. Make this a Sunday-night dinner stop. LUNCH AND D I N N E R T U E – S U N. 8396 Musick Memorial, Brentwood, 314-645-2835, maileestl.com. $$

BAKERY. World-class pastry chef Nathaniel Reid has opened a dream of a traditional bakery. Light-as-air macarons, fruit and seasonal sweet croissants, cookies, and extraordinary cakes fill the cases, which are replenished throughout the day. Savories include breakfast and lunch sandwiches, quiche, and salads. B R E A K FA ST A N D L AT E LU N C H MON–SAT. 11243 Manchester, Kirkwood, 314858-1019, chefnathanielreid.com. $

NOBU’S JAPANESE/SUSHI. At the best Japanese restaurant in St. Louis, the sushi is correctly prepared and presented, with minimal Americanized silliness. Tempura is crisp, golden, and hot. Don’t overlook the noodle dishes—or the kamameshi: seasoned rice, chicken, and vegetables steamed in a pot. DINNER TUE–SAT. 8643 Olive, University City, 314-997-2303, nobusushistl.com. $$

NUDO HOUSE

LATE BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER THU–

J A PA N E S E . At Qui Tran’s long-awaited restaurant, you’ll find a happy fusion of the noodle dish’s classic version mixed with innovative riffs. Try a pho dip with a banh mi sandwich or a traditional miso pork ramen. The mid-county location’s perfect for lunch; lines aren’t as long for dinner. LU N C H A N D DINNER MON–SAT. 11423 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-274-8046, nudostl.com. $$

3101 Sutton, Maplewood, 314-384-2287, mauhauscafe.com. $

OCEANO BISTRO

MAUHAUS CAT CAFÉ & LOUNGE AMERICAN. The region’s first cat café has, on average, a dozen cats in residence, all adoptable through a local shelter. (Sorry, patrons’ cats aren’t allowed.) Food options include predominantly baked goods but also some savory items, such as hummus and salmon dip. S U N.

MICHAEL’S BAR AND GRILL BAR & GRILL . Traditional Greek flavors can be found in this neighborhood sports bar setting. Fried zucchini with horseradish sauce is a refreshing twist on French fries. The 10-ounce Michael Burger is a sight to behold, especially when topped with a ball of soft cheddar. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 7101 Manchester, Maplewood, 314-644-2240. $$

MILAGRO MODERN MEXICAN M E X I C A N . The beautiful interior makes this an attractive restaurant, but Milagro’s take on Mexican fare—wild mush-

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SEAFOOD. Seafood flown in daily and a fantastic veranda continue to bring diners to one of the city’s only seafood restaurants, one of the hottest see-and-be-seen spots. Call ahead for a window seat. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SUN. 44 N. Brentwood, Clayton, 314721-9400, oceanobistro.com. $$$

OLIVE+OAK AMERICAN. High-voltage chatter about this new place has dominated the local food scene. There’s a constantly changing menu of light snacks and full meals, including the perfect butterscotch pot de crème, as well as inventive mixed drinks. The service is personable

and refreshingly excellent. D I N N E R DA I LY. 102 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves, 314-7361370, oliveandoakstl.com. $$$

ONE 19 NORTH WINE BAR. This tapas place gets it right. The atmosphere is romantic, with live music on weekends. The menu is reasonably priced. The plates—baked goat cheese, calamari, smoked- Gouda grits—are delicious. And there’s a lovely wine selection. You’ll nibble, sip, chat, fall in love. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY. 119 N. Kirkwood, Kirkwood, 314-8214119, one19north.com. $$

PARIGI E U R O P E A N . It’s among the most elegant restaurants in town, with a cool and sleek Continental feel. The menu’s Italian, with a dash of French. There’s arancini, risotto, fish stew. Presentations look effortlessly perfect. Reserve a table near the big windows and dine during a spectacularly romantic sunset. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE-SAT. 8025 Bonhomme, Clayton, 314-899-9767, parigistl.com. $$$$

PASTARIA ITALIAN. A wide selection of house-made organic pastas account for the bulk of the menu at this family-focused Italian dining hall. Woodfired pizzas and veggie-centric apps make up the rest. The reasonable prices mean that you can enjoy some gelato, too. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 7734 Forsyth, Clayton, 314-862-6603, pastariastl.com. $$

PEARL CAFÉ THAI. The traditional Thai menu is filled with chicken, beef, pork, and seafood dishes. If you’re feeling adventurous, take the King of Spice Challenge by sampling dishes of increasing hotness. There are also more than 200 beers and 125 single-malt Scotch selections. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R M O N – SAT. 8416 N. Lindbergh, Florissant, 314-831-3701, dinepearlcafe.com. $$

PENO ITALIAN. This neighborhood trattoria blends old-style Italian with less-expected options. It’s an above-average spot for vegetarians, too, with five meat-free pizzas, among other suitable options. If he’s not otherwise occupied, the chatty chef/proprietor will bring you up to date on things. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER TUE–SUN, BRUNCH SUN. 7600 Wydown, Clayton, 314-8999699, penosoulfood.com. $$

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Nudo House

PEPPE’S APT. 2

PRIVADO

PÚBLICO

Located in a renovated Victorian home, Peppe’s has “romantic” spilling all over, from the chandeliers to the crisp table linens. Chef/owner Peppe Profeta’s veal is exceptional, the pasta dishes are housemade, and half-portion options are a nice touch. The wine selection’s also classy. Reservations are a must. LUNCH TUE–FRI, D I N N E R T U E – SAT. 800 S. Geyer, Kirkwood, 314-909-1375, peppesapt2.com. $$$

Owner/chef Mike Randolph’s envelope-pushing weekends-only, reservationsonly tasting menu restaurant also features open bar service with limited á la carte items.

PAN-LATIN. The massive hearth, with its wood fire, creates the exceptional flavors of dishes inspired by countries south of the border. Adventurous selections like arepas topped with turkey liver butter, fried sage, and maple syrup share space with comforting tacos al pastor. Presentations are always superb, and the food’s delicious. DINNER TUE–SUN. 6679 Delmar, University City, 314-833-5780, publicostl.com. $$$

ITALIAN.

Photography by Kevin A. Roberts

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AMERICAN.

D I N N E R F R I – SAT, P LU S P R I VAT E E V E N T S .

6665 Delmar, University City, 314-899-9221, privadostl.com. $$$$

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REEDS AMERICAN TABLE AMERICAN. Led by former Taste chef Matt Daughaday, a crackerjack team of culinarians serves amped-up “neighborhood restaurant” fare with a beverage program to match. The main dining room is upstairs, but we prefer the action on the ground floor. On weekends, check out the brunch menu; it’s among the best around. D I N N E R W E D – M O N , B RU N C H SAT & SUN. 7322 Manchester, Maplewood, 314-899-9821, reedsamericantable.com. $$

SARDELLA I TA L I A N . Gerard Craft’s latest endeavor features creative yet comforting Italianinfluenced fare at lunch and dinner, as well as house-baked pastries, grain bowls, and riffs on morning meal classics at breakfast time. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 7734 Forsyth, Clayton, 314-862-6603, sardellastl.com. $$

SCHLAFLY BOTTLEWORKS B A R & G R I L L . Schlafly offers 20 beers on tap and hearty pub food. Consider the beer bread or chorizo meatloaf with a Fitz’s root beer–tomato glaze. An outdoor farmers’ market runs Wednesdays from April–October, and there’s an indoor market from November–March. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 7260 Southwest, Maplewood, 314-241-2337, schlafly.com. $$

THE SLIDER HOUSE A M E R I CA N . Though the classic burgers are fine, there are such surprises as the Nashville fried chicken slider and the Texican. Also unexpected: a delightful butter poached–lobster Cobb. You’ll find community tables, a cozy fire pit, and even volleyball in warm weather. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 9528 Manchester, Rock Hill, 314-942-6445, thesliderhouse.com. $

TANI SUSHI BISTRO After a move to a new location in Clayton, the sushi spot benefits from a larger space that retains the loungelike feel of the original. Sushi is fine, particularly the rolls; consider, though, specialties like tempura and teriyaki. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER MON–SAT. 7726 Forsyth, Clayton, 314296-8069, tanisushi.com. $$ JA PA N E S E /S U S H I .

Sardella

TRUFFLES Truffles is a Ladue landmark, with an emphasis on creative preparations of quality ingredients. Note the award-winning wine list. And be sure to pick up some prime meats at the Butchery, next door, before heading home. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–FRI, DINNER ONLY SAT. 9202 Clayton, Ladue, 314567-9100, todayattruffles.com. $$$$ A M E R I CA N.

TWISTED TREE STEAKHOUSE STEAKHOUSE. This relatively new steakhouse in Sunset Hills serves old-school fare—familystyle salads, long-aged steaks, and batter-fried lobster tails—at its finest. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE-SAT. 10701 Watson, Sunset Hills, 314-3943366, twistedtreesteakhouse.com. $$$$

VERNON’S BBQ & CATERING BARBECUE . At Vernon’s, you’ll find a whole lotta barbecue (ribs, brisket, pulled pork, chicken wings) and more unexpected flavors (tequila-lime green beans, smoked seasonal

fruit, and barbecue nachos). LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–SUN. 6707 Vernon, University City, 314-726-1227, vernonsbbq.com. $$

WEBER GRILL RESTAURANT A M E R I CA N. Steaks, seafood, pizzas, and veggies are all cooked on stainless steel Weber grills inside the restaurant. Reserve booth 335 for a great view of the grills, or relax by the fire pit on the all-season patio. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY. Saint Louis Galleria, Richmond Heights, 314-930-3838, webergrillrestaurant.com. $$$

WINSLOW’S HOME A M E R I C A N . Winslow’s Home offers locally sourced food and home goods. Much of the menu features organic fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs grown on Winslow’s Farm. B R E A K F A S T A N D L U N C H T U E – S U N , D I N N E R T U E – S AT. 7213 Delmar, University City, 314-725-7559, winslowshome.com. $$

SEE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, PG. 85: Bartolino’s / The Block / Bristol Seafood Grill / Companion Café / Crushed Red / Dewey’s Pizza / Drunken Fish / Five Star Burgers / Half & Half / Katie’s Pizza & Pasta Osteria / Lombardo’s / The Original Pancake House / The Pasta House / Pi Pizzeria / Robust / Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse / Salt + Smoke / Sasha’s / Sauce on the Side / Seoul Taco / The Shack / Sugarfire Smoke House / Sugo’s Spaghetteria / Three Kings Public House / Tucker’s Place / Wasabi Sushi Bar / ’ZZA Pizza + Salad

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OUTER-RING SUBURBS & EXURBS ANDRIA’S COUNTRYSIDE

BEAST CRAFT BBQ CO.

FIREBIRDS WOOD FIRED GRILL

The highest-grade steaks in the metro area meet the grill at this odd but delightful place. Andria’s is odd in that it’s a converted ranch-style house. It’s delightful in that the steaks and sides are extraordinary. Don’t forget to check out the oft-overlooked Lounge menu. DINNER MON–SAT. 7415 Highway 143, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-656-0281, andriascountryside.com. $$$$

Owner David Sandusky barbecues with focused intensity. It pays off with killer slabs, thick pork steaks that are tender to the bone, crazy-good chicken, and sausages that bite with a juicy snap. He only uses the best fresh ingredients, adheres to the standards, and serves food that’s “all killer, no filler.” LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 20 S. Belt West, Belleville, Ill., 618-257-9000, beastcraftbbq.com. $$

AMERICAN. The moniker “polished casual” is apropos at the first Missouri location of the popular chain. Imbibers are lured by a waterfall of backlit liquor bottles and the signature pineapple-infused martini; diners succumb to the signature Durango Burger, fresh seafood, and the reasonably priced bleu-cheese fillet, all cooked on an oak- and fruitwood- burning grill. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY . 1501 Beale, St. Charles, 636-866-0984, st-charles.firebirdsrestaurants.com. $$$$

STEAKHOUSE .

BARBECUE .

ANDRIA’S RESTAURANT STEAKHOUSE. A family-run gem in a beautiful old home, Andria’s makes things special with simple touches such as hot bread and bacon– blue cheese–stuffed turnovers. Though the beef gets top billing, consider the outstanding seafood dishes. Multiple rooms range from spacious to intimate. DINNER MON–SAT. 6805 Old Collinsville, O’Fallon, Ill., 618-632-4866, andrias.com. $$$$

CLEVELAND–HEATH

ANNIE GUNN’S

COOPER’S HAWK WINERY & RESTAURANT

Every dish on the acclaimed restaurant’s menu—a robust steak, a signature hamburger, a fluffy potato pancake—is approached with passion, creativity, and an eye toward tasteful composition. Pair that food with a glass of wine from an award-winning list. LUNCH AND DINNER TUE–SUN. 16806 Chesterfield Airport Rd., Chesterfield, 636-532-7684, anniegunns.com. $$$$ AMERICAN.

AMERICAN. Warning: The deviled eggs here are potentially addicting. Limit yourself, and concentrate on the ever-changing seasonal menu. Housed in a 1930s-era building, Cleveland–Heath is one of the most popular restaurants in the Metro East. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. 106 N. Main, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-307-4830, clevelandheath.com. $$$

GALLAGHER’S A M E R I CA N . Paying homage to the crispy browned bird, this comfortable Waterloo classic is a repository of local architectural details, with vintage doors, railings, and more. A wide-ranging menu includes premium steaks and a candied bacon cheeseburger. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R T U E – S U N . 114 W. Mill, Waterloo, Ill., 618-939-9933, gallagherswaterloo.com. $$$

AMERICAN. This Chicago-based restaurant/ winery hybrid offers a wine-paired menu in a large multi-room space that belies its size. A mandatory stop is the tasting room, where guests learn about—and taste—the broad range of Cooper’s Hawk wine. LUNCH A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 1146 Town & Country Crossing, Town and Country, 636-489-0059, coopershawkwinery.com. $$

MARCELLA’S MIA SORELLA

A M E R I CA N . An extensive wine list spans more than 860 offerings. The contemporary American menu’s influenced by French, Spanish, and Italian cuisine, with small plates, flatbreads, and entrée portions. And more vino is available in the wine shop. L U N C H A N D D I N N E R M O N – SAT, B RU N C H S U N. 1772 Clarkson, Chesterfield, 636-449-6700, balabanswine.com. $$

DALIE’S SMOKEHOUSE

MIKE SHANNON’S GRILL

Bogart’s serves up killer ’cue in Valley Park. Order a slab or a sandwich, add some Papa Joe’s Original sauce, and pair it with a side of hush puppies or Fire and Ice Pickles. LUNCH A N D D I N N E R T U E – SAT, L U N C H S U N . 2951 Dougherty Ferry, Valley Park, 636-529-1898, daliessmokehouse.com. $$

AMERICAN. Mike Shannon once played for some local team—there’s a couple (hundred) reminders decorating this stylish steakhouse. You can order burgers and fries or excellent steaks and seafood. Don’t miss the upsidedown apple pie. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SUN. 871 S. Arbor Vitae, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-655-9911, mikeshannonsgrill.com. $$$

BC’S KITCHEN

EDGEWILD RESTAURANT & WINERY

NAPOLI 2

Bill Cardwell’s beautifully prepared fare impresses. The setting is sleek and contemporary, roomy and relaxed. Sample the inventive cocktails; don’t fill up on the magnificent onion ring and Saratoga chips appetizer. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 11 Meadows Circle, Lake Saint Louis, 636-542-9090, billcardwell.com/bcs.html. $$$

T h i s w i n e b a r, w i n e r y, and restaurant has a certified sommelier and a certified specialist of wine— perhaps no surprise for a place with its own EdgeWild-label wines and dishes accompanied by carefully chosen wine pairings. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SUN. 550 Chesterfield Center, Chesterfield, 636-532-0550, edgewildwinery.com. $$$

I TA L I A N . This Chesterfield restaurant doesn’t miss a thing, with elegant décor, gracious service, and a superior wine selection that all focus attention on the menu. Fresh pasta, steaks, and a veal chop the size of Connecticut are combined with classics like eggplant Parmesan and calamari fritti. DINNER DAILY. 1054 Town & Country Crossing, Town and Country, 636-256-9998, napoli2.com. $$$

ITALIAN. Named one of Thrillist’s “21 Best Italian Restaurants in America,” this sister restaurant to Trattoria Marcella has a contemporary Italian menu centered by housemade pasta, exquisite risotto, and hand-tossed pizza. Even the cheeseburger is exemplary. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER MON–SAT. 14426 Clayton, Ballwin, 636-333-1015, miasorellastl.com. $$

BALABAN’S

AMERICAN.

BA R B E C U E . The team behind Pappy’s and

AMERICAN.

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PANGEA Haute hits the hinterlands—or at least New Town—at this ambitious upscale eatery. Bone marrow tarts, beef cheeks… The menu sparkles with surprising ingredients that are impressively presented. The surroundings are so attractive, a post-prandial stroll is almost mandatory. DINNER MON–SAT. 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles, 636-757-3579, pangeaworldfusion.com. $$ A M E R I CA N.

PAUL MANNO’S CAFÉ

presented as it’s meant to be: crisp, greaseless, and awesomely fresh. Sushi Sen is located in an out-of-the-way strip mall, but it’s well worth the trip. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. 161 Civic Center, Lake Saint Louis, 636-561-4449. $$

WESTPORT SOCIAL AMERICAN. The sprawling space houses live music, shuffleboard, foosball, giant kickballpool, hoops, darts, ping-pong, giant TVs, sleek lounges, a full kitchen, and an even fuller bar. It’s an entertainment gather-

ing spot for fun, long lunches. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 910 Westport Plaza, Maryland Heights, 314-548-2876, westportstl.com. $$

YA YA’S EURO BISTRO EUROPEAN. This upscale chain offers housemade pasta, brick-oven pizzas, and sustainably sourced seafood. With limestone walls, a mosaic-tile floor, and sconce lighting, Ya Ya’s is impressive inside and out. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SUN. 15601 Olive, Chesterfield, 636-537-9991, yayasstl.com. $$$

I TA L I A N. Effortlessly elegant, this upscale Italian restaurant serves house specialties like pasta della Nonna. The romantic, softly lit setting includes classic 1950s jazz and photos of Italian-American celebrities. DINNER MON–SAT. 75 Forum Center, Chesterfield, 314-878-1274. $$$

PRASINO AMERICAN. Eat for a week here, and you’ll still be trying to figure it out: The menu bounces from sushi to tacos, barbecued short ribs to lamb sirloin… Each dish has a terrific presentation. The atmosphere’s easygoing yet sleek, with a sizable craft beer selection. There’s a patio, and memorable design makes even the interior seem “outside.” LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BREAKFAST SAT & S U N. 1520 S. Fifth, St. Charles, 636-2770202, prasinostcharles.com. $$$

STONE SOUP COTTAGE A M E R I CA N. SLM’s 2010 Restaurant of the Year boasts the area’s only prix fixe, nochoice, one-seating menu. It’s built around ingredients grown on the beautiful farm on which the restaurant sits. After all this time, Stone Soup remains the must-try (and then must-make-reservations-and-return) spot for destination dining. That reminds us: It’s time to head back for dinner. DINNER THU– SAT. 5809 Highway N, Cottleville, 636-244-2233, stonesoupcottage.com. $$$$

SUSHI SEN J A P A N E S E / S U S H I . Among the top tier of local Japanese eateries, this familyrun restaurant is relaxed. Ignore the sushi rolls that you can get anywhere. Instead, go for splendid, expertly presented sashimi, grilled yellowtail jaw, or tempura—

Westport Social

SEE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, PG. 85: 1818 Chophouse / Bristol Seafood Grill / Charlie Gitto’s / Companion Café / Crushed Red / Dewey’s Pizza / Joey B’s / McGurk’s Public House / The Original Pancake House / The Pasta House / Peel Wood Fired Pizza / Pi Pizzeria / Rosalita’s Cantina / Russell’s Café & Bakery / Seoul Taco / The Shack / Sugarfire Smoke House / Sugo’s Spaghetteria / The Tavern Kitchen & Bar / Walnut Grill / Wasabi Sushi Bar

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MULTIPLE LOCATIONS 1818 CHOPHOUSE

COMPANION CAFÉ

HALF & HALF

Options abound at this upscale eatery. Go all out with a bone-in Delmonico, midrange with the brown sugar–brined chicken, or casual with the lobster BLT with egg. LUNCH TUE–SAT, DINNER TUE–FRI, BRUNCH SUN. 210 S. Buchanan, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-307-9300; 1405 N. Green Mount, O’Fallon, Ill.; 1818chophouse.com. $$$$

This lunch favorite serves bread, daily soups, and fresh ingredients in an airy café. No meal is complete without a cookie. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DAILY. 9781 Clayton, Ladue, 314-218-2280; 2331 Schuetz, Maryland Heights, 314-627-5262; companionstl.com. $

AMERICAN. A mix of standard fare and variations, such as mascarpone-and-raspberry pancakes, sates the appetites of sweet- and savory-breakfast aficionados alike. A rotating selection of guest roasters’ coffee is also a highlight. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH TUE–FRI, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 8135 Maryland, Clayton, 314-7250719; 220 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves, 314962-1617; halfandhalfstl.com. $$

STEAKHOUSE .

BARTOLINO’S ITALIAN. Bartolino’s opened in 1969 on The Hill. Today, two locations—one in South County and another in a Drury Inn—serve a menu of Italian specialties, seafood, fine meats, pastas, risotto, sandwiches, and St. Louis style pizzas. LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY. 2103 Sulphur, Clifton Heights, 314-644-2266; 5914 S. Lindbergh, South County, 314-4874545; bartolinosrestaurants.com. $$$

THE BLOCK “Meat-friendly” hardly covers it. The place has its own butchery, just in case the braised pork, beef ribs, and bacon jam aren’t enough. The thick-cut bacon in the togo case at the Webster location is as good as any in town. HOURS VARY BY LOCATION. 33 N. Sarah, Central West End, 314-535-5100; 146 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves, 314-918-7900; theblockrestaurant.com. $$ AMERICAN.

CAFÉ.

CRUSHED RED PIZZA . Individual pizzas are built to order, along with tasty chopped salads. The atmosphere is informal, happy, and convivial; the ingredients are flawless and delicious. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, crushed-red.com. $

DEWEY’S PIZZA PIZZA . This gourmet pizza chain serves inventive specialty pizzas, as well as seasonal offerings. Rotating craft beers are on tap, and the wine list includes Dewey’s own line from Novy Family Wines. LUNCH MON–FRI, D I N N E R DA I LY. See website for locations, deweyspizza.com. $$

DRUNKEN FISH JA PA N E S E /S U S H I . Though sushi gets the most attention, consider the donburi, bowls filled with rice and generous toppings of chicken or fish. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, drunkenfish.com. $$$

BRISTOL SEAFOOD GRILL The fish is fresh, the sides are attractive, and the service is polished. The lobster bisque might even have healing powers. The Sunday brunch buffet is legendary. S E A F O O D.

LUNCH MON–FRI, DINNER DAILY, BRUNCH SUN.

11801 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-567-0272; 2314 Technology, O’Fallon, Mo., 636-625-6350; bristolseafoodgrill.com. $$$

Classic Italian accommodates both dressing up and dressing down. The eggplant Napoleon is a culinary wonder, and Nunzio— as in Gitto’s signature veal dish—is apparently Italian for Oscar. HOURS VARY BY LOCATION. 5226 Shaw, The Hill, 314-772-8898; Hollywood Casino, Maryland Heights, 314-7707663; 15525 Olive, Chesterfield, 636-536-2199; charliegittos.com. $$$

BAR & GRILL. A big menu of appetizers, burgers, wings, sandwiches, and even steak Modiga keeps crowds coming back. The pizza is remarkably satisfying for a spot that doesn’t focus on it. Don’t miss the tower of hand-breaded onion rings. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, joeybsmanchester.com. $$

KATIE’S PIZZA AND PASTA OSTERIA ITALIAN. The kitchen’s obsessed with assembling pizzas topped with fresh ingredients. The pastas are even more entertaining, dressed with such splendid ingredients as wild boar ragù and caviar. Much of the fare is garnished with bounty from the patio garden. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DAILY, BRUNCH SAT & SUN. 9568 Manchester, Rock Hill, 314-942-6555; 14171 Clayton, Town and Country, 636-220-3238; katiespizzaand pasta.com. $$

LOMBARDO’S FIVE STAR BURGERS Former Harvest owner Steve Gontram’s family-friendly burger outpost whips up meat-eating perfection with creative toppings, alongside a stellar selection of craft beer and wine. LUNCH AND DINNER D A I LY. 8125 Maryland, Clayton, 314-7204350; 11621 Olive, Creve Coeur, 314-942-6450; 5starburgersstl.com. $$ A M E R I CA N .

CHARLIE GITTO’S ITALIAN.

JOEY B’S

ITALIAN. Classic and cultivated, this longtime local favorite offers urbane Italian dining. The veal is wonderful, and pasta portions are generous. The lunch menu’s Italian sausage sandwich is the best in town. HOURS VARY BY LO CATION. 10488 Natural Bridge, Edmundson, 314-429-5151; 201 S. 20th, downtown, 314-621-0666; lombardosrestaurants.com. $$$

McGURK’S PUBLIC HOUSE GIOIA’S DELI Oil tanker–size sandwiches are the attraction at the downtown location, whose roots stretch back nearly a century. Build your own, or go with a classic such as the Porknado or Hogfather. H O U R S VA RY BY L O CAT I O N. 1934 Macklind, The Hill; 903 Pine, downtown; 314-776-9410; gioiasdeli.com. $ AMERICAN.

BAR & GRILL . Chunky Guinness stew steaming in a bread bowl. Live maudlin music. Corned beef and cabbage. Yeah, it’s Irish and a pub. What distinguishes the Soulard spot is a huge outdoor garden and traditional Irish music. In O’Fallon, Missouri, there’s also a giant bar and relaxed patio. H O U R S VA RY B Y L O CAT I O N . 1200 Russell, Soulard, 314-776-8309, mcgurks. com; 108 S. Main, O’Fallon, Mo., 636-978-9640, mcgurkspublichouse.com. $$

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MISSION TACO JOINT Specialties include house-made corn tortillas, authentic Mexican street food reminiscent of the offerings in San Francisco’s Mission District, and handcrafted cocktails. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, missiontacojoint.com. $ MEXICAN.

THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE A M E R I C A N . Even weekday mornings are packed. The reason: fluffy flapjacks, golden clouds of hash browns, sunrises of eggs. B R E A K FA S T A N D L U N C H T U E – S U N . 8817 Ladue, Ladue, 314-932-1340; 17000 Chesterfield Airport, Chesterfield, 636-536-4044; originalpancakehousestlouis.com. $

THE PASTA HOUSE CO. ITALIAN. For decades, this St. Louis pasta chain has been a go-to for favorite Italian dishes, such as pasta con broccoli, fettucine Alfredo, and toasted ravioli. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. See website for locations, pastahouse.com. $$

314-241-8118; 3150 S. Grand, Tower Grove East, 314-772-3447; roosterstl.com. $$

ROSALITA’S CANTINA M E X I CA N . You’ll find an array of the usual taco-burrito-chimichanga standards, but consider such specialties as the Oaxacan grouper, pepita-encrusted salmon, and fried quail. Margaritas flow, and a tableside guacamole is sabrosisimo. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY, BRUNCH SUN. 12796 Manchester, Des Peres, 314-441-7060; 1235 Washington, downtown, 314-621-2700; rosalitascantina.com. $$

RUSSELL’S CAFÉ & BAKERY CAFÉ. Whether the call is for breakfast, lunch, or baked goods, chef Russell Ping delivers, sourcing produce and proteins locally and roasting lunchmeats in house. Expect soups, salads, sandwiches, cookies, and cakes like Grandma used to make. BREAKFAST AND LUNCH, MON– SAT, DINNER MON–FRI. 952 Brookwood Center, Fenton, 636-343-8900; 14888 Clayton, Chesterfield; russellscafe.com. $

PEEL WOOD FIRED PIZZA PIZZA . Pizzas are topped with innovative ingredients: BBQ pork, duck sausage, roasted sweet potatoes… And in O’Fallon, Illinois, there’s an entire brewpub upstairs. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 921 S. Arbor Vitae, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-659-8561; 104 S. Cherry, O’Fallon, Ill., 618726-2244; peelpizza.com. $$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE STEAKHOUSE . Ruth’s Chris is ideal for those moments when you’ve just gotta dress up and eat a week’s worth of protein paired with gorgeous wine. The atmosphere is opulent, and service shines. DINNER DAILY. 1 N. Brentwood, Brentwood, 314-783-9900; 315 Chestnut, downtown, 314-259-3200; ruthschris.com. $$$$

PI PIZZERIA PIZZA . President Barack Obama’s favorite pizza comes in thin-crust and deep-dish styles, with Pi’s distinctive cornmeal dough. Consider the neighborhood-themed pizza specials. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, pi-pizza.com. $$

ROBUST WINE BAR. In many cases, tapas has become synonymous with “overpriced little plates.” Not at Robust. Exquisite cheeses and cured meats are matched with an extraordinary wine list. HOURS VARY BY LO CATION. 635 Washington, downtown, 314-287-6300; 227 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves, 314-963-0033; robustwinebar.com. $$

ROOSTER CAFÉ. Downtown, guests line up for the cheeseladen crêpes, loaded scrambles, and lavish French toast in a light-filled space. The South Grand location has a communal layout and pictures of roosters drawn by local children. HOURS VARY BY LO CATION. 1104 Locust, downtown,

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ping. The Nutella/banana dessert calzone is mandatory. LUNCH AND DINNER MON–SAT. See website for locations, eatcalzones.com. $

SALT + SMOKE BARBECUE . A singular focus on “barbecue, bourbon, and beer” translates to loads of meat, craft and barrel-aged cocktails, and more than 40 bourbons. Don’t-miss sides include fried house pickles with flaxseed mayo, hush puppies with maple butter, and burntend T-ravs. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. 6525 Delmar, University City, 314-727-0200; 5625 Hampton, St. Louis Hills; saltandsmokestl.com. $$

SASHA’S WINE BAR. At the flagship, enjoy a wine flight on the patio before taking a stroll in the seminary grounds across the street. The Shaw location boasts two bars, funky décor, and an equally fetching patio. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. 4069 Shaw, Shaw, 314-771-7274; 706 DeMun, Clayton, 314-863-7174; sashaswinebar.com. $$

SAUCE ON THE SIDE ITALIAN. The concept is brilliant in its simplicity: half a dozen salads and 15 kinds of calzones, with 10 sauces “on the side” for dip-

SEOUL TACO KOREAN. Owner David Choi mashes up such Korean staples as bulgogi and spicy pork with Mexican musts like tacos and burritos. Choi’s 24-hour meat marination process almost guarantees a return visit. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, seoultaco.com. $

THE SHACK AMERICAN. Omelets and skillets lead the breakfast menu; lunch features piled-high sandwiches, such as the Leftovers dish—bacon-wrapped meatloaf topped with melted Provolone. HOURS VARY BY LO CATION. See website for locations, shackstl.com. $

SUGARFIRE SMOKE HOUSE BA R B E C U E . Yes, we have other phenomenal BBQ joints, but none matches Sugarfire for inventive dishes and the most exquisite brisket outside Texas. It’s fun and decidedly informal, with patrons eating daily specials off metal trays. LU N C H A N D D I N N E R DA I LY. See website for locations, sugarfiresmokehouse.com. $$

SUGO’S SPAGHETTERIA ITALIAN. There are affordable Italian specialties with startlingly big portions. It’s southern Italian, whipped up by a well-known St. Louis chef who can duplicate Nonna’s classics. H O U R S VA R Y B Y L O C AT I O N . 10419 Clayton, Frontenac, 314-569-0400; 243 Harvard, Edwardsville, Ill., 618-659-4640; sugoscucina.com. $$

THE TAVERN KITCHEN & BAR The Tavern serves artful comfort food. The Seafood Trio and Surf & Turf tasting boards are standouts. There are also vegetarian, gluten-free, and kids’ menus. Don’t miss the donuts and house-infused cocktails. H O U R S VARY BY LOCATION. 392 N. Euclid, Central West End, 314-696-8400; 2961 Dougherty Ferry, Valley Park, 636-825-0600; tavernstl.com. $$$ AMERICAN.

THREE KINGS PUBLIC HOUSE BAR & GRILL. The menu includes upscale pub grub, as well as seafood stew, pan-roasted chicken, and a pub chips platter with Irish cheddar rarebit. An impressive tap list features an ever-rotating selection. LUNCH AND D I N N E R DA I LY. See website for locations, threekingspub.com. $$

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TUCKER’S PLACE

WALNUT GRILL

Portions way past “generous” are standard at this longtime steakhouse. The ribeyes, buttery prime rib, and suitcase-size baked potatoes are legendary. It’s renowned for amazingly low prices on protein; on Tuesdays at the South County and Soulard locations, for instance, you can order a 16-ounce prime rib, baked potato, and salad for $17.95. LUNCH MON–SAT, DINNER DAILY. 3939 Union, 314-845-2584; 2117 S. 12th, 314-772-5977; 14282 Manchester, 636-227-8062; tuckersplacestl.com. $$

This upscale-casual chain based in Pittsburgh surprises with such fusions as Thai pork mac and cheese. Or try the chicken salad, something of a cross between a Rich & Charlie’s salad and a slinger. LUNCH MON–SAT, D I N N E R DA I LY, B RU N C H S U N. See website for locations, eatwalnut.com. $$$

STEAKHOUSE.

AMERICAN.

WASABI SUSHI BAR JA PA N E S E /S U S H I . The popular local chain serves up sushi, noodles, and other Japanese

fare. Go with the Wasabi combinations, or consider the generous bento. See website for locations, wasabisushibars.com. $$

’ZZA PIZZA + SALAD PIZZA . Though individual, oblong pizzas get the spotlight, don’t overlook the freshly mixed salads with ingredients like falafel and tortilla chips. It’s great for weekday lunches, and it’s kid-compatible. There’s also a good selection of local beers. LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY. See website for locations, zza-pizza.com. $

Katie’s Pizza and Pasta

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SCHOOLS STATS Here is a comprehensive guide to the region’s schools, from kindergarten through college—the only place you can find information on public and private schools in one convenient package. In creating these charts, we strove to be as inclusive as possible, inviting more than 200 schools in St. Louis city; Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis counties; and Madison, St. Clair, and Monroe counties in Illinois to respond to an informational survey. In some cases, data came from public school districts rather than individual schools. All information is self-reported; these charts should just be considered starting points.

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% REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID TU ITION STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S S C HO OL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIAT ION % MINORIT Y STUDENTS U NIFORMS ENROLLMENT GRAD E LEVELS OFFER ED FOU ND ED AREA PRIVATE GRAD E SCHO OL ABIDING SAVIOR LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-892-4408 / aslsonline.org

SOUTH COUNTY

1984

AGE 2– GRADE 8

210

YES

5%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

13

13:1

$5,800

30%

ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART 636-946-6127 / ash1818.org

ST. CHARLES

1818

PRE-K– GRADE 8

241

YES

18%

CATHOLIC–NETWORK OF SACRED HEART SCHOOLS

31

8:1

$6,000– $11,780

15%

ANDREWS ACADEMY 314-878-1883 / andrewsacademy.com

CREVE COEUR

1975

PRE-K– GRADE 6

120

NO

70%

INDEPENDENT

22

8:1

$19,340

27%

LAKE SAINT LOUIS

2008

K– GRADE 6

90

NO

29%

INDEPENDENT

17

8:1

$13,000

14%

ASA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-524-4272 / asachristianacademy.org

NORTH COUNTY

1999

INFANT– GRADE 6

85

YES

99%

CHRISTIAN

6

17:1

$4,800– $7,500

25%

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 314-727-4535 / centralschoolstl.org

CLAYTON

1957

AGE 3– GRADE 6

284

NO

36%

CHRISTIAN

20

8:1

$9,220

22%

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 314-993-4400 / chaminade-stl.org

CREVE COEUR

1910

GRADES 6–8

260

YES

18%

CATHOLIC–MARIANIST

32

9:1

$18,998

43%

CHESTERFIELD DAY SCHOOL 314-469-6622 / chesterfielddayschool.org

CHESTERFIELD

1962

18 MONTHS– GRADE 6

148

NO

33%

INDEPENDENT

23

6:1

$6,465– $18,600

22%

CHESTERFIELD MONTESSORI SCHOOL 314-469-7150 / chesterfieldmontessori.org

WEST COUNTY

1981

16 MONTHS– GRADE 8

168

NO

40%

MONTESSORI

10

9:1

$10,900– $17,500

20%

KIRKWOOD

1973

INFANT– GRADE 8

660

YES

12%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

36

16:1

$4,005– $6,970

40%

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1980

PRE-K– GRADE 8

423

NO

12%

CHRISTIAN

45

10:1

$2,650– $7,850

25%

CHURCHILL CENTER & SCHOOL 314-997-4343 / churchillstl.org

TOWN & COUNTRY

1978

GRADES 1–9

143

NO

15%

SCHOOL FOR LEARNING DISABILITIES

51

3:1

$33,600

8%

CITY ACADEMY 314-382-0085 / cityacademyschool.org

NORTH ST. LOUIS

1999

PRE-K– GRADE 6

185

YES

94%

INDEPENDENT

20

8:1

$3,500

100%

O’FALLON, MO

2016

PRE-K– GRADE 7

11

YES

0%

CLASSICAL

0

5:1

$6,700

0%

WEBSTER GROVES

1963

PRE-K– GRADE 8

258

NO

25%

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION

30

9:1

$8,900– $17,500

25%

LADUE

1914

AGE 3– GRADE 6

339

NO

30%

INDEPENDENT

48

7:1

$18,200– $19,725

20%

72

NO

10%

EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN

8

8:1

$4,400– $4,600

5%

ANDREWS ACADEMY LAKE SAINT LOUIS 636-561-7709 / andrewsacademy.com

CHRIST COMMUNITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-822-7774 / ccls-stlouis.org CHRISTIAN ELEMENTARY & PRESCHOOL SCHOOL 636-978-1680 / lwcs.us

CLASSICAL ACADEMY DE LAFAYETTE** 636-222-3442 / cadlafayette.com THE COLLEGE SCHOOL 314-962-9355 / thecollegeschool.org COMMUNITY SCHOOL 314-991-0005 / communityschool.com CORNERSTONE ACADEMY 314-845-8788 / cornerstoneacademy.com

SOUTH COUNTY

1998

K– GRADE 8

COUNTRYSIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL 314-434-2821 / montessori4children.com

CREVE COEUR

1964

2 MONTHS– K

68

NO

15%

MONTESSORI

6

6:1

$7,740– $15,327

18%

TOWN & COUNTRY

2003

PRE-K– GRADE 6

145

YES

5%

BIBLICAL, RELATIONAL, EXPERIENTIAL, INTEGRAL

7

8:1

$8,100

25%

VILLA RIDGE

1990

PRE-K– GRADE 12

167

NO

5%

CHRISTIAN

5

9:1

$5,500

17%

CENTRAL WEST END

1974

GRADES 7–12

231

NO

43%

INDEPENDENT

26

9:1

$23,600

>50%

O’FALLON, IL

2002

K– GRADE 8

211

NO

9%

BAPTIST

12

18:1

$4,450

6%

O’FALLON, MO

1964

K– GRADE 6

106

YES

13%

BAPTIST

10

15:1

$5,720

0%

FORSYTH SCHOOL 314-726-4542 / forsythonline.com

CITY OF ST. LOUIS

1961

AGE 3– GRADE 6

370

NO

34%

INDEPENDENT

47

8:1

$13,772– $20,161

25%

THE FULTON SCHOOL AT ST. ALBANS 636-458-6688 / tfssa.org

FRANKLIN COUNTY

1994

PRE-K– GRADE 8

75

NO

7%

MONTESSORI

15

8:1

$5,225– $17,550

25%

GOVERNOR FRENCH ACADEMY 618-233-7542 / governorfrench.com

BELLEVILLE, IL

1983

K– GRADE 12

120

YES

50%

COLLEGE PREP

6

12:1

$5,940

0%

GRACE CHAPEL LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-867-6564 / gracechapelstl.org

BELLEFONTAINE NEIGHBORS

1955

PRE-K– GRADE 8

174

YES

70%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

10

15:1

$4,600

60%

WEBSTER GROVES

1834

K– GRADE 8

130

NO

45%

SPECIALIZED FOCUS: BEHAVIORAL & AUTISM

28

4:1

$24,500

10%

COVENANT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 314-787-1036 / ccsstl.org CROSSPOINT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 636-742-5380 / crosspointschool.org CROSSROADS COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 314-367-8085 / crossroadscollegeprep.org FIRST BAPTIST ACADEMY 618-726-6040 / fbaofallon.org FIRST BAPTIST CHRISTIAN ACADEMY O’FALLON, MISSOURI 636-272-3220 / fbcacademy.org

GREAT CIRCLE SCHOOL 314-919-4700 / greatcircle.org

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% REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID TU ITION STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S S C HO OL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIAT ION % MINORIT Y STUDENTS U NIFORMS ENROLLMENT GRAD E LEVELS OFFER ED FOU ND ED AREA PRIVATE GRAD E SCHO OL GREEN PARK LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-544-4248 / greenparklutheranschool.org

SOUTH COUNTY

1961

PRE-K– GRADE 8

205

YES

4%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

11

14:1

$6,850

20%

H.F. EPSTEIN HEBREW ACADEMY 314-994-7856 / eha.org

OLIVETTE

1943

AGE 2– GRADE 8

120

NO

DND

ORTHODOX JEWISH

21

5:1

$10,500– $14,935

50%

FENTON

1999

GRADES 6–12

21

NO

17%

CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN

7

9:1

$8,650

25%

HOLY CROSS LUTHERAN 618-344-3145 / holycross-collinsville.org

METRO EAST

1848

PRE-K– GRADE 8

154

NO

5%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

12

11:1

$3,470

10%

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN DAY SCHOOL 314-993-5004 / immanueldayschool.org

OLIVETTE

1844

PRE-K– GRADE 8

165

YES

60%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

13

13:1

$5,400

10%

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-946-0051 / immanuelstcharles.org

ST. CHARLES

1848

AGE 2– GRADE 8

485

YES

6%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

35

18:1

$6,080

20%

RICHMOND HEIGHTS

2009

AGE 2– GRADE 2

108

YES

25%

LANGUAGE IMMERSION

12

8:1

$12,600

0%

JOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL 314-993-4040 / jburroughs.org

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

1923

GRADES 7–12

619

NO

37%

INDEPENDENT

90

7:1

$27,540

23%

KIRK DAY SCHOOL 314-434-4349 / kirkdayschool.org

TOWN & COUNTRY

1992

AGE 3– GRADE 6

290

YES

18%

CHRISTIAN

30

8:1

$2,880– $8,690

18%

KIRKWOOD CHILDREN’S HOUSE 314-966-2030 / kirkwoodchildrenshouse.com

KIRKWOOD

1985

TODDLER– K

53

NO

13%

MONTESSORI

8

8:1

$8,350– $15,785

13%

WEST COUNTY

2005

PRE-K– GRADE 8

175

NO

5%

CHRISTIAN

8

12:1

$6,400

15%

55

YES

95%

CATHOLIC

6

9:1

SLIDING SCALE

91%

18

YES

10%

MONTESSORI

2

9:1

$10,000

39%

6

12:1

$12,000

100%

17

13:1

$6,725

15% 20%

HERITAGE CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 636-394-8063 / heritageclassical.org

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLHOUSE 314-874-0715 / internationalschoolhouse.com

LIVING WATER ACADEMY 636-821-2308 / livingwateracademy.com LOYOLA ACADEMY OF ST. LOUIS 314-531-9091 / loyolaacademy.org

GRAND CENTER

1999

GRADES 6–8

MAP ST. LOUIS 314.884.1637 / mapstlouis.org

GRAND CENTER

2016

GRADES 7–9

70

YES

97%

CATHOLIC– NATIVITY MIGUEL

356

YES

5%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

7

14:1

$5,300– $9,750

MARIAN MIDDLE SCHOOL 314-771-7674 / marianmiddleschool.org

SOUTH CITY

1999

GRADES 5–8

MESSIAH LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-329-1096 / mlslions.org

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

2000

PRE-K– GRADE 8

METRO EAST

1970

PRE-K– GRADE 9

100

NO

24%

ASSOCIATION MONTESSORI INTERNATIONALE

LADUE

1859

PRE-K– GRADE 8

590

NO

37%

INDEPENDENT, NONSECTARIAN

61

8:1

$19,950– $27,300

21%

MIRIAM SCHOOL 314-968-3893 / miriamstl.org

WEBSTER GROVES

1956

PRE-K– GRADE 8

93

NO

22%

INDEPENDENT, SPECIAL EDUCATION

17

10:1

$29,000

50%+

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 618-462-1071 / mvcs-il.org

MADISON COUNTY

1974

PRE-K– GRADE 12

106

NO

5%

CHRISTIAN

13

15:1

$3,324

0%

CENTRAL WEST END

1969

AGE 3– GRADE 6

313

NO

45%

MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES

40

8:1

$13,730– $19,350

40%

300

NO

70%

CHRISTIAN

25

14:1

$7,400

25%

METRO EAST MONTESSORI SCHOOL 618-931-2508 / metroeastmontessori.com MARY INSTITUTE AND SAINT LOUIS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL (MICDS) 314-995-7367 / micds.org

NEW CITY SCHOOL 314-361-6411 / newcityschool.org NORTH COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 314-972-6227 / nccsedu.org

NORTH COUNTY

1962

PRE-K– GRADE 12

OAKHAVEN MONTESSORI SCHOOL 636-978-4440 / oakhavenmontessori.net

DARDENNE PRAIRIE

2008

PRE-K– GRADE 5

74

YES

10%

MONTESSORI

6

10:1

$7,560– $11,620

26%

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-427-3444 / ourredeemerstl.org

OVERLAND

1914

PRE-K– GRADE 8

80

YES

37%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

8

10:1

$5,000

90%

OUR SAVIOR LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-343-7511 / oursaviorlcs.org

FENTON

1964

PRE-K– GRADE 8

99

YES

10%

LUTHERAN

8

10:1

$5,770

6%

PRINCIPIA SCHOOL 314-434-2100 / principiaschool.org

WEST COUNTY

1898

PRE-K– GRADE 8

158

YES

17%

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

13

8:1

$9,760– $14,220

94%

SAPPINGTON

1994

K– GRADE 12

119

YES

8%

CHRISTIAN

24

10:1

$7,900– $9,700

10%

WEST COUNTY

2006

AGE 2–K

80

YES

30%

REGGIO EMILIA– INSPIRED, FOREST SCHOOL

14

6:1

$16,100

12%

KIRKWOOD/ WEBSTER GROVES

1937

AGE 2– GRADE 6

82

NO

22%

INDEPENDENT

15

8:1

$446– $18,400

31%

PROVIDENCE CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-842-6846 / providencestl.org RAINTREE SCHOOL 314-858-1033 / raintreeschool.org ROHAN WOODS SCHOOL 314-821-6270 / rohanwoods.org

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% REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID TU ITION STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S S C HO OL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIAT ION % MINORIT Y STUDENTS U NIFORMS ENROLLMENT GRAD E LEVELS OFFER ED FOU ND ED AREA PRIVATE GRAD E SCHO OL ROSSMAN SCHOOL 314-434-5877 / rossmanschool.org

CREVE COEUR

1917

PRE-K– GRADE 6

222

NO

43%

INDEPENDENT

28

8:1

$19,700

13%

SAINT LOUIS PRIORY SCHOOL 314-434-3690 / priory.org

CREVE COEUR

1956

GRADES 7–8

130

YES

17%

CATHOLIC– BENEDICTINE

57

7:1

$23,300

30%

SOUTH COUNTY

1911

AGE 2– GRADE 8

217

YES

2%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

12

12:1

$6,425

35%

CREVE COEUR

2012

K–GRADE 8

185

NO

17%

JEWISH

24

8:1

$14,950

40%

SOULARD

2004

PRE-K– GRADE 5

130

NO

20%

PROGRESSIVE

15

9:1

$9,225

75%

SOUTH CITY

2010

PRE-K– GRADE 8

164

NO

20%

CHARLOTTE MASON PHILOSOPHY

10

12:1

$1,935– $6,550

64%

WEST COUNTY

2011

PRE-K– GRADE 8

71

YES

DND

CLASSICAL EDUCATION, CATHOLIC THEOLOGY

8

9:1

$6,890– $7,290

30%

ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-464-7303 / sjlsarnold.org

ARNOLD

1848

PRE-K– GRADE 8

200

YES

8%

LUTHERAN CHOURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

14

14:1

$6,157

55%

ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-664-3299 / slcacougars.org

SOUTH CITY

1952

K–GRADE 12

75

YES

50%

NONDENOMINATIONAL CHRISTIAN

10

10:1

$4,000

40%

ST. MARK’S LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-938-4432 / stmarkseureka.org

WEST COUNTY

1982

K–GRADE 8

42

YES

1%

LUTHERAN

5

12:1

$5,100

23%

CLAYTON

1967

INFANT– GRADE 8

150

NO

30%

REGGIO, EXPERIENTIAL

28

6:1

$16,600– $17,200

29%

13

13:1

$2,400– $6,900

15%

11

15:1

$5,000

60%

$2,375– $8,085

10%

SALEM LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-353-9242 / slcas.org SAUL MIROWITZ JEWISH COMMUNITY SCHOOL 314-576-6177 / mirowitz.org THE SOULARD SCHOOL 314-865-2799 / soulardschool.org SOUTH CITY COMMUNITY SCHOOL 314-667-4311 / scccommunityschool.org THE ST. AUSTIN SCHOOL 314-580-2802 / saintaustinschool.org

THE ST. MICHAEL SCHOOL OF CLAYTON 314-721-4422 / stlmichaelschool.org ST. PAUL’S LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-822-2771 / stplutheranschool.org

WEST COUNTY

1865

K–GRADE 8

167

YES

16%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

SHAW

1978

K–GRADE 8

150

YES

65%

CHRISTIAN

WEST COUNTY

1972

PRE-K– GRADE 8

200

NO

15%

CHRISTIAN

12

15:1

JEFFERSON COUNTY

1974

K–GRADE 8

70

NO

4%

EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN

14

8:1

$4,200

20%

KIRKWOOD

1967

AGES 2– GRADE 12

185

NO

13%

MONTESSORI

6

14:1

$6,183– $9,854

15%

VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL 314-432-2021 / vdoh.org

WEST COUNTY

1929

AGE 3– GRADE 12

207

YES

15%

CATHOLIC–NETWORK OF SACRED HEART SCHOOLS

67

8:1

$6,450– $21,485

25%

VISITATION ACADEMY 314-625-9100 / visitationacademy.org

WEST COUNTY

1833

PRE-K– GRADE 8

201

YES

15%

CATHOLIC

26

11:1

$15,985– $18,565

DND

95

NO

30%

WALDORF

15

7:1

$12,860

54%

265

YES

19%

CHRISTIAN

22

11:1

$16,700

20%

23

7:1

$26,125

30%

TOWER GROVE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-776-6473 / tgcs.net TWIN OAKS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 636-861-1901 / twinoakschristianschool.org VICTORY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 636-223-7330 / vcacademy.org VILLA DI MARIA MONTESSORI 314-822-2601 / villadimaria.org

THE WALDORF SCHOOL OF ST. LOUIS 314-962-2129 / waldorfstl.org

WEBSTER GROVES

1993

PRE-K– GRADE 8

WESTMINSTER CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-997-2900 / wcastl.org

TOWN AND COUNTRY

1976

GRADES 7–8

WEST COUNTY

1952

GRADES 6–12

134

NO

30%

INDEPENDENT, NONSECTARIAN

THE WILSON SCHOOL 314-725-4999 / wilsonschool.org

CLAYTON

1913

PRE-K– GRADE 6

170

NO

34%

INDEPENDENT

26

7:1

$19,400

35%

WORD OF LIFE LUTHERAN SCHOOL 314-832-1244 / wordoflifeschool.net

ST. LOUIS HILLS

1974

PRE-K– GRADE 8

192

YES

25%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

14

16:1

$5,850

50%

ZION LUTHERAN SCHOOL 636-441-7424 / zioharvester.org

ST. CHARLES

1851

18 MONTHS– GRADE 8

570

YES

2%

LUTHERAN

26

14:1

$5,600

5%

ZION LUTHERAN SCHOOL 618-234-0275 / zionschoolbelleville.org

BELLEVILLE, IL

1861

AGE 3– GRADE 8

300

NO

8%

LUTHERAN CHURCH– MISSOURI SYNOD

20

15:1

$3,650– $4,950

14%

WHITFIELD SCHOOL 314-434-5141 / whitfieldschool.org

THE FINE PRINT

By marking “NA,” the school is stating that the category is “not applicable”; “DND” means “does not disclose”; “int’l” is an abbreviation for “international.” Grade Schools 1. Because of space constraints, SLM was unable to include the many public grade schools, as well as parish elementary schools in the Archdiocese of St. Louis or the Metro East. For more information about area schools, visit archstl.org/education and stlcityschools.org. 2. Some schools also have high schools, but for the purposes of this chart we asked that administrators only include information that pertains up to grade 8. 3. Some schools list only grades 6–8. In most cases, these are schools that incorporate middle school grades into their high schools. We included their middle-school students on this chart and their high-school students on the next chart. 4. *Only reflects grades 7 and 8. 5. **After recently opening, Classical Academy de Lafayette plans to add a grade each year through grade 12.

ST. LO U I S E C O N O M I C D E VE LO PM E N T PA RT N E RSH IP

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AVERAGE S PENDING PER ST UDENT % REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID ANNUAL OR ANNUALIZED T UIT ION STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S % TEAC HER S WITH ADVANCED DEGR EES S C HO OL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIAT ION % C ONTINU ING TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCAT ION AVERAGE ACT S COR E % MINORIT Y STUDENTS AC C EPTANC E RAT E ENROLLMENT FOU ND ED AREA PRIVATE HIGH S CHO OL SCHOOL

ALTHOFF CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 618-235-1100 / althoffcatholic.org

BELLEVILLE, IL

1964

380

100%

27%

23

98%

ROMAN CATHOLIC

45%

24

15:1

$7,300

100%

$12,500

BARAT ACADEMY 636-300-5500 / baratacademy.org

CHESTERFIELD

2007

92

92%

17%

27

100%

CATHOLIC

65%

16

11:1

$14,900

40%

$19,500

BISHOP DUBOURG HIGH SCHOOL 314-832-3030 / bishopdubourg.org

ST. LOUIS HILLS

1950

335

98%

27%

23

98%

CATHOLIC

70%

35

11:1

$10,500

45%

$13,000

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 314-993-4400 / chaminade-stl.org

CREVE COEUR

1910

570

82%

18%

27

100%

CATHOLIC–MARIANIST

70%

76

9:1

$18,998

43%

$20,000

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 314-985-6095 / cbchs.org

WEST COUNTY

1850

850

95%

20%

25

99%

CATHOLIC–LASALLIAN

87%

85

10:1

$14,725

37%

$17,900

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1980

351

85%

12%

25

99%

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

50%

30

10:1

$9,150

10%

DND

AFFTON

1956

596

DND

6%

29

100%

ROMAN CATHOLIC

89%

55

12:1

$14,600

28%

$17,100

VILLA RIDGE

1990

167

95%

5%

25

95%

CHRISTIAN

21%

5

9:1

$5,500

17%

$5,250

CENTRAL WEST END

1974

231

DND

43%

25

97%

INDEPENDENT

73%

26

9:1

$24,400

>50%

DND

DE SMET JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL 314-567-3500 / desmet.org

CREVE COEUR

1967

746

93%

8%

26

100%

CATHOLIC

83%

75

10:1

$15,980

28%

$18,500

FATHER MCGIVNEY CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 618-855-9010 / mcgivneygriffins.com

METRO EAST

2012

190

100%

19%

25

96%

CATHOLIC

50%

15

10:1

$6,700

50%

$11,000

FIRST BAPTIST ACADEMY 618-726-6040 / fbaofallon.org

O’FALLON, IL

2002

65

95%

17%

27

95%

BAPTIST

36%

11

6:1

$4,850

8%

$4,850

GIBAULT CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 618-939-3883 / gibaultonline.com

WATERLOO, IL

1966

212

100%

10%

24

99%

CATHOLIC

40%

22

10:1

$8,470

50%

$11,027

GOVERNOR FRENCH ACADEMY 618-233-7542 / governorfrench.com

BELLEVILLE, IL

1983

39

100%

48%

25

95%

COLLEGE PREP

43%

14

10:1

$5,940

0%

$6,300

WEBSTER GROVES

1834

110

NA

45%

NA

NA

SPECIALIZED BEHAVIORAL LEARNING

42%

27

4:1

$24,500

10%

$29,100

CREVE COEUR

2005

20

96%

85%

27

98%

ALTERNATIVE

100%

4

1:1

$15,000

0%

$10,000

HERITAGE CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 636-394-8063 / heritageclassical.org

FENTON

1999

53

99%

17%

25

100%

CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN

71%

7

9:1

$8,650

25%

$10,500

INCARNATE WORD ACADEMY 314-725-5850 / iwacademy.org

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

1932

345

85%

26%

25

100%

CATHOLIC

69%

27

12:1

$13,545

42%

$15,252

JOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL 314-993-4040 / jburroughs.org

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

1923

619

35%

37%

32

100%

INDEPENDENT

81%

90

7:1

$27,540

23%

$34,740

LOGOS SCHOOL 314-997-7002 / logosschool.org

WEST COUNTY

1970

100

93%

28%

24

92%

THERAPEUTIC

48%

20

6:1

$29,000

100%

$36,000

LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL NORTH 314-389-3100 / lhsnstl.org

NORTH COUNTY

1947

249

DND

74%

21

98%

LUTHERAN

75%

19

13:1

$13,050

71%

$11,697

UTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH 314-389-3100 / lhsnstl.org

SOUTH COUNTY

1957

443

97%

16%

24

98%

LUTHERAN

70%

44

12:1

$13,050

38%

$12,843

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1980

345

99%

11%

25

97%

LUTHERAN

70%

26

12:1

$9,757

20%

$10,057

GRAND CENTER

2016

18

95%

10%

N/A*

N/A*

MONTESSORI

100%

2

9:1

$10,000

39%

$13,486

ALTON, IL

1927

413

95%

15%

23

99%

CATHOLIC

60%

37

12:1

$6,700

50%

$9,000

LADUE

1859

633

47%

34%

30

100%

INDEPENDENT

81%

63

8:1

$27,300

25%

$27,850

WEST COUNTY

2016

34

100%

9%

N/A*

N/A*

PRIVATE

75%

8

10:1

$29,000

60%

$35,000

CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL 636-978-1680 / lwcs.us COR JESU ACADEMY 314-842-1546 / corjesu.org CROSSPOINT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 636-451-6504 / crosspointchristianschool.org CROSSROADS COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 314-367-8085 / crossroadscollegeprep.org

GREAT CIRCLE SCHOOL 314-919-4700 / greatcircle.org GREENWAYS ACADEMY 314-432-7534 / greenwaysacademy.com

LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY 636-928-5100 / lutheranhighstcharles.com MAP ST. LOUIS* 314-884-1637 / mapstlouis.org MARQUETTE CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 618-463-0580 / marquettecatholic.org MARY INSTITUTE AND SAINT LOUIS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL (MICDS) 314-995-7367 / micds.org MIRIAM ACADEMY* 314-962-6080 / miriamacademy.org

92 / GATEWAY TO THE BEST

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AVERAGE S PENDING PER ST UDENT % REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID ANNUAL OR ANNUALIZED T UIT ION STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S % TEAC HER S WITH ADVANCED DEGR EES S C HO OL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIAT ION % C ONTINU ING TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCAT ION AVERAGE ACT S COR E % MINORIT Y STUDENTS AC C EPTANC E RAT E ENROLLMENT FOU ND ED AREA PRIVATE HIGH S CHO OL MISSISSIPPI VALLEY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 618-462-1071 / mvcs-il.org

MADISON COUNTY

1974

106

95%

5%

20

95%

CHRISTIAN

40%

10

15:1

$3,324

0%

$3,700

NERINX HALL 314-968-1505 / nerinxhall.org

WEBSTER GROVES

1924

585

DND

12%

27

100%

CATHOLIC

90%

65

9:1

$14,200

27%

$17,400

NORTH COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 314-972-6227 / nccsedu.org

NORTH COUNTY

1962

125

98%

70%

23

98%

CHRISTIAN

15%

25

14:1

$8,713

25%

$9,500

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL 314-544-1015 / ndhs.net

SOUTH COUNTY

1934

231

95%

14%

24

100%

CATHOLIC

74%

28

13:1

$11,800

33%

$14,100

WEST COUNTY

1898

237

93%

13%

DND

92%

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

69%

32

7:1

$16,310

94%

$51,736

SAPPINGTON

1994

28

99%

8%

29

100%

CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN

50%

18

10:1

$9,700

12%

$9,700

CENTRAL WEST END

1911

300

80%

35%

27

100%

CATHOLIC

70%

37

12:1

$12,050

47%

$13,403

SAINT LOUIS PRIORY SCHOOL 314-434-3690 / priory.org

CREVE COEUR

1956

282

DND

17%

31

100%

CATHOLIC

87%

57

7:1

$23,300

30%

$26,650

ST. DOMINIC HIGH SCHOOL 636-240-8303 / stdominichs.org

O’FALLON, MO

1962

700

96%

6%

24

99%

CATHOLIC

58%

48

14:1

$9,215

34%

$9,861

KIRKWOOD

1960

605

95%

9%

24

99%

CATHOLIC–MARIANIST

82%

46

13:1

$14,300

29%

$15,100

FRONTENAC

1840

505

DND

7%

27

100%

CATHOLIC

75%

52

11:1

$14,210

DND

DND

50%

12

10:1

$5,000

40%

DND

PRINCIPIA SCHOOL 314-434-2100 / principiaschool.org PROVIDENCE CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-842-6846 / providencestl.org ROSATI-KAIN HIGH SCHOOL 314-533-8513 / rosati-kain.org

ST. JOHN VIANNEY HIGH SCHOOL 314-965-4853 / vianney.com ST. JOSEPH’S ACADEMY 314-394-4300 / sja1840.org ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-664-3299 / slcacougars.org ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 314-531-0330 / sluh.org

SOUTH CITY

1952

100

DND

50%

24

95%

NONDENOMINATIONAL CHRISTIAN

ST. LOUIS CITY

1818

1,000

85%

16%

30

99%

CATHOLIC–JESUIT

95%

100

10:1

$16,800

40%

$18,961

ST. MARY’S HIGH SCHOOL 314-481-8400 / stmaryshs.org

SOUTH CITY

1931

334

92%

39%

22

97%

CATHOLIC–MARIANIST

70%

40

12:1

$9,800

51%

$11,980

ST. PIUS X HIGH SCHOOL 636-931-7487 / stpius.com

JEFFERSON COUNTY

1959

300

DND

12%

23

100%

CATHOLIC

60%

28

10:1

$9,400

89%

$11,634

FRANKLIN COUNTY

1994

45

DND

17%

27

100%

MONTESSORI

75%

15

8:1

$20,975

25%

DND

THOMAS JEFFERSON SCHOOL 314-843-4151 / tjs.org

SUNSET HILLS

1946

83

53%

60%

30

100%

NON-SECTARIAN

93%

13

8:1

$26,900****

29%

$27,000

TOWER GROVE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-776-6473 / tgcs.net

ST. LOUIS CITY

1978

50

90%

60%

23

90%

COLLEGE PREP

60%

13

13:1

$6,800

30%

$8,000

TRINITY CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 314-741-1333 / trinitycatholichigh.org

NORTH COUNTY

2003

339

95%

51%

24

98%

CATHOLIC

58%

38

9:1

$8,755

60%

$12,500

URSULINE ACADEMY 314-984-2800 / ursulinestl.org

OAKLAND

1848

409

94%

9%

25

100%

CATHOLIC

90%

36

10:1

$14,200

29%

$16,700

VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL 314-432-2021 / vdoh.org

WEST COUNTY

1929

263

DND

15%

27

100%

CATHOLIC–NETWORK OF SACRED HEART SCHOOLS

70%

44

8:1

$21,695

25%

$24,195

VISITATION ACADEMY 314-625-9100 / visitationacademy.org

WEST COUNTY

1833

284

DND

13%

29

100%

CATHOLIC

85%

43

14:1

$19,985

22%

DND

TOWN & COUNTRY

1976

710

73%

19%

26

99%

CHRISTIAN

69%

70

11:1

$16,700

20%

$19,500

WEST COUNTY

1952

311

75%

30%

27

100%

INDEPENDENT

66%

37

7:1

$26,125

30%

$25,000

THE FULTON SCHOOL AT ST. ALBANS 636-458-6688 / tfssa.org

WESTMINSTER CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 314-997-2900 / wcastl.org WHITFIELD SCHOOL 314-434-5141 / whitfieldschool.org

Private and Public High Schools 1. These charts include schools with students enrolled in grades 9–12. 2. Some schools in these charts also include middle and elementary school grades. 3. *New school; data not yet available. 4. ** Districtwide 5. *** Students attend South Technical High School part-time. 6. **** Annual cost of tuition for day school at Thomas Jefferson School; the annual cost for boarding school is $48,950.

ST. LO U I S E C O N O M I C D E VE LO PM E N T PA RT N E RSH IP

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AVERAGE S PENDING PER ST UDENT STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S % TEAC HER S WITH ADVANCED DEGR EES % C ONTINU ING TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCAT ION AVERAGE ACT S COR E % MINORIT Y STUDENTS ENROLLMENT FOU ND ED AREA PU B LIC HIGH S C HO OL AFFTON HIGH SCHOOL 314-638-6330 / afftonschools.net/affton-high-school

SOUTH COUNTY

1934

789

25%

21

89%

91%

45

21:1

$11,432**

BELLEVILLE WEST HIGH SCHOOL 618-222-7500 / bths201.org

METRO EAST

1917

2,056

47%

21

77%

66%

130

20:1

$12,285**

BRENTWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 314-962-3837 / brentwoodmoschools.org

BRENTWOOD

1927

245

40%

23

92%

96%

23

11:1

$16,618

CARNAHAN HIGH SCHOOL OF THE FUTURE 314-457-0582 / slps.org/carnahan

ST. LOUIS CITY

2006

357

96%

17

84%

65%

26

15:1

$15,347**

CENTRAL VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS HIGH SCHOOL 314-771-2772 / slps.org/cvpa

ST. LOUIS CITY

1984

411

87%

17

78%

35%

29

14:1

$15,347**

CLAYTON HIGH SCHOOL 314-854-6600 / claytonschools.net/chs

CLAYTON

1908

867

40%

26

94%

89%

91

10:1

$17,870

CLEVELAND NJROTC HIGH SCHOOL 314-776-1301 / slps.org/cleveland

ST. LOUIS CITY

1915

306

84%

16

57%

58%

24

11:1

$15,347**

CLYDE C. MILLER CAREER ACADEMY HIGH SCHOOL 314-371-0394 / slps.org/miller

ST. LOUIS CITY

1996

593

97%

16

75%

65%

46

14:1

$15,347**

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE & BIOSCIENCE HIGH SCHOOL 314-696-2290 / slps.org/csmb

ST. LOUIS CITY

2013

224

71%

23

98%

47%

15

12:1

$15,347**

DOWNTOWN

2003

2,441

99%

14

96%

88%

171

15:1

$15,602

EUREKA

1909

1,885

14%

24

91%

80%

136

19:1

$11,226**

ST. PETERS

2007

1,241

18%

21

81%

76%

93

19:1

$11,282**

ST. PETERS/O’FALLON, MO

1987

1,335

13%

22

80%

79%

97

19:1

$11,282**

FORT ZUMWALT WEST HIGH SCHOOL 636-379-0300 / whs.fz.k12.mo.us

O’FALLON, MO

1998

1,917

16%

22

85%

83%

135

22:1

$11,282**

FORT ZUMWALT NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 636-272-4447 / nhs.fz.k12.mo.us

O’FALLON, MO

1960

1,515

13%

21

72%

78%

103

21:1

$11,282**

CONFLUENCE PREPARATORY ACADEMY 314-588-1088 / confluenceacademy.org EUREKA HIGH SCHOOL 636-733-3100 / rsdmo.org/eurekahs FORT ZUMWALT EAST HIGH SCHOOL 636-477-2400 / ehs.fz.k12.mo.us FORT ZUMWALT SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 636-978-1212 / shs.fz.k12.mo.us

FOX HIGH SCHOOL 636-296-5210 / fox.k12.mo.us

ARNOLD

1956

1,745

7%

21

72%

76%

102

24:1

$9,100

FRANCIS HOWELL CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 636-851-4600 / fhc.fhsdschools.org

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1997

1,902

16%

22

80%

80%

112

27:1

$11,174**

FRANCIS HOWELL HIGH SCHOOL 636-851-4700 / fhh.fhsdschools.org

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1881

1,896

15%

23

87%

81%

113

27:1

$11,174**

FRANCIS HOWELL NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 636-851-4900 / fhn.fhsdschools.org

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1986

1,741

24%

21

80%

86%

106

25:1

$11,174**

GATEWAY STEM HIGH SCHOOL 314-776-3300 / slps.org/gatewaystem

ST. LOUIS CITY

1992

1,104

82%

16

70%

58%

94

12:1

$15,347**

GRAND CENTER ARTS ACADEMY 314-533-1791 / grandcenterartsacademy.org

ST. LOUIS CITY

2010

712

74%

19

98%

93%

41

17:1

$11,686

HANCOCK PLACE HIGH SCHOOL 314-544-1200 / hs.hancock.k12.mo.us

SOUTH COUNTY

1903

405

32%

18

90%

88%

36

15:1

$10,411**

HAZELWOOD CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 314-953-5400 / hazelwoodschools.org

NORTH COUNTY

1965

1,912

90%

18

74%

73%

109

18:1

$11,087**

HAZELWOOD EAST HIGH SCHOOL 314-953-5600 / hazelwoodschools.org

NORTH COUNTY

1976

1,200

98%

16

66%

74%

80

19:1

$11,087**

HAZELWOOD WEST HIGH SCHOOL 314-953-5800 / hazelwoodschools.org

NORTH COUNTY

1975

2,129

57%

19

76%

77%

118

20:1

$11,087**

HOLT HIGH SCHOOL 636-327-3876 / wentzville.k12.mo.us

WENTZVILLE

1939

1,743

18%

21

71%

85%

105

16:1

$9,588**

KIRKWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 314-213-6110 / kirkwoodschools.org

KIRKWOOD

1865

1,739

17%

24

91%

86%

118

16:1

$12,000

LADUE

1952

1,281

41%

26

91%

82%

94

13:1

$13,943

LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL 636-733-4100 / rsdmo.org/lafayette

WILDWOOD

1960

1,874

24%

25

92%

84%

135

17:1

$11,820**

LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL 636-561-0075 / wentzville.k12.mo.us

LAKE SAINT LOUIS

2013

1,338

16%

21

83%

77%

82

16:1

$9,588**

LADUE HORTON WATKINS HIGH SCHOOL 314-993-6447 / lhwhs.ladueschools.net

94 / GATEWAY TO THE BEST

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AVERAGE S PENDING PER ST UDENT STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FU LL-TIME C ERT IFIED INST R UCTOR S % TEAC HER S WITH ADVANCED DEGR EES % C ONTINU ING TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCAT ION AVERAGE ACT S COR E % MINORIT Y STUDENTS ENROLLMENT FOU ND ED AREA PU B LIC HIGH S C HO OL LIFT FOR LIFE ACADEMY 314-231-2337 / liftforlifeacademy.org

ST. LOUIS CITY

2000

585

97%

18

85%

80%

62

14:1

$12,000

SOUTH COUNTY

1950

2,112

13%

23

84%

79%

124

21:1

$9,748**

MAPLEWOOD

1909

330

44%

23

67%

90%

33

12:1

$12,806

CHESTERFIELD

1993

2,239

29%

25

89%

81%

146

16:1

$11,226**

MCCLUER HIGH SCHOOL 314-506-9400 / edline.net/pages/McCluer_High

NORTH COUNTY

1962

1,050

89%

17

68%

74%

77

15:1

$11,348**

MCCLUER NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 314-506-9200 / edline.net/pages/McCluer_North_High

NORTH COUNTY

1972

1,493

77%

18

73%

66%

85

18:1

$11,348**

MCCLUER SOUTH–BERKELEY HIGH SCHOOL 314-506-9800 / edline.net/pages/McCluer_South-Berkeley_High

NORTH COUNTY

2004

482

91%

17

67%

71%

46

12:1

$11,348**

ST. LOUIS CITY

1904

258

58%

23

91%

60%

38

14:1

$15,347**

SOUTH COUNTY

1930

1,580

22%

20

82%

79%

93

17:1

$8,798

ST. LOUIS CITY

1972

340

61%

25

99%

67%

24

14:1

$15,347

NORTH COUNTY

1968

777

85%

16

50%

59%

83

12:1

$11,304

ST. LOUIS CITY

1964

314

99%

15

42%

43%

28

13:1

$15,347

SOUTH COUNTY

1930

1,614

14%

22

91%

82%

77

21:1

$8,798**

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

1959

560

15%

20

74%

79%

38

19:1

$11,310

LINDBERGH HIGH SCHOOL 314-729-2410 / go.lindberghschools.ws/lhs MAPLEWOOD RICHMOND HEIGHTS HIGH SCHOOL 314-644-4401 / mrhschools.net MARQUETTE HIGH SCHOOL 636-891-6000 / rsdmo.org/marquette

MCKINLEY CLASSICAL LEADERSHIP ACADEMY 314-773-0027 / slps.org/mckinleycla MEHLVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 314-467-6000 / mehlvillehigh.mehlvilleschooldistrict.com METRO ACADEMIC AND CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL 314-534-3894 / slps.org/metro NORTH TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 314-989-7600 / northtechnical.org NORTHWEST ACADEMY OF LAW HIGH SCHOOL 314-385-4774 / slps.org/northwest OAKVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 314-467-7000 / mehlvilleoakvillehigh.ss11.sharpschool.com ORCHARD FARM HIGH SCHOOL 636-250-5400 / ofsd.k12.mo.us PARKWAY CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 314-415-7900 / edline.net/pages/ParkwayCentralHS

CHESTERFIELD

1961

1,295

40%

24

91%

84%

101

17:1

$12,317**

PARKWAY NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 314-415-7600 / edline.net/pages/ParkwayNorthHS

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

1971

1,132

49%

23

89%

85%

88

16:1

$12,317**

PARKWAY SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 314-415-7700 / edline.net/pages/ParkwaySouthHS

MANCHESTER

1976

1,702

27%

23

90%

89%

127

17:1

$12,317**

PARKWAY WEST HIGH SCHOOL 314-415-7500 / edline.net/pages/West_High

WEST COUNTY

1968

1,398

31%

25

93%

92%

101

18:1

$12,317**

PATTONVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 314-213-8051 / phs.psdr3.org

MARYLAND HEIGHTS

1936

1,710

50%

21

92%

83%

131

14:1

$14,495

RITENOUR HIGH SCHOOL 314-493-6105 / ritenourschools.org

NORTHWEST COUNTY

1911

1,832

70%

18

54%

80%

95

17:1

$10,417**

ROCKWOOD SUMMIT HIGH SCHOOL 636-891-6800 / rsdmo.org/rsummit

WEST COUNTY

1993

1,301

20%

24

86%

77%

106

16:1

$11,226**

ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL 314-776-6040 / slps.org/roosevelt

ST. LOUIS CITY

1925

462

89%

14

47%

40%

39

13:1

$15,347**

SOLDAN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES HIGH SCHOOL 314-367-9222 / slps.org/soldan

ST. LOUIS CITY

1909

574

97%

16

77%

67%

38

16:1

$15,347**

SOUTH COUNTY

1967

776

26%

N/A***

N/A***

33%

47

13:1

$11,204

SOUTH TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL*** 314-989-7400 / southtechnical.org SUMNER HIGH SCHOOL 314-371-1048 / slps.org/sumner

ST. LOUIS CITY

1875

320

100%

14

36%

52%

29

12:1

$15,347**

TIMBERLAND HIGH SCHOOL 636-327-3988 / wentzville.k12.mo.us

WENTZVILLE

2002

1,672

14%

22

87%

87%

106

16:1

$9,588**

VALLEY PARK HIGH SCHOOL 636-923-3613 / vp.k12.mo.us

VALLEY PARK

1932

289

35%

23

92%

92%

31

12:1

$12,000

VASHON HIGH SCHOOL 314-533-9487 / slps.org/vashon

ST. LOUIS CITY

1927

510

100%

14

43%

53%

40

15:1

$15,347**

WEBSTER GROVES

1889

1,355

24%

23

92%

86%

91

14:1

$12,048**

JEFFERSON COUNTY

1939

903

21%

20

37%

58%

58

16:1

$8,699

WEBSTER GROVES HIGH SCHOOL 314-963-6400 / webster.k12.mo.us WINDSOR HIGH SCHOOL 636-464-4429 / windsor.k12.mo.us/hs/

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% REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID Y EARLY RO OM A ND BOAR D OU T- OF-STATE T UIT ION PER CR EDIT HOUR IN-STATE TU ITIO N PER CR EDIT HOUR GRAD UATE PRO GR AM AVAIL ABLE NU MBER OF GRADUAT E ST UDENTS AVERAGE ACT S COR E MAJ OR FIELD S OFFER ED STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FAC U LT Y MEMB ER S INTERNATIONAL ST UDENTS MINORIT Y STU D E NTS GREEK SYSTEM MALE/FEMALE RAT IO % STU D ENTS LIVING ON CAMPUS AC C EPTANC E RAT E PART-TIME STU DENTS FU LL-TIME STU DENTS FOU ND ED MAIN CAMPU S C OLLEGE DRURY UNIVERSITY 800-922-2274 / drury.edu

SPRINGFIELD, MO

1873

1,398

27

70%

65%

44% M 56% F

Y

21%

10%

110

13:1

70

26

420

Y

$25,850*

$25,850*

$7,040

96%

FONTBONNE UNIVERSITY 314-862-3456 / fontbonne.edu

CLAYTON

1923

765

128

92%

31%

38% M 62% F

N

14%

8%

76

10:1

44

23

519

Y

$671

$671

$9,590

92%

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY 314-340-3366 / hssu.edu

ST. LOUIS

1857

1,163

279

100%

29%

36% M 64% F

Y

88%

3%

163

16:1

19

17

156

N

$204

$397

$9,250

87%

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY 573-681-5000 / lincolnu.edu

JEFFERSON CITY

1866

1,804

708

93%

53%

45% M 55% F

Y

66%

2%

126

DND

49

18

333

Y

$209

$427

$6,770

69%

LINDENWOOD UNIVERSITY 636-949-2000 / lindenwood.edu

ST. CHARLES

1827

6,235

713

79%

60%

47% M 53% F

Y

19%

13%

794

14:1

96

22

1,787

Y

$16,300*

$16,300*

$8,700

90%

ST. LOUIS

1872

2,375

808

93%

36%

37% M 63% F

Y

13%

5%

149

14:1

90

25

598

Y

$781

$781

$10,088

92%

LEBANON, IL

1828

1,500

135

67%

76%

50% M 50% F

Y

22%

1%

97

14:1

52

23

553

Y

$28,560*

$28,560*

$9,350

85%

ST. LOUIS

1964

1,519

2,989

65%

35%

39% M 61% F

Y

33%

3%

286

19:1

57

22

454

Y

$355– $857

$355– $857

$10,180

93%

JOPLIN

1937

4,358

1,664

95%

13%

40% M 60% F

Y

26%

3%

350

19:1

140

22

1,218

Y

$182

$367

$6,800

90%

SPRINGFIELD, WEST PLAINS

1905

15,363

5,001

71%

26%

41% M 59% F

Y

14%

4%

1,084

21:1

100

24

3,454

Y

$210

$458

$8,537

72%

MISSOURI UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 573-341-4111 / mst.edu

ROLLA

1870

6,128

792

82%

51%

76% M 24% F

Y

14%

3%

373

17:1

34

23

1,328

Y

$282

$877

$10,094

88%

MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 816-271-4200 / missouriwestern.edu

ST. JOSEPH

1915

3,503

1,818

95%

33%

41% M 59% F

Y

23%

2%

211

15:1

122

21

753

Y

$204

$421

$8,102

66%

NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY 660-562-1212 / nwmissouri.edu

MARYVILLE

1905

4,806

668

74%

36%

42% M 58% F

Y

19%

3%

302

21:1

178

23

1,027

Y

$188

$406

$8,714

43%

ST. LOUIS

1818

7,424

731

64%

46%

40% M 60% F

Y

21%

6%

1,110

9:1

90

28

1,778

Y

$41,540*

$41,540*

$10,996

88%

MARYVILLE UNIVERSITY 314-529-9300 / maryville.edu MCKENDREE UNIVERSITY 618-537-4481 / mckendree.edu MISSOURI BAPTIST UNIVERSITY 314-434-1115 / mobap.edu MISSOURI SOUTHERN STATE UNIVERSITY 417-625-9300 / mssu.edu MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY 417-836-5000 / missouristate.edu

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY 800-758-3678 / slu.edu

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% REC EIVING FINANCIAL AID Y EARLY RO OM A ND BOAR D OU T- OF-STATE T UIT ION PER CR EDIT HOUR IN-STATE TU ITIO N PER CR EDIT HOUR GRAD UATE PRO GR AM AVAIL ABLE NU MBER OF GRADUAT E ST UDENTS AVERAGE ACT S COR E MAJ OR FIELD S OFFER ED STU D ENT/TEAC HER R AT IO FAC U LT Y MEMB ER S INTERNATIONAL ST UDENTS MINORIT Y STU D E NTS GREEK SYSTEM MALE/FEMALE RAT IO % STU D ENTS LIVING ON CAMPUS AC C EPTANC E RAT E PART-TIME STU DENTS FU LL-TIME STU DENTS FOU ND ED MAIN CAMPU S C OLLEGE SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY 573-651-2000 / semo.edu

CAPE GIRARDEAU

1873

7,779

2,679

85%

39%

43% M 57% F

Y

5%

7%

409

20:1

157

23

2,087

Y

$206

$391

$8,963

76%

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY– CARBONDALE 618-453-2121 / siu.edu

CARBONDALE, IL

1869

9,455

1,532

76%

22%

53% M 47% F

Y

27%

5%

731

14:1

101

23

3,331

Y

$9,450*

$9,450*

$10,622

95%

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY– EDWARDSVILLE 618-650-3705 / siue.edu

EDWARDSVILLE, IL

1957

9,550

1,850

90%

36%

48% M 52% F

Y

24%

1%

860

18:1

49

23

2,406

N

$292

$292

$9,481

72%

FLORISSANT VALLEY, FOREST PARK, MERAMEC, WILDWOOD

1962

7,091

11,744

NA

NA

40% M 60% F

Y

49%

3%

404

45:1

80

N/A

2,248

N

$110 IN-DISTRICT; $157 INSTATE

$215; $225 INT’L

NA

46%

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY 660-785-4000 / truman.edu

KIRKSVILLE

1867

5,134

764

68%

49%

41% M 59% F

Y

13%

7%

324

16:1

38

27

1,180

N

$7,352*

$14,136*

$8,630

84%

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL MISSOURI 660-543-4111 / ucmo.edu

WARRENSBURG

1871

7,701

2,100

84%

42%

45% M 55% F

Y

22%

3%

494

16:1

86

22

4,133

Y

$221

$442

$8,536

69%

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI–COLUMBIA 573-882-2121 / missouri.edu

COLUMBIA

1839

22,197

1,620

78%

22%

48% M 52% F

Y

18%

3%

1,362

19:1

93

25

6,331

Y

$282

$839

$10,676

77%

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI–ST. LOUIS 314-516-5000 / umsl.edu

ST. LOUIS

1963

5,492

8,320

83%

14%

45% M 55% F

Y

18%

5%

825

18:1

41

24

2,108

Y

$336

$876

$9,363

87%

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS 314-935-6000 / wustl.edu

ST. LOUIS

1853

7,059

0

16%

63%

47% M 53% F

Y

19%

8%

828

8:1

136

33

1,759

Y

$2,110

$2,110

$16,006

53%

WEBSTER UNIVERSITY 800-981-9801 / webster.edu

WEBSTER GROVES

1915

2,295

496

54%

38%

43% M 57% F

Y

26%

3%

613

8:1

128

27

759

Y

$690

$690

$11,050

82%

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE 800-888-9266 / westminster-mo.edu

FULTON

1851

759

7

89%

84%

56% M 44% F

Y

16%

6%

57

13:1

35

24

184

N

$800

$800

$9,810

99%

WILLIAM WOODS UNIVERSITY 800-995-3159 / williamwoods.edu

FULTON

1870

722

55

72%

81%

30% M 70% F

Y

12%

7%

54

10:1

37

23

252

Y

$22,450*

$22,450*

$9,400

90%

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 314-539-5000 / stlcc.edu

Colleges and Universities 1. Because of space constraints, this chart does not include trade schools, seminaries, or institutions with fewer than 700 students. 2. Unless otherwise indicated, all stastics pertain to undergraduates. 3. *Annualized tuition 4. **In-state tuition applies to residents of Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Kentucky, Wisconsin, Arkansas, Indiana, and Tennessee. 5. ***Graduates receive a master’s degree; no undergraduate degrees bestowed.

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Welcome to St. Louis! Come visit us!

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DIFFERENCE MAKERS SOME OF THE COMPANIES, ORGANIZATIONS AND INSTITUTIONS THAT MAKE ST. LOUIS A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE AND WORK SHARE THEIR STORIES.

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BJC HEALTHCARE One mission. 15 hospitals. Regional leadership. National acclaim. BJC.ORG

BJC HealthCare is one of the largest nonprofit health care organizations in the United States, and is focused on delivering services to residents primarily in the greater St. Louis, southern Illinois and mid-Missouri regions. BJC serves the health care needs of urban, suburban and rural communities. Services include inpatient and outpatient care, primary care, community health and wellness, workplace health, home health, community mental health, rehabilitation, long-term care and hospice. With national accolades, 15 hospitals and more than 4,000 physicians, including Washington University specialists, BJC HealthCare gives you access to not only the world’s best medicine, but the medicine that is best for your world. ALTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL BARNES-JEWISH HOSPITAL BARNES-JEWISH WEST COUNTY HOSPITAL BARNES-JEWISH ST. PETERS HOSPITAL BOONE HOSPITAL CENTER CHRISTIAN HOSPITAL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL BELLEVILLE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL EAST MISSOURI BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER MISSOURI BAPTIST SULLIVAN HOSPITAL PARKLAND HEALTH CENTER PARKLAND HEALTH CENTER BONNE TERRE PROGRESS WEST HOSPITAL ST. LOUIS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL THE REHABILITATION INSTITUTE OF ST. LOUIS

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SITEMAN CANCER CENTER An international leader in research, treatment and prevention offers unparalleled strength in the fight against cancer. SITEMAN.WUSTL.EDU FIVE LOCATIONS IN GREATER ST. LOUIS, INCLUDING AT WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CAMPUS 800-600-3606

It is an unprecedented time in the advancement of cancer research, treatment and prevention. The disease, which has touched so many lives and communities, is not a one-dimensional affliction. It is complex and dynamic, and its defeat will require aggressive, multidisciplinary approaches. A national leader in cancer, Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is uniquely positioned to become the epicenter of curative discovery. Renowned physicians and scientists there conduct groundbreaking biomedical and prevention research, develop innovative technologies and advance new therapies that each day lead us closer to beating cancer. Siteman holds the prestigious Comprehensive Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and is one of only a handful of centers nationwide to earn the NCI’s highest rating: exceptional. RESEARCH: DISCOVERING POWERFUL NEW KNOWLEDGE More than 450 Washington University scientists and physicians affiliated with Siteman hold more than $150 million in grants for cancer research and related training. They work together, along with the talented trainees they mentor, to move discoveries from the laboratory to the patient’s bedside. Among Siteman’s most significant research initiatives are efforts to harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer. Siteman researcher Robert Schreiber and colleagues published the first conclusive evidence that the immune system plays a role in controlling cancer. Building on that landmark work, scientists and clinicians at Siteman are developing cancer immunotherapies, including personalized vaccines for breast, brain and other cancers, and gene therapies, which supercharge patients’ own immune systems to kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Clinical trials allow scientists and physicians to test the safety and effectiveness of new treatments in patients. Siteman has one of the country’s largest clinical research programs, offering more than 500 therapeutic clinical trials each year. By participating in a clinical trial, patients can gain access to experimental therapies not yet available to the public.

TREATMENT: INNOVATIVE CARE FOR BETTER OUTCOMES Siteman clinicians who specialize in medical, surgical and radiation oncology and other therapies care for more than 50,000 patients each year, including nearly 10,000 newly diagnosed patients, making the center one of the largest in the country. As a result, Siteman has broad experience in treating both common and rare forms of the disease. Technology is critical when it comes to cancer diagnosis and care. Siteman has pioneered the development of many tools that help physicians detect and treat the disease more precisely, including: ▪▪ High-tech goggles that enable surgeons to see cancer cells and remove only diseased tissue. ▪▪ The world’s first single-vault proton beam radiation therapy system, which delivers targeted treatment to tissue near the spine, brain, heart and eyes. In addition to treating patients, most Siteman physicians are scientists as well. Through their involvement in laboratory and clinical research, they advance new techniques and treatments that are adopted by other care providers. Siteman physicians developed: ▪▪ An aggressive and creative treatment regimen for certain types of pancreatic cancer that has increased survival dramatically. ▪▪ Unique genomically guided personal treatments for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. PREVENTION: REDUCING THE CANCER BURDEN FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITIES Working with the knowledge that half of all cancers are avoidable, Siteman’s renowned prevention and control experts are profoundly motivated by the field’s promise for improving human health. As with all of their endeavors, these experts approach their work through research, using science to create knowledge and programs that reduce disparities, increase access, address public policy limitations and improve community education programs. HOPE: TAKING THE FIGHT TO THE NEXT LEVEL Cancer takes many forms and affects each person differently. Conquering this elusive foe will be difficult. But now, more than at any other time in history, scientists and physicians understand what drives cancer, making it possible to develop prevention and treatment strategies that improve disease management and offer hope for a cure. Siteman is one of the few institutions in the country with the depth of experience and comprehensive resources to take the fight against cancer to the next level. Most importantly, Siteman experts are determined to defeat the disease, for the benefit of patients in the St. Louis region and around the globe.

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Fire & Light Show

Three-Sixty Rooftop Bar

Westport Social

Grand Hall

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Lodging Hospitality Management

LODGING HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (LHM) Past, Present & Future: A 360-Degree View of St. Louis with Lodging Hospitality Management LHMC.COM Surveying downtown St. Louis from the sky-high patio at Three-Sixty, the hip lounge and restaurant at the top of the Hilton at the Ballpark, it’s clear that the best is yet to come for the Gateway City. To the south, Three-Sixty overlooks the popular and growing Ballpark Village development and Busch Stadium, home of the beloved St. Louis Cardinals. From the east side of the outdoor patio, the redesigned Gateway Arch grounds are visible, with the new Museum of Westward Expansion opening to visitors in 2018 at the base of the nation’s tallest man-made monument. On the north side of the patio, guests can cozy up by the outdoor fireplaces and see the newly redesigned Kiener Plaza, an open-air gathering place in the heart of downtown across from the historic Old Courthouse. Looking west, the stone tower of St. Louis Union Station, once the largest and busiest train terminal in the nation, is in view. It’s a 360-degree view of exciting growth from the aptly named hotspot deemed one of the world’s best rooftop bars. ST. LOUIS’ FIRST FULL-SCALE AQUARIUM & MORE Built in 1894, the National Historic Landmark Union Station continues to grow and change with the modern world, welcoming an undersea adventure to downtown in mid-2019. That’s when the St. Louis Aquarium at Union Station is slated to open, bringing the oceans and rivers of the world to everyone at the center of the country. Along with the 120,000-gallon aquarium, an outdoor train park will open with a 200-foot-tall observation wheel and much more. The St. Louis Union Station Hotel, a Curio Collection by Hilton, is expanding for the future with the addition of more flexible meeting space, hotel rooms and the elegant redesign of its existing rooms and suites. Hotel guests and local residents enjoy cocktails and small plates in the beautiful Grand Hall at Union Station while award-winning 3-D light shows play on the vaulted ceiling. By 2019, when the aquarium opens, more than $160 million will have been invested to create this family entertainment complex and reimagined tourist destination. A NEW CONCEPT IN THE COUNTY In St. Louis County, the Westport Plaza mixed-use development is booming. Tech giant World Wide Technology has moved its headquarters there, adding to the district’s list of corporate residents. The hottest hangout in town has also opened at the plaza. Westport

Social is an upscale gaming lounge and a great playdate location for friends. In addition to a menu of creative bar foods and an expansive beer, wine and cocktail program, the new venue is filled with games that add to the fun. Hoops, bocce, ping pong, darts, shuffleboard, foosball—all are free for guests. Karaoke rooms overlook the large gaming floor. A fire pit on the patio takes the fun outside with a snookball court and giant Jenga game. Twelve additional restaurants and two Sheraton hotels, both recently renovated, add to the lively atmosphere at Westport Plaza. Each of these venues has something in common. They’re owned by St. Louis-based Lodging Hospitality Management (LHM), helmed by Chairman and CEO Robert F. O’Loughlin. “We believe in St. Louis’ past, present and future,” says O’Loughlin. “Our investment in the community continues each year with the preservation and enhancements at Union Station, developments at Westport Plaza, the addition of Three-Sixty to the Hilton at the Ballpark, and the construction and renovation of our many hotels and restaurants in St. Louis City and County. “We think this city in the heart of America has a wonderful future, with its emphasis on tech and biotech investment and incubation, amazing historic infrastructure and architecture, and a population with a big heart and a great work ethic. LHM is proud to be investing in St. Louis now and in the future.”

LHM’S ST. LOUIS INVESTMENTS ST. LOUIS UNION STATION The St. Louis Union Station Hotel, a Curio Collection by Hilton Fire & Light Show at the Lake The Aquarium at St. Louis Union Station (2019) The St. Louis Wheel & Train Park (2019) HILTON ST. LOUIS AT THE BALLPARK Three-Sixty Rooftop Bar WESTPORT PLAZA Sheraton Westport Plaza Sheraton Westport Chalet Westport Social THE CHESHIRE Boundary at The Cheshire Basso Fox & Hounds Tavern SEVEN GABLES INN Molly Darcy’s Pub HILTON ST. LOUIS AIRPORT MARRIOTT ST. LOUIS AIRPORT CROWNE PLAZA ST. LOUIS AIRPORT HILTON GARDEN INN ST. LOUIS AIRPORT DOUBLETREE ST. LOUIS AT WESTPORT HOMEWOOD SUITES ST. LOUIS WESTPORT DOUBLETREE ST. LOUIS CHESTERFIELD Chesterfield Athletic Center HILTON GARDEN INN ST. LOUIS/CHESTERFIELD HILTON GARDEN INN ST. LOUIS/O’FALLON FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON HOLIDAY INN ST. LOUIS FOREST PARK DOUBLETREE COLLINSVILLE ST. LOUIS Porter’s Steakhouse

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HOK HOK believes design has the ability to improve people’s lives where they work, play, heal, learn and dwell. HOK.COM/STLOUIS

HOK is a global design, architecture, engineering and planning firm. Through a network of 23 offices worldwide, its teams provide design excellence and innovation to create places that enrich people’s lives and help clients succeed. A leading industry publication recently named HOK the No. 1 U.S. architecture/engineering firm for sustainable design. The firm was founded more than 60 years ago in St. Louis, which remains one of its largest, most important offices. A 2017 survey ranked HOK both the area’s largest architecture firm and the largest interior design firm. HOK has shaped the image and landscape of St. Louis through the design of an unprecedented number of commercial, civic and cultural landmarks, including the new Busch Stadium, the James S. McDonnell Planetarium at the Saint Louis Science Center, the Priory Chapel and St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Current design projects in the metropolitan area include the Washington University School of Medicine Campus Renewal Project for BJC Healthcare; multiple projects in the Cortex Innovation Community, including the 4220 Duncan Building, Microsoft and Cambridge Innovation Center; Missouri Foundation for Health; and renovations to the Clayton on the Park tower and South Grand residential project. HOK’s people teach in local universities, mentor young people and are active in numerous nonprofits across the region. The firm is involved with many charitable organizations, including United Way, Habitat for Humanity, Pedal the Cause, Arts and Education Council and St. Louis Children’s Hospital KIDstruction Week.

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PURINA “When people and pets bond, life becomes richer.” PURINA.COM

While Purina may be an international leader in pet care and a household name in pet food, treats and litter with brands like Dog Chow, Friskies, Purina Pro Plan, Purina ONE, Beggin’ Strips, Purina Beyond and Tidy Cats, its success started and remains deeply rooted in the place that it was founded more than 120 years ago: St. Louis. Today, Purina’s pet-friendly U.S. headquarters in downtown St. Louis attracts top talent to the city, employing more than 2,200 people, including hundreds of pet nutritionists, behaviorists, immunologists and veterinarians who work tirelessly to make breakthrough discoveries and groundbreaking products that help pets live longer, healthier lives. Guided by the belief that pets make life richer, and driven by its passion for pets, Purina is on a mission to bring and keep pets and people together, starting in its own backyard. PURINA BRINGS PETS AND PEOPLE TOGETHER SUPPORTING ADOPTION Each year, Purina supports pet shelters, rescues and other nonprofits throughout the St. Louis region in a big way, through funding, pet food and cat litter, as well as volunteer support to help bring pets and people together and make St. Louis a more pet-friendly community. Purina also leads the St. Louis Petlover Coalition, which brings together more than 50 area pet welfare organizations and shelters to share knowledge, best practices and resources with a shared goal of promoting responsible pet ownership and increasing the save rate of pets in our community. PROVIDING HUMANE EDUCATION To teach the next generation of pet owners about responsible pet ownership, Purina funds the implementation of Mutt-i-grees curriculum, developed by Yale University, in several schools and after-school programs throughout the St. Louis area. Mutt-i-grees seeks to build calm, confident and caring kids through an innovative PreK–12 social/emotional learning curriculum that highlights the unique characteristics of shelter pets (mutts) to teach essential skills for academic and life success. ENGAGING PET LOVERS Purina Farms is the place where pet lovers of all ages go to play, learn and compete. This family-friendly attraction located on more

than 300 acres of rolling hills just outside of St. Louis in Gray Summit, Missouri, features an opportunity to get up close and personal with a variety of farm animals, as well as dogs and cats. The Visitor Center, open from Memorial Day through Labor Day, offers a variety of fun activities, including hayloft play areas; interactive pet-centric educational exhibits; tractor-drawn wagon rides; adoptable animals; and exciting canine performances of flying disc, agility and diving dog. The Purina Event Center at Purina Farms, a state-of-the-art, 84,000-square-foot indoor facility, is open year-round to host some of the most prestigious dog and cat shows in the country, as well as special events open to the public. PURINA KEEPS PETS AND PEOPLE TOGETHER To help make St. Louis a more pet-friendly place to live, work and play, Purina works with several local organizations and champions on a host of initiatives to allow and encourage pets and people to be together. THROWING THE NATION’S BIGGEST PARTY FOR PETS For more than 20 years, Purina, through its Beggin’ Strips dog treat brand, has sponsored the Beggin’ Pet Parade, a Guinness World Record-holding pet parade, in the Soulard neighborhood. Held annually the Sunday before Mardi Gras, the event, which includes a costume contest, is a showplace for pet pride, attracting thousands of dogs and tens of thousands of people to the party. The Beggin’ Pet Parade is one of many events that Purina supports in St. Louis throughout the year. CREATING BETTER PLACES TO PLAY With the help of hundreds of employees, Purina has worked to build and improve dog parks throughout the city to strengthen neighborhoods and encourage a better sense of community through the mutual love and ownership of dogs. In the downtown area, Lucas Park Dog Park and The Laclede’s Landing Dog Park, along with Frenchtown Dog Park in Soulard, have all received hands-on support from Purina through its annual employee volunteer day. REUNITING PATIENTS AND PETS In 2016, Purina worked with St. Louis Children’s Hospital to design and build the first-ever Purina Family Pet Center, enabling young patients to reconnect with their beloved pets during their hospital stays without leaving the building, their doctors or the technology on which so many of them rely. The facility brings together family-centered care with the healing power of the human-animal bond that pets provide to help promote and improve patient wellness. It is the first center of its kind in the region, and the fourth in the world. Whether you’re in St. Louis to live, work, play or heal, rest assured that there are plenty of ways to include your fourlegged friends in your experience, thanks to a little help from the pet lovers at Purina.

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SPIRE Serving St. Louis for more than 160 years SPIREENERGY.COM

Before the Gateway Arch and Cardinals baseball, Laclede Gas Light Company provided comfort and safety to St. Louis residents by heating their homes and lighting city streets. More than 160 years later, the company continues providing safe, reliable, affordable natural gas across the region and beyond, now serving more than 1.7 million homes and businesses in Missouri, Alabama and Mississippi as Spire. A St. Louis institution since 1857, Spire is committed to the city where it was founded. Recently, Spire remodeled and moved into a historic building in the heart of downtown. The company has increased its investment in pipeline infrastructure, delivering on the promise to provide safe, reliable energy for years to come. Spire also partners with businesses large and small to provide energy solutions that reduce costs and increase productivity. In keeping with a long-standing tradition of service, part of the Spire mission is to advance communities and enrich lives. To live that mission, Spire supports hundreds of local nonprofit organizations, encourages employee volunteerism, matches employee gifts and sponsors local charitable events. Spire also works closely with United Way of Greater St. Louis to offer the DollarHelp program, where Spire customers can donate a dollar each month to help local families heat their homes all winter. While growing its presence in the community, Spire has also grown as a company over the last five years with president and CEO Suzanne Sitherwood at the helm. Under her leadership, the company has tripled in size and doubled its stock price, resulting in Spire becoming the fifth largest publicly traded natural gas company in the nation. She continues leading Spire toward growth and innovation in how the company serves its customers and communities. Today, nearly 3,300 employees, more than half of whom live and work in the St. Louis area, dedicate themselves to deliver on Spire’s mission every day in the cities they call home.

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Ronald J. Kruszewski Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

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STIFEL A Wealth Management and Investment Banking Firm Built Around You STIFEL.COM ONE FINANCIAL PLAZA 501 NORTH BROADWAY ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Forward-thinking. Entrepreneurial. Nimble. Innovative. These are all characteristics one might associate with a startup company, not an investment firm that’s been in business for more than 125 years. Stifel, however, is not like most investment firms. Although the firm has been around a while, it has the spirit of a startup. Stifel’s clear vision and enduring client focus have helped it become one of the nation’s premier wealth management and investment banking firms. A HISTORY OF SUCCESS Stifel is built on a solid foundation that dates all the way back to 1890. Since then, the firm has navigated the Great Depression, two world wars and dozens of bull and bear markets. During the financial crisis of 2008, Stifel’s fiscal responsibility and financial strength enabled the firm to maintain its growth trajectory and position itself for future success. Amid widespread industry consolidation, Stifel has grown organically and through acquisitions. And as banks began to absorb brokerage firms, Stifel defied this convention by acquiring its own bank. Today, Stifel Bank exists to serve advisors and their clients as part of Stifel’s holistic wealth management approach. FOCUSED ON CLIENTS Placing the client’s needs first. All investment firms say they do it. But Stifel lives it. Whether working with individual investors, corporations or institutions, clients’ best interests drive every decision the firm makes. Why? Because Stifel believes that their success is predicated on their clients’ success. As such, every aspect of the firm is built to earn— and keep—their clients’ trust. Stifel’s focus on “safeguarding the money of others as if it were your own”—the motto of its namesake, Herman Stifel—has enabled the firm to grow and evolve in a constantly changing industry. It continues to guide the firm to this day. It’s even reflected in Stifel’s organizational chart, which positions clients at the top.

A GROWING FIRM Stifel’s parent company, Stifel Financial Corp., is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol “SF.” Under the leadership of Ron Kruszewski, who became CEO in 1997, Stifel has recorded 21 consecutive years of record net revenues, having grown from 700 associates to more than 7,000; from $110 million in revenue to more than $2.6 billion; and from $40 million in market capitalization to more than $3 billion. Stifel now serves clients from more than 390 offices across the nation, ranking as the nation’s seventh largest full-service investment firm in terms of number of financial advisors. Dedicated to providing clients with solid, studied advice, Stifel has built the industry’s largest equity research franchise. And true to the firm’s full-service capabilities, Stifel is also a leading provider of investment banking services to the middle market and a top-ten municipal bond underwriter. INVESTED IN ST. LOUIS Stifel’s roots in St. Louis run deep, dating back to the firm’s founding. When Stifel purchased its headquarters building in 2011, the firm wanted to enhance it in such a way that would heighten visibility and serve as a symbol for Stifel, much as the Arch serves as a symbol of St. Louis. To that end, Stifel commissioned renowned sculptor Harry Weber to create the iconic statue “Forces.” Depicting a bull and bear locked in conflict, it represents the firm’s commitment to using the opposing forces of the market to benefit clients. Stifel plays an important role in St. Louis’ vibrant financial services sector. The firm is also proud to support a number of charitable causes and other organizations dedicated to making St. Louis a better place.

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EXPRESS SCRIPTS Express Scripts Puts Health Care Spotlight on St. Louis LAB.EXPRESS-SCRIPTS.COM

Express Scripts is proud to call St. Louis home. Founded in 1986, the city’s largest startup has grown to be one of the largest health care companies in the world. Express Scripts employs approximately 6,000 people in the St. Louis community. A recent study from the University of Missouri– St. Louis found that the company generated $7.6 billion in total Missouri economic activity from 2006 to 2013. Nationally, Express Scripts plans to hire an additional 1,000 technology-focused employees in the coming years—and many of those jobs will be located right here in the St. Louis area. Express Scripts knows that health care is constantly evolving and the most successful companies must be agile and forward-looking to thrive. What does a changing environment look like? Individual patients are increasingly demanding a more rational and personalized system. A rapidly aging population is going to have far greater health care needs. The pace of costly, breakthrough therapies is expected to accelerate. The strain on private and public payers’ budgets will only intensify. Pharmacy benefit management is the gateway to generating better value in health care. In an employer-based system, pharmacy benefit management is essential to supporting a productive workforce that enables large employers and small businesses to compete globally. By reducing wasteful spending, Express Scripts helps states and the federal government balance competing demands for investment in education, job training and infrastructure.

Express Scripts is built for the future of health care. The company’s competitive, sustainable advantage is underpinned by three key areas: 1—A unique business model delivering access, affordability and care, while providing the freedom to create competition throughout the industry. 2—Clinically based intellectual capital, refined over decades, to manage prescriptions at both the individual level and for large, complex and diverse patient populations. 3—An unrivaled pharmacy data set of 30 years’ experience that can be deployed on behalf of clients in combination with Express Scripts’ scale, clinical expertise and technological enhancements. Express Scripts is constantly looking ahead as it transforms health care through technology, people and ideas. The company recently announced a significant investment to improve the patient, client and physician experience and, ultimately, to deliver more value to everyone it serves. And that’s just the beginning. Express Scripts is leading the way for the St. Louis region and the nation’s health care system.

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ONE CARDINAL WAY NOW LEASING FOR SPRING 2020

“Life in full swing” ONECARDINALWAY.COM 314-621-0001

Opening Day, Spring 2020: Luxury living like never before is heading to the heart of St. Louis. And like all great things, this exciting development didn’t happen overnight, but over time. It’s the result of going about things the right way—doing things the Cardinal Way. It all began with a partnership between two family-owned businesses with long records of success: real estate developers The Cordish Companies, and the St. Louis Cardinals. The idea? To spearhead the revitalization of downtown St. Louis. The outcome? The incomparable entertainment destination that is Ballpark Village. Located in the central business district next to Busch Stadium, Ballpark Village burst onto the scene as one of the nation’s first and largest stadium-anchored, multi-phased, mixed-use developments. And since opening, it has attracted more than 6 million visitors a year with its world-class dining, premier shopping, sensational entertainment and irresistible nightlife. With this second phase, it will truly become a neighborhood, including 75,000 square feet of new retail space, a brand new 120,000-square-foot office building and the Live! By Loews–St. Louis hotel. And now, those looking to call the most thrilling slice of St. Louis home can do so at the 297-residence One Cardinal Way.

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A residence at One Cardinal Way is more than a luxury apartment. It’s an invitation to live every day like part of the Cardinals family—an opportunity not found anywhere else. It’s where a one-of-a-kind suite of amenities includes a resort-style rooftop pool deck, relaxing cabanas and a fantastic entertainment lounge complete with plush furnishings, high-end screens and a low-key cocktail bar. It’s where the daily delights of exceptional luxury—like gourmetinspired kitchens, stainless steel appliances and panoramic windows—make heading for home all the sweeter. And it’s where powerful new perspectives of Busch Stadium, the Gateway Arch and downtown St. Louis can be shared from the cool comfort of a private balcony. This is only the beginning—for both Ballpark Village and One Cardinal Way. Visit OneCardinalWay.com for further information and regular updates.

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ELECTRICAL CONNECTION “Where Quality Matters” ELECTRICALCONNECTION.ORG

With every advancement in technology and energy, the Electrical Connection provides the most proficient electrical contractors and skilled and safe workforce to engineer and install all that powers Missouri’s future. The Electrical Connection is a partnership of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local One and the St. Louis Chapter, National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). Through its IBEW/NECA Electrical Industry Training Center in St. Louis, the partnership has trained more highly skilled electricians and communication technicians than any education program in the state. For more than 75 years, training has been provided free of charge, at no taxpayer expense, allowing participants to earn while they learn. Electrical Connection unites more than 150 NECA contractors and more than 5,000 IBEW journey workers to help economic development, business and civic leadership optimize rapidly evolving technology and energy installations impacting commercial and residential construction. This includes: ▪▪ Engineering and installing all forms of energy, including renewable energy such as solar, wind and biomass. ▪▪ Adapting training curriculum to meet Missouri’s next-generation electrical needs, including electric vehicles, cybersecurity, data centers, robotics, advanced manufacturing and specialized health care.

▪▪ Providing electrical industry guidance through board service with The Hawthorn Foundation, Missouri Partnership, Missouri Energy Initiative and other leading economic development organizations. As a community partner, the Electrical Connection supports other needs including: ▪▪ Advancing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. In 2017, it committed $500,000 to Saint Louis Science Center STEM programs and also supports FIRST Robotics and programs honoring STEM achievers. ▪▪ Committing more than $2.7 million in donated labor and materials to help Habitat for Humanity and Rebuilding Together build safer homes and National Night Out create safer, well-lit neighborhoods. ▪▪ Funding law enforcement trust-building “Shop with a Cop” programs, including reenergizing Ferguson, Missouri’s program.

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FOREST PARK “The region’s greatest civic treasure is a place of beauty, joy and discovery—for all of us” FORESTPARKFOREVER.ORG

Founded in 1876, Forest Park is one of the nation’s greatest urban public parks. The Park’s 1,300 acres feature beautiful landscapes sprinkled with forests, nature reserves, lakes and streams, as well as five of the region’s major cultural institutions and endless opportunities for recreation and family activities. Forest Park attracts 13 million visitors each year, making it the sixth most visited urban park in the United States and the most popular attraction in the region. In recent years, Forest Park was named one of the “World’s Most Beautiful City Parks” by Fodor’s Travel and voted the No. 1 City Park in America by readers of USA Today. One of our community’s greatest points of pride, Forest Park is a big, beautiful reason why many individuals, families and businesses make the St. Louis region their home. BY THE NUMBERS 40,000 TREES 75 ATHLETIC FIELDS 36 HOLES OF GOLF 35 TENNIS COURTS 19 MILES OF PATHS 5 WORLD-CLASS CULTURAL DESTINATIONS 3 PLAYGROUNDS 2 FORESTS 1 FREE URBAN OASIS

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STEWARDS OF A TREASURE Founded in 1986, the nonprofit conservancy Forest Park Forever works in partnership with the City of St. Louis to restore, maintain and sustain Forest Park. One of the nation’s most respected park conservancies, Forest Park Forever has raised more than $190 million in private funds for the Park and has earned a reputation for careful stewardship of donor dollars. The organization’s work, which includes restoration, maintenance and visitor services, is made possible through the generosity of 7,500 members, 1,600 volunteers and many leading community and corporate partners. Get the most out of your Forest Park experience—and support the Park’s continued care for others—at forestparkforever.org.

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MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN “To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment in order to preserve and enrich life.” MISSOURIBOTANICALGARDEN.ORG MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 4344 SHAW BOULEVARD ST. LOUIS, MO 63110 314-577-5100 BUTTERFLY HOUSE FAUST PARK 15193 OLIVE BOULEVARD CHESTERFIELD, MO 63017 314-577-0888 SHAW NATURE RESERVE 307 PINETUM LOOP ROAD GRAY SUMMIT, MO 63039 314-577-9555

The Missouri Botanical Garden, founded in 1859, has deep roots in the St. Louis community. Its mission, “to discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment in order to preserve and enrich life,” reflects its link to the past and its direction for the future. In addition to the South St. Louis campus, the Garden also operates the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House in St. Louis County’s Faust Park, as well as Shaw Nature Reserve, a 2,400-acre protected area in Gray Summit. Collectively, the sites welcome more than 1 million visitors each year. Each of the three sites offers a variety of special events each year.

The Garden features 79 acres of horticulture displays and includes a 14-acre Japanese Garden. The Climatron® opened in 1960 and was the first geodesic dome to be used as a greenhouse, featuring a tropical rainforest environment inside. The Doris I. Schnuck Children’s Garden is an added benefit to younger visitors, introducing them to nature and the great outdoors with its slides, tree houses, water features and interpretive learning stations—wonderful and safe opportunities for adventures! Garden founder Henry Shaw’s country home, Tower Grove House, is also open to the public seasonally.The Linnean House greenhouse, located near Ridgway Visitor Center, is the oldest continuously operated greenhouse west of the Mississippi. The Garden is not only a beautiful space to visit but also a center for science, conservation and education. It is widely considered one of the world’s best plant science programs. Garden botanists annually discover hundreds of new plant species. Its herbarium contains more than 7 million dried plant specimens and is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collections of plant diversity.

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THE REGIONAL BUSINESS COUNCIL “We’re Making the St. Louis Region our Business” STLRBC.ORG

When committed business leaders work together for the greater good and future generations, the results can be remarkable. That’s what drives the St. Louis Regional Business Council, a consortium of CEOs representing 100 of the region’s largest companies. These companies have a tremendous impact on the economic health of the St. Louis region, employing more than 120,000 people and generating over $65 billion in revenue annually. With such potential influence, the RBC is critical to enhancing the well-being and vitality of this region by leveraging corporate involvement and investment. RBC members prioritize civic and philanthropic efforts with the most impact and are generous with their time and resources. RBC outcomes are felt throughout the St. Louis region: from investing $550,000 through the It’s Our Region fund over the past five years to help 133 nonprofits and community organizations with capital projects to better serve their populations, to creating the Reinvest North County Fund when civil unrest erupted in Ferguson in August 2014 to facilitate more than $1 million for support of four school districts and small businesses. These are just two examples of the RBC making an immediate, impactful difference. Business leaders primarily focus on initiatives that address the long-term future of this region in its entirety—all 16 counties. With its business, civic and philanthropic mission, Regional Business Council members work together to influence pro-growth and pro-business public policy, develop diverse professional talent, advance school reform to educate all youth, fill skill gaps in our workforce, consult

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with key leaders on issues around crime and safety and give back to the region through community engagement and investment. Attracting and retaining a talented, diverse workforce is a core tenet of the RBC, inspiring the launch of the Young Professionals Network (YPN) in 2007. Now nearly 4,200 members strong, the YPN’s diverse young professionals come together for leadership development, to build social and business networks and to identify ways to give back to the community. The benefits of a well-educated and well-trained population are many. The RBC recognizes talent as the most important driver for success in business, and that talent comes from many places. A multidimensional workforce will undoubtedly become our local and national future leaders. Through the RBC Mentor Network Programs, rising stars are paired with CEOs and become invested in the fabric of the St. Louis community. “Together, we can invest in our region’s prosperity for future generations,” states Kathy Osborn, President and CEO of the RBC. “Let’s think about all that we can do to harness the energy of a young diverse workforce and support them in realizing their goals and ambitions, right here, with us.”

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ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA “Experience the Musical Spirit of St. Louis” SLSO.ORG 718 N. GRAND BOULEVARD ST. LOUIS, MO 63103 314-534-1700

Founded in 1880, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra is the second-oldest orchestra in the country and widely considered one of the world’s finest. The SLSO strives for artistic excellence, educational impact and community connection, while meeting its mission statement: enriching people’s lives through the power of music. The SLSO presents a full season of classical programs, Live at Powell Hall concerts, and hundreds of free education and community programs each year. Additionally, the SLSO is known for its Grammy Award-winning recordings, appearances at Carnegie Hall, innovative programming, extensive community engagement initiatives, and domestic and international tours. The orchestra presents concerts that remain true to its symphonic identity, while exploring innovative programming ideas. With key community, education and corporate partnerships, the SLSO has established itself as a one of the most impactful arts organizations in the nation. Through its culture of collaboration, diversity and inclusion, the SLSO makes music accessible to people from all backgrounds. From free concerts at places of worship to music lessons at schools, the musicians of the SLSO spread the joy of music across the St. Louis region and beyond. The orchestra celebrated its 50th year at Powell Hall during the 2017–2018 season. The historic

landmark offers superb acoustics that help the SLSO’s world-class musicians provide audience members with a unique musical experience. More than 250,000 people experience the SLSO at Powell Hall and across the region each season. The SLSO’s media partners include St. Louis Public Radio (90.7 KWMU), which broadcasts the SLSO’s Saturday night subscription concerts live, and the Nine Network, which regularly features SLSO performances on its Night at the Symphony program. The SLSO’s community impact and artistic success are directly tied to the support it receives from the St. Louis community.

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SANSONE GROUP “Our legacy is built on helping create yours.” SANSONEGROUP.COM 120 S. CENTRAL AVENUE, STE. 500 ST. LOUIS, MO 63105

Sansone Group is one of St. Louis’ leading full-service commercial real estate companies, with 60 years of experience in the market and a portfolio of services including property management, brokerage, development and redevelopment of retail, industrial, office and multifamily properties. Anthony F. Sansone Sr. started Sansone Group in 1957 and today is joined by four of his sons—Jim, Tim, Doug and Nick—as principals. As a team, they have built up a company committed to the industry that is strengthened by its culture of teamwork and their dedication to the company’s branding statement. Sansone Group currently employs more than 250 professionals who provide a wide range of services that support each division. Their brokers have extensive experience in client representation, from relocation, leasing and purchasing to new-site selection. They represent national, regional and local clients and offer comprehensive market analysis. The property management department is a hands-on team that oversees over 12.5 million square feet of property, which includes multi-

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family, office and industrial properties; retail centers; and medical facilities. Multi-family is a comprehensive, full-service division currently managing approximately 6,000 residential units throughout the Midwest. Sansone Group also has developed more than 50 projects totaling over 7 million square feet of property. While they are often recognized for developing retail shopping centers, they have also developed multi-family residences; office buildings; industrial warehouses; parking garages; and free-standing structures, including 26 Walgreens stores. Sansone Group’s continued growth and consistent results are the product of decades of experience and a wealth of knowledge in the market, but their team of committed professionals truly makes this all possible.

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SAINT LOUIS CONSTRUCTION COOPERATIVE “Building Better Together” STLOUISCONSTRUCTIONCOOPERATIVE.ORG

For 45 years, the Saint Louis Construction Cooperative has been a “Model for America,” advancing the skills of the region’s construction industry. It’s the nation’s first voluntary construction labor/management/consumer cooperative, uniting 19 building trades, 12 contractor associations and construction consumers to propel a mission of “Building Better Together.” The cooperative is an important resource for site selectors, economic development interests and businesses. It leverages the prowess of its contractors, the skill and safety of its building trades and insights of construction consumers to innovate and sustain important construction initiatives, including: OPTIMIZING CONSTRUCTION VALUE—Cooperative members engage in the most productive construction practices, on time and on budget with a skilled, safe and drug-free workforce. W O R K F O R C E R E C R U I T M E N T— The cooperative’s Careers in Construction manual is an industry staple used to recruit the next generation of construction workers. PROJECT FUNDING—The cooperative leverages its membership to connect national real estate investment trusts to fund projects in St. Louis and Missouri that demand the value delivered by the highest skilled and safest workforce.

SOLUTIONS—The cooperative is where dialogue takes place to overcome challenges, resolve industry issues, share business intelligence and promote industry growth to ensure continued prosperity in St. Louis. DIVERSITY—The cooperative is an active supporter of industry diversity to build a sustainable minority workforce and minority contracting community. This includes the award-winning Building Union Diversity (BUD) Program and the Regional Union Construction Center (RUCC)—the firstever minority incubator to help minority firms build business models that will ensure long-term success. The cooperative’s enduring success has encouraged other cities nationally to try and duplicate this “Model for America.” Learn more about the Saint Louis Construction Cooperative and how it ensures St. Louis delivers the best construction value, safety and skills by visiting stlouisconstructioncooperative.org.

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ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL (SLUH) A Jesuit College Preparatory School Educating Men for Others Since 1818 SLUH.ORG 4970 OAKLAND AVENUE ST. LOUIS, MO 63110 314-531-0330

Since 1818, St. Louis University High School has provided a
premier education to young men from all walks of life. The oldest Jesuit high school west of the Mississippi River, SLUH began as a Latin school for boys in a riverfront house. Since then, it has remained committed to its city location. SLUH
inspires its students to accept extraordinary challenges, while preparing them to be “Men for Others” and leaders in their communities. Infused with the five-century-old tradition and philosophy established by St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, SLUH’s focus in all of its endeavors reflects the Jesuit motto Ad Majorem
Dei Gloriam, a Latin term meaning “For the greater glory of God.”

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SLUH’s dedicated faculty—95 percent of whom have advanced degrees—seek to develop critical thinking and thoughtful expression among their
students. Its impressive curriculum offers more than
100 electives and Advanced Placement courses in over 20 disciplines. By engaging nearly every interest through a storied
athletic program and more than 75 student clubs, SLUH further encourages students to build community through participation. SLUH’s student body is composed of more than 1,000 young men from nearly 95 ZIP codes in the metropolitan area. A financial aid program of over $4 million ensures that all
academically qualified young men are admitted based on their ability to succeed, rather than their economic circumstances. With an average ACT of 30, SLUH’s most recent graduates were accepted at 200 different colleges and universities throughout the United States. These students accepted scholarships for their freshman year of studies valued at approximately $3.2 million. About 15,000 SLUH alumni represent leadership in all levels and disciplines, nationally and internationally. Of these, 8,000 reside in the St. Louis area, with graduates leading many aspects of their community, from civil service to non-profits and leadership at Fortune 500 companies.

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COCA Enriching lives and building community through the arts. COCASTL.ORG 524 TRINITY AVENUE ST. LOUIS, MO 63130 314-725-6555

COCA–Center of Creative Arts is a nationally recognized not-for-profit arts organization whose innovative programs encourage people to see, think and express themselves in new ways. As a leader in arts education, and the largest multidisciplinary arts institution in St. Louis, COCA annually serves more than 50,000 people of all ages, ability levels and backgrounds. Through dance, vocal music, theatre, art and design, and beyond, COCA nurtures the artistic and creative potential in its students—and the community. COCA is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Precollegiate Arts Schools (ACCPAS).

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SSM HEALTH “At SSM Health, we believe the better we know you as a person, the better we can treat you as a patient.” SSMHEALTH.COM

SSM Health is committed to delivering high-quality care that is personalized, convenient and affordable. The organization operates the largest and most distributed health care network in the St. Louis region, providing patients seamless and coordinated access to the full continuum of services—from primary and preventive care to advanced, highly specialized care. SSM Health has eight top-ranked hospitals across the region, including SSM Health’s Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital, DePaul Hospital, Saint Louis University Hospital, St. Clare Hospital–Fenton, St. Joseph Hospital–Lake Saint Louis, St. Joseph Hospital–St. Charles, St. Joseph Hospital–Wentzville and St. Mary’s Hospital. The system also includes more than 40 physician offices, 25 SSM Health Express Clinics at Walgreens and six urgent care centers, along with fully coordinated in-patient and out-patient behavioral health, rehabilitation, home care and hospice services conveniently located throughout the region. In addition, SSM Health offers many patients 24/7 access to

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care through its network of telehealth services. This means individuals and families can get the care they need, when and where they need it most. As a nationally renowned academic medical center and Level I trauma center, SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital provides tertiary/quaternary care to patients throughout Missouri and Southern Illinois. SSM Health SLU Hospital has performed thousands of successful organ transplants and provides advanced medical services in heart, cancer, neurology and neurosurgery. In August 2017, SSM Health broke ground on a brand new $550 million SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital and Ambulatory Care Center that will open in September 2020. SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital, named among the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report, works with pediatric specialists from Saint Louis University School of Medicine. It is home to a Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)—the highest level of designation—where doctors, nurses and specialists provide the highest level of care for the most complex diagnoses. Its Heart Center makes cardiology care convenient and more accessible for patients and their families and is consistently ranked as one of the top programs in the country. Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital also offers transplant services and 3-D printing, along with telemedicine, making it easier for families in rural communities to receive the care they need. SSM Health was the first health care winner of the prestigious Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. The organization also has earned an international reputation for quality and has become a national leader for the depth of its electronic health record integration. SSM Health in St. Louis has more than 15,000 employees and, together with SLUCare Physician Group, more than 3,000 physicians who are committed to its Mission: “Through our exceptional health care services, we reveal the healing presence of God.”

2018

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY RED CARPET USA; REHG PHOTO, LLC

Christian Harding (VaxNewMo, 2017), Duckenson Joseph (Arch Grants volunteer), Ross Donaldson (Sunstation USA, 2017), Alexandra Stodalka and Avi Silverberg (MyStrengthBook, 2017) | 2017 Finalist Pitch Day

Blake Marggraff (Betabox, 2014), CEO of Epharmix | 2017 Arch Grants Gala

Reuben Riddick (Demestik by Reuben Reuel, 2017), Angie Lawing (Spoke Marketing) and Allison Mitchell (Allison Mitchell, 2017) | 2017 Finalist Pitch Day

ARCH GRANTS Igniting Innovation & Ingenuity in St. Louis ARCHGRANTS.ORG 911 WASHINGTON AVENUE, STE. 415 ST. LOUIS, MO 63101 314-272-4857

Arch Grants is a nonprofit organization at the center of a movement to accelerate economic development through entrepreneurship. St. Louis is one of the fastest-growing startup scenes in the U.S., and Arch Grants works hard to maintain this designation by attracting and retaining talent and companies to the region. Each year, the Arch Grants Global Startup Competition awards cash grants and pro bono support services to startups that agree to locate their business in St. Louis for at least one year. Arch Grants looks for innovative technologies, products or services, wrapped within scalable for-profit business models, that have the potential to make national or international impact. Since its inception in 2011, the industry-agnostic competition has awarded over $6.1 million to 114 companies, funding startups in such areas as AgTech, Big Data, FoodTech, BioTech, FinTech, Hardware Technology, Health Tech, Health Care IT, Manufacturing, Medical Devices, Social Venture and others.

In addition to a $50,000 equity-free cash grant, Recipients receive: ▪▪ Pro bono and discounted services in essential business areas (legal, accounting, marketing, HR, banking, etc.) ▪▪ Personal introductions to strategic business and civic leaders ▪▪ Access to angel investment and venture capital networks ▪▪ Educational programming ▪▪ Access to Arch Grants leadership ▪▪ Talent acquisition/recruiting services ▪▪ Professional and high-level business mentorship ▪▪ Relocation assistance ▪▪ Social support and community-integration services ▪▪ Inclusion into a community of innovative entrepreneurs In turn, grant Recipients provide the organization with data on jobs created, revenue and follow-on capital; report and trace expenditures of the grant; and provide mentorship to new Recipients entering the program, as well as participating in Arch Grants’ community-focused events. Supporters of Arch Grants come together each year to celebrate the region’s entrepreneurial spirit and community at the Arch Grants Gala. The event features the announcement of each year’s Recipients and the presentation of the Entrepreneur Award to an entrepreneurial St. Louisan for outstanding business accomplishments and community and civic leadership. Past honorees include Maxine Clark, David Steward, Rodger Riney, Michael Neidorff and Jerry Kent.

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ST. LOUIS CARDINALS There’s Only One Cardinals Baseball CARDINALS.COM

For more than a century, Cardinals baseball has been a source of excitement and civic pride. With 11 World Series Championships, 19 National League Pennants, 28 postseason births and a rich history of winning baseball by the storied franchise, St. Louisans’ bleed Cardinal Red. Simply put, St. Louis is a baseball town. Each year, the Cardinals are among the top teams in MLB in terms of attendance, and their local TV ratings consistently rank among the highest among the 30 teams in baseball, despite being located in the 23rd-largest television market. The fans in St. Louis are so good that the Commissioner of Baseball has said that St. Louis is the best city in all of baseball. Since the ownership group led by Bill DeWitt Jr. purchased the Cardinals from Anheuser-Busch in 1996, the Cardinals have posted the thirdbest record in the majors and advanced to the postseason 13 times, including 12 times in the past 18 seasons. The Cardinals were National League Champions in 2004, 2006, 2011 and 2013. The organization captured its 10th World Championship in 2006, the first year in their new ballpark. The Cardinals won their 11th World title in 2011, while also being named Organization of the Year by Baseball America. In 2017, the Cardinals drew more than 3.4 million fans, the 19th time in the last 22 years that the team has drawn more than 3 million fans. Of the more than 3 million fans that take in a Cardinals game each year,

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more than a million are from outside the state of Missouri. The team’s home market fan base spans a 10-state region, drawing a large number of visitors to St. Louis annually, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy and helping local businesses. In March 2014, the St. Louis Cardinals and The Cordish Companies celebrated the grand opening of the $100 million first phase of Ballpark Village, one of the first master-planned, mixed-use developments designed around a new MLB ballpark. The approximately 120,000-square-foot, multi-story first phase, which is visible beyond the center field wall and was designed to look like an extension of Busch Stadium, was nominated for an Urban Land Institute Global Award for Excellence. Owners of sports franchises from around the world have visited Ballpark Village to take back lessons learned from the innovative development. Recently, the Cardinals and The Cordish Companies broke ground on the $260 million second phase of Ballpark Village. The 700,000-square-foot mixed-use expansion project will complete a full build-out of Clark Street, transforming it into one of the most exciting streets in all of professional sports. The second phase, which is more than seven times the scale of the first phase, will include a 29-story luxury residential tower, a Live! By Loews luxury hotel and the first office building to be built in downtown St. Louis since 1989. The 2018 season is the Cardinals’ 127th year of play in the National League. Whether for the day, the weekend or the full season, the team looks forward to welcoming every fan to the ballpark in 2018.

2018

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KRANZBERG ARTS FOUNDATION Serving & Supporting 43 Resident Organizations, Artists & Curators | Providing essential infrastructure for the arts to thrive in St. Louis KRANZBERGARTSFOUNDATION.ORG 3224 LOCUST STREET, STE. 401 ST. LOUIS, MO 63103 314-533-0367

The Kranzberg Arts Foundation believes artists and the cultural communities they represent are the heart and soul of our city. Through the development and operation of performing arts venues, visual arts galleries, free music programs and work spaces for nonprofit arts organizations, the foundation nurtures the growth of St. Louis’ artistic community. By working with emerging and leading arts institutions to engage with the greater community in ways that are relevant, inclusive and inspiring, the Kranzberg Arts Foundation helps the arts uplift our region.

Venues within the Kranzberg Arts Foundation ecosystem host hundreds of independent productions and events throughout the year. On any given night, a visitor to St. Louis’ Grand Center Arts District can attend a concert, play or dance performance at The Grandel, Kranzberg Arts Center, .ZACK and The Marcelle; take in an exhibit at the Kranzberg Arts Center’s gallery, Duet or on The Dark Room’s art walls; and listen to the best in St. Louis Jazz on The Dark Room’s stage (Wednesday–Sunday) or during the neighborhood-wide weekly Wednesday Night Jazz Crawl, all at no cover. In striving to offer patrons of the arts with the best possible experience, the Kranzberg Arts Foundation focuses heavily on hospitality by providing patron amenities such as food and beverage options, professional ticketing and box office services, secure parking and more. Enjoy lunch, dinner and brunch at The Dark Room, or an innovative cocktail at Sophie’s Artist Lounge & Cocktail Club on the second floor of .ZACK. Kranzberg Arts Foundation venues also host a variety of private events throughout the year with perfect spaces for everything from wedding ceremonies and receptions to business meetings, awards receptions and fundraisers. Please visit kranzbergartsfoundation.org to learn more about KAF’s mission, programs, venues and resident organizations which make St. Louis a more inspiring and interesting place to live, visit and explore.

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A rendering of the future National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency site

WOW air founder SkĂşli Mogensen

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

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Cortex

2018

Photography by David Torrence and Kevin A. Roberts, courtesy of WOW air, St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

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Partners in Business Working alongside local leaders, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership strives to spur stronger companies and communities. Whether connecting businesses and communities with valuable resources, bringing together St. Louis’ best and brightest minds, or fostering international relationships, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership’s aim is to grow the metro region in new and significant ways. Its business development and finance teams call on decades of experience and a vast network of support to help companies thrive, guiding them through challenges, relocations, and growth. The Partnership begins by identifying key resources, whether local and state incentives, loans and bonds, new market tax credits or grants, or geographic data to determine the best location for their business. For instance, in 2016, Boeing opened a 424,000-square-foot composite center to house parts manufacturing for its newest commercial jetliner, the 777X. This was the largest commercial aviation work statement the company had ever placed in St. Louis, a site traditionally known for manufacturing military aircraft. The new facility is expected to generate approximately 700 jobs; it also created roughly 325 full-time construction jobs while being built. “Boeing has had a presence in St. Louis for nearly 80 years,” said Bob Ciesla, a vice president for Boeing and the program manager for the 777X St. Louis work. “With the opening of this new composite center, our well-trained, high-quality workforce is able to demonstrate its versatility and expertise, positioning our region for additional commercial and defense work in the future.” Pfizer is another industry leader that recognized the region’s strengths and decided to invest in its future. The biopharmaceutical leader recently broke ground on a state-of-the art, 295,000-square-foot facility in Chesterfield. In addition to consolidating more than 450 employees scattered across the region, the company plans to hire another 80 in the coming years. And as

part of the county’s and state’s incentives package, Pfizer is donating $20,000 to the Parkway School District to support STEM education. “We’ve been proud to call Missouri home since 2002,” said John Ludwig, Pfizer senior vice president of BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences. “We’ve benefitted from the excellent life sciences workforce based in Missouri and also from a strong partnership with the state, St. Louis County, and St. Louis Economic Development Partnership. All of these were important factors as we sought a new home where we could continue to evolve our business over the coming years.” FUELING INNOVATION Popular Mechanics recently proclaimed St. Louis the No. 1 startup city in America. Among the many reasons that the startup scene here is so robust is a

FORTUNE 1,000 ST. LOUIS-BASED HEADQUARTERS Ameren Arch Coal Belden Caleres Centene Edgewell Personal Care Edward Jones Emerson Electric Express Scripts Graybar Electric Monsanto Olin Panera Bread Peabody Energy Post Holdings Reinsurance Group of America Spire Stifel Source: St. Louis Regional Chamber, July 2016

supportive environment, including the Partnership’s network of four innovation centers, known as STLVentureWorks. For years, the Partnership has worked to lay the groundwork by building business incubators and lab space; connecting mentors, investors, and entrepreneurs; leveraging research capacity; and encouraging new enterprises. These innovation centers have concentrations in manufacturing, food production, tech, biomedical, and ag-tech. Located in Creve Coeur near the BioResearch & Development Growth Park at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, the Helix Center Biotech Incubator is a destination for bioscience, agricultural technology, and plantscience startups. Clients have access to more than 33,000 square feet of affordable wet labs, dry labs, office space, financing, and collaboration. The incubator is at the heart of the 39 North ag-tech district, an innovation district that looks to advance St. Louis’ global leadership in plant sciences and ag-tech by attracting talent and finding strategies for growth. The goal is to spur collaboration and connections, creating sustainable spaces where colleagues and coworkers can get out of the labs and mingle over soccer, coffee, or cocktails. At more than 600 acres, the district is just one part of a broader ag-tech corridor that extends to such leading institutions as the Missouri Botanical Garden and Washington University, corporate leaders like Monsanto and Bunge North America, other innovation centers like Cortex and T-REx, and the University of Missouri’s renowned School of Agriculture. GLOBAL CONNECTIONS The Partnership strives to make connections not just across the region, but around the world. For more than 20 years, its international division, World Trade Center St. Louis, has made sure St. Louis companies are represented in an increasingly glob-

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al marketplace. The team collaborates with business and government agencies to support trade and investment, whether through customized research, trade training, hosting delegations, or managing St. Louis’ foreign trade zone. Through the Global Cities Initiative, the Partnership worked with the Brookings Institution to develop strategies for connecting companies with more export opportunities and foreign investment. One of the latest examples of global connection is the return of transatlantic flights to St. Louis Lambert International Airport. In May, WOW air will begin offering affordable international flights to Reykjavík, Iceland, and then on to London, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Frankfurt, Dublin, and more. “This is a great addition for our residents seeking global leisure travel,” said St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, “and for the ever-growing number of local businesspeople who are expanding their operations internationally.” St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson remarked that “with this announcement by WOW air, St. Louis and the entire region benefit for leisure and business connections, and St. Louis becomes a bigger destination for international tourists.”

Of course, the Partnership is not only looking to bring newcomers to St. Louis; it wants to encourage them to stay. To that end, five years ago, the Partnership and World Trade Center St. Louis launched the Mosaic Project. The public-private initiative aims to encourage more immigrants to move to the region and to connect with those who already do, bringing new energy and ideas. The organization believes St. Louis is stronger as a cultural mosaic, one that invests in its diverse communities. IMPROVING NEIGHBORHOODS One of the most rewarding aspects of the Partnership’s mission is its ability to energize communities across the region. To stabilize, strengthen, and improve neighborhoods, the organization’s real estate and community investment team provides project management support and technical assistance to area municipalities and developers. Often this involves returning abandoned, contaminated, or underutilized sites to productive use, whether through land assemblage, brownfield remediation, or infrastructure improvements. The team meets regularly with St. Louis County Public Works and St. Louis County

Planning about construction project updates, grant application statuses, site inspections, licensing requirements, boundary adjustments, and more. Some projects involve a single site, such as the shuttered Jamestown Mall. The county executive has made it a top priority to redevelop the property. Hazardous waste and other materials are being cleared from the site, and the county is seeking public input about its future use. Other projects span multiple blocks. The Lemay Streetscape, for instance, involved replacing sidewalks; upgrading bus shelters; installing bike racks; and adding lighting, rain gardens, and ADA-accessible crosswalks along Lemay Ferry Road between Military Road and Hoffmeister Avenue in South County. The St. Louis County Port Authority, staffed by the Partnership, oversaw the project, which received the Missouri Park and Recreation Association’s Award. Other projects have more sweeping ambitions. In 2015, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development designated a large portion of North St. Louis City and County as a U.S. Promise Zone, giving distressed areas preferred access to federal agencies and programs.

A rendering of the 39 North ag-tech district

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2018

Image courtesy of St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

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ST. LOUIS ACCOLADES “City to Watch” —Condé Nast Traveler, April 2017 “Most Romantic Cities in America” —Open Table, February 2017 “10 Rising Cities With Affordable Homeownership” —Curbed, December 2016 “Top 10 Foodie Cities” —Wallethub, October 2016 “St. Louis Is the New Startup Frontier” —fivethirtyeight.com, September 2016 “Top 10 Cities for Pet Lovers” —Wallethub, August 2016 “Best City Park” —USA Today, May 2016 “Fastest Growing Start-Up City” —Business Insider, January 2016 The Ferguson Community Empowerment Center’s ribbon-cutting ceremony

“This Promise Zone designation will help us improve people’s lives in our most distressed areas by leveraging existing plans and creating sustainable strategies in Ferguson, North St. Louis County, and North St. Louis City,” said Rodney Crim, the Partnership’s president. Last summer, the Ferguson Community Empowerment Center opened on the site that once housed the QuikTrip that burned to the ground in 2014. More than 75 percent of the contractors and employees who built the 13,500-squarefoot facility, funded by the New Markets Tax Credits program, are African-American. Co-owned by the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis and the Salvation Army, the center offers a variety of services, including after-school tutoring,

Photography courtesy of St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

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“Top Sports City in America” —Wall Street Journal, January 2016 financial assistance for rent and utilities, and support for individuals reentering society after incarceration. The Promise Zone also spans the footprint of the future National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency site, which marks a $1.7 billion investment in the community. “This decision will revitalize a historic and beautiful stretch of St. Louis near the riverfront,” said Partnership CEO Sheila Sweeney. “It will lead to a rebirth of North St. Louis and strengthen public safety for many years to come. It will also be a catalyst to our growing technology and IT sector. “The St. Louis region is an incredible place to live and work,” Sweeney added. “The NGA leaders saw that and made their decision accordingly.”

“Bar City of the Year” —Esquire, May 2015 “Top 25 Cities for Jobs” — Glassdoor, May 2015 “Top 10 Affordable Cities” —Forbes, March 2015 “Cool Cities for Millennials” —Christian Science Monitor, February 2015 “#1 Startup City in America” —Popular Mechanics, February 2015 “Most Creative Cities” —Movoto, February 2015

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RESOURCE GUIDE Helpful organizations and institutions across the region

EDUCATIONPLUS edplus.org The organization encourages student success with programs at schools all across the state.

EDUCATION ASSOCIATION MONTESSORI INTERNATIONALE ami-global.org The association supports children around the globe through educational programs and funding. CATHOLIC EDUCATION OFFICE–ARCHDIOCESE OF ST. LOUIS archstl.org/education The office is dedicated to providing leadership in Catholic education. CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS csasl.org This association’s work is focused on Christian education in the area. CITY CATHOLIC COLLABORATIVE citycatholiccollaborative. wordpress.com This network of Catholic grade schools and parishes aims to sustain strong Catholic education.

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FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC SCHOOLS IN THE NORTHEAST DEANERY federationofcatholic schools.org These 11 parishes collaborate to support the mission of Catholic education in North County. INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION OF THE CENTRAL STATES isacs.org The organization comprises more than 230 schools in 13 states. INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS OF ST. LOUIS independentschools.org The association includes nearly 50 independently governed schools across the region.

JEWISH FEDERATION OF ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT cajestl.org The organization enriches the Jewish education of children and adults. LUTHERAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS lesastl.org A network of approximately 40 Lutheran schools across the metro area LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS lhsastl.org Lutheran High School North and Lutheran High School South work together to facilitate college-preparatory Christian education and leadership. STL CITY SCHOOLS stlcityschools.org Started by concerned parents, this online school guide shares helpful stats and tips, including what to ask when searching for the right school for your child.

HOSPITALS ALTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 1 Memorial, Alton, Illinois, 618-463-7300, altonmemorialhospital.org ANDERSON HOSPITAL 6800 State Route 162, Maryville, Illinois, 618-288-5711, andersonhospital.org BARNES-JEWISH HOSPITAL 1 Barnes-Jewish Hospital Plaza, 314-747-3000, barnesjewish.org BARNES-JEWISH ST. PETERS HOSPITAL 10 Hospital, St. Peters, 636-916-9000, bjsph.org BARNES-JEWISH WEST COUNTY HOSPITAL 12634 Olive, 314-996-8000, barnesjewishwestcounty.org

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CHRISTIAN HOSPITAL 11133 Dunn, 314-653-5000 christianhospital.org DES PERES HOSPITAL 2345 Dougherty Ferry, 314-966-9100, despereshospital.com GATEWAY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 2100 Madison, Granite City, Illinois, 618-798-3000, gatewayregional.net HSHS ST. ELIZABETH’S HOSPITAL One St. Elizabeth’s Boulevard, O’Fallon, Illinois, 618-234-2120 steliz.org MEMORIAL HOSPITAL BELLEVILLE 4500 Memorial, Belleville, Illinois, 618-233-7750 memhosp.com MERCY HOSPITAL– ST. LOUIS 615 S. New Ballas, 314-251-6000, mercy.net MISSOURI BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER 3015 N. Ballas, 314-996-5000, missouribaptist.org OSF SAINT ANTHONY’S HEALTH CENTER 1 Saint Anthony’s Way, Alton, Illinois 618-465-2571, sahc.org

PROGRESS WEST HOSPITAL 2 Progress Point Pkwy., O’Fallon, Missouri, 636-344-1000, progresswest.org SITEMAN CANCER CENTER 4921 Parkview Place, 314-362-5196; Medical Office Building 2, 10 Barnes West, Creve Coeur, 314-996-8270; 150 Entrance Way, St. Peters, 636-916-9000; 5225 MidAmerica Plaza, 314-286-2500; 11125 Dunn, 314-653-5000; siteman.wustl.edu SSM CARDINAL GLENNON CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER 1465 S. Grand, 314-577-5600, cardinalglennon.com SSM HEALTH DEPAUL HEALTH CENTER 12303 Depaul, 314-344-6000, ssmhealth.com SSM HEALTH SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 3635 Vista, 314-577-8000, ssmhealth.com SSM HEALTH ST. CLARE HOSPITAL 1015 Bowles, 636-496-2000, ssmhealth.com

SSM HEALTH ST. JOSEPH HEALTH CENTER– LAKE SAINT LOUIS 100 Medical Plaza, 636-625-5200, ssmhealth.com SSM HEALTH ST. JOSEPH HEALTH CENTER– ST. CHARLES 300 First Capitol, 636-947-5076, ssmhealth.com SSM HEALTH ST. JOSEPH HEALTH CENTER– WENTZVILLE 500 Medical, Wentzville, 636-327-1000, ssmhealth.com SSM HEALTH ST. MARY’S HEALTH CENTER 6420 Clayton, 314-768-8000, ssmhealth.com ST. ANTHONY’S MEDICAL CENTER 10010 Kennerly, 314-525-1000, stanthonysmedcenter.com ST. LOUIS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL 1 Childrens Place, (314) 454-6000, stlouischildrens.org ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL 232 S. Woods Mill, 314-434-1500, stlukes-stl.com

OTHER RESOURCES CITY OF ST. LOUIS 314-622-4800, stlouis-mo.gov ELECTRICAL CONNECTION 314-781-0755, electricalconnection.org GREATER GATEWAY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS 618-692-8300, gatewayrealtors.com REGIONAL BUSINESS COUNCIL 314-225-2100, stlrbc.org ST. CHARLES COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS 636-946-4022, stcharlesrealtors.com ST. LOUIS CONVENTION AND VISITORS COMMISSION 800-916-8938, explorestlouis.com SAINT LOUIS CONSTRUCTION COOPERATIVE 314-588-7511, stlouisconstruction cooperative.org ST. LOUIS COUNTY 314-615-5000, stlouisco.com ST. LOUIS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP 314-615-7663, stlpartnership.com ST. LOUIS REALTORS 314-576-0033, stlrealtors.com

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A Monumental Idea “I do think that everyone involved, and especially Eero Saarinen, was inspired by a particular something or place,” an anonymous person once wrote in an online conspiracy forum. “The place that I am referring to is Sirius.” The subject was the Gateway Arch, which has also been accused of being a “stargate,” a cosmic tuning fork, and a weather-controlling device that shoots positive ions out one leg and negative ions from the other. And it does have an alien feeling—a quality apparent even on the maquette scale, its cold, mathematical form reflected in what looks more like a Zen reflecting pool than the sludgy Mississippi River, full of catfish and farm runoff. In fact, everything in this model is idealized, from the riverboats parked in a perfect line to the supershiny dome of the Old Courthouse, as cleanly gold as a newly forged wedding ring. Why would the Arch come from Sirius? Because Sirius is the brightest star, the scorcher. America in 1960 was all about atom bombs and astronauts, bright flashes of all sorts, things always being on the up and up. It was about steel and pneumatics, about flying-car daydreams, about everything being even better tomorrow. One day, we’ll all be sailing through space, the cosmos pouring out in front of us like an endless royal carpet, and we will transcend death. That is what the Arch says sometimes, and why it feels so unearthly, so sublime. —STEFENE RUSSELL

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2018

Photography by Balthazar Korab, courtesy of The Library Of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, LC-KRB00-128

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Welcome! Although we call other cities “home,” St. Louis is our hometown. We’re glad to be part of this special region, and we welcome you to a thriving and growing community filled with great people – and plenty of opportunities.

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

MKT-10921-A © 2017 EDWARD D. JONES & CO., L.P. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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Healthcare is complex, but our mission is simple: We help people get the medicine they need to live their best lives. At Express Scripts, 26,000 of us are focused on delivering more affordable care to 83 million Americans – one patient at a time.

Š 2018 Express Scripts. All Rights Reserved.

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Gateway to the Best  

A welcome guide to St. Louis

Gateway to the Best  

A welcome guide to St. Louis

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