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Top 200 Overview

THE TOP

By Peter Reina and Gary J. Tulacz

INTERNATIONAL

DESIGN

FIRMS

Large engineering and architectural firms explore new strategies to survive the slump

he construction industry has entered a recession that has affected virtually every region and market. The downturn has had its most immediate impact on the design professionals on the front end of projects. For the world’s largest engineers and architects, this means now is a good time to reexamine their services and strategies.

T

Only a short time ago, the world market was one of the hottest most large design firms had ever seen. Many firms worried market sectors were close to overheating, putting pressure on staff, costs and materials supplies. The scale of the 2007-2008 boom can be seen in the design revenue reported by ENR’s Top 200 Design Firms. The Top 200 as a group generated $52.62 billion in design revenue in 2008 from projects outside their respective home countries, a rise of 22.4% over 2007’s $42.99 billion. However, this boom came to a crashing halt in late summer 2008, when the U.S. housing bubble burst, inflicting economic distress on financial institutions. The resulting contraction in the credit markets caused projects around the world to be canceled or deferred, sending the industry into a recession. Big, diverse design firms, however, 42

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generally are surviving the crisis. “I believe we will come out of it stronger than we went in,” says Lars-Peter Søbye, chief executive of Denmark’s COWI A/S. Stimulus packages around the world “are more or less exactly where we have our core competence. We are short staffed at the moment,” he adds. For many firms, diversity is the key. “We are fortunate we are in many markets that have felt less of an impact from the recession, like mining and metals, infrastructure and oil and gas,” says Pierre Duhaime, recently appointed CEO of Canada’s SNC-Lavallin. He says SNC also has been helped by its program and construction management and operations and maintenance services, giving the firm a steady revenue stream. “When the global financial crisis hit, we saw some project deferrals and cancellations,” says Zimi Meka, CEO of Austra-

lia’s Ausenco. He says the firm reduced staff by 10%, but beginning about March, he has begun to see some turnaround. “We are working on feasibility studies on about $20 billion in work,” he says. Other firms also are seeing stabilization in the markets. “The impact of the global recession has been widely felt in the last quarter of 2008 and first quarter of 2009. Since that time, however, only Russia and Dubai remain seriously affected. India, in particular, has been fairly stable throughout,” says Victor Smith, CEO of Canada’s Ingenium. The U.K.’s Mott MacDonald Group is “not growing as much as we want, but we are still growing,” says Richard Williams, development director. “I am very bullish about infrastructure and transport,” says Philip Dilley, Arup Group’s chairman. “There is a lot happening in the transport world.” Arup recently won major contracts on London’s new Crossrail project. But global weakness in the building sector has contributed to Arup cutting about 500 jobs in the past year. The impact of the worldwide recession on design firms is not evenly distributed but rather market-oriented. “Rather than regions or countries, we are finding the private-sector property and buildings and resources sectors most challenging,” says Nicholas Apostolidis, general manager for client development for Australia’s GHD Pty. Ltd. “Fortunately, GHD is a diverse

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THE 2009 TOP 200 AT A GLANCE MARKET ANALYSIS

VOLUME DOMESTIC INTERNATIONAL TOTAL $ BIL. % CHG. $ BIL. % CHG. $ BIL. % CHG. REVENUE

64.1 +11.9

52.6

+22.4

116.8 +16.4

REVENUE $ MIL.

TYPE OF WORK BUILDING

9,319.9

MANUFACTURING

17.7

696.0

1.3

INDUSTRIAL

5,941.1

11.3

PETROLEUM

16,690.7

31.7

WATER

2,350.1

4.5

AVERAGE % OF PROFIT LOSS

SEWER/WASTE

1,795.5

3.4

TRANSPORTATION

7,889.4

15.0

PROFITABILITY NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING PROFIT LOSS

PERCENT OF TOTAL

DOMESTIC

161

7

10.1

NA

HAZARDOUS WASTE

2,125.9

4.0

INTERNATIONAL

148

16

10.5

NA

POWER

4,197.3

8.0

219.9

0.4

1,396.2

2.7

TELECOMMUNICATIONS OTHER

PROFESSIONAL STAFF business, with most of our people working on infrastructure projects.” “We are not depressed,” says Peter Gammie, CEO of the U.K.’s Halcrow Group. “The diverse nature of our business means we can make opportunities,” he adds. “Anything to do with the private sector is difficult.” For some firms, the recession has not been entirely negative. “We have seen a retraction of the industry back to 2007 levels, which by any measure was still a great year,” says John Pearson, global managing director for energy for Canada’s Hatch Group. If this recession has a silver lining, it is that project failures due to talent shortages in the overheated market were likely prevented, he says. A few firms are in markets that have survived the recession relatively well. “Our principal focus is in the life-sciences sector. This sector has not been as badly impacted by the global recession as other sectors,” says Pat McGrath, CEO of Ireland’s PM Group. He says parts of western Europe still hold opportunities, particularly in Belgium, France and Germany, as well as India and China. McGrath notes that many governments still are investing heavily in health care, education, universities and publicly funded research and development. “We see this in the U.K., Saudi Arabia, Qatar, India, China, Singapore and Australia,” he says. Also, “the food sector seems to be

NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING AVERAGE % DOMESTIC INT’L DOMESTIC INT’L INCREASE

129

126

15.1

11.4

DECREASE

22

14

27

12.4

SAME

35

31

NA

NA

INTERNATIONAL REGIONS NUMBER REVENUE PERCENT OF FIRMS $ MIL. OF TOTAL CANADA

76

5,810.4

11.1

U.S.

49

6,324.7

11.9

114

2,596.7

4.9

CARIBBEAN ISLANDS 68

580.1

1.1

LATIN AMERICA

BACKLOG NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING

AVERAGE %

EUROPE

137

13,375.7

25.4

MIDDLE EAST

161

9,562.5

18.2

HIGHER

88

33.8

ASIA/AUSTRALIA

164

10,807.2

20.5

LOWER

40

15.6

AFRICA

128

3,545.9

6.7

SAME

48

NA

4

18.6

0.0

quite resilient to the recession,” McGrath says, noting that PM currently is working on five infant nutritional facilities with a combined project value of over $1 billion in Asia and the Middle East. First-quarter results for Netherlandsbased DHV Group were “still OK, [but] we are starting to see the impact,” says Bertrand M. van Ee, president. DHV’s buildings, airport and marine businesses are being hit. Public markets “are still strong with stimulus packages,” he says. The credit crunch has made launching private projects difficult. “Private-sector investment has been hit hard, especially in the area of public-private partnerships, which sadly will have an impact on the ability to insert greater innovation into projects,” says Paul Dougas, CEO of Australia’s Sinclair Knight Merz. “A project developed under a private partnership arrangement generally comes to fruition quicker, and thus the effect of a downturn in private investment is no-

ARCTIC/ANTARCTIC

ticed far sooner,” says Brian Minhinick, international executive director for Australia’s Snowy Mountain Engineering Corp. (SMEC). Looking ahead, the crisis will create a flight to quality, says van Ee. “There will be more focus on what we are really good at,” he says. Mott’s Williams says, “We are determined to be ready for the upturn.” Rather than cut staff now, the firm prefers to “take a little drop in cash flow.” Stimulating After the stimulus packages, Søbye hopes the private sector will pick up and new work will emerge from growing interest in climate and sustainability issues. He does not foresee a dramatic drop in work in the next two to three years. But some designers worry about whether the economic stimulus packages around the world will produce real economic growth. “We hope agencies spend this money on projects that will improve enr.com July 27, 2009

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Top 200 Overview

the economy, infrastructure and quality of life for years to come rather than just repaving roads and highways,” says Rick Prentice, vice president, international, for Canada’s Stantec. Gammie also is concerned. “Infrastructure markets are OK at the moment, but...for the U.K., which is 50% of our work, the medium and longer term will be challenging,” he says. Williams agrees. “Governments cannot continue to spend

the way they are doing,” he says. For many major design firms around the world, mergers and acquisitions have fueled growth and expansion into new markets and regions. For example, in June, Dutch Arcadis acquired U.S.-based Malcolm Pirnie. In March, Connell Wagner of Australia, and Africon and Ninham Shand, of South Africa, merged to form Aurecon, with 87 offices in 27 countries. One major move in the past year was

TOP 10 BY MARKET BUILDING

INDUSTRIAL/PETROLEUM

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $4,454.5 MIL. OF $9,319.9 MIL. TOTAL

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $15,717.1 MIL. OF $22,631.7 MIL. TOTAL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

HOCHTIEF AG AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS) ARUP GROUP LTD. ARCADIS NV WSP GROUP PLC JACOBS AEDAS HOK RAMBOLL GRUPPEN A/S

WORLEYPARSONS FLUOR CORP. FUGRO NV AMEC PLC KBR SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC. BECHTEL JACOBS FOSTER WHEELER AG TECNICAS REUNIDAS

MANUFACTURING

TRANSPORTATION

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $599.9 MIL. OF $696.0 MIL. TOTAL

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $3,923.8 MIL. OF $7,889.4 MIL. TOTAL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

GOLDER ASSOCIATES CORP. CH2M HILL ARCADIS NV WSP GROUP PLC URS CORP. JACOBS HOCHTIEF AG CDI ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS SUMITOMO MITSUI CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD. AMEC PLC

AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. LOUIS BERGER GROUP DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS) JACOBS EGIS MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD. SYSTRA WSP GROUP PLC PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF INC. ARUP GROUP LTD.

POWER

HAZARDOUS WASTE

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $2,146.4 MIL. OF $4,197.3 MIL. TOTAL

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $1,918.4 MIL. OF $2,125.9 MIL. TOTAL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

CHINA CHENGDA ENGINEERING CO. LTD. AMEC PLC POYRY WORLEYPARSONS PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF INC. SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC. AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. THE SHAW GROUP INC. FOSTER WHEELER AG LAHMEYER INTERNATIONAL GMBH

ARCADIS NV URS CORP. ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (ERM) AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. STANTEC INC. AMEC PLC ENVIRON HOLDINGS INC. CONESTOGA-ROVERS & ASSOC. CH2M HILL JACOBS

WATER

SEWER/WASTE

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $1,309.0 MIL. OF $2,350.0 MIL. TOTAL

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $1,061.1 MIL. OF $1,795.5 MIL. TOTAL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

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MWH GLOBAL AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. ARCADIS NV GRONTMIJ NV SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC. MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD. BLACK & VEATCH STANTEC INC. LOUIS BERGER GROUP DHV GROUP

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MWH GLOBAL CH2M HILL BLACK & VEATCH GRONTMIJ NV AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD. GOLDER ASSOCIATES CORP. STANTEC INC. LOUIS BERGER GROUP POYRY

by Ausenco of Australia. In early 2008, it acquired Canada’s Sandwell International as well as U.S.-based Vector Engineering and Pipeline Systems Inc. “We were traditionally a mining engineer until 1998, when we internationalized our business, mostly in Asia and Africa,” says Meka. But last year, the firm decided to move into the Americas and expand into the infrastructure and environmental markets. “To be sustainable, you have to diversify, and that is what we are doing,” he says Another firm that has helped boost its presence in a new market through acquisition is SKM. “This year, we merged with Arch Consulting Services in India to create Sinclair Knight Merz Consulting (India),” says Dougas. The merger gives SKM an on-the-ground team of 150 people to serve India’s pent-up demand for power, water and transportation. PM Group decided to enter architectled projects in health care and education by acquiring Devereux Architects, London and Dewjo’c Architects, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. McGrath says these moves allow PM to provide conceptual and front-end design while also providing construction management services. One firm making changes internally is Korea’s Hyundai Engineering Co. Yeji Kim of HEC’s corporate strategy team notes that most Korean construction companies are focused on construction, not engineering. HEC, however, is an engineering firm that now is expanding its business field into engineering/procurement/construction. She says HEC now can bring its engineering and management skills to become a solution provider in an EPC environment. Fair Dealing The design profession has become more global. “Technology has allowed design firms to collaborate with peers across borders and even to source lower-cost drawing production from overseas service bureaus,” says Smith. The skills shortage “has driven the development of virtual teaming and a network of centers of capability around the world,” says Dougas. But Smith worries the trend toward

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virtual teaming may commoditize the industry to a high degree. “Our greatest concern is that we may be shut out of the best international opportunities because we are too expensive,” he says. Prentice of Stantec also is seeing a disconnect between the pricing of Western firms and some Asian firms, which are offering lower rates. He says this could lead to a change in client expectations about pricing and impede Western firms’ ability to compete fairly. The recession is adding to this pricing pressure. “We are seeing a lot more competition and panic pricing in some sectors,” says Apostolidis of GHD. Minhinick of SMEC has noticed more projects won at extremely low prices, “which suggests that companies are possibly deciding to drop their margins in order to keep their staff employed.” Some large Chinese engineering firms are a beneficiary of this competitive pricing for design services. “Compared to European and American countries, we have some competitive advantages, such as low cost, and our engineering technologies and management standards nearly reach the level of those European and American companies,” says Zhang Gang, international business development director for China Chengda Engineering Co. Two issues concerning many large design firms are political and economic transparency in much of the developing world. Mohammed Fahmy, vice president of Egypt’s EHAF Consulting Engineers, says markets in many nations in central and southern Africa are difficult because “those countries’ systems are not yet well established and lack transparency.” He adds, “If Africa opens, the consulting industry landscape will change.” However, some designers see encouraging signs. “We are optimistic about the long-term international market because of the global push toward accountability and transparency,” says Prentice. “We have seen increased transparency measures put forward by the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank.” He says this will help to ensure money put toward infrastructure actually gets spent

on the projects as intended. Prentice also praises the work by the Swiss-based International Federation of Consulting Engineers in guiding international designers toward better and more responsible business practices. This helps all firms compete for work “on an even playing field and gives clients reassurance they are getting the best service and quality projects,” he says. Some large international design firms

worry the global recession will cause some countries to erect trade barriers. “Protectionism and bureaucracy tend to stifle international exchange of expertise and professional service,” says Nick Burns, chairman of Hong Kong’s P&T Group. “Our biggest concern would be an increase in protectionism.” Smith of Ingenium says he is worried about the pushback that might be felt if the “Buy American” attitude that has been

TOP 10 BY REGION MIDDLE EAST

5 FUGRO NV

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $4,373.1 MIL. OF $9,562.5 MIL. TOTAL

6 BECHTEL

1 TECNICAS REUNIDAS

7 POYRY

2 FLUOR CORP.

8 URS CORP.

3 DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS)

9 HATCH GROUP

4 KBR

10 TECNICAS REUNIDAS

5 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

EUROPE

6 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP.

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $7,138.6 MIL. OF $13,375.7 MIL. TOTAL

7 WORLEYPARSONS

1 FUGRO NV

8 KHATIB & ALAMI

2 JACOBS

9 THE SHAW GROUP INC.

3 GRONTMIJ NV

10 JGC CORP.

4 RAMBOLL GRUPPEN A/S

ASIA

5 POYRY

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $4,937.2 MIL. OF $10,807.2 MIL. TOTAL

6 FLUOR CORP.

1 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP.

7 ARCADIS NV

2 KBR

8 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP.

3 WORLEYPARSONS

9 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

4 FOSTER WHEELER AG

10 WSP GROUP PLC

5 FLUOR CORP.

U.S.

6 FUGRO NV

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $5,192.9 MIL. OF $6,324.7 MIL. TOTAL

7 THE SHAW GROUP INC.

1 ARCADIS NV

8 PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF INC.

2 HOCHTIEF AG

9 CHINA CHENGDA ENGINEERING CO. LTD.

3 STANTEC INC.

10 HATCH GROUP

4 AMEC PLC

AFRICA

5 WORLEYPARSONS

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $1,811.6 MIL. OF $3,545.9 MIL. TOTAL

6 FUGRO NV

1 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

7 DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS)

2 DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS)

8 MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD.

3 KBR

9 WSP GROUP PLC

4 HATCH GROUP

10 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

5 EGIS

CANADA

6 MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD.

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $5,151.4 MIL. OF $5,810.4 MIL. TOTAL

7 BECHTEL

1 AMEC PLC

8 DHV GROUP

2 WORLEYPARSONS

9 LOUIS BERGER GROUP

3 JACOBS

10 FLUOR CORP.

4 BECHTEL

LATIN AMERICA/CARIBBEAN

5 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP.

TOP 10 WITH REVENUE OF $1,672.6 MIL. OF $3,176.8 MIL. TOTAL

6 URS CORP.

1 FLUOR CORP.

7 CH2M HILL

2 ARCADIS NV

8 FLUOR CORP.

3 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC. 4 AMEC PLC

9 FUGRO NV 10 MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD.

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creeping into the public realm in the U.S. gets out of hand. “The establishment and enforcement of trade restrictions in any form will harm America’s long-term participation in international growth,” says Smith. Not all geographic markets are suffering, report some design firms. “Unlike the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998, this time Asia has been less hard hit than the West by the recession,” says Burns of P&T Group. East Asia is “stable,” with Hong Kong creating infrastructure opportunities, says Gammie. Singapore still booms, says Williams, “but if anybody is not there now, they have missed out.” China continues to tempt designers. “There are still opportunities in China,” says van Ee. “Everyone expected China to close down after the Olympics, but it didn’t.” Arup maintains a staff of about 500 in its Chinese business, says Dilley. India is experiencing “very strong growth,” says van Ee. COWI is expanding its Indian business to handle design work for export, says Søbye. About 10% of its roughly 350 Delhi staff now is doing outsourced work. “There are lots of opportunities,” adds Williams. Pakistan is also attractive “if you can handle the security situation,” he says. Business in the Gulf is “very variable,” says Dilley. Abu Dhabi is “reasonably good,” and in Dubai, “a lot of the work has not stopped,” he adds. “Dubai will not

“Our biggest concern would be an increase in protectionism.” —NICK BURNS, CHAIRMAN, P&T GROUP, KONG

HONG

be allowed to fail.” Arup has grown its Gulf business to about 10% of the group’s total in recent years. “The impact of the recession on Dubai was extreme,” says Fahmy of EHAF. He says Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Egypt have felt less impact from the recession, and Libya and Algeria have felt no effects. He points out that the Gulf region has the wealth, a large desert and a second generation of rulers who want to make their own mark. The will and the money is there, with only political instability and fear as obstacles, Fahmy says. Halcrow has “radically reduced staff” in Dubai, says Gammie. “I am sure it will recover,” though probably not to the previous level, he adds. COWI is finding alternative work in Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia, though Qatar has slowed down, says Søbye. The Gulf market “will come back. It is a very sustainable market,” says Keith Clarke, CEO of the U.K.’s W.S. Atkins plc. “Will it be a boom like it has been? I sort of hope not.” In Europe, Scandinavian countries, especially Norway, are still busy, says

Søbye. Apart from Poland and Hungary, Eastern Europe is weak. “It will be some years before [the Baltic nations] come out of recession,” he adds. “Russia and Eastern Europe are the most disappointing, since our expectations were so high,” says Smith. “Business practices and working conditions were stressful even while project opportunities appeared plentiful. Today, the market for design services is virtually nonexistent.” Not everyone agrees. “Russia is clearly a growing force in our world, primarily in mining, metals and energy sectors,” says Pearson of Hatch. “We have been successful there by using our proven approach of technical innovation, project delivery and focus on long-term client relationships.” Most international design firms look eagerly to the future. “We are definitely optimistic about the future in the international markets,” says Apostolidis of GHD. He expects to see little growth in the short term and possibly some contraction in some sectors, but he says issues spurring the international design market—climate change, population growth, urbanization, infrastructure deterioration—are not going away. N

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THE TOP INTERNATIONAL DESIGN FIRMS’ SUBSIDIARIES AND THE COUNTRIES WHERE THE FIRMS WORKED ARE POSTED ON ENR.COM

HOW THE TOP INTERNATIONAL DESIGN FIRMS SHARED THE 2008 MARKET DESIGNER

NUMBER OF

NATIONALITY

FIRMS

AMERICAN CANADIAN EUROPEAN British German French Dutch Italian Other AUSTRALIAN JAPANESE CHINESE KOREAN ALL OTHERS ALL FIRMS

75 9 56 8 6 6 7 10 19 7 10 22 5 16 200

INT’L REVENUE

MIDDLE EAST

$ MIL.

$ MIL.

20,087.0 4,416.3 19,491.0 6,227.4 1,246.7 910.4 6,463.5 717.8 3,925.2 3,821.6 733.6 1,408.0 208.4 2,456.0 52,621.9

%

38.2 8.4 37.0 11.8 2.4 1.7 12.3 1.4 7.5 7.3 1.4 2.7 0.4 4.7 100.0

3,927.0 530.2 2,930.6 949.7 99.6 164.6 315.1 223.8 1,177.7 417.6 287.6 285.6 63.2 1,120.7 9,562.5

%

ASIA $ MIL.

41.1 5,621.5 5.5 677.6 30.6 2,037.2 9.9 933.2 1.0 61.6 1.7 141.0 3.3 570.6 2.3 61.6 12.3 269.2 4.4 974.8 3.0 330.9 3.0 823.3 0.7 51.4 11.7 290.6 100.0 10,807.2

AFRICA %

$ MIL.

EUROPE %

$ MIL.

52.0 836.0 23.6 5,275.5 6.3 647.2 18.3 632.5 18.9 1,216.5 34.3 6,887.4 8.6 316.4 8.9 1,192.0 0.6 88.3 2.5 222.9 1.3 259.1 7.3 286.3 5.3 272.3 7.7 3,128.6 0.6 107.9 3.0 215.2 2.5 172.5 4.9 1,842.5 9.0 136.1 3.8 344.1 3.1 57.7 1.6 8.4 7.6 235.3 6.6 33.5 0.5 31.9 0.9 20.6 2.7 385.3 10.9 173.6 100.0 3,545.9 100.0 13,375.7

U.S. %

39.4 4.7 51.5 8.9 1.7 2.1 23.4 1.6 13.8 2.6 0.1 0.3 0.2 1.3 100.0

$ MIL.

CANADA %

0.0 0.0 1,414.9 22.4 3,889.3 61.5 1,325.9 21.0 747.7 11.8 33.8 0.5 1,653.2 26.1 1.3 0.0 127.4 2.0 573.5 9.1 26.2 0.4 0.5 0.0 8.3 0.1 412.0 6.5 6,324.7 100.0

$ MIL.

3,189.1 0.0 1,434.7 1,268.8 0.0 10.4 132.1 0.6 22.8 1,161.8 0.0 1.5 0.4 23.1 5,810.4

%

54.9 0.0 24.7 21.8 0.0 0.2 2.3 0.0 0.4 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 100.0

LAT. AMER./CARIB. $ MIL.

1,237.9 513.7 1,077.0 241.5 26.7 15.2 391.6 107.4 294.7 213.8 22.8 28.3 32.7 50.7 3,176.8

%

39.0 16.2 33.9 7.6 0.8 0.5 12.3 3.4 9.3 6.7 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.6 100.0

EXCLUDING $1.61 MILLION FROM ANTARCTIC/ARCTIC AND $17.0 MILLION UNASSIGNED

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Designers Search

T

he worldwide economic recession has forced large design firms around the globe to scramble. However, 2008 was a big year for ENR’s Top 200 Interna-

tional Design Firms, perhaps the last for a while.

The Top 200 generated total design revenue in 2008 of $52.62 billion from projects outside of their home countries, an increase of 22.4% over $42.99 billion reported for the group in 2007.

for Safe Havens HOW TO USE THE TABLES COMPANIES are ranked according to revenue for design services performed in 2008 in $ millions (*). Those with subsidiaries are indicated by (†). For information on subsidiaries and where each firm worked outside of the U.S., see www.enr.com. **Firms not ranked last year. Some markets may not add up to 100% due to omission of “other” miscellaneous market category and rounding. NA-Not available.

stores, educational facilities, government buildings, INDUSTRIAL PROCESS pulp and paper mills, steel mills, nonferrous metal refineries, pharmaceutical hospitals, medical facilities, hotels, apartments, plants, chemical plants, food and other processing housing, etc. plants, etc. MANUFACTURING auto, electronic assembly, textile plants, etc. PETROLEUM refineries, petrochemical plants, offshore facilities, pipelines, etc. POWER thermal and hydroelectric powerplants, waste-to-energy plants, transmission lines, substa- TRANSPORTATION airports, bridges, roads, canals, tions, cogeneration plants, etc. locks, dredging, marine facilities, piers, railroads, tunnels, etc. KEY TO TYPE OF FIRM A-architect; E-engineer; WATER SUPPLY dams, reservoirs, transmission EC-engineer-contractor; AE-architect-engineer; pipelines, distribution mains, irrigation canals, HAZARDOUS WASTE chemical and nuclear waste EA-engineer-architect; ENV-environmental; desalination and potability treatment plants, treatment, asbestos and lead abatement, etc. GE-geotechnical engineer; L-landscape architect; pumping stations, etc. TELECOMMUNICATIONS transmission lines and P-planner; O-other. Other combinations possible. cabling, towers and antennae, data centers, etc. SEWERAGE/SOLID WASTE sanitary and storm Firms classified themselves. sewers, treatment plants, pumping plants, GENERAL BUILDING commercial buildings, offices, incinerators, industrial waste facilities, etc.

THE TOP 200 INTERNATIONAL DESIGN FIRMS (BASED ON DESIGN REVENUE FROM PROJECTS OUTSIDE HOME COUNTRY) 2008 INTL. REVENUE

RANK 2009 2008 FIRM

1 2 3

TYPE OF FIRM

1 FUGRO NV, Leidschendam, The Netherlands† 2 WORLEYPARSONS, North Sydney, NSW, Australia† 14 AMEC PLC, London, U.K.†

IN $ MIL.

% OF TOTAL REV.

MARKETS (% OF 2008 REVENUE)

GEN. BLDG.

MFG.

2008 INTL. REVENUE

WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE

TELECOM

RANK 2009 2008 FIRM

8

0

2

1

0

77

6

0

0

26

28 CH2M HILL, Englewood, Colo., U.S.A.†

EAC

718.1

19

3

10

5

7

21

38

13

4

0

0

0

9

0

0

89

0

0

0

27

32 STANTEC INC., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada†

EALP

653.8

55

23

0

5

11

11

6

21

22

0

27 GOLDER ASSOCIATES CORP., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada† 29 MWH GLOBAL, Broomfield, Colo., U.S.A.†

2

13

2

2

65

6

4

0

28

4

EC

2,331.0

54

0

0

1

0

0

98

0

0

1

29

5

4 JACOBS, Pasadena, Calif., U.S.A.

EAC

2,080.0

38

18

2

2

0

1

56

19

1

0

30

6

7 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP., Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.A.† 5 ARCADIS NV, Arnhem, The Netherlands†

EA

2,019.4

39

33

0

8

12

4

0

35

8

0

E

1,954.0

77

21

4

3

8

0

5

13

45

0

6 SNC-LAVALIN INTERNATIONAL INC., Montreal, Quebec, Canada† 8 KBR, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.†

EC

1,852.5

61

11

0

11

6

0

68

3

0

EC

1,777.2

82

9

0

0

0

0

87

0

0

10 DAR AL-HANDASAH CONSULTANTS (SHAIR & PARTNERS), Cairo, Egypt 9 BECHTEL, San Francisco, Calif., U.S.A.†

EA

1,455.0

100

44

0

2

3

3

12

36

EC

1,320.0

54

0

0

3

0

0

93

EC

1,129.0

92

0

0

10

0

0

13

12 FOSTER WHEELER AG, Clinton, N.J., U.S.A.† 11 TECNICAS REUNIDAS, Madrid, Spain†

EC

995.0

91

0

0

3

0

0

14

16 POYRY, Vantaa, Finland†

E

966.0

80

3

0

26

3

6

48

15

E

961.5

57

19

0

9

10

9

17

16

15 MOTT MACDONALD GROUP LTD., Croydon, Surrey, U.K.† 20 WSP GROUP PLC, London, U.K.†

E

891.6

64

46

6

2

2

3

7

17

19 ARUP GROUP LTD., London, U.K.†

E

878.5

57

49

2

1

1

1

6

18

E

867.3

64

0

0

2

5

2

19

22 HATCH GROUP, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada† 25 HOCHTIEF AG, Essen, Germany†

EC

830.5

92

84

5

1

0

20

23 URS CORP., San Francisco, Calif., U.S.A.†

EAC

812.5

16

8

7

12

21

21 LOUIS BERGER GROUP, Morristown, N.J., U.S.A.†

EAP

786.2

81

0

0

6

22

26 PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF INC., New York, N.Y., U.S.A.† 24 RAMBOLL GRUPPEN A/S, Virum, Denmark†

EAC

761.6

48

21

0

32

4

1

2

34

23

E

752.8

67

35

1

3

6

2

14

25

24

** GRONTMIJ NV, De Bilt, The Netherlands†

E

727.4

60

26

0

7

19

13

13

23

25

13 THE SHAW GROUP INC., Baton Rouge, La., U.S.A.†

EC

723.9

24

0

0

16

0

0

82

0

48

N

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N

July 27, 2009 enr.com

ENR_07_27_2009_p48copy.indd 48-49

TELECOM

93

1

12

WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE

71

2

11

MFG.

2,956.0

75

10

MARKETS (% OF 2008 REVENUE)

GEN. BLDG.

2,755.2 2,391.3

9

% OF TOTAL REV.

E

E

8

IN $ MIL.

EC

3 FLUOR CORP., Irving, Texas, U.S.A.†

7

TYPE OF FIRM

E

627.9

65

1

30

11

4

12

20

6

4

EC

531.1

51

0

0

6

49

45

0

0

0

0

EA

429.1

16

46

1

4

4

0

10

34

1

0

31

34 WS ATKINS PLC, Epsom, Surrey, U.K.† 35 HALCROW GROUP LTD., London, U.K.†

E

417.8

48

24

0

2

9

8

5

51

0

0

32

33 COWI A/S, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark†

E

399.0

64

21

0

6

3

3

4

42

0

0

0

33

61 MCDERMOTT INTERNATIONAL INC., Houston, Texas, U.S.A.†

EC

398.1

63

0

0

6

0

0

94

0

0

0

0

34

38 CHINA CHENGDA ENGINEERING CO. LTD., Chengdu, Sichuan, China†

E

387.2

48

0

0

98

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

35

30 JGC CORP., Yokohama, Japan

EC

371.0

69

0

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

3

1

0

36

50 MUSTANG ENGINEERING, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.†

EC

370.0

37

0

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

87

0

2

0

37

EC

367.6

31

0

0

23

25

35

15

0

0

0

97

0

0

0

38

40 BLACK & VEATCH, Overland Park, Kan., U.S.A. 37 EGIS, Saint Quentin en Yvelines, France†

EC

367.3

52

0

0

0

9

2

0

89

0

0

14

0

1

39

343.7

52

10

1

2

20

16

2

40

0

0

2

1

40

44 DHV GROUP, Amersfoort, The Netherlands† 42 HOK, St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.†

E

33

AE

330.0

44

84

0

0

0

0

0

16

0

0

30

1

1

41

** AEDAS, New York, N.Y., U.S.A.†

A

307.6

87

90

1

0

0

0

0

9

0

0

29

3

1

42

EC

278.6

41

22

11

0

2

2

24

38

0

0

75

15

0

0

43

43 CDI ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A.† ** SYSTRA, Paris, France†

E

277.8

79

0

0

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

1

7

0

0

44

E

268.6

28

23

0

13

2

3

9

6

0

0

4

2

24

9

29

0

45

48 SINCLAIR KNIGHT MERZ, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia† ** MAIRE TECNIMONT, Rome, Italy†

EC

259.2

100

0

0

19

0

0

81

0

0

0

9

9

0

76

0

0

46

E

254.8

82

3

1

4

1

5

66

20

0

0

1

0

47

0

1

48

0

0

1

0

** AUSENCO, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia† 49 KHATIB & ALAMI, Beirut, Lebanon†

EA

251.0

97

52

0

2

11

11

5

15

0

0

ENV

241.3

54

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

95

0

49

36 ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (ERM), Exton, Pa., U.S.A.† 47 ROYAL HASKONING, Nijmegen, The Netherlands†

E

240.2

45

19

0

0

13

4

8

33

0

0

50

41 SAIPEM, San Donato Milanese, Italy†

EC

220.0

17

0

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

enr.com July 27, 2009

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7/20/09 1:30:44 PM

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