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COMPANY-PRODUCTS Metal Processing Machinery Manufacturing Technologies Magazine EMO Fair Special Issue Publication Type

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Yay›n Türü

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AjansMik Co., Ltd.

Hazırlık & Tasarım

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Grafik Tasarım

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EMO of the Journal of the metalmak published since 1989 in Turkey in 2019 was prepared in English and to be fair EMO, which will be distributed at the 2019 Trade metalmach the Magazine EMO Fair in Suppl you in taking part with your advertising and text, your product to the EMO Fair audience and promote your company.

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Protecting machine tools from cyber attacks EMO Hannover 2019 showcasing solutions for complex networked systems Data security is gaining in importance as Industry 4.0 takes shape. Automation, cloud applications and globally networked machines and components play key roles when it comes to shielding systems from external threats. As digitalisation becomes more prevalent across industries, there is a growing need for compa-nies to safeguard against cyber risks. This is because German industry is increasingly becoming a target for cybercriminals: more than eight in ten industrial companies (84 per cent) have re-ported an increase in the number of cyber attacks in the past two years, with more than a third (37 per cent) reporting a strong increase. This is the result of a 2018 survey conducted by the Bitkom digital association, which interviewed 503 managing directors and

"German industry is under constant digital fire –from petty digital criminals, organised crime and even state-backed hackers," says Bitkom President Achim Berg.

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security officers from all sectors of industry. "German industry is under constant digital fire – from petty digital crimi-nals, organised crime and even state-backed hackers," says Bitkom President Achim Berg. "The nature and scale of the cyber attacks is set to increase." One thing is certain, however: cybercrime is a worldwide phenomenon that does not stop at na-tional borders or at locked factory gates. It can happen wherever people use computers, smartphones or other IT devices. Responding to security vulnerabilities and software bugs The Balluff Group is a global player in the automation sector. With its workforce of 4,000 em-ployees the company offers a comprehensive portfolio of sensor, identification, network and software solutions for all areas of automation. Protecting against cybercrime is a key aspect in the development and design of customer solutions. "Cybercriminals often use known vulnerabilities or bugs in outdated software to gain access to a system. "Promptly installing updates and security patches considerably reduces the risk of cyber attacks," says Philipp Echteler, IIoT Strategy Manager at Balluff. Using versioned software and firmware and monitoring these help create greater transparency. "Avoidable dangers also ema-nate from devices that were originally only designed for communication with the controller

"Promptly installing updates and security patches considerably reduces the risk of cyber attacks," says Philipp Echteler from Balluff. of iso-lated networks, and not for connection to the Internet. Many of these Ethernet-enabled automation devices have no protection features, which leaves them vulnerable to attack," continues Echteler. Protecting systems from manipulation and cybercrime But what are the best ways to protect complex networked systems against manipulation and cybercrime? "In principle, any networked system represents a possible point of attack. a well-designed security concept is therefore indispensable for safeguarding such systems against ma-nipulation and cybercrime," says Juliane Schneider, Junior Product Manager at Symmedia. Symmedia GmbH from Bielefeld has been developing service solutions for the mechanical en-gineering sector since 1997. The

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS company's digitalisation expertise – especially in the field of mechanical and plant engineering – is strengthened by its alliance with Georg Fischer, a me-chanical engineering company to which Symmedia has belonged since 2017. "When it comes to handling sensitive data, any human negligence poses a security risk. An un-noticed cyberattack, the reckless multiple use of passwords or the deliberate divulgence of con-fidential data  any human action can have major consequences and cause significant damage," says Schneider, listing just some of the more obvious risks. Echteler adds: "The risks which arise from internal threats should not be underestimated. Employees unthinkingly open email attachments which can be used to smuggle in viruses unnoticed, or they send critical company infor-mation in unencrypted form by email." Poorly protected or forgotten maintenance access rou-tines represent back doors that attackers can then use for their own purposes. Firewalls that automatically conduct trustworthiness checks Encryption mechanisms such as SSL or TLS must be deployed as standard in order to protect complex networked systems from manipulation and cybercrime. These encrypt all data traffic between servers, computers and applications in a network. Another common practice is to install a firewall which checks the trustworthiness of all parties seeking access to a computer in order to automatically protect it from attacks or unauthorised access. "Having separate production and office networks offers additional security. Further recommen-da-

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tions include minimising the number of network accesses and routing the data stream via a central, monitored gateway. Potential threats can often be identified at an early stage if data and network traffic levels and individual nodes are also continuously analysed," says Echteler, citing further options that can help increase security. Solutions for data security in networked production Balluff has established its own team of experts to offer comprehensive consulting services to customers all over the world. Some of the Balluff devices now also feature hardware encryption based on the Trusted Platform module. In addition to minimum requirements such as firewall protection, Symmedia also uses HSM and TPM procedures (based on so-called hardware secu-rity and Trusted Platform modules) to ensure that only secure software is run. "We also use a proprietary network protocol to provide very high level protection against unwanted access. It is virtually impossible to hack into these connections," says Schneider. The company uses a secure and workflow-based point-to-point link for digital service support. "The use

Juliane Schneider, Junior Product Manager atsymmedia, emphasises: "When it comes to handling sensitive data, any human negligence poses a security risk."

of common encryption, authentication and authorisation procedures for client applica-tions, servers and programming interfaces, so-called APIs, is also a matter of course for us. In addition, we offer many other security measures, including a PKI (public key infrastructure)-based individual machine and user certificate structure, password rules, the irreversible storage of access data with up-to-date hash procedures and multi-factor authentication," continues Juli-ane Schneider. Clouds and corporate clouds have a role to play Another major point with regard to data handling is the location of the data storage. Three in ten companies (29 per cent) use a cloud solution that is outsourced to a certified data centre – either to achieve possible cost savings, to relieve the strain on their own IT staff or to obtain greater se-curity. Another ten per cent plan to do so and 28 per cent are discussing this as an option. This is shown by the Digital Office Index 2018 – a representative survey of 1,106 Bitkom companies with 20 or more employees. According to the Index, fewer than three in ten companies (28 per cent) state that cloud hosting is of no concern to them. A comparison of the different industries reveals that the mechanical engineering and plant construction sector is the frontrunner in this field. According to Bitkom, almost half of all companies in this industry (46 per cent) are already using external cloud service providers. For Balluff, too, the public cloud is the first choice. "Its high availability is attractive because its platforms are replicated in independent, geographically distributed data cen-

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS Examples of data protection and security concepts at the EMO

Juliane Schneider, Junior Product Manager at symmedia, emphasises: "When it comes to handling sensitive data, any human negligence poses a security risk." tres. Other ad-vantages include its easy scalability, its high level of security, its use of state-of-the-art technolo-gies and encryption, and its service continuity. These guarantee that the solutions will work even in the event of negative scenarios," emphasises IIoT Strategy Manager Echteler. From experience we know that it is not possible for a company's own IT staff also to run a cloud. This is a task for suitably qualified specialists. Symmedia, on the other hand, of-

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fers its customers hybrid solutions. "This gives our customers flexibility combined with outstanding security. And this in turn gives them full data sovereignty," says Junior Product Manager Juliane Schneider. They can decide for themselves which data they want to store centrally, for example in a cloud, and which is only to be stored locally. "We have found that our customers are open to central solutions, but always want to be able to store specific data locally, depending on how sensitive it is."

At the EMO Hannover, Symmedia will be showcasing a digital factory to demonstrate its soft-ware's capabilities and show its practical applications in daily production. There will be live demonstrations, for example, of condition monitoring, alarm scenarios and remote services. Visi-tors will also be able to find out about predictive maintenance, data protection and security concepts, and pick up information on the use of Symmedia software across systems made by dif-ferent manufacturers. Balluff will be presenting productivity enhancement solutions in the metalworking field. These in-clude innovative concepts for intelligent manufacturing systems. Chief among these are a retrofit tool management system and solutions for continuous machine tool process monitoring.

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Zero-point clamping systems from AMF support revolutionary hybrid production Champions of the Substrate (Wiesbaden/Fellbach) You can neither see nor hear them when they are being used. And yet they are the true masters when it comes to reducing set-up times: The Zero-Point clamping system from AMF. With it, set-up times can be reduced by as much as 90 per cent. This has gone down well with the people in charge at MATSUURA. For their revolutionary hybrid machines which combine additive and subtractive methods, the AMF Zero-Point system ensures that everything runs quickly and seamlessly and that the cost-effectiveness is right. "The AMF Zero-Point system makes the set-up processes in the systems of our Lumex range demonstrate maximum levels of repeat accuracy, process reliability and efficiency", enthuses Holger Hermann, Head of Application Engineering for AM Technology at MATSUURA Europe GmbH in Wiesbaden, Germany. In this way, the clamping experts from AMF (Andreas Maier Fellbach) once again prove that they are at the apex of development with their clamping modules specially developed for additive manufacturing. This is especially the case since the Lumex systems do not represent conventional machines for additive manufacturing, if such a young technology can even be mentioned using such terms. Additive and subtractive combined in one machine With the hybrid additive manufacturing systems of the Lumex range, MATSUURA unifies selective laser sintering (SLS) and high-speed milling

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Holger Herrmann, Matsuura (left): "The AMF Zero-Point system makes the set-up processes in the systems of our Lumex range demonstrate maximum levels of repeat accuracy, process reliability and efficiency". Manuel Nau, AMF: "We know about the strengths of our zero-point clamping technology, and also with regard to the difficult field of additive manufacturing. This is where we delight in impressing with the unbeatable fact of time-saving". (HSM) into one machine. Through this combination of laser sintering and high-speed milling, components can be fully processed on one machine. Extra finishing work by means of other processing methods on other machines is only necessary where there are special requirements. The AMF Zero-Point system brings with it the best conditions for both sides of production. In the method offered by MATSUURA in two Lumex machines, unique up until now, metal powder is turned into any three-dimensional shape desired by means of selective laser melting in the powder bed in layers. In this process, a mirror galvanometer directs fibre lasers 500 or 1,000 watts in strength, depending on the

design of the machine, to the intended point with fine precision. After every pass, the scrapers spread the metal powder out again on the machine table that has been moved downwards and away. On the face of it, this is a 3D printing process, as people would understand it. However, after ten powder layers each with a layer thickness of 50 Îźm, something special happens. The base or substrate plate does not move downwards another time so that the coater can apply the next layer of powder. Instead, it stays where it is for the time being. The milling head emerges "from the depth of the space" It pops out of the void of the milling head, whose high-performance spin-

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS dle accelerates the cutter to up to 45,000 rpm. It then moves along the outer contours and rough-machines a section of the allowance with an R2 ball cutter, for example. "Milling can not yet be performed to the final dimension, however, since the hot material is still cooling down and the geometry is therefore still changing", explains Hermann. This process is repeated for all ten layers generated by the laser. A tool changer holds 20 tools at the ready for this purpose. Amongst them are pre-cutters for rough-machining the machining allowance generated by the laser melting. After three times ten layers – or 1.5 mm – the final contour is created with the finishing tool at the points at which the component has cooled down somewhat. "In comparison with a pure AM process, here we achieve greater precision, especially in places which are subsequently difficult to access, or which can no longer be accessed at all", ensures Herrmann. This goes down to 0.005 mm and down to Rz 3.5 μm compared with 0.05 mm and Rz 25 μm. Furthermore, everything that is made possible by the ideal design options – such as cooling ducts in tool and mouldmaking – cannot be acknowledged exhaustively here. Thus, in most cases at the end of the processes, the machine-finished component with the base plate can be approved by the AMF zero-point modules. Invisible performance of the clamping technology in the substrate So far the attention has been on the visible operations at the top area of the machine table. What has been going on in the substrate in the meanwhile remains hidden from the observer, but is no less critical. The zero-point clamping modules specially tailored by AMF for additive manufacturing meet the specific requirements and accelerate the set-up processes involved. Carefully selected materials and processes are used here so that the zero-point clamping

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Champions in the substrate: With the Zero-Point clamping system from AMF, set-up times can be reduced by up to 90 per cent. modules can defy the sometimes adverse conditions. For example, very high temperatures prevail in the 3D printing process. At the melting point of the metal in the powder bed it is 1,400°C. Even if the clamping modules are underneath a 30 mm-thick plate, temperatures of up to 150° and higher still occur there. AMF therefore uses seals and media which can withstand this. In order for process reliability and repeat accuracy not to suffer from the temperature fluctuations due to the constant heating up and cooling down, the Fellbach operation uses carefully selected materials and processes. This is the only way the zero-point clamping modules can meet the requirements. Hardened surfaces are just one example in this regard. And then they have to satisfy the usual requirements of the subtractive manufacturing processes. "But that is of course no problem", reassures Manuel Nau, Sales Manager at AMF, "because that is where we come in". Direct workpiece clamping: Base plate is part of the product K5.3 built-in clamping modules from AMF are used in the Lumex models from MATSUURA for additive manufacturing. They open pneumatically at

an operating pressure from 5 bar, which is available in every production hall – and this happens with just one connection. Five modules pick up the clamping bolts, which are housed under the 3D base plate. This is more or less direct workpiece clamping. "This is because our customers from tool and mouldmaking do not subsequently cut the base plate off from the finished 3D product at all," stresses Herrmann, who cites subsequent warping of most hardened shapes as the reason for this. The K5.3 built-in clamping modules achieve draw-in forces of 1.5 kN and holding forces of 13 kN. Locking is performed through spring force so that, following the opening and insertion of the clamping bolts, the pressure pipes can be disconnected at any time. Due to the optimal contour of the clamping bolt, a tilt-free retraction and extension, and thus a secure locking of the clamping modules, is ensured – even if the plate has been put on with a slight incline. The optional, integrated blow-out mechanism of the clamping modules and a contact control mechanism for querying as part of automated processes are not installed in the Lumex systems, but can be supplied by AMF from the factory at any time.

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS in most cases at the end of the processes, the machine-finished component with the base plate can be approved by the AMF zero-point modules. Invisible performance of the clamping technology in the substrate

With the Lumex hybrid additive manufacturing systems, MATSUURA unifies selective laser sintering (SLS) and high-speed milling (HSM) into one machine. Under no circumstances does MATSUURA wish to relinquish the speed it can achieve during setting up with the AMF Zero-Point system, however. Herrmann also explains why: "By reducing the production time by up to 65 per cent, such as with injection moulding tools for example, with the hybrid method, we are offering our Lumex customers an enormous efficiency advantage. Here, the ZeroPoint system from AMF offers an optimal supplement for many applications which contributes to the efficiency of the entire process". Before the AMF sales engineer, who has long been acquainted with MATSUURA, had suggested the zero-point solution, clamping had been performed

laboriously with conventional technology. Back then, the base plate was bolted down to the machine table with four screws and aligned every time with the dial gauge and calibrated with a zero-point sensor. This cumbersome calibration process had to be performed repeatedly for every component. "With the AMF ZeroPoint system, the set-up time can be reduced to a tenth of the time", buoys Herrmann. This goes down to 0.005 mm and down to Rz 3.5 μm compared with 0.05 mm and Rz 25 μm. Furthermore, everything that is made possible by the ideal design options – such as cooling ducts in tool and mouldmaking – cannot be acknowledged exhaustively here. Thus,

So far the attention has been on the visible operations at the top area of the machine table. What has been going on in the substrate in the meanwhile remains hidden from the observer, but is no less critical. The zero-point clamping modules specially tailored by AMF for additive manufacturing meet the specific requirements and accelerate the set-up processes involved. Carefully selected materials and processes are used here so that the zero-point clamping modules can defy the sometimes adverse conditions. For example, very high temperatures prevail in the 3D printing process. At the melting point of the metal in the powder bed it is 1,400°C. Even if the clamping modules are underneath a 30 mm-thick plate, temperatures of up to 150° and higher still occur there. AMF therefore uses seals and media which can withstand this. In order for process reliability and repeat accuracy not to suffer from the temperature fluctuations due to the constant heating up and cooling down, the Fellbach operation uses carefully selected materials and processes. This is the only way the zero-point clamping modules can meet the requirements. Hardened surfaces are just one example in this regard. And then they have to satisfy the usual requirements of the subtractive manufacturing processes. "But that is of course no problem", reassures Manuel Nau, Sales Manager at AMF, "because that is where we come in". Direct workpiece clamping: Base plate is part of the product

With the AMF Zero-Point system, the set-up time can be reduced to a tenth of the time.

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K5.3 built-in clamping modules from AMF are used in the Lumex models from MATSUURA for additive manu-

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS

The milling head: Whose high-performance spindle accelerates the cutter to up to 45,000 rpm. facturing. They open pneumatically at an operating pressure from 5 bar, which is available in every production hall – and this happens with just one connection. Five modules pick up the clamping bolts, which are housed under the 3D base plate. This is more or less direct workpiece clamping. "This is because our customers from tool and mouldmaking do not subsequently cut the base plate off from the finished 3D product at all," stresses Herrmann, who cites subsequent warping of most hardened shapes as the reason for this.

tion of the clamping bolts, the pressure pipes can be disconnected at any time. Due to the optimal contour of the clamping bolt, a tilt-free retraction and extension, and thus a secure locking of the clamping modules, is ensured – even if the plate has been put on with a slight incline. The optional, integrated blow-out mechanism of the clamping modules and a contact control mechanism for querying as part of automated processes are not installed in the Lumex systems, but can be supplied by AMF from the factory at any time.

The K5.3 built-in clamping modules achieve draw-in forces of 1.5 kN and holding forces of 13 kN. Locking is performed through spring force so that, following the opening and inser-

Under no circumstances does MATSUURA wish to relinquish the speed it can achieve during setting up with the AMF Zero-Point system, however. Herrmann also explains why: "By re-

ducing the production time by up to 65 per cent, such as with injection moulding tools for example, with the hybrid method, we are offering our Lumex customers an enormous efficiency advantage. Here, the ZeroPoint system from AMF offers an optimal supplement for many applications which contributes to the efficiency of the entire process". Before the AMF sales engineer, who has long been acquainted with MATSUURA, had suggested the zero-point solution, clamping had been performed laboriously with conventional technology. Back then, the base plate was bolted down to the machine table with four screws and aligned every time with the dial gauge and calibrated with a zero-point sensor. This cumbersome calibration process had to be performed repeatedly for every component. "With the AMF ZeroPoint system, the set-up time can be reduced to a tenth of the time", buoys Herrmann. Clamping technology indicates an efficiency advantage For Günter Brunn, the MATSUURA sales manager, the equipping of the Lumex machines with the AMF ZeroPoint system represents consistency. "Through the lightning-quick set-up operations, we are signalling to our customers right from the clamping stage that they are in the Champions League with our Lumex systems and have an advantage in terms of efficiency". The fact that a part of this champion operates in the substrate and cannot be seen most of the time does not pose a problem for Manuel Nau: "We know about the strengths of our zero-point clamping technology, and also with regard to the difficult field of additive manufacturing. This is where we delight in impressing with the unbeatable fact of time-saving".

For MATSUURA, the Zero-Point system from AMF offers an optimal supplement for many applications, which contributes to the efficiency of the entire process. www.metalmachinemagazine.com

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Cobots – Successful collaboration between man and robot EMO Hannover 2019 showcasing robotic and automation solutions for manufacturers Robotics and automation are among the key technologies for ensuring lasting in-ternational success. Cobots interact directly with humans and give manufacturing companies a competitive edge in the market. At EMO Hannover 2019, trade visi-tors will find countless automation solutions and collaborative robots aimed at en-hancing productivity. Automation and digitalisation can be used to make manufacturing processes more efficient. Of particular interest here are cobots. These collaborative industri-al robots work together with humans – without special protective measures such as fences or demarcated areas. In which processes are cobots already being used? How can collisions and any resulting risk of injury be avoided? Robotics manufacturers, suppliers of various peripheral components for automation solutions, as well as safety and scientific experts will be providing an overview of the current situation and giving forecasts for future developments.

The more closely man and machine can collaborate, the more efficient robot applications will become. However, this involves increased safety requirements, as each application has its own individual safety aspects which need to be considered. sponse to the demographic shift." Different validation methods have to be applied to human-robot collaboration (HRC). For example, it is imperative that measurements are taken to determine the safety risks involved in any possible collisions. Pilz has de-veloped its own method for this. A system measures the forces acting on the hu-man body and compares them with the ISO/TS 15066 limit values for collabora-tive robots. "The challenge is to eliminate any

Making working life easier – and more ergonomic "Humans are indispensable for intelligent production," says Jochen Vetter, Man-ager of Robot Safety at Pilz GmbH & Co. KG in Ostfildern. "Robots can perform physically demanding or repetitive activities, leaving the humans to take care of more sophisticated tasks. Automation can thus also provide a re-

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boundaries between the working areas of hu-mans and machines. In addition to the dangers posed by the robot, human movements must also be taken into account," says the robotics safety expert. "The speed of these is not always predictable, nor are human reflexes or the sud-den arrival of other people. "Collisions, however, should never result in injury." These must be prevented by the use of more reliable control systems and intelli-gent, dynamic sensors built into the robot. In addition, it is important to set reliable safety standards based on normative principles. "The interaction will develop 'organically', for example in terms of language and gestures," Vetter is convinced. "This will take HRC to a new quality level for a dif-ferent category of actions. In addition, HRC solutions will in future be linked to the factory control system via OPC UA or Industry 4.0 RAMI standards. Potential ar-eas of application lie not in large-series production, but in the manufacture of medium and small series. HRC makes sense in situations where employees can be relieved – ergonomically – of physically strenuous tasks, such as in maintenance work." Gripping workpieces of up to 8 kg using safety intelligence

The Baden-Württemberg-based automation specialists are aiming to provide robot manufacturers and integrators with independently tested co-act grippers that can be used for rapid implementation and certification of collaborative scenarios.

"The biomechanical limits specified by ISO/TS 15066 have so far restricted the use of cobots to the handling of small parts, for example in assembly applications in the electronics industry or in the pick & placing of housings, turned and milled parts, etc.," says Prof.

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS Markus Glück, Managing Director of Research & Devel-opment, Chief Innovation Officer at Schunk GmbH & Co. KG, Lauffen/Neckar. "Our EGL-C long-stroke gripper, however, allows a new scale of components to be manipulated. For the first time it is possible to handle workpieces up to 8 kg safely with form-fit gripping. This opens up great potential, including for machine tools or in assembly." Thanks to integrated safety intelligence (patent pending), the Co-act (collaborative actuator) EGL-C has succeeded in achieving gripping forces of up to 450 N in collaborative applications. This is around three times greater than before and represents a world first – and is also on show at EMO Hannover 2019. "HRC will radically change the world of work," predicts Prof. Glück. "The focus is on improving the ergonomics, creating more flexible work processes, increasing efficiency and optimising processes. Intelligent gripper sys-tems will permit higher component weights to be handled in the future. In addition, 24V technology will enable them to be deployed on mobile platforms which will gain in importance as a result. There is also great potential for the use of light-weight robots to assist in assembly." A new era in machine tool charging "Collaborative and mobile robot systems offer new possibilities for the automation of machine tools. For the first time, automation can break out of its rigid con-straints and achieve unprecedented levels of flexibility and productivity thanks to innovative robotic solutions," reports Peter Pühringer, Division Manager at Stäubli Robotics in Bayreuth. In order to maximise this flexibility, Stäubli has designed its new six-axis TX2 generation for universal use. The robots in the new version can collaborate directly with humans. They are also avail-

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give innovative enterprises an unprecedented competitive edge. At EMO Hannover we will be presenting these solutions to a mass audience." Sensors help avoid possible collisions Division Manager Peter Pühringer with the new six-axis generation of TX2 robots, also on show at EMO Hannover 2019.

A crucial and topical issue is how the CE process is handled when robots are used at different stations. able as mobile and collabora-tive robot systems. "This heralds a new era in machine tool charging," states Pühringer, convinced. The robots work both in stand-alone operation and directly with machine operators. Mobile versions of the robot can easily link different machine tools together and take care of the complete workflow in an Industry 4.0 en-vironment. "This unbelievable flexibility allows completely new, digitally networked production processes to be created," says Pühringer. "These will significantly in-crease productivity and

Human-robot collaboration (HRC) must rule out the possibility of injury in the event of a collision. In the future, intelligent gripping systems will also enable the handling of greater component weights.

"At present, cobots are frequently used for simple handling processes, such as charging machines. Although there is often no safety fence, they are equipped with additional safety features and are not generally used for direct human-robot collaboration," says Prof. Gunther Reinhart, holder of the Chair of Industrial Man-agement and Assembly Technology at the iwb (Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management) at the Technical University of Munich. "Work is currently focussing on HRC planning support, on safety, and also on instructing the robots. Safety-related innovations are aimed at detecting possible collisions in advance through the use of different types of sensors – such as capacitive or ultrasonic sensors – or cameras." Many companies remain unsure of how to comply with the current standards. "In particular, it is important to know how to interpret the values given in ISO/TS15066," says Reinhart. "Once the legal issues of occupa-tional safety have been clarified, collaborative robots are likely to be used mainly in assembly," says Reinhart, looking to the future. "Other major potential applica-tions include ergonomic assistance. For this, however, there must first be more HRC robots which are capable of handling higher payloads. The Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management will be on hand at EMO Hannover 2019 to provide further information to trade visitors." Author: Dag Heidecker, daxTR – Technik Redaktion, Wermelskirchen (near Cologne)

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Metalworking inspired by the stars EMO Hannover 2019: Astrophysicists looking to optimise milling

Astrophysicists Theo Steininger and Maksim Greiner are looking for new applications for artificial intelligence software.

Recently, even astrophysicists have started taking an interest in EMO Hannover. Garching-based Dr. Theo Steininger and Dr. Maksim Greiner, former PhD students at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, have developed Artificial Intelligence (AI) software that makes use of the latest statistical analysis methods developed for astrophysics. They have successfully deployed the software for door assembly by a German premium car manufacturer, but are now looking to conquer the metalworking market as well. They are

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hoping to discover potential applications in Hanover in September.

Difficulty in identifying end positions

The new, statistical approach of the young entrepreneurs from Garching in Bavaria permits the real-time evaluation of machining processes. This is still some way off, but the usefulness of the method has already been proven by the automotive industry. In an effort to reduce costly reworking, it was looking for an AI system that could be used to mount doors more accurately and with greater process stability.

The task is described in a white paper by the two ex-scientists: "Determin-ing the best position for mounting a vehicle door is difficult. Neither the door nor the body have been painted at the time of installation. There are no windows, accessories or seals. How all these factors influence the door position through deformation and additional weight must be antici-pated and compensated for if the desired end position is to be reached. That's why employees always have to re-

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS align the doors manually after assembly." The solution devised by the astrophysicists, who recently founded the company Erium GmbH in Garching, is to combine machine intelligence with the knowledge and experience of process experts. Based on this additional information, the AI software can calculate the ideal assembly positions after only a few vehicles have been built. "Fast machine learning is very important for us," explains Theo Steining-er. "This distinguishes it from the highly flexible neural networks, which require a lot of data. We have to make do with very little data – in contrast to other typical Big Data tasks, which can be solved at great technical ex-pense and using correspondingly fast, high-performance computers." With such a small amount of data, however, the degree of technical effort involved is minimal, and laptops are currently sufficient for the purpose. Much greater effort is required, by contrast, for developing the algorithms that analyse and process in real time the data needed for the process. "Before the actual software is installed, we analyse the problem along with the customer's experts," explains Steininger. "Together, we define the optimisation goal and the critical process steps." Expert knowledge as the basis of the analysis These expert discussions allow insignificant parameters to be excluded that play no or only a minor role. A clearly defined network of dependen-cies is thus created step by step, which, according to Steininger, can be used to create a fast-working algorithm. "In this way we abstract facts that experts in the

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field take for granted, and explain them to the program – such as Ohm's law or the fact that velocity is the derivative of place after time," says the astrophysicist. "However, these are non-trivial relation-ships that a neural network must first learn from the data." Yet in contrast to such relatively selfevident aspects, there are other questions that the process experts must first consider. For example, whether a car door has actually been deformed by a new type of sealing tape, as they predicted based on their experience. "Instead of the usual method of 'Give us all the data and let's see what we can do with it', we take a different approach," says Steininger. "We put the human element first, exploiting the expert's knowledge as the foundation of the analysis." So far, the method has mainly been used in the automotive industry, but the Garching-based company is now also targeting machining processes. Potential uses include milling spindles, the rotational behaviour of which deteriorates with increasing wear. The spindles start to wobble to varying degrees, depending on the type of wear. Enriched with expert knowledge, the astrophysicists' algorithm can now optimise how to use the spindle depending on the degree of wear. But Steininger is already thinking ahead: "The question as to whether the higher spindle wear is justified when machining border areas is of particular relevance in components which need to be manufactured in a very short time. Our program consid-ers not only the machine parameters themselves, but also soft factors such as customer relationships." For this, however, the Garching-based experts need ac-

cess to their customers' production and quality data. EMO Hannover 2019 – a source of detailed information Yet this was not the only reason that the astrophysicist wished to obtain detailed information about EMO Hannover 2019. Steininger will be on the joint start-up stand of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (BMWi) in Hanover. He is interested in showcasing his company, but he also wants to find out more about highly complex and extremely high-speed processes, some of which are too fast to be controlled by humans. He is particularly interested in how the digitalisation wave is progressing, precisely because their AI program requires such production and quality data. Steininger: "That's why having personal discussions with exhibitors and users is so valuable to me."

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS

The CHIRON Group is appearing at EMO with a lot of debuts: new machining centers, software and automation solutions - Premier: the double-spindle CHIRON DZ 25 P with 800 mm spindle distance - Automated and highly-productive: new variants of the 16 series - New: STAMA MT 733 one plus trend-setting in complete machining - SmartLine software solutions for even better productivity CHIRON Group is attending EMO in Hanover from September 16 to September 21 with innovative must-sees relating to machining. Machining centers from CHIRON, STAMA and SCHERER, new automation solutions and an extended software program await visitors to the exhibition. CHIRON: new variants of the 16 series and world premier of DZ 25 P At EMO, CHIRON is combining the new FZ 16 S five axis with VariocellPallet pallet automation for the first time. The new automation solution is aimed at machining small batch sizes and complex workpieces autonomously. Furthermore, the new DZ 16 W five axis will be presented live in action in Hanover. The highly-productive 5-axis double spindle machining center has already convinced those visiting the CHIRON OPEN HOUSE because of its unique combination of dynamics and precision.

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Autonomous machining of complex workpieces – at the EMO, CHIRON is combining the new FZ 16 S five axis with VariocellPallet pallet automation for the first time. The CHIRON DZ 25 P is celebrating its world premier at EMO, designed for productive machining of large components in the automotive industry and aviation. With the 25 series, CHIRON is achieving a combination of productivity, precision and flexibility that has never been seen in this class before. With a spindle distance of 800 millimeters, the DZ 25 P is predestined for double-spindle machining of aluminum structural components. It is operated and loaded on separate sides, which allows ideal access to the work area and a good insight into the process. The machine only requires a small amount of floor space thanks to its compact design.

Furthermore, its optimal dynamics make it a compelling offering in this competitive environment. Visitors can experience the DZ 25 P live in a new light in CHIRON's interactive showroom. STAMA MT – trend-setting in complete machining for complex workpieces that are difficult to machine Whether from the bar or the chuck, STAMA keeps setting new milestones in complete machining with the MT 7 and MT 8 systems' milling and turning machines offering innovative machining solutions. Since September 2018, STAMA has been offering new machining centers for 6-side milling and turning in

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS Automation is at the heart of retrofit specialist CMS's work as well. In Hanover, the company is showing how an out-dated machining center can be enhanced by a modern automation solution and how this can significantly improve productivity. Automation is gaining significant importance across different industries. That's why retrofits are an attractive and cost-efficient way for many customers to remain futureproof. MT 733 one plus: Complete machining of complex components and difficult-to-cut materials. one set-up in the form of the MT 733 series, especially for complex components and materials that are difficult to machine. The MT 733 one plus will enjoy its world premier in Hanover. Like all models of the MT 733 series, it has a gantry design: this allows the machining process to gain a significant amount of stability on a thermal, mechanical and static level. The GalaxieÂŽ drive system in the B-axis bolsters this effect with its extreme power density, stiffness and positioning precision. The final result is highly dynamic and highly precise milling/turning and drilling operations, simultaneous 5-axis machining and integrated automation. These are the best conditions for a successful "first part good part" strategy. The MT 838 TWIN, presented by STAMA, is a HSK-A100 milling and turning machining center that is unique in double-spindle milling and turning of chuck components with a spindle distance of 600 mm.

pertise with the VDZ 320 multifunctional vertical pickup turning machining center. The series can be precisely tailored to the customer's requirements thanks to numerous equipment options and variants. Options include another milling spindle and special modules for ball turning, bearing track milling and hobbing. An additional Y-axis in the main spindle ensures high productivity during complex machining. CMS presents automation solutions that can be retrofitted

SmartLine software portfolio extended This year, the CHIRON Group is extending its SmartLine program with ConditionLine and ProtectLine. The software modules can be implemented individually or together. They support the user in taking even better advantage of the machining centers' capabilities. ConditionLine allows precise planning of maintenance work and repairs. The software is reliable at detecting abnormal operating behavior and wear in a timely manner. ProtectLine has a preventative function in protecting physical machining centers from collisions with help from a digital twin. The virtual machining center always runs ahead of the real one and shuts it down in good time if there are any collision risks.

Vertical turning from SCHERER for the customer's needs Highly productive turning takes center stage again at SCHERER. The company is demonstrating its ex-

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The SmartLine modules ensure process reliability, higher productivity and production optimization.

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Castrol SmartControl: A smarter way to manage metal working fluids Fluid monitoring: essential but less than perfect

Concentration - pH level

Metal working fluid (MWF) management is a critical support activity in manufacturing operations; one that directly impacts productivity and efficiency. “At Castrol we know that managing cutting fluids requires many manual processes, like sampling, testing, intervention and documentation, which are an inefficient use of our customers’ time and resources. That’s why we’ve created Castrol SmartControl, our automated, realtime condition monitoring solution. It can maximise the effectiveness and efficiency of our customers’ cutting fluid management and limit the associated HSSE risks”, said Mathias Buschbeck, Global Industrial Leader at Castrol. Under control

- Conductivity - Temperature - Volume flow

Castrol SmartControl is the new way for industrial Control Freaks like you to monitor and control your central system of metal working fluids automatically and in real-time. To make this happen, our liquid engineers have joined forces with German control system experts Tiefenbach. engineers to get on with other valuable tasks that would have traditionally slipped down their agenda.

Any variation away from specification triggers an alert to enterprise, production and control IT systems. It does without manual sampling, meaning no loss of time while samples are transported to the lab to be analysed, and ensures there are no delays on account of reports being sent late. SmartControl even self-cleans and self-calibrates, in order to maintain ongoing accuracy.

SmartControl continually measures the following MWF parameters:

SmartControl is, as the name suggests, a smarter way to deal with metalworking fluid management. It moves monitoring and management to a new level, and takes repetitive, dirty, and dangerous tasks out of engineers’ hands. Real-time condition monitoring is designed to improve MWF management, minimise errors, and maintain fluids and their performance by integrating Castrol’s advanced XBB MWFs with Industry 4.0 technology. Castrol’s XBB industrial fluid technology is proven to cut unscheduled interventions, improve efficiency, reduce waste, and allows

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Castrol SmartControl gives you real-time measurement of your vital metal working fluid parameters and allows you to automate many of the tasks you currently do manually. www.metalmachinemagazine.com


COMPANY-PRODUCTS

JUARISTI's new TH3-MT Multifunction Center JUARISTI will present a new development in high-productivity multitasking machining centres at the EMO fair, as well as a new range of universal 5-axis heads Productivity, increased autonomy and improved accuracy. These are the axes of JUARISTI's innovation strategy, which in recent months has led to the development of the new TH3-MT Multifunction Center, optimised for highly reliable boring, milling and Turning operations, and the new ACD7 and ACD8 universal heads, designed for maximum precision 5-axis machining. For JUARISTI, a company specialising in the design and manufacture of premium machining solutions, the EMO 2019 trade fair will be a huge opportunity to present the most disruptive developments of the last year. On this occasion, the company will be exhibiting the advantages of the new TH3-MT Multitasking Machining Center, its commitment to fulfil the needs of customers who demand a machine capable of performing multiple milling and turning operations with greater productivity and precise results, and the new range of 5-axis universal heads.

prehensive automation package and has been completely redesigned to improve ergonomics, extend service life and optimise swarf and cutting fluid management. The TH3-MT continues to offer the key benefits of TH series solutions: high dynamics (up to 40m/min rapid feed with 3m/s² accelerations) and interoperability with the next generation high feed and high swarf removal tools. Thanks to its symmetrical design with a column-centred head and 4 guides (two front and two rear), it offers unbeatable precision, thermal stability and high cutting power.

The major breakthrough has been the introduction of a new special head for turning and a turning table. JUARISTI's new head, dubbed the ACD8, is a universal model that allows 5-axis machining and reaches rotation speeds of up to 8,000rpm, with high power (60kW) and spindle torque (1,600Nm). The milling and turning table included in the machine will have a Ø1600 chuck diameter (options up to Ø2000) with a 400rpm maximum speed and a 5 tonnes maximum part capacity in turning and 10 tonnes in milling. Rotation speeds reach 400rpm. The new machine features multi-

The new machining center is a new development in the TH series, the JUARISTI 5-axis Multifunctional Centers, which this time includes a milling and turning table and a special milling head with an optimised design for milling and turning operations. The centre includes a com-

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COMPANY-PRODUCTS both features and performance, they stand out for a rotation speed of up to 6,000rpm.

ple automated systems that can be adapted to customer requirements, including a quick-change matrix tool changer with the capacity for up to 200 tools and an FMS multipallet system. Finally, the TH3-MT has gone through an extensive redesign process, achieving a more stylish and ergonomic ensemble. The new design achieves a more compact layout for better floor space usage. Plus, it optimises the swarf and cutting-fluid collection system, improving the solution's autonomy and avoiding unproductive downtimes due to manual cleaning. Another design enhancement is the stainless steel housing of the full enclosed guarding, which protects and extends the life of the machine. Its excellent ergonomics mean that the operator has perfect control of operations, as well as the meticulous arrangement of the

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main components to facilitate monitoring and maintenance, with maximum safety. New range of milling and turning heads JUARISTI heads are well-known in the market thanks to their very high rigidity and great performance. Now our design department delivers a stroke of genius with a 5-axis universal head model that will enable high-precision milling, turning and boring while minimising tool change time. The results of this innovative drive have been the development of not one, but two top universal head models targeted at different types of users: the ACD7 and the ACD8. The ACD7 stands out for its double continuous rotation axis (horizontal and 45º) and for achieving very fast repositioning movements (from 0 to 180º in 7 seconds). In terms of

On the other hand, the new ACD8 spindle is a development that integrates all the technology of the ACD7 but which also allows turning operations using the spindle unit. It has a continuous 45º rotation axis with a double pinion system, with spindle speeds of up to 8,000rpm. The head, thanks to its sturdiness, enables demanding turning operations by automatically changing the turning attachment. Due to their fast positioning times and interpolation capacity with the other axes, both models achieve a drastic saving in tool change times, greatly increasing productivity. These new developments are part of the C.A.S.T. strategy (Connectivity, Automation, Service and Technology), concepts that guide JUARISTI's customer service relationships. These areas will be the focal points of the company’s efforts in innovation and development to satisfy all the customers' needs for maximum versatility, to improve businesses through high-level services and to build interconnected machines that work together efficiently and intelligently. JUARISTI, experts in milling and boring multifunction centers, has been a leader in the machine tooling industry for more than 75 years. Its headquarters are located in Azkoitia (Gipuzkoa, Spain) and its product range covers all types of milling and boring machines, as well as multifunction centers.

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MetalMachine Magazine EMO Fair Special Issue is being prepared  

MetalMachine Magazine EMO Fair Special Issue is being prepared

MetalMachine Magazine EMO Fair Special Issue is being prepared  

MetalMachine Magazine EMO Fair Special Issue is being prepared

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