Page 1

Aiysha Alsane a sample of work


Note to reader:

C O N TENTS

This is a selection of work that I feel most comprehensive and expressive of my abilities. Consider it a lot of a little bit as opposed to a little bit of a lot. For inquiries or more in-depth description of the work, please find the contact information and do no hesistate to reach out.

I. rĂŠsumĂŠ II. architecture as... ........................................ collaboration ...................................................... order ................................................. gradient ............................................... elevation III. thesis: ........... improvisation in public places IV.appendix: .................................. industrial design .................................... graphic abillties ................................................... articles


CONTACT

Aiysha Alsane alsane.aiysha@gmail.com 99 55 77 77

EDUCATION

aiyshaalsane.com linkedin.com/in/aiyshaalsane issuu.com/aiyshaalsane archinect/aiysha

VIRGINIA TECH B.ARCH 2015

Dean’s List. Minors: Industrial Design, Landscape Architecture

RIVA S. VITALE | Spring 2014

Centre for European Studies and Architecture / Architecture Residency Program 1 of 10 undergraduate architecture students admitted

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY ABROAD | Summer 2014

Pre-thesis research and travel: Rome, Bagnaia, Pienza, Siena, Venice, Verona, Vienna, Brno, Prague, Berlin, Hamburg, Copenhagen.

EXPERIENCE SENIOR EDITOR ARCH2O LLC | 2013-current

after interning with them previously, promoted to junior editor then to senior editor, ~50 articles published Role: currently leading 2 interns, and 1 junior editor. I assign topics, edit the work, coordinate with other editors and administration, and publish to the website.

AGi ARCHITECTS | Intern 2012. Kuwait City, Kuwait.

on the winning entry for competition to build the General Department of Information System Role: early programmatic requirements, study of flow of people, produced diagrams for presentation (Adobe Illustrator), worked on site plans (AutoCAD), documented sketches and findings, went to client meetings, learned to document legibly and proficiently present ideas

2015 DESIGN BIENNIAL BOSTON | July 16, 2015

Hired as construction/fabrication labor by Nathan King from MASS Design Group, entry is collaborative effort between MASS, students of the Digital Mentorship Collaborative at Virginia Tech, and faculty.The pavillion is currently installed in Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston for the next six months to one year

DESIGN/BUILDLAB Description: Project Based Experiential Learning program at VT focused on the research, development and implementation of innovative construction methods and architectural designs, where students design and build the project themselves. Project: Smith Creek Pedestrian Bridge (Phase II Smith Creek Park) Field Skills: - Completed the 12 courses in construction safety, most certifications are valid until 2018 (Article 6) - Trained in MIG welding Technical Skills: - Produced full set of Construction Documents and full set of Shop Drawings - PR team. My role: documentation of the process, contacting town officials or the public, and coordinating with the college - Personally in charge of the foundation drawings, contacting the concrete manufacturer, and producing the concrete take-offs for the budgeting team - On the railing design detailing team, produced drawings and mock-ups of the railing detail

AWARDS & HONORS

For Smith Creek Park collectively, continually recognized & published AZURE MAGAZINE AZ AWARDS 2014: International A+ Student Award VSAIA ARCHITECTURE HONOR AWARD 2014: AIA Virginia Excellence in Architecture ARCHITIZER AWARDS 2014 Popular Choice: Architecture + Urban Transformation Category

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP AIAS. American Institute of Architects, Students. Virginia Tech. Since Fall 2012. − Vice President of Public Relations Fall 2013

Alpha Rho Chi. Professional fraternity of architecture and allied arts. Since Fall 2011. AIGA. The Professional Association for Design. Since Fall 2010 NOMAS. The National Organization of Minority Architects, Students. 2012-14. XYZ Gallery. Blacksburg, VA. Involved 2010-12. still active: AIA, Alpha Rho Chi, AIGA PUBLICATIONS

Around 50 articles published to date, critquing art, architecture, and design published on Arch2O, refer to the appendix for the full list Alsane, Aiysha, and Fernanda Rosales. Pears National Centre for Autism Education. N.p.: OnSite, n.d. design/buildLAB, 3 Apr. 2013. Web

ARTWORK

GRAPHICS FOR BOOK

visualized graphics for Prof. J. Boyer’s textbook (20+ collages)

COMMISSIONED PAINTING

currently finalizing a requested painting for Mr. Scott Stanina in Burnsville, Minnesota

PHOTOGRAPHY

partook in international annual exhibitions: Hamasat 5 & 6 in Qatif, Saudi Arabia

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Virginia Tech Percussion Ensemble (VTP) advertising poster for print and web, event took place April 18th, 2015

SKILLS

LANGUAGE

Fluent: Arabic and English; Working Proficiency French and Italian AutoCAD Rhinocerous 3DS Max 2D & 3D SketchUp Revit VRAY Hand Rendering

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIII IIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

Word OFFICE Excel Powerpoint

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

Welding Woodworking laserCAMM FABRIC3D Printing ATION Plasma Cutting CNC Routing

ADOBE

InDesign Photoshop Illustrator Acrobat Flash

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Architecture as Collaboration Smith Creek Pedestrian Bridge

In my third-year, I partook in the continually recognized design/buildLAB at Virginia Tech. The team of 17 third-year students designed and built the Smith Creek Pedestrian Bridge, phase II of award-winning and well published Smith Creek Park in Clifton Forge, VA. In a collaborative effort, after lots of tugging and pulling, we managed to arrive at one design that is a result of all of 17 students’ work. Then, we built it.

photographs on right: © Jeff Goldberg/ESTO photographs on left: © Aiysha Alsane On bottom: © design/buildLAB personally worked on renders for client meeting & unveiling ceremony, with four team-members 4


This experience has taught me how to raise funding by means of grants. It taught me how to communicate with local manufacturers to figure out some unconventional ways to build. It taught me how to draw construction documents, apply for permits, weld steel, work wood, make jigs, build formwork, pour foundations, re-grade land, lay gravel, and so much more. It taught me how we could turn raw material into architecture. Considering the difficulties of collaborative work and the strong convictions designers generally have, we were successful in our collaboration, and we have grown as designers at an advantageously early stage in our education.

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Because the bridge has been published and recognized, I thought it best to showcase my own work within the larger group dynamic. I was on the team that designed the Span of the bridge, crossing over Smith Creek and consequently in the direct floodway. I was also on the team that designed the railing system for the bridge. Asking students that know little about technical drawing conventions to produce a set of CDs meant we started off struggling quite a bit. In attempt to resolve those struggles, I made these drawings that show the assembly sequence, delineating the sequence as well as ‘action’ used to fabricate, and the machine required to carry out the action. I find that these types of drawings are most informative and wholesome.

I. © Jeff Goldberg/ESTO rest of photographs taken by myself all drawings created by myself, of my own initiative, independent of design/buildLAB 6

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I also detailed the foundations and made those drawings with teammates Ryan, Amanda, and Fernanda. Between the 17 of us, we produced the full set of Construction Documents and Shop Drawings and then built the project.

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My responsibilities were: - connection of Span to retaining wall - connection of ramp to foundation - producing final take-offs for total cubic yard of concrete - contacting & coordinating with manufacturer (Amanda’s Redimix)

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Here are the some drawings I worked on.

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17 students that are unfamiliar with the build or permit process producing a set of Construction Documents and Shop Drawings could be quite the feat. After the fact, we’ve not only produced these drawings, but all the research, knowledge, calculations, and tests. That type of knowledge, unlike a set of drawings, is something you could easily draw on for future endeavors.


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Architecture as Order

Performing Centre, Riva S. Vitale, Switzerland This is a study of a unit as a microcosm of the whole. The unit is repeated, establishing a grid, and the grid establishes an order. This idea is taken a step further on a larger scale: the project is a set of small buildings that make a field of little buildings. They read as a whole because of that 7’x 7’ grid. The dimension comes from the smallest personal enclosure: the personal square unit. The project is a growth of this unit. The system allows for a framework for flexibility: a ledge is seat height, but doesn’t look empty when unoccupied. It also doubles to be a roof of the room below, which is partially sunk below grade.

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A field of buildings: The four buildings in this set house four activities: perform, practice, play, and park*. The intention is that the four small buildings speak the same architecture language. Therefore, they read as a set. These boundaries come in three forms. The vertical plane: either a wall (immobile) or door (mobile). The point: a column, an intersection on the grid. An elevation change: either by means of a slope change or simply a step.

*’park,’ like: ‘park your car.’ 10

PERFORM


The grid works with the system of boundaries. Spaces of different scales are enclosed with boundaries that intervene just enough so as to allow for flexibility and transformation over different scales. This allows for adaptive reuse in the future, but also designs for both the passerby wanting to sit down for a bit and the community convening on occasions. Movable boundaries are distinguished by a change in material. In this case, it is wood. So, all doors and pivoting walls are wooden. These sets of rules are meant to establish an overarching order and rhythm. When all the separate buildings have one language they read as a whole despite their separation: like pieces in a set.

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PRACTICE


The rhythm is reminiscent of walking through the streets of Riva San Vitale. The colors and proportions of the building facades that pass you by, walking through streets that rythmatically vary in width, has an order to it, not a calculated order like the one in my proposed buildings, but nonetheless a rhythmic order. Juxtaposing the two â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;rhythmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is meant to magnify both types of order, making each all the more clarified.

12

PLAY


Architecture as Gradient Shenandoah Autism Center

A feasibility study: a new school for the kids at S.A.C. Due to the high student-to-teacher ratio, the classrooms needed to be partitioned. This project is a test of gradation. There’s a gradual transition from classroom to classroom, with translucent walls that create ‘fins’ onto the circulation spine. The fins act as ‘cubbies’ for the kids, and also as a way-finding tool, personalizing the face that looks onto the hallway or ‘circulation spine.’ The transluscent material allows the sunlight from clerestory-esque windows and from the overhead skylight, to gradate into the circulation spine. My biggest tool in designing was a section-model that stripped away a layer with each terrace, revealing more interior space with each step down.

13


37 degress North

heat, store it centrally, then distribute it to other rooms. The sunspace can be accessed by every terrace/floor since it houses the building’s egress stairs as well as exists at the topmost and bottommost levels. Since it is a transitory space, only occupied when the user is moving from space to space, it is not a place to rest. Therefore, on sunny days when it is hotter than other spaces, or colder in the winter, it wouldn’t matter as much to the individual, who will most likely be spending most his/her time in a classroom or office.

from space to space, it is not a place to rest. Therefore, on sunny days whe other spaces, or colder in the winter, it wouldn’t matter as much to the in most likely be spending most his/her time in a classroom or office. Sun, Wind, and

‘The ratio of mass area to glazing collection area should be at least 3:1.’ Light by Brown & DeKay. 16,800 SF : 4,896 SF = 3.4:1

‘The ratio of mass area to glazing collection area should be at least 3:1. Light by Brown & DeKay.

The form and size of the sunspace was predominately determined by the function of the space. It needs to hold the egress stairs and exits as well as an elevator. The ‘glass box,’ is the exception to the terraces. Circulation-wise it acts as an excpetion, too: it is the only place in the building that the user travels vertically.

Since the sunspace is an egress stairwell, the doors leading to it are fire-resistant and consequently thermally insulated, which is why that 3 to 1 ratio is allowed to go up to almost 3.5 to 1.

16,800 SF : 4,896 SF = 3.4:1

Top Two Floor Plans

The form and size of the sunspace was predominately determined by the func It needs to hold the egress stairs and exits as well as an elevator. The ‘ exception to the terraces. Circulation-wise it acts as an excpetion, too: it in the building that the user travels vertically.

Opaque Facade. Area = 3,720 SF

Transparent Facade. Area = 7,470 SF Sunspace Glazing Area: 2,378 SF (E) 918 SF (S) 1,600 SF (W) 4,896 SF TOTAL

Total Floor Area = 16,800 SF

Since the sunspace is an egress stairwell, the doors leading to it are consequently thermally insulated, which is why that 3 to 1 ratio is allowed 3.5 to 1.

The school would sit a mere two-minutes out of the downtown area, on, and within, a steep site. Gradation takes a step further by stepping the whole building, to account for the steep slope of the site, creating strips of terrace-like, one-room-wide stories. The clerestory-esque windows in the classrooms provide views of the pine-tree canopies, excluding the view of the town below, limiting distractions, an issue that came up during our interview with parents and teachers. The main susnspace / glass-encased volume is where four-story views are revealed. It is also where all vertical circulation happens, and where egress occurs. It separates the life-skills and office areas from the classrooms limiting distractions in the everyday learning realm, clearly defining two realms, separating them, but also joining them in common veritcal activity.

Direct gain system: As a way to deal with the steep slope, the building consists of terraced floors. Therefore, each space consists of one concrete retaining wall and a slab on grade. The north walls are retaining walls and the south walls are glazed. Sunspace: Mass to glazing ration: 16, 150 SF : 4,896 SF = 3.3 : 1 min. is 3:1 to act as a sunspace. All components in the wall section are denotated started with ‘1’ closest to the exterior and moving inwards until we reach the enclosed space. 14

Top Two Floor Plans Opaque Facade. Area = 3,720 SF Transparent Facade. Area = 7,470 SF Sunspace Glazing Area: 2,378 SF (E) 918 SF (S) 1,600 SF (W) 4,896 SF TOTAL Total Floor Area = 16,800 SF


The section-model was at a scale that allowed me to easily put myself in the building, make discoveries as I went along, really testing out my design intentions. Gradient is two-fold: diffusing the threshold moving from space to space and the diffusing of light. This first intention, is best represented in the translucent walls that are angled, which make them visible from the hallway, but do not completely enlcose the space within. The second intention was due to programmatic requirements. There was a need for many enclosures, and the challenge was how to bring light to necessarily enclosed spaces. These ‘finned’ translucent walls provide just that while also providing ease of access, a way-finding tool, and transparency.

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photographs: section model showing terraces and circulation sunspace, with each level, an additional layer is taken off to reveal structure I. view from ‘hallway’ showing the ‘fins’ II. & III. first level is as-built, next level roof is peeled, then the ceiling, and then the interior walls, revealing the wood stud construction within the walls IV. view from within circulation & sun-space

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Architecture as Elevation

Nature Conservancyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Warm Spring Mt. Preserve | Visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center The building acknowledges that the visitors to the site are most likely traveling by car due to its remote location. That, in combination with an awareness of prevailing winds and heavy snowfall, influenced the form. TThe design is integrated into the landscape by partly submerging it underground, making the parking area embedded in the landscape. This makes the first floor partially elevated, held up by stilts, appearing to be floating above ground, a statement of nonimposition on the landscape. Foundations and slabs had to be poured. Stacking the building atop the parking, limited the square footage of imposition, as opposed to a building with adjacent parking.

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collaborative effort with Fernanda Rosales, fellow student, third-year competition 16


Thesis: In-Progress

I am studying improvisation in public places. Paraphrased from Noise Orders: Jazz, Improvisation and Architecture, David P. Brown: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;improvisation, a negotiation between anticipated and unanticipated phenomena and a play of the familiar within processes of tradition, repetition, change.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I have operated in an improvisational manner, studied current improvisations on the site, and proposed a framework that allows for improvisation to occur. Throughout, this mode of operation was present in paintings and architecture. I use the painting to test improvisational operations of addition and subtraction. I keep coming back these operations to test the current iteration with previous discoveries, keeping a healthy dialogue between the two domains.

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Thesis: The Narrative The people tend to occupy the periphery… creating edges as much as possible. This exist with the current social deficit… with an abundance of under-used parks… in a Garden City… in a desert climate… in a mass produced young city… arose in a matter of few decades… with social consequences… human behavior illustrate social issues at hand.

I. A visualization of preliminary intentions to create an axial relationship to space: a fountain as an anchoring element, engaging the ‘z’ axis. II. The graphic is from my travels, rendered as an embodiment of my study. The full research can be found in a book titled: The Person, The People, in Public Places. (http://www.issuu.com) First: intervention as an anchoring element - treatment of space as gravitational - element that attracts activity Second: - architecture as framework that contains activity - static frame but open for movement within it - permanent structure for passing people/cycles 18

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Four Overarching Conditions

Thesis: The Proposal

A Framework for Improvisation In an attempt to synthesize my observations on how people relate to space, I have produced this matrix of ideas. I collected all the activities that were happening on the site and tried to define them: the what’s. Then, I tried to rationalize why such activities happen and traced them back to social concepts of space: the why’s. Occupying the Periphery

This is the basis of my proposal: the so’s. what: current improvisations on the site why: a translatable social and cultural reason for future and past improvisations so: a physical and spatial proposal that allows for these improvisations to occur, a framework for flexibility

Hyper-sensitivity to the Ground

Behavior Towards ‘Empty’ Space

Current Social Space Deficit 19

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Why

So


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My studies take place at different scales: personscale, the passerby, or people-scale, the communal. I am proposing a redesign of a park in my neighborhood in Kaifan, Kuwait City. Can I create a framework for flexibility? A space that is deliberate and calculated, but accounts for this inevitable improvisation that happens in public place? 5 mi

My proposal redefines the following typologies:* - diwan (or diwaniya) - majlis - hosh (courtyard or yard) by creating anchoring elements that set a framework in place for future, inevitable improvisations. The park has the ability for temporary privatization. The spaces are open-ended, allowing a framework for flexibility, setting the stage for this improvisation.

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site plan / analysis 25 ft

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I. country map II. zooming into bay area, showing neighboring parks & intersection of highways to create neighborhoods (was based on Ebenezer Howardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden city plan) III. & IV. kaifan neighborhood *click on the italic terms to see what each typically looks like, just to give a broad idea V. current improvisations: privatizing parts of the park, creating boundaries and fencing off VI. aerial view of the current site with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;patchingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the park to make private but illegal spaces 20

VI.


The proposal addresses the idea of sameness. Think of the park as composed of many smaller spaces that read together as parts of a set. By communicating the same architectural language, and by providing an order to the otherwise disordered improvisation that occurs, the boundaries create a framework for flexibility. These room-sized interventions act as follies in a larger field or network. Framework for flexibility: A ledge that is seat height, is inviting in a park, and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look empty when not occupied. What reads as a ledge at ground level, actually continues to the level below grade as a retaining wall. Boundaries like these are suggestive but not imposing, allowing for a framework for flexibility. This sets the stage for future improvisation to occur, but creating anchoring elements that hint at an underlying framework.

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Industrial Design Take this array of sketches as a selection from my sketchbook that provide a quick overview of skills Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gained while obtaining my Industrial Design minor. These sketches show a cultivation of drawing skills that I can readily rely on, which has served as a great visualization tool. Questions that arose: What makes a drawing vs what makes a sketch? If a drawing is constructed and calculated, and a sketch is informal and felt, can you attempt to construct a sketch? Take these as constructed sketches of things.

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Industrial Design This is a study of form and proportion. Here are two renderings of my own designs for what is ‘formally’ a sedan and what is ‘formally’ a sportscar. This exercise was not only a test of mixed-media rendering tools, but served as an intiation into my Industrial Design minor. The scale of product design allows for quick (or quicker) drawings and renderings, which allowed me to move through iterations faster. My newfound drawing skills also aided my visual representation skills in architecture.

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Here is an excerpt from an article I find myself referencing in my work today:

Articles I have been writing for arch2O.com, since I interned with them in the Fall of 2013. After that, I was invited to come back as an editor. I currently have around 50 articles published. I was drawn to writing because it is one of my passions; the reason I have continued to write, was because of the impact it has had on my work. Writing about architecture means research and a critical eye, and that exposure to a myriad of projects at different scales in different contexts was healthy to my work in the studio. It also helped me build an archive in my mind, that I can readily draw from as reference and precedent. Here is an article I find myself referencing in my current work.

Title: Zaryadye Park|Diller Scofidio + Renfro Published: November 5, 2014

Zaryadye Park would be the first park built in Moscow for half a century, now. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro […] it will link the city’s monuments with the surrounding neighborhoods […] The park is a hybrid between nature and architecture. This ‘wild urbanism’ concept is displayed in different ways […] In today’s cities, urbanism and nature can be two opposing forces. Often you’d need to travel outside the city to access nature and ‘get away from it all.’ So, how do you make nature accessible in an urban hub? This is the question Zaryadye Park addresses. The park’s ‘pathlessness’ encourages a fluid movement of pedestrians. Another way Diller Scofidio + Renfro have made the park even more accessible is by providing controlled ‘microclimates’ that make the park habitable in the cold Russian winters. With the right manipulation of nature, these microclimates regulate temperature and control wind making the park accessible during harsh weather […] they can give you a couple extra weeks of summer when fall has started or hold on to spring, when summer’s already here. […] What I love about Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s work that is especially relevant to this park is how they listen to what the landscape already has to offer. Although the architecture is beautiful, the most beautiful aspect of their work is that they provide a framework for a landscape that is waiting to be harnessed. […] Diller Scofidio + Renfro are importing these four [landscape] typologies to one place: tundra, steppe, forest, and wetland. They have organized [them] in ‘bands’ from northeast to southwest, creating terraces across the site. The park knits nature and architecture seamlessly together. Although the park is pathless. The pavement creates a gradient from hardscape to landscape, meant to induce the meandering of the pedestrians, letting them choose their own way throughout the park but also knitting the urban fabric with nature.

all my published articles can be found at http://www.arch2o.com image on far right: a screenshot of my articles as published on arch2O.com, found on the above link

[…] Zaryadye Park would offer a beautiful layering of space. The park would offer a successful and strong landscape that enhances the surrounding Russian monuments without taking away from the existing culture it offers.

images on left: renders as published on article I wrote entitled ‘Zaryadye Park | Diller Scofidio + Renfro,’ image courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro 24


Photographs, Sketches & Paintings My photographs, sketches & paintings are well archived on my website: http://www.aiyshaalsane.com/

What I’ve cautioned myself against is that if I were to do something I should do it well, so even if I dabble in many things, it shouldn’t distill from the quality of work I produce. The result is I’ve done quite a few things, call it a designer’s curiosity, if you will. These are just many of the multi-media projects that I have ventured in. They could stand alone, but I like to think they are part of the ‘making of an architect’ even if they are not the ‘making of architecture.’ Portraiture, especially, is part of my study of human existence. It gives me the opportunity to explore, question, and document my on-going questions and observations.

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At the end of the day, I am a designer; I am a painter; I am a writer. Not one serves the other, necessarily. They can stand alone, but their simultaneous existence enhances each. Think of the painting and writing as part of the making of an architect, even when it â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not directly the making of architecture. As Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown as an architect, I have enhanced my other traits as well. They are like parallel paths that occasionally meet, but always talk to each other. With those final thoughts, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to conclude by thanking you for your time. Thank you, Aiysha

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Work Sample  

a brief selection of work I feel best showcase my abilities

Work Sample  

a brief selection of work I feel best showcase my abilities

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