Page 29

Taste comes later, but first, the details. Upon entering the parking lot, traditional Latin music is playing, complementing the beautifully decorated front patio and welcoming you into a place where waiting for your table is a pleasure. The entryway and reception area are laced with an artistic flow, which is not only created by local artisans, but has also created an undeniable urge to touch all that you see. And, there is plenty to see, from the crystal chandelier, hand-strung with thousands of tiny crystals, to the map on the wall showing the history of the Barbacoa style; starting in the Caribbean, it moved to Old Spain, through Latin America and on to Boise. A large metal sculpture sitting atop booths in the lounge is called “Medusa,” representing the archer and the seducer. This piece couldn’t be more fitting, as Barbacoa is all about the art of seduction. Fun is in the details. The lounge is adorned with original ceiling art, which looks likes a peaceful woman during the week and becomes a little naughty by the weekend, when the dance floor and DJ come out to play. Take a trip to the men’s and ladies’ rooms, where the men are treated to a peep into the forbidden, and the ladies are enchanted by what Martine deems the “Barbie-coa” bathroom: pink onyx walls and beautiful, originally designed stilettos, displayed in lighted built-ins. It’s these details that help in the creation of an intoxicating experience, which Robert deems a “multi-dimensional dining destination and night spot.” The entry to the dining room is a path through a wine tunnel, boasting eight columns from a 19th century Turkish library and handcrafted metal work. Veer off to the right and have a seat in the appetizer bar, complete with a wood stone brick oven and a multitude of wines, spirits and beer on tap. The bar is perfect for enjoying a casual night with friends, and the offerings on the menu are perfect for sharing. The BBQ Duck Quesadilla is enough for four people, encouraging patrons to divide and conquer. The dining room, lined on one side by a water sculpture above a line of fire, boasts a private banquet room behind King Kong doors and a view of the Boise foothills. Even someone without an artistic bone in his or her body can’t deny giving some attention to the dining area chandelier. The piece is made of “3,126 plus or minus a bunch” hand-blown glass antlers, according to the designer, Filip Vogelpohl. The restaurant is trying to stay true to Barbacoa style, serving steak and seafood with cutting edge presentation. This includes having modern-style presentation platters

Fusion Magazine v.1.1 JUne/july 2011 29

Fusion Magazine  

The Voice of the Valley

Fusion Magazine  

The Voice of the Valley

Advertisement